Science topic

Grief - Science topic

Normal, appropriate sorrowful response to an immediate cause. It is self-limiting and gradually subsides within a reasonable time.
Questions related to Grief
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
5 answers
Hello,
Does anyone has the Arabic version of the Traumatic Grief Inventory Self Report Plus (TGI-SR+)?
I need to find it urgently in Arabic language.
Your help is greatly appreciated.
Thanks in advance
Best regards,
Ceyda
Relevant answer
Answer
Hi again dear Nur Afifah Binti Abas,
Sure, I'd love to tell you more and get to know more about your interest and work.
Shall we contact personally ? And it will be my pleasure to talk to you.
Kind regards,
Ceyda
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
2 answers
A classical statement of the basic good will in The Hindu View of Life (by S. Radha- krishnan, p. 92) occurs "in the sublime verse of the Bhagavata: 'I desire not the state [of bliss] with its eight perfection the cessation of rebirth. May I take sorrow of all creatures who suffer and enter into them so that they may be made free from grief.'
I tried to search the Sanskrit text which means the given English statement. Which bhagvata is it. How can I find it.
Relevant answer
The Bhagwatam Diary 2004 - esamskriti.com https://www.esamskriti.com/sa/SPECIAL-SECTIONS/The...It is that which underlies the sublime verse of the Bhagavata Purana, “I desire not the supreme state with all its eight siddhis nor the cessation of rebirth; may I assume the sorrow of all creatures who suffer and enter into them so that they may be made free from grief.” (CWSA, Volume: 23-24, The Synthesis of Yoga, p.269)
Did this help you?
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
5 answers
I'm a doctoral student and in the early stages of exploring research on counselor competencies. I'm especially interested in learning about how competency can be measured in specialty areas such as grief counseling and end-of-life counseling.
Relevant answer
doi: 10.1080/07481187.2011.553503.. 2012 Jan;36(1):23-40.Death Stud
Death competence: an ethical imperative
Louis A Gamino, R Hal Ritter Jr
Check if this help you. Also if the therapy I suggest in the attached paper is of use for you:
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
2 answers
Grief models best suited ? Additional resources ? What skills does a psychotherpist need to inform themselves of ?
Relevant answer
Answer
Thank you so much this s very helpful. Michael Uebel
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
7 answers
I guess there must be some data collected regarding Covid and related to the field of psychology/psychiatry, considering its psychological impact. It might be gathered from the patients, family members or the society at large, either a public or private collection. Does anybody have any idea on how to access such data for research purposes?
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Prof. Farhad Montazeri ,
For example, I saw of Lancet & Nature publications, just register, they will send updated data and research as you agreed to get updated - the ones you chose - to your email registered with them e.g.:
ABOUT THIS ALERT Access to article abstracts is open to all Alert recipients. Access to full-text articles is limited to subscribers who have activated their online access. Activate your online access to your subscriptions at (under elsevier):
@
the Lancet COVID-19 Resource Centre
@
Please add briefing@nature.com to your address book.
Enjoying this newsletter? You can use this form to recommend it* to a friend or colleague — thank you!
@
LitCovid is a curated literature hub for tracking up-to-date scientific information about the 2019 novel Coronavirus
@
Novel Coronavirus Information Center
Elsevier’s free health and medical research on the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) and COVID-19
@
COVID-19: Epidemiology, virology, and prevention
Hope I understand you correctly, dear Prof.
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
3 answers
I am looking for the Child version of ICG to update my French book on Grief and prolonged grief.
Relevant answer
Answer
I' m so sorry to make you wasting your time. Maybe you should not answer at all. Probably it will be better to have more time improving your own work . Best wishes. as
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
8 answers
I write my Master Thesis about the topic humor and grief.
My question: How can humor help bereaved adults in their griefing process?
Does es anyone know about studies in English or German.
Thanks,
Helen
Relevant answer
Answer
Carolyn:
Here is a PowerPoint about "Humor and Psychology." It might give you some ideas:
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
10 answers
Does anyone have links to reseach into the impact of disenfranchised grief for workers in mental health? Or evidence of practises used to recognise and honour this in practice? For example days of mourning? Many thanks
Relevant answer
Answer
Our Architectural studio designs healing environments for trauma and loss. I co taught a course at the University of Chicago , the Divinity School with Professor Peter Homans called the Ability to Mourn. In our work we have designed environments for mourning for both "patients" and caregivers. Paul
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
9 answers
I am researching the impact of grief and loss on meaningful connection. Can professionals really listen and respond appropriately to clients thoughts of suicide and experiences of loss - if they are not digesting and caring for thier own losses? Does personal disconnect lead to meaningless assessments?
I am interested in any research on this area of personal experiences.
Many thanks for your thoughts.
Relevant answer
Answer
Personally, I believe that "I've not been heard," far too much in life. But that certainly doesn't negatively impact "my own," ability to listen, negatively. In fact, I think it enhances my ability to listen. Empathy is a condition of humility and spiritual connectedness. Without humility and spiritual connectedness, the "listener" has very little motivation to truly "hear" what a person is experiencing in grief.
If there isn't significant humility, then the grieving individual's shared experience really wouldn't mean that much to me. But, recognizing MY OWN times of being ignored really do enhance my own ability to listen, since I recognize the injustice of being minimized/ignored during my own periods of grief/trauma.
I am becoming a Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner, mainly because several people have stated that I "found my gift" in pediatric psychiatry. Who more needs someone to really LISTEN to them than pediatrics who have mental health problems and are in crisis? I believe taking the time to listen to children, and discover what's really "eating their lunch," underneath the behavior problems, is critical to being a good provider of mental health services.
I suppose I wouldn't have a passion for this area of health care, had I not experienced significant difficulties myself, and have compassion for them, and what they need to share... AND FEEL HEARD/understood. After all, BEING HEARD is one of the most basic of human needs.
Good question, by the way!
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
2 answers
I'm running Mplus-5 for latent class analysis and I would like to save the output of univariate distibution fit by class as a csv file to analyze in R (I'm more used to R). I have tried to use the SAVEDATA: command to try to accomplish that but I failed. This is the last code I tried:
TITLE: LCA DATA: File is "C:/Users/wang/Desktop/R/MPLUSDATAonlylogCRP.txt"; VARIABLE: Names are ID sexo idade LOGCRP fum MDIAB MHAS MCOR MINF MDERR MOUT MTIR DEPMOOD IRRIT LOINT WLOSS WGAIN INSOM HYSOM MOTORR MOTORA FATIG USELESS GUILT IMPTHINK INDEC DEATHOS SUICI SPECPLAN SUICATT FUNCIMP DRUPHY MOURN ; missing are all (999); CLASSE = c(3); USEVAR are LOGCRP sexo DEPMOOD IRRIT LOINT WLOSS WGAIN INSOM HYSOM MOTORR MOTORA FATIG USELESS GUILT IMPTHINK INDEC DEATHOS SUICI SPECPLAN SUICATT FUNCIMP DRUPHY MOURN; categorical are sexo-MOURN; IDVARIABLE IS ID; ANALYSIS: TYPE = MIXTURE; STITERATIONS = 100; ALGORITHM=INTEGRATION; MODEL: %overall% c ON LOGCRP; OUTPUT: TECH1 TECH8 TECH10 TECH11 RESIDUAL STANDARDIZED CINTERVAL; SAVEDATA: FILE IS "C:\Users\wang\Downloads\output3class.csv"; FORMAT IS FREE; RESULTS ARE "C:\Users\wang\Downloads\outputResults.csv"; ESTIMATES ARE "C:\Users\wang\Downloads\outputEstimates.csv"; SWMATRIX IS "C:\Users\wang\Downloads\outputmatrix.csv"; SAMPLE IS "C:\Users\wang\Downloads\outputSAMPLE.csv"; DIFFTEST IS "C:\Users\wang\Downloads\outputDIFFTEST.csv"; TECH3 IS "C:\Users\wang\Downloads\outputTECH3.csv"; TECH4 IS "C:\Users\wang\Downloads\outputTECH4.csv"; BASEHAZARD IS "C:\Users\wang\Downloads\outputBASEHAZARD.csv"; RESPONSE IS "C:\Users\wang\Downloads\outputRESPONSE.csv"; SAVE = CPROBABILITIES;
The reason for so many lines in SAVEDATA: is I tried every command I found in the Mplus manual trying to discover if any of them was what I needed.
Relevant answer
Answer
Hi Caio
The following syntax will save the probabilities and class assignment for each participant in a file called 'four.dat'. this is just a plain ascii file. Then you import this file in whatever program you want to do further analysis. I tend to read the .dat file into Excel, as this is easy, and then almost all other stats packages will read the excel file.
SAVEDATA:
file is four.dat;
save cprob;
cheers
mark
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
8 answers
Looking for suggestions from the literature regarding the use of and/or effectiveness of dance (of any sort) in helping people ease the pain of grief (bereavement and non-bereavement losses) - anywhere in the world. thanks!
Relevant answer
Answer
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
6 answers
Out of curiosity, I was wondering to know whether or not animals grief like humans do and the how, when, and why of doing so?
Relevant answer
Answer
Yes some animals grief like dogs, elephants or chimpanzee. We have the famous example of the chimpanzee Washoe grieving after the loss of her sick baby. By means of the sign language she could say " baby gone, baby finished". During several days she remained prostrated ans did not take any food... You can ask also the famous specialist on animal behavior Mike Huffman
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
9 answers
I'm looking for information regarding the experience of individuals with intellectual disabilities in grieving. I'd also be interested in any resources to assist those with ID through the grieving process.
Relevant answer
Answer
Cynthia A. Waugh We have first hand experience with this. Our daughter, with moderate to light ID lost both her beloved grandparents only a few weeks apart. She was 7 years old at the time. We tried to get advice, but very little was available from the «experts» in the field. We are more than willing to share the reaction of grief, the strategies we chose and our reflections on this now five years on. The key for us was a advice we gort from an intencive care nurse. Her simple message was: «Let your daughter take part in as much as possible of the prosess. Let her see and touch the bodies. Talk about the dead. Let her attend the funeral and put flowers on their grave. It is the abstract that is most difficult to handle. Sorrow is hard, but it is part of real life.
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
1 answer
Our analyses (as well as others) suggest that mortality is a component of population-level indicators of morbidity. For example, we estimate that 5% of the overall mortality in the HRS cohort (aged 50 years and older) is directly attributable to being exposed to the loss of a parent, spouse, sibling or adult child (Allegra et al 2015). Like others, we also see elevated rates of hospitalization and physician visits (Miles et al 2015). The size of this influence suggests that designing interventions to prevent or delay morbidity and mortality needs to include attention to grief and loss.
Relevant answer
Answer
More studies is needed to examine this hypothesis
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
5 answers
My research involves an IPA study (Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis) of the lived experiences of Professional Caregivers in end of life care from an existential perspective related to meaning, responsibility and freedom. Also, from the Physical, Social, Personal and Spiritual dimensions.
Relevant answer
Answer
This is a fascinating topic. In A Very Easy Death, Simone de Beauvoir writes about her experience caring for her mother, which removed her existential theories related of choice from their theoretical position and placed them within lived experience. It's a short read.
I once had the privilege of interviewing an alternative death educator for a project in which I studied how people's work shaped their relationship to the people around them and their general orientation to life. In his wooded New England woodworking shop, which is actually his basement, where he fashions coffins, my interviewee told me about his own wife's passing, and how he cared for her at the end of her life. I was completely moved--I had come to learn about his profession, and ended up in the presence of something transcending that. My interviewee and his wife dedicated much of their existence to advocating for choice surrounding one's own death, and when his wife was faced with her mortality, she chose to be cared for by my interviewee in the home. He was moved to tears as he told me about this, and I felt practically unfit to witness. He pointed a finger, gnarled from a woodworking incident thirty years prior, towards the woods, and he told me that his wife had chosen to be buried on the property in an environmentally conscious, natural burial site. People talk about philosophers like Nietzsche and Camus living by their philosophy, but my God, they had nothing on this individual; he is the embodiment of existentialism.
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
3 answers
I have an MSW student who is doing a single subject research project with a five year old whose father recently died from breast cancer, and I'm looking for some "tool" she might use to assess any changes in the child's "response" to the loss.
Any ideas?
Relevant answer
Answer
I agree. These children are far too young for an inventory. You could create a symptom check-list that is observational for the therapist to use, but with a single subject design I'd rely on more clinical, intuitive assessments that come out of play therapy, etc.
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
7 answers
I am a student of Social Work and I would like to know if there is any manual or texts that will help me to know how to react to a situation of mourning with a children.
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
6 answers
Chemical composition of tears ?
Biological tests ?
Relevant answer
Answer
Hello,
What an interesting question. These links are not academic papers, but relevant. Evidently, the composition of tears varies according to the reason why they are being produced.
The first link includes the sentence:
"Emotional tears, for instance, have been found to contain protein-based hormones including the neurotransmitter leucine enkephalin, a natural painkiller that is released when the body is under stress."
This has a similar content:
Very best wishes,
Mary
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
5 answers
Hi Jan. My name is Erin Pasqualetto and I am currently a masters of counselling student in Canada. I'm completing my thesis "Romantic Relationship Implications Following the Loss of a Sibling" and I came across your psychlopaedia publication. I was wondering if you had a complete article that I could read and possibly include in my research? My email is epasqualetto@cityuniversity.edu and I would love to hear from you.
Thank you so much for your time.
All the best,
Erin Pasqualetto
Relevant answer
Our paper: perception of problematic events are also concerned with the relationship between patient with leukemia and siblings. However I do not succeed in attaching the file. You have to go to my contributions.
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
3 answers
There are so many diseases are out of our medical school learning scope. They are unreal diseases from people's grief, guilt, against ethics, past life wound, karma, etc.
Could you please share your experience and how did you treat and the result. Thanks.
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Dr. Kemp,
Thanks for your reply. I treated patients who are not really very sick as their MDs treated. It induced me to ask the question here to see if shared clinical experiences can let doctors use another approach to treat patients that are not only cut down medical cost. But also make the patient go back to his normal life to have production instead of sick and consume resources without any productivity.
Now, I am rushing for something. Three days later, when I have more time, I will post some cases.
Frieda
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
3 answers
I have the original paper for the measure (Prigerson et al., 1995) but cannot for some reason find the revised version of the scale. This scale is broken down into 3 sections (A = 4 questions; B = 11 questions; C = 1 question). I have attached a formatted version of the scale but cannot seem to find the original paper from which I took it and thus any scoring information Any help would be greatly appreciated!!
Relevant answer
Answer
Hi Rhian,
The ICG-R can be found in the book 'Handbook of bereavement research: Consequences coping and Care, edited by Margaret Stroebe, Robert Hansson and Henk Schut. It is in a chapter by Prigerson and Jacobs. If you would like me to, I can send you the English version of this paper. Just send me a message via Researchgate.
Best wishes,
Maarten Eisma
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
12 answers
Family of Origin
Relevant answer
Answer
I would say it depends on the client as their grief will be greatly influenced, likely out of their awareness, by their style of attachment and the type of relationship they had with the person they lost. Whatever approach, the relationship you have with them will be the most important tool. In terms of models, I favour William Worden’s Four Tasks of Mourning over any proposed stages of grief, as they give some control and power to the client to work through their pain, as opposed to a sense of hopelessness and being at the mercy of waiting for time to pass.
I hope this helps.
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
4 answers
I have heard that some forms of mutual support groups for bereavement may be ineffective, and may do harm. I am aware of the research on one to one counselling efficacy, but not group work.
Relevant answer
Answer
Thanks guys, thats really helpful. I will go through this material.
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
5 answers
Musthave used EGI in previous research
Relevant answer
Answer
I am wondering if you have heard of the Inventory of Complicated Grief. There is an interesting intervention done by Shear et al (JAMA) that used this measure. It has pretty good psychometric data to support it. It might be worth a look. 
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
8 answers
My thesis involves looking at grief responses based on the shared relationship the bereaved had with the deceased. one of my questions deal with coping strategies but it seems the models do not distinguish between the responses and the strategies for coping.
Relevant answer
Answer
ethnofocal model of pottinger (1999), phase model of bowlby (1980), dual process model of stroebe and schut (2005). the one that gave rise to this question is the dual process model of bowlby because it demonstrates adaption to bereavement; which leads me to wonder if grief responses are in actuality coping strategies and a dichotomy of the coping strategies and the grief responses is not necessary.
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
5 answers
Morning everyone,
I just saw that beautiful mourning ring made with an actual eyeball and dated from early 19th. Does anyone know something about that practice ? Any references or other exemples ?
Thank you so much !
Jennifer
Relevant answer
Answer
This may or may not be relevant to you, but I just heard about an eye set in silver as a relic of a Jesuit priest (Oldcorne), on a radio program (see link for transcript). It reminded me about this and thought it might be of interest to you. Obviously it is earlier than your ring, but they may have common origins?
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
3 answers
 what is the theoretical framework of childhood traumtic grief/
Relevant answer
Answer
Play therapy and photo-elicitation: A narrative examination of children’s grief.
By Stutey, Diane M.; Helm, Heather M.; LoSasso, Heather; Kreider, Hannah D.
International Journal of Play Therapy, Vol 25(3), Jul 2016, 154-165.
Children, like adults, experience grief after a significant loss. Unlike adults, however, most children have not developed the complex, expressive language skills to explain their emotions in relation to a loss. In this qualitative narrative study, children ages 6 to 9, who had lost a loved one 3 to 18 months before participation in the study, were interviewed utilizing photo-elicitation. Photo-elicitation facilitated the interview process allowing the children to share emotional experiences surrounding the loss through photographs they took to capture significant aspects of their relationship and the subsequent loss. Significant findings are presented in narrative form to capture the emotion, language, and perspective of the participants’ loss experience. Narratives were developed based on data collected from semistructured interviews and the children’s descriptions of the photos they took to symbolize the relationship and the loss. Implications for play therapists working with children experiencing grief, utilizing photography in the playroom with children, and recommendations for future research are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
1 answer
How have patients benefited from body therapies when they have somatic pain caused by grief?
Relevant answer
Answer
 Hello Jennifer, 
you can find answers to your question in this study, 
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
13 answers
I am closely associated with the oil and gas industry. Price fall since 1014 caused a lot of redundancies in this industry. One estimate says it is over 300,000 skilled professionals.  Somebody suggested to me Elisabeth Kübler-Ross has done a useful study. She is a Swiss psychiatrist who explored the understanding of grief and emotions in terminally ill patients. Her work has subsequently applied in cases such as dealing with unpleasant changes.
I love to hear what you think?
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear all,
 I like Miss Boyd's life story and the way she managed to re-invent herself.  My life story is similar but had more ups and downs.  I can detect traces of her advice in your posts too; of course in addition to other things  you have mentioned.
Performing artists are also subject to redundancy, in the form of  public withdrawing their patronage and sending the artist to oblivion.  You don't need me to tell you how the majority of them cope. However, the best example of  re-invention is Madonna. You need  both hands to count the number of times she re- surfaced again triumphant. Good for her.  
I have seen people in industry followed the path which Miss Boyd has sketched  with success. In between redundancy and   re-surfacing one must follow Hazim's  pearl of wisdom.  We would do well to keep in mind what  Lilliana and Harshvardhan  have said, before the ship sinks. The conclusion is don't try to salvage the sinking ship.
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
4 answers
Which would be the best way to organize good bereavement support: primary healthcare, internet, support groups, based on information, specialized services, based on stepped care, or others options?
Relevant answer
Answer
The challenge I find is sustaining specialized groups requires more population than our area has. I'm looking at starting a new group in a rural community which will have to find someway to be "all things to all people." I'll probably shift focus based on the population participating at any given time.
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
1 answer
Please send me the link if any one have where i can find this scale
Relevant answer
Answer
Annie, there is no Urdu translation. You might be able to find someone who can translate it, but then you have to to validity and reliability studies on the translated version. If you want to see what the process is like, here is an article on how a Swedish translation was done:
Scand J Caring Sci. 2006 Sep;20(3):269-73.
Translation of the short version of the Perinatal Grief Scale into Swedish.
Adolfsson A1, Larsson PG.
Author information
 
Abstract
INTRODUCTION:
Women's emotions and grief after miscarriage are influenced not only by the context in which the miscarriage occurred but also by their past experience, the circumstances around the miscarriage and their future prospects. Their emotions therefore express a specific form of grief. Normally the time needed to work through the loss varies. A number of different scales, measuring women's emotions and grief after miscarriage have been published. One instrument that measures the specific grief, such as the grief after miscarriage is the Perinatal Grief Scale (PGS) that was designed to measure grief after perinatal loss and has good reliability and validity.
AIMS:
The purpose of this study was to translate the PGS into Swedish and to use the translation in a small pilot study.
MATERIAL AND METHOD:
The original short version of the PGS was first translated from English into Swedish and then back-translated into English, using different translators. During translation and back-translation, not only the linguistic and grammatical aspects were considered but also cultural differences. The Likert 5-point and a 10-point scale were tested in a pilot study where 12 volunteers anonymously answered the PGS twice. The intra-personal correlations were compared and analysed with weighted kappa-coefficient.
FINDINGS:
In all, five different versions were tested before the final Swedish version was established. The weighted kappa-coefficient for the volunteers was 0.58, which is regarded as representing good reproducibility.
CONCLUSION:
The PGS was translated successfully into Swedish and could be used in a Swedish population. As this work is rather time-consuming we therefore wish to publish the Swedish version so that it may be used by other researchers.
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
3 answers
Are there any known readings on using art therapy to explore grief - preferably grief of adolescents or refugee adolescents. 
Relevant answer
Answer
Using the arts and humanities with the dying, bereaved,... And ourselves.
By Bertman, Sandra
Stillion, Judith M. (Ed); Attig, Thomas (Ed), (2015). Death, dying, and bereavement: Contemporary perspectives, institutions, and practices. , (pp. 245-259). New York, NY, US: Springer Publishing Co, xxvii, 414 pp.
Poets, artists, and writers have always illustrated and illuminated death, dying, and grief. This chapter documents how the arts and humanities have played a critical role in educating both medical personnel and budding thanatologists. The chapter also includes a brief discussion of art therapy and an introduction to specific techniques used with children and adults. Attempting to demonstrate the richness involved in this process to multiple audiences over a half century, I hope this chapter provides substance and inspiration for all who work in the field. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved)
Art therapy as an intervention for mass terrorism and violence.
Creative interventions with traumatized children (2nd ed.).
By Loumeau-May, Laura V.; Seibel-Nicol, Ellie; Hamilton, Mary Pellicci; Malchiodi, Cathy A.
Malchiodi, Cathy A. (Ed), (2015). Creative interventions with traumatized children (2nd ed.). Creative arts and play therapy., (pp. 94-125). New York, NY, US: Guilford Press, xx, 364 pp.
This chapter focuses on the impact of mass violence on children and the use of art therapy to help those children impacted by traumatic grief to develop coping skills and resiliency. Mass violence comprises political violence (including terrorist acts), ongoing exposure to street violence, and mass single-incident shootings. Although mass trauma can result from natural disasters, this chapter concentrates on mass trauma inflicted by humans, notably mass terrorism and nonterroristic mass violence. Two powerful single-incident examples of mass violence—the September 11, 2001 (9/II), terrorist attacks and the December 14, 2012 (12/14), school shooting in Newtown, Connecticut—are highlighted with case examples to demonstrate the therapeutic needs of the children affected and how clinical interventions are structured to address these needs. This chapter validates how art therapy interventions support the role of creativity in trauma recovery from mass terrorism and violence. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved)
Focusing-oriented expressive arts therapy and mindfulness with children and adolescents experiencing trauma.
Creative interventions with traumatized children (2nd ed.).
By Rappaport, Laury
Malchiodi, Cathy A. (Ed), (2015). Creative interventions with traumatized children (2nd ed.). Creative arts and play therapy., (pp. 301-323). New York, NY, US: Guilford Press, xx, 364 pp.
Focusing-oriented expressive arts therapy (FOAT) is a mindfulness-based approach that I developed by integrating Eugene Gendlin's (1981, 1996) mind-body Focusing method with the arts therapies (Rappaport, 2009, 2010, 2014b). FOAT is based on over 30 years of clinical experience with a range of clients with varying types and causes of trauma. FOAT is especially suitable for children and adolescents who have experienced trauma because its foundational principles are predicated on the needs for safety, empathy, and trust building and its techniques are somatic and sensory-based. FOAT also cultivates a compassionate inner witness aspect of self that can stand outside overwhelming experiences, access an inherent place of well-being, and provide access to one's own inner wisdom. Integrating mindfulness practices with FOAT empowers children and adolescents with self-care methods designed to reduce disturbing symptoms of trauma, such as hyperousal, hypervigilance, and a state of alarm; enhance feelings of calm and groundedness; and increase positive emotions. FOAT and mindfulness practices also access inner strengths and resources, nurturing qualities of resilience to work through and integrate the more difficult experiences associated with the trauma, so that the child or adolescent can move forward and live a meaningful, satisfying life (Weiner & Rappaport, 2014). This chapter includes an overview of FOAT and describes how its theory and methodology provide a trauma-informed approach for working with children and adolescents. It also describes the significance of incorporating a phase-oriented treatment model in working with trauma and presents a new three-phase model based on FOAT theory and practices. The foundational principles and main methods of FOAT are described and integrated into the treatment phases: (1) establishing safety and cultivating resilience; (2) processing the trauma and accessing inner wisdom; and (3) integrating the healing process and fostering the life-forward direction. Highlights from my work with a 12-year-old girl who suffered traumatic loss and grief are integrated throughout the descriptions of the three phases to demonstrate the methods and healing process over time. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved)
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
12 answers
We are looking for some references and possible collaborations for future publications. We are specially interested on Photography and autobiographical documentary.
Relevant answer
Answer
 You're welcome. And try to get in touch with Susana Noronha from Coimbra - she has an incredible work on visualization, art and cancer. I was a discussant on her PhD exam and was very impressed with the thesis. Best c
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
17 answers
I'm doing research about the contemporary visual representation of illness and anticipatory grief, specially in SNSs and I'm trying to contextuallice those practices also.
Relevant answer
Answer
A blog with a lot of references (in spanish)
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
46 answers
I am working with few clients with unresolved grief. Some of them are not recovering as I expected.
Relevant answer
Answer
I am coming to this topic a bit late, but am happy to see that you have received many interesting answers.
In my own experience with difficulties following the death of my wife in 1996, I found good results from my individual practice of transcending, taught in this case by the Transcendental Meditation organization.
The deep and unique state of rest developed by transcending offers a way to accept the difficult feelings that result from the death of a loved one. There is no judgement involved, and no need to find a suitable therapist, in a self-conducted effortless mental process. The addition of this unique state of consciousness and physiology to daily life gradually dissolves and eliminates the whole spectrum of stresses and dysfunctions caused by unresolved or overwhelming feelings and cognitions, so it is not limited to treating bereavement. All of life naturally improves when internal stress is dissolved.
With the recent availability of quality instruction in transcending by written manual, it is now possible to reach isolated patients with this effective procedure. It is also practical to conduct controlled experimentation to document these remarkable results.
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
4 answers
I am a student of psycology department and i am working on a project about parental suicide and the impact on their child.I am wondering if someone has access to some articles that I haven't. For example ''do circumstances of the death matter?Identifying socioenviromental risks for grief-related psycopathology in bereaved youth(2014), or "grief shortly after suicide and natural death:a comparative study among spouses and first degree relatives"
thanks in advance
Relevant answer
Answer
Hi Ioanna,  
A few more references.
Brent, D., Melhem, N., Donohoe, M. B., & Walker, M. (2009). The incidence and course of depression in bereaved youth 21 months after the loss of a parent to suicide, accident, or sudden natural death. The American journal of psychiatry, 166(7), 786-794.
Cerel, J., Jordan, J. R., & Duberstein, P. R. (2008). The impact of suicide on the family. Crisis: The Journal of Crisis Intervention and Suicide Prevention, 29(1), 38
Kuramoto, S. J., Stuart, E. A., Runeson, B., Lichtenstein, P., Långström, N., & Wilcox, H. C. (2010). Maternal or paternal suicide and offspring's psychiatric and suicide-attempt hospitalization risk. Pediatrics, 126(5), e1026-e1032
Ratnarajah, D., & Schofield, M. J. (2007). Parental suicide and its aftermath: A review. Journal of Family Studies, 13(1), 78-93.
Toula
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
7 answers
What are these courses about? What do they consist of? Do they prove helpful? Are they obligatory or it is a matter of choice to take them?
Relevant answer
Answer
You're welcome!
Unfortunately, I don't know when it happens, only that it does, as a result of my research into griefwork upon the death of a companion animal.  If the online catalog allows a search, you might try looking under death, dying, euthanasia & griefwork.
Good luck!
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
7 answers
All of my own searches have resulted in articles in which the ICG was used but not the ICG itself, which is what I need.  Thanks!
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Denise: The ICG developed by Priggerson and team was revised from the original version. Dr Priggerson now recommends using the PG-13 (A 13 question measure of prolonged grief) that they've developed to correspond with the proposed prolonged grief disorder criteria. Tool attached.
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
3 answers
I notice that patients with behavioral contracts because of aggression often have assessments of grief, including the recent death of a loved one. I am curious if there is a correlation and how this might limit contracts if grief is supported earlier.
Relevant answer
Answer
Donald,
You have probably heard of ELNEC - Endo of Life Nursing Education Consortium, and they have an awesome program.  They did not cover in a conference I just went to aggression contracts, however, they did discuss normalilzation of the grief process, individualization of the grief process, and support systems.  Johns Hopkins  has a video which might be helpful to you.   The lwebsite is :  http://johnhopkinsdemo.bluerush.ca/demo/final _cut _short.html.
You might also contact ELNEC to discuss this I know that they are extremely well researched and published, which might provide you with the research citations you might need.
Doris
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
6 answers
Latest study is on the timing of perinatal loss follow up. Contacting families after a perinatal loss, what is perceived to be most helpful and when following the loss is the best time to contact families.
Relevant answer
Answer
I don't know of any but it might be worth looking at Katy Gold's work. 
GOLD, K. J. 2007. Navigating care after a baby dies: a systematic review of parent experiences with health providers. J Perinatol, 27, 230-7.
GOLD, K. J., DALTON, V. K. & SCHWENK, T. L. 2007. Hospital care for parents after perinatal death. Obstetrics & Gynecology, 109, 1156-66.
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
4 answers
Current policies or procedures in place to help young children who are experiencing a loss, grief or bereavement?
Relevant answer
Answer
I published a paper about Parental Loss (see it attached here). It is not about treatment but it's a longitudinal study on bereaved children psychological outcomes. Hope it is useful.
Luca
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
10 answers
I have been using ideas from complexity theory (basins of attraction, butterfly effect, emergence, non-predictability, etc.) as metaphors to help clarify issues of grief and mourning. I would like to be able to move away from only using these ideas a metaphors and begin to use them to model grief and mourning, but don't have a clue as how to go about doing this.
I could list variables that we suspect impact how people grieve (expected or unexpected loss, quality of the relationship, past losses, definitions of the relationship, etc.) but beyond that I haven't a clue.
Any suggestions -- including those saying why this is a fools errand -- would be appreciated.
mgs 7/6/2014: I changed the title because when we look at all the issues a person who has experienced a serious loss (say a woman whose husband has died) must face, those issues include not just things we think of as grief, but more practical issues such as how to live without the deceased (cooking for one, paying taxes, fixing the car....) So since we are attempting to look at all the factors impacting a person's reaction to a loss, we need to include those "restoration-oriented" issues as well.
Relevant answer
Answer
Michael,
On your last statement - Complexity and definitive causality are surely not the best of buddies. And that's precisely why its a holisim rather than reductionism thrives in such cases.
I have very limited expertise in the field but I have tried to use Agent Based models for systems that have a human element but can be codified in terms or rules and actions of agents. ABM has been applied in economics, I've done some work to apply the same in Financial risk and more recently in Cyber security (IT systems) - in all these cases the common is the human element of impact.
 
Grief and mourning is similar, with the exception that the number of governing factors will be multiple fold more. Starting from what the weather is like, to what the neighbours think of the situation - the list will go on. But as long as a definitive list can be made, they can be modelled in my opinion.
The bigger challenge in my mind; as you rightly said; is the way to measure Grief. The one big difference in other systems where I've seen ABM being used is that the measure of success (or measure of the quntity of interest) was simple - commercial growth, number of cyber attacks, financial losses, number of car accidents etc. But that unfortuntely is not the case in your situation.
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
5 answers
I'm looking at human-animal bonding from the start of life to death and the grief work that may follow as a result of death.
Relevant answer
Answer
I would start out with the Hosey & Melfi review listed below then branch out from there.
Davis, H. L. (2011). Death of a Companion Animal: Understanding Human Responses to Bereavement. In C. Blazina, G. Boyra, & D. Shen-Miller (Eds.), The Psychology of the Human-Animal Bond (pp. 225–242). Springer New York. Retrieved from http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-1-4419-9761-6_13
Hosey, G., & Melfi, V. (2014). Human-animal interactions, relationships and bonds: a review and analysis of the literature. International Journal of Comparative Psychology, 27(1). Retrieved from http://escholarship.org/uc/item/6955n8kd#page-1
Smith, A. (2012). Pet Loss and Human Emotion: What's New? Death Studies, 36(3), 292–297. doi:10.1080/07481187.2011.590443
Weisman, A. D. (1990). Bereavement and Companion Animals. OMEGA--Journal of Death and Dying, 22(4), 241–248. doi:10.2190/C54Y-UGMH-QGR4-CWTL
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
8 answers
For my senior research thesis in Conflict Analysis and Resolution, I am looking at the way people with developmental disabilities engage in bereavement after the death of a loved one, and how a caretaker's preconceived notions about what is best for that individual may cause more grief in the long run. I have several conflict theories to plug into this equation, including Basic Human Needs Theory, Structural Violence, Social Conflict Theory, Structural Functionalism, Mechanical Solidarity and Action Theory. The literature on each of those is plenty. The problem I may run into now is the research on the experience of people with developmental disabilities as it applies to bereavement. Not so much literature on that topic. If anyone has any personal or professional knowledge or experience with this subject matter, PLEASE get in touch with me so I can pick your brain!
Relevant answer
Answer
Hey Lincoln, this is such a good question. But you are right, there is scant evidence in the literature for this topic. I am a grief counsellor and was a lecturer for many years teaching a loss program, and so know the bereavement literature pretty well, in that it would be an area very under considered. I would suggest you have a look at Ken Doka's concept of disenfranchised grief... he suggests there are grievers whose loss or grief is disenfranchised by society either because the loss is not seen as significant, or because it is assumed that the griever is not capable of grieving... this could be a starting point. Although he has stated this, I doubt that he has elaborated further on the 'how to' provide bereavement care to people with developmental disabilities. I am not familiar with your area of expertise, and happy for you to contact me to talk about anecdotal experiences (a couple)... good luck, I hope you pursue this further it is an area which needs someone with great heart to explore.
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
1 answer
I am using the GPI in research and lacking the validity for the 30 item inventory. Please help.
Relevant answer
Answer
Currently the data from my research is being used to validate the GPI Scales, I have partnered with Louis Gamino and Nancy Hogan on the project and look forward to reporting the outcomes.
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
2 answers
A young woman loses her husband in a car crash. She has no history of psychiatric disorders. She is grief-stricken and has to take time off work. Because of the removal of the bereavement exclusion, after 2 weeks, she clinically fulfills the ‘new’ criteria for major depression, She consults her primary care doctor...
Relevant answer
Answer
Labels, labels everywhere. Instead of focusing on labels, focus on the patient. I start with the simple stuff. We now know that diet plays a key role in enhancing brain function so I would encourage her to focus on eating a healthy diet. Exercise is another great way to counter anxiety and stress. I would hold off on any medications at this point. As Peter Gotzsche points out in his new book "Deadly Medicines and Organized Crime" many psychotropic medications seem to cause more harm than good.
I suspect the "new" criteria for major depression were strongly influenced by those who have financial ties to drug companies.
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
2 answers
Professionals in academia consider a lot about “effectiveness", “effects” or “outcomes” for grief counseling or therapy. Is it from the perspective of clients or of researchers/therapists? Is there any philosophical base for this emphasis?
It seems to me that this emphasis suggests those who are bereaved do not want to get better or they do not know how to get better. But it is clearly not true based on my experiences working with the bereaved.
Relevant answer
Answer
I think the interest in the "effectiveness" in grief counseling comes not so much from an assumption that bereaved individuals don't want to get better or don't know how to get better as it comes from a question about if grief therapy is always a good thing. Many, if not most, people seems to go through the grief and mourning experiences with the assistance of friends and family, and without any "professional" intervention.
And there is some evidence (I believe) that grief work might actually be of some harm to some people, it might actually get in the way of their healing. So I think that the research into the effectiveness of grief therapy is more to find out who can be helped by what kind of therapy when.
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
3 answers
Traditional models of loss and mourning tend to have been created based on work with people who have lost a loved one to death. I am interested in grief related to losses that are not directly related to death, such as the loss of a limb, the loss of a job, the loss of a parent who is incarcerated or suffering from severe mental health issues. While the traditional death-based models can offer some insights to these other types of loss, I feel that a more non-theoretical approach might be more useful.
Stroebe and Schut presented a "dual process model" that looks the specific stressors an individual experiences as a result of a loss (for example,being angry at god for letting the loss happen) and the processes the person uses to deal with each stressor (talking to a minister, leaving the church...). Using this approach we can look at the specific stressors each individual person experiences, as well as the adaptive or not-so-adaptive processes they use to address those stressors. Concepts, assumptions and hypothesis from the traditional models of grief can be used a 'sensitizing concepts' that inform our work with bereaved, but we don't try to fit our client's experience into those models.
So my question is based on knowing I have blind spots. I think this is a useful approach to take, but I don't know what I'm missing. Has an approach such as this been used (successfully or otherwise) in other disciplines or with other situations? Are there issues to look out for in terms of sharing the results formally or informally? Any hints on how to proceed?
This summer I am teaching an elective to Master of Social Work students, and will be having them interview people using this approach. So any thoughts would be greatly appreciated.
I've attached a paper by Stroebe and Schut on their Dual Process Model for those who are interested.
Relevant answer
Answer
Hi Michael,
I know you posted this earlier in the year but I just wondered if you have seen this paper - Ando, M, Tsuda, A, Morita, T, Miyashita, M, Sanjo, M, & Shima, Y 2013, 'A Pilot Study of Adaptation of the Transtheoretical Model to Narratives of Bereaved Family Members in the Bereavement Life Review', The American Journal Of Hospice & Palliative Care DOI: 10.1177/1049909113490068
I use Stroebe and Schut "dual process model" when teaching undergraduate nursing students and I find that they can relate to this model better than linear task models. I also find Tony Walter’s biographical model useful to use. 'A new model of grief: bereavement and biography', Mortality, 1, 1, pp. 7-25
Hope this is helpful. Clare
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
1 answer
I am doing some research into the biblical arguments for or against baptizing infants as a part of the grief process for parents who have lost an infant due to fetal demise or other natural causes.
Relevant answer
Answer
Infant baptism is not found specifically in scriptures, but baptism is. Infant baptism is a symbol of the parents dedicating themselves to raise the child up in a biblical way. (Just to insert a viewpoint, personally, I do not believe that it would be wrong for parents to have a priest/ pastor baptize their infant post mortem.) King David lost an infant son, but he was comforted in knowing that he would see him again in heaven. Infants, who die, regardless of how they died, are taken to heaven. Sin is what separates us from God. He offers every human being forgiveness and life with Him after our physical death, but we have to accept His offer. Infants cannot comprehend sin or anything else, except what they want. If they are hungry, they understand that. If something hurts that, they understand that that does not feel good. Since they cannot make decisions, or have knowledge of God, God does not judge them as He would someone who understands these concepts. We are all held accountable according to what we have come to know (what has been revealed to us about God). If baptizing their deceased infant/child helps grieving parents work through the grieving process, then by all means, it should be allowed.
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
15 answers
We are in the process of doing an evaluation of our current program, with families who are completing their first year of bereavement follow up- any tools (especially validated and reliable tools) and sources would be appreciated.
Relevant answer
Answer
so true Barbara- hate that metrics guide our work instead of conversation- our leaders and government need numbers, we know experiences. We only wish that the stories would be the power needed. Small steps- in deed, baby steps for the newborn intensive care population, and pediatrics in general, but we are getting acknowledgement in the process.
  • asked a question related to Grief
Question
26 answers
I´m trying to find some articles to quote if possible. In our work we´re analyzing the History of Loss Inventory (spanish version), the relations between history of loss, depressive symptomatology and prevalence of complicated grief.
Relevant answer
Answer
Answering this question is a key component to preserving public health and societal well-being in an aging society. I am conducting a series of analyses with longitudinal cohort in the U.S. Right now, no one knows the answer to this question.
There are a series of papers by Rostilla and colleagues that provide clues. I've attached his classic 'Time does not heal all wounds.'