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Geomorphological Mapping - Science topic

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Hi everyone,
I'm currently working on groundwater mapping for a watershed located in Turkey. I need geomorphological map for the area that I am studying on and I'd be glad if you could help me with finding these maps online.
Thanks in advance
Best of luck
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There is no service you mentioned like geomorphological mapping service.
First of all you must create the geomorphological map with DEM data There are numerous explanation videos on Youtube about making geomorphological maps. You should find a high resolution DEM I think.
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Are there any iPad pro apps for GIS mapping and analysis? Thanks
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Dear Jens Kleb Antônio Carlos Pereira dos Santos Junior Omid Vakili , for precision monitoring I use an emlid reach rs2+ GNSS antenna and its app is well supported by apple so this doesn't worry me. My basic idea is to use the iPad as if it were a topographic map on which to digitize with the pen in the field or in the laboratory the various shapes obviously geo-referenced and using as a base map a topographic map in ecw format, export in shape format and load everything into my beloved QGis, but taking full advantage of the potential of the apple pencil. Is this possible? I must also admit that I am a big fan of global mapper. Regards
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Dear research colleagues,
Is there a method to detect glaciers from out of space with satellite images?
Resolution is of course the bottleneck here. So coarser than 100m image data is not beneficial.
1) What Satellite Images are most beneficial for this task?
2) What type of image data might be suited best? Is a specific choice of bands helpful or do LST provide most promising results?
3) I have encountered this work below. It seems very promising, can someone evaluate?
The final goal is to automatically generate masks in shape of these glaciers. For example with help of unsupervised k-means classification or if necessary supervised classification to recognize and distinguish between glaciers and everything else including snow-covered soil by color (examples attached, as you can see it does not work very well yet.). These masks are further a key element for the test part in a CNN project.
Here is a very nice project with very fine masks from lakes and sea instead of glaciers: https://github.com/JiahuiYu/generative_inpainting/issues/451
Since I work mostly with GEE, here are several LST datasets which I ask you to evaluate if you have more experience than me:
Cheers,
Sven Szardien
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You can use Sentinel 10mpp. Albedo is great when it is used in snow-free season
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Are there today any easy free GUI software e.g. to do with DEM this: draw a polygon, or select a feature/features/, or (automatically) somehow determine a wider area, and get the length, width and height and so on of (glacial) landform(s), or get morphometric characteristics of the selected area/part of the DEM.
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Ayan,
Thanks!
I still have a lot to learn on this topic. 55/5000
I have not yet gone very far on this issue.
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1. The purpose is to develop land use/ land cover map, lithology map, geomorphology map.
2. To study land use pattern and and coast line changes with time.
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I think that you must make a supervised classification.
You can make your own spectral signatures from the Landsat images, and then make the classification of the all images.
But I think that you must considers the temporal difference between the images that you are going to use. If this is the case, probably you must repeat this procedure to each image. Other alternative is to make your spectral signatures with a radiometer or ask o someone that could have it, but taking into account this temporal difference.
I think that the supervised classification could give you all the information that you need
Best regards!
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I wish to know the windward and leeward (rain shadow) locations/districts of Western Himalayas (WH) of India during the passage of Western disturbance in December to March months.
[P.S. The WH region runs through three subdivisions of India namely Uttarakhand, Himachal Pradesh, and Jammu & Kashmir] 
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To know the details we have to see the meteorological data of at least past 10 years. I general cold desert areas of Lahul spithi of HP, Ladkah, parts of Uttrakhand are rainshaow areas but for characterization of districts we have to see rainfall pattern of a decade or more.
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Questionnaire is carried out in order to develop my master thesis: The impact of user-defined parameters on DEM accuracy. By using feedbacks from the users who works with DEMs the conclusion about users perception of the importance of user-defined parameters in digital terrain modelling will be performed. 
Thanks in advance to all !
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I tried viewing a GeoTIFF file using an ordinary photo viewer, and was curious as to why the GeoTIFF displayed differently compared to when it is loaded into a GIS software. Can anyone explain why this is so? Does this have to do with the amount of data stored per pixel in a GeoTIFF file or something?
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(: Not from me. If you are using ArcMap you should export raster from it with the checkbox "Use renderer". TIFF will then be displayed correctly.
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These are the the end results which I  produced and I want a little interpretation. the first image is a geological map of the area and the next is with faults activated. i want to ask what interpretations can i make from this data.
And the next question is about the cross section ? can i interpret as graben structure in between the fault lines. ? 
help would be appreciated.
Regards
Abdul Rehman 
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Please check if the boundary between quartenary deposits and the limestone has the same orientation like the other geological boundaries. It could be that the quartenary deposits hide geological units below them.
There is a drilling dtabase of the BGR where you can check this topic:
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One example is of Hattian Landslide, Kashmir, Pakistan that was triggered by earthquake, 2005. This landslide is situated very near to trace length of Bagh-Balakot Fault and at the landslide locality, this fault was also known as Tanda Valley Fault in the previous literature. Second example is Attabad Landslide (although aseismic landslide), Hunza valley, Pakistan. During a geomorphological mapping campaign carried our during a project, a fault was also inferred.  
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Dear Ijaz, I am not a geologist but as a geomorphologist I can say that a fault line can be a major driving factor but not every gigantic landslide can be attribuited to faultlines. 
Faults often are associated with geological discontinuities and dip slopes, both can result in surface landslides due to different lithologies and sedimentary paleo-environments. Think about a layer of evaporites in an alpine setting which is overlayed by a karstic layer coming from a nearby units. The fault is responsible of getting two units together that, given an important slope, can result in hydrogeological instabilities. This is due to surface water percolation thru the limestone and its karsification and erosion of the underlying evaporites layer.
This example shows you how a fault can set things together and generate areas of instabilities, but it is generally gravity and sub-surface erosion to cause gigantic sheet-on-sheet landslides, (excluding earthquakes in active faults and barrier-generated issues, obviously), this can occur far away from the actual faultline, as well as directly underneath it.
I hope this helped a bit,
Nic
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I want to creater a paleosurface for my study site. So I have to deal with colluvial layers. I want to bring them back to the slopes. In preperation of detailed field investigations I am searching for GIS or R tool to calculate this. Maybe it is liek an inverse erosion modelling.
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Hi Johannes,
This may not fully help you but there is a software called DionisosFlow (sold by the company Beicip-Franlab) that allows you to model different types of sediment deposits (including colluvial ones, if I well recall). And it should allow you to reconstruct the model through time (so you can visualize the sediments back on the slopes). It is not a free software, but I think you can obtain University/Research licences. If you want to take a look, here is the link to the official website : http://www.beicip.com/stratigraphic-modeling-0
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I am trying to use a logic ( rule -based classification ) to extract built-up area, similar to as suggested by Xu (2007).He uses, three spectral indices, SAVI( Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index), NDBI ( Normalized Difference Built-up Index ) and MNDWI ( Modified Normalized Difference Water Index) to help extract built-up area. However, I am not able to know the method he chose a threshold of SAVI=-0.344 in the following statement:( In other words, how am i able to extract the right threshold value for SAVI to avoid spectral confusion?)
Given, Band 1=SAVI , Band 2= NDBI and Band 3=MNDWI
If Band 1 < -0.344 and Band 2 > Band 3 then 1 Else 0.
The maximum of built-up land class in band1 (SAVIband) of Fuzhou image is -0.343, whereas the minimum of vegetation class in that band is - 0.182. Therefore, using -0.344 as a threshold value can help avoid the confusion between vegetation and built-up land classes and greatly increase the extraction accuracy (see sections below).
Xu, H., 2007. Extraction of Urban Built-up Land Features from Landsat Imagery Using a Thematic oriented Index Combination Technique. Photogrammetric Engineering & Remote Sensing 73 12: 1381–1391.
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Hi Kaleab,
                 For any process, a threshold value is determined emperically. Same is true for any model or indices. The characteristics of soils of your study area, exposed area of soil surface, climate and presence of aerosols etc. should be considered. You may read the following article
Good luck
Supriti
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NW Himalaya differs largely from the central Nepal sector, for which plenty of cross-sections are available. I am in search of newly published generalised one.
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Please find the cross sections in District resource maps published by Geological Survey of India. You can procure data for required area from GSI. They have mapped Major Structural formations like anticlines, synclines and Faults in the Entire Himalayas. As the geological structures are regional the maps are published in 1:250,000 scale and 1deg*1deg area covered in 1 Sheet.
regards...
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From what I see, gemorpohology of proglacial zones of tropical glaciers has not been a major issue of concern. Together with my students, we're planning a small geomorphological project on Zongo glacier in Bolivia (drone, DEM, gemorphological map). Any publications, maps or more ideas for research would be of great use.
Thanks in advance,
Jakub
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Hi Jakub,
Jacob Yde, a colleague of mine, has just published an article about snow distribution in Andes.Please find the link to his article below.
Cheers
Lukasz 
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From sub-pixel correlation of optical imagery the migration of sand dunes in river bed can be analyzed. How does this analysis enable me to suggest a suitable site for the construction of a bridge? 
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I think, it is important to read this file 
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Where can I find a map indicates locations of southern coast line of Palestine through Pliostocene?
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Thanks my freind Jan, No problem.
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in anthropogeomorphology mostly we assess the landforms created by human being but mostly economical activities and construction on mountain affect geomorphological features on mountain 
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The human effect  (urban development,road building,landcover etc.) on the geomorfology of the landsacpe, can recovered from open data as( usgs, corine 2000 etc),digital elevation model or digitazing remote sensing & google earth images.The human features can calculated with other layers as (slope, geology,etc )which used in geomorfological analysis, with the arc gis tools raster calculator for raster or feature calculator for vector features.
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Hi, this site from ESRI explains the curvature, my question is about the profile curvature. They say that positive values represent a concave cell, were the flow will be accelerated. Negative values indicates a convex cell, and flow will be decelerated. I know other software’s use different signs but the logic of the acceleration shouldn’t be the contrary?I thought that a concave cell would in fact decelerate the flow!! probably read that in other sources but i need something absolutely correct to cite..
Which is right (without comparing magnitudes) a concave surface accelerates or decelerates the flow?
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Here's a graphic I built to help my students learn the difference between plan and profile curvature.
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I'm seeking some guidance as I develop my PhD dissertation. I had planned on using a geomorphological mapping approach (remote sensing, terrain modeling, and field mapping) to map landforms and processes operating at different spatial scales to understand the spatial distribution (pattern) and interaction of landforms at different stages of placer development (placer diamonds). I'm interested in addressing this issue from the watershed scale since much work has been done at the reach scale with the physics-based approach.  I need to narrow down my focus and address specific scientific questions and am seeking advice.
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Anicet,
Thank you for your suggestions and for the paper that you attached.  I read it with great interest and see that it may be useful in defining a direction forward for my work.  The paper you shared was also very interesting considering that my work has been focused on placer deposits in West Africa (including Guinea and Cote d'Ivoire). I appreciate your help and guidance.
Pete Chirico
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Dear Researchers and Academics;
I work on the 100% renewable power Global Grid subjects. I am interested in the locations of very large and large renewable power plants.
During my research, I define and describe the importance of the soil conservation regions, water conservation regions and forest conservations regions. These regions have to be untouchable (no settlement, no concrete, no metal, etc.; soil conservation only for agriculture, water conservation only for clean fresh water, forest conservation only for forests). These regions should be large and very large sites.
I thought and assumed that the international governing bodies (e.g. the United Nations) had already worked on these topics, defined, decided, and published a Global Soil Conservation Map (worldwide protected sites)‏, a Global Water Conservation Map‏ (protected lakes, rivers, underground water, etc.)  and a Global Forest Conservation Map (protected forests) for large protected areas agreed upon and published by international consensus (like by the United Nations).
All authorities (regional, national, international) have to obey the borders of these defined and published large protected areas.
I could not find any official map (a map for soil, a map for water, a map for forest) yet.
Can you please send me a Global Soil Conservation Map‏, a Global Water Conservation Map‏ and a Global Forest Conservation Map, if there is one for Global Soil Conservation‏, one for Global Water Conservation and one for Global Forest Conservation.
If there are GIS files for these maps in some formats such as for Google Earth, ESRI ArcGIS, they will be very useful for my research.
I would like to thank all of you who contribute to this question in advance.
Best Regards
Burak Omer Saracoglu
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Hi Burak,
you might find activities of ISRIC - World Soil Information of your interest. Especially their data can be useful for your research (global 1km soil grid, etc.)
Regards
Lukas
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River erosion ( Geomorphology)
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Hi Sir,
I think you can produce your own geomorphological map by considering the digital elevation model (DEM) and geology of the area. Number of terrain classifications are available based on the DEM.
Open source software's such as SAGA and Whitebox GAT etc can do the things.
Hope this will help you .
Good luck.
Vijith
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A Question for Geomorphologists: I need to find geomorphological maps indicating Gaza strip features. thanks
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You could try getting DEMs using ASTER satellite data. Alternatively,USGS may have DEMs with 60 or 100 meter resolution, unless the server is now operated by a different agency. You would have to correct the georeferencing.
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I considered using GIS data, but I do not have any good terrain raster available in the region I am working. My group need to collect data of rivers that have about 0.5 to 2 meters in depth.
Is there any technique to estimate river bathymetry that can be used when there is no access to equipments?
Thanks!
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A good pair of waders and a metre stick!  Seriously all you need in equipment is what I have said.  However, it would be wise to measure up to a level well above the river surface.  Stretch a metric tape right across from one bank to the other at least 1 metre above the river surface and perfectly level.  Drop a tape with a heavy weight on the bottom end and measure to the taut tape above.  Record measurements at every 1m along the tape, unless there is a sudden change in slope when 0.5m may be more appropriate.  If the stream is deeper than 1.5m you will need to find some way of getting out there - suggest a small rubber dinghy as long as the flow is gentle. 
It is important to choose a reach of river which is straight and even for velocity/discharge.  If you do the cross-profile depths correctly you can use them to build up a graph of river stage measurements.  It can also be used to apply the Manning equation to.  Hope this helps.  If you need more information, do not hesitate to email me at george.strachan12@btinternet.com.
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What are the typical criteria to identify glacial or fuvio-glacial deposits in core samples as old as Permian?
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Dear Sir,
Surface texture studies will also throw light on such differentiation.
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Feel no problems with rocky-shores: dominated by canopy-forming fucoid seaweeds, barnacles and mussels. Spans in E Atlantics from Northern Africa to the Barents Sea, by phytogeographic data (i.e. Van den Hoek 1975, Jüterbock et al. 2013). But what about sedimentary shores? How to define, how to contour?
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…sedimentary shores dominated by infaunal bivalves and polychaetes. Macoma balthica probably is everywhere, Mya, Cerastoderma, etc. through most of area. A bit strange for me:   so many papers about North Atlantic intertidal communities lacking general definition of these communities. Especially for soft bottoms
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I am adding the gebco data into arcgis, and it has no spatial reference information. So that, I used data management tools to define the projection. The spatial reference selected: WGS 84. My question is, is it correct if I used WGS 84? Or do I need to project the data into local projection?
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GEBCO are provided as gridded data in a variety of formats: netCDF, Esri ASCII and GeoTiff (INT16).
For gridded data you should use wgs84 (epsg 4326). You can also access the information from a WMS service (epsg 3857).
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My study is on "application of storm water for firefighting and other service utility". I want to know is there any relation between fire demand based on calorific value of the materials used in the construction of a building, so that quantity of backup stored water could be designed on the basis of the calories produced at the time of fire hazard and water required to suppressed it. I will be thankful if someone could help me with some related papers.
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While studying fire and emergency services, standard operating procedures, and general exposure to construction practices I would say that building design, layout, and material has no consideration towards water storage.
Most organizations focus on having enough water and pressure to "get the job done" and these same organizations have very little say (if any at all) in material used in construction. Organizations such as the NFPA or USFA.
We do however regulate specific items based on toxicity from being burned and burn patterns that will lead to death because of poor building design. The connection to total water supply on a calorific level of materials being burned is very interesting.
(Answers are based on United States references)
Good luck!
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Is it appropriate to use google earth images to study the long term coastal erosion?
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Why not? I am wondering if coastal erosion studies have been carried out with moderate resolution satellite data such as Landsat, then why not use Google Earth with much better resolution sometimes even to centimeters of spatial resolution. I came across a Featured article in NASA Earth Observatory on Coastal erosion in the East Coast of US (link attached). Although they have used Landsat Images from the past 30+ years, you can download the kml file (link attached) and study the area with the historical imagery slider on Google Earth. I think it is a very useful image analysis tool. Gives you much better perspective and more importantly you can make quantitative measurements of shoreline change rates. Having said that, I think for Coastal Geologists, Engineers and Planners Google Earth is an excellent tool for studying shore line changes and coastal features. I am sure you will find more examples on the web if you search.
I would be interested to read what others have to add against using Google Earth for coastal erosion studies..
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I looked up Google's satellite imagery and realized that a number of units with significant different are visible in the images. I want to know how this distribution pattern have been created.
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I also suggest you look up desert pavements, which closely resemble your first picture. As someone mentioned before, the clasts in that picture are quite angular, suggesting minimal transport by water. I suggest that the lack of fine sediment is due to aeolian deflation, whereas in the second picture you have an ephemeral stream (someone mentioned wadi already) that periodically sees water flow. Two different processes at work: two different sedimentological signatures. 
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I'm a geomorphologist and I live in Costa Rica, but I want to take a LiDAR and Remote Sensing course online or presential. If you know about any course I would be interested. Thank you
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We (OpenTopography) co-organized a pair of courses this past spring in Mexico focused on lidar applications to geomorphology and Earth science. All lecture slides and tutorial materials are freely available:
Lidar Derived DEMs applied to Landslide, Fault, Earthquake Rupture, and Landscape Changes - at UNAM in Mexico City: http://www.opentopography.org/index.php/resources/short_courses/15_UNAM
Applications of High Resolution Topographic Data to the Earth Sciences - at CICESE in Ensenada: http://www.opentopography.org/index.php/resources/short_courses/15_NPAC
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Drainage basin is a place of work for fluvial geomorphologists not only as a geomorphic unit but gets attracted by many researcher also due to its interdisciplinary nature. Therefore, the delineation and mapping of it is the foremost work of further researches. The shortfall of narratives on methodology to delineate and mapping a drainage basin/catchment preludes the scientific society to make a common consensus or standardisation of this vital task of map making in broader perspectives. Please put forward your views & comments...
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A drainage basin refers to the whole drainage area of a river up to its confluence e.g. the Ganga-Brahmaputra-Meghna basin. When we say catchment area, it generally means the drainage area up to a certain point on the river, say a discharge observation site e.g. catchment area of Brahmaputra river up to Pandu. Watershed generally refers to the ridge line i.e. drainage divide of the basin, but is also used interchangeably with drainage basin. Thus, drainage basin and watershed can be said to be synonymous, but catchment has a different connotation. 
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In term of the geomorphological mapping, the landform unit must refers to a proper classification. For geological purpose, the unit must explain the genesis which form the unit.
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Landforms classification and representation are strongly influenced  by the scale (regional, basin scale, local) and the application (e.g., morphotectonic, fluvial, applied studies) of the geomorphological mapping. In this regard you should read the third chapter ("Nature and Aims of Geomorphological Mapping") of the book "geomorphological mapping" (Smith et al., 2011). Furthermore you can see different applications of geomorphological mapping in a poster presented at IAG conference in Paris:
Hope this helps.
Best
Tullio
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I am studying biodiversity of Diptera and I am looking for 5 bogs in this region
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thank you so much
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Beside the relative topographic roughness using focal statistics, what are the other best options, using ArcMap?
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Depending on the size of your study area, I still believe that the human eye, paired with geomorphological experience in landslide field-mapping, is much superior to any - even highly sophisticated - algorithm. And: normally the error rate is significanty lower with visual interpretations than with machine-based interpretations. If, however, you have to cover a very large region, then you might try to apply shape parameters like vertical and horizontal slope curvatures ...
Manfred Buchroithner
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I made a subsurface 3D seismic mapping of one of the horizons and now I am trying to predict lithology based on the geomorphological geometries. I am curious if it's possible, if there is any study you are aware of, please share it with me.
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Dear Mr. Fayzullaev,
one answer has already addressed the problem. What type of surface do you deal with? Is it the interface between lithology and a permanent water body or is it the interface between the atmosphere and the lithosphere with its various subtypes (e.g. pedosphere)? Subaerial geomorphological processes show an outward appearance different from those of subaquatic and as such the results you may expect are certainly very different and hard to be compared with each other. There are numerous block-diagrams published in books and papers on sequence stratigraphy. To test the quality of these block-diagrams is mostly done by 1-D subcrops (wells). In an subaerial environment you have 2-D and 3-D proofs. In subaquatic environments the geomorphology is strongly impacted by the hydrographic regime. A special type or subtype is the "drowned subaerial geomorphology" where you might have direct connections with the 2-D and 3-D situation on land.
We used slope inclination, slope gradient and slope morphology for combined geomophological-geological  studies. Maybe the paper attached can provide you with some ideas and can be of assistance in both geomorphological settings.
Good luck !
H.G.Dill
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I have studied the effect of the neotectonic activity in a cuesta landform of Parana Basin, a large sedimentary basin located in Brazil, Argentina, Paraguay, Uruguay and Bolivia. The research has shown that the impact of Neotectonic on the landform of the area isn't strong, although there are many faults and large fractures (joints).
I have had difficulty to differentiate fractures (large joints) and faults in the field because the rocks (fine sandstones) of the region don't permit the formation of kinematic indicators, like slickensides and steps. Also, the movement of the faults was subhorizontal and the offsets are so small.
How could I differentiate strike-slips faults and large fractures when the kinematic indicators aren't so clear?
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Marcos,
one valid criterion, in the lack of clear kinematic indicators, is to look for possible pre-faulting/fracturing features that could be used as markers. In the case of a strike-slip fault, the marker appears truncated, offset and displaced.In the case of a large fracture, the marker is truncated, but not offset and displaced. I hope this could be a simple criterion to answer your question.
Best wishes,
Enrico
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I want to know how far landsat image is useful for detail geomorphphic mapping or should I go for some other option of high resolution data?
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For geomorphological mapping or for that matter a geological mapping, moderate resolution multi-spectral imagery may not be very useful if used in isolation. Usually it works better in combination with a colour-shaded DEM for example, in combination with a pan-sharpened imagery and an anaglyph image. I've attached all of the mentioned imagery as an example for you to weigh the difference and the significance of each in relation to the objective. Usually, I found that a colour-shaded topographic image is an excellent starting point to map geomorphological units which may not be visible/obvious at all in a Landsat ETM multi-spectral imagery. In the attached example you can quite clearly make out the alluvial fans which are at the base of the Lower Himalayas on which Dehradhun city is situated, which is otherwise not so apparent in the ETM multi-spectral imagery. With some proficiency you can even distinguish the relative ages of the alluvial fans which are found in between the Siwalik Range and the Lower Himalayas. You can also see them in the Indogangetic plains. The river channels are easily discernible in the hill-shaded image and the variations in the intricate drainage patterns are conspicuous enough to pinpoint the differences in underlying lithology. Often with multi-spectral colour composites the terrain may not be highlighted because of the presence of vegetation, anthropogenic borders etc. Have a look at the color composite ETM where a clear boundary (human made) is identified along the south face of the Siwalik Range, whereas if you compare the same location in the color-shaded DEM, you will not find it. These are only some of the advantages of using a colour-shaded DEM in conjunction with a colour composite multi-spectral imagery for geomorphological mapping where the terrain information is more valuable than a land cover. For geological mapping too, these data sources are superlative authorities, wherein anticlines, synclines, strike-slip faults, lineaments, flatirons (indicators of bedding planes) and many other geological features are observed with marked distinction. Therefore, I think the key to a first-rate geomorphological mapping is a blend of various data sources. I'm not sure what is the scale of your study area, nevertheless I believe ETM/OLI from Landsat together with a DEM can be a good starting point for a fine and direct geomorphological mapping. My views are open for criticism and discussion.
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As I am doing a glaciohydrological modelling using Spatial Processes In hydrology (SPHY), one of the input data is precipitation and the data should be in map format, but I am just the beginner in programming, I have not that concrete idea in scripting large nos of point data into maps using pc-raster. So I would very much appreciate your kind help in figuring out this problem I am facing now. 
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There is a built-in function which does excatly what you want. You need a map of the stations and a file with the time series.
timeinputscalar(Raintimeseries, pzones);
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I just want to know if there is any algorithms developed for this purpose. i will be glad to know that please.
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you can't remove the cloud from satellite image. maybe, you can choose other one without cloud
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We currently use IGBP (International Geosphere and Biosphere Programme) land classification data to map inland open water fractions. However, the IGBP dataset is fixed in time and doesn't have any temporal variation.
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Thanks for your reply Bill. I'm looking for a product with about 1km spatial resolution and daily temporal resolution. However, a 5km, 10 day product would still be very useful.
I'm really looking for an "off the shelf" type product that has already been documented, tested and validated.
Imtiaz
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Help me please! I need it immediately!
The geomorphological legend must be modern and preferably for mountain regions.
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Hi Andrij,
you can get a free set of ArcGIS geomorphic mapping symbols for high mountain environments here:
It is conceptually based on the German "GMK Hochgebirge". Maybe this article gives some basic ideas:
Here are some example maps of the standard GMK:
Hope this helps!
Best,
David
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The Arabian Empty Quarter has the remains of the bed of third largest lake in the world and a river bed whose flow 6,000 years ago would have rivaled the Nile or perhaps the Amazon.  Anyone given these two features official geographic names? 
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The first feature in the north can be called as Wadi Rimah and the second feature can be called Wadi Adwasir both formed gravel fans or and lake beds underneath sand sheets
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I`m read many papers about this procedure, I ask why we need normalizing the geomorphological index such as (longitudinal, transverse river profile) or normalizing indices such ( steepness, area and so on)....
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Joe Wheaton (now at Utah State I think) has done some fantastic work on this topic.  I think one short answer to your question is that detrending the data allows for integration with floodplain DEMs and thus spatial hydrologic or other habitat modeling.  I'm not trying for self-promotion here.  But, you might find the attached paper interesting and helpful.
cheers,
Ray
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I need more information about how to run SAGA GIS as a software to analyze coastal morphodynamic using lansat data.
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Thank you for the answer.
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I tried to make Web-tiles of a large raster image about terrain classification ( Iwahashi and Pike, 2007), but it failed. Is this a ghost phenomenon? Strange faded images appeared in small scale views of Google Earth (Please see an attachment). They disappear in large scale views.
I used GDAL (gdal2tiles) to export the GeoTIFF to Web-tiles as follows.
gdal2tiles -k -r antialias infile.tif outfolder
The GeoTIFF file was created from a grayscale 8-bit image (about 35,000 by 15,000 cells) by adding a color map which includes a transparent code using ArcGIS.
Is there anyone who met with & solved the same problem?
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Please follow exactly what scrolled as possible?
Because this software is not made for complex raster operations, has mostly Display.
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I am working with a student to model the distribution of karst in Nova Scotia, Canada, where most karst is underlain by gypsum. We want to map areas with moderate to high probability of surface karst development (we're primarily interested in sink-hole occurrence (dolines)). In addition to bedrock geology, factors that we are considering include depth to water table (previously modelled), overburden depth, and soil porosity (indexed by % of clay in soil). Does anyone have experience with this kind of research? We want to select appropriate parameters for each of these variables (e.g., what depth of overburden, depth to water table, etc.).
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You might also want to find out why the gypsum is below the limestone.
Gypsum is the byproduct when limestone is attacked by sulfuric acid, and the
carbonate ion is replaced by the sulfate ion. ( Calcium carbonate becomes
calcium sulfate in the presence of hydrogen sulfide gas and water.
Perhaps the limestone is being attacked in place from the bottom upward
by H2S from below.
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For my current research I am trying to find a map which includes the location of the Storegga Submarine Slide and both the Stuoragurra fault and the Parve fault. Does anyone whether a map like that exists?
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Thank you very much, I have since been offered one that I did used in my work, I am not sure how to remove the question now. But thank you and Kindest regards
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The research area is a part of the Ukrainian Carpathians. The relief of research area is mainly used and changed by human through the functioning of small towns (along the periphery), logging and tourist load. Human pressure on the relief of mountain systems often leads to undesirable geomorphic processes.
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i work on feature extraction from LiDAR DTM, and we succesfully applied LiDAR DTMS and geomorphometric parameters (I.e. Curvature or residual topography) in floodplains for anthropogenic feature extractions (the paper is published on Hydrological Processes and the full text is also uploaded on my profile here on research gate, if you are interested), and in general, we succesfully tested LiDAR DTMs and geomorphic parameters for feature extraction in mountains. maybe the same type of approach considered in floodplains could be used to identify anthropogenic relief....
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Would like to learn more about the geomorphology in this region.
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Genevieve
Google: National Speleological Society
click on: the second listing
click on: Find a Grotto
click on: Georgia
there are several listed in Georgia, Alabama,
Tennessee,
Call and Ask questions
Cave exploration is not something you do alone.
For safety and a lot of other reasons, including
cold, wet, slippery , falls, Hypothermia, and
having fun, it is done in groups, and the groups
get you access to cavers, and professional people
that are interested in what you are interested in.
The Networking is very important.
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An hypothesis is that carrying sand material and leaving silts. I strongly disagree with this theory because it can not justify the fine materials.
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Can you describe in more detail the profile that your referring to?
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Does anyone have experience with the program PhotoModeler (in geomorphology, morphometry, speleology ...)? http://www.photomodeler.com/index.html
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Ok, what you can do before bying PhotoModeler is testing your data with the 123D Catch from Autodesk (see http://www.123dapp.com/catch) this will give you a rough Idea (for free) of the capability of such solution. Photomodeler coud be better or not compared to 123D catch but results should be about the same. 123D catch is a good way to practice and also to learn about how to take good picture for such purpose. Usually, this gives you good results but this all depend on the main purpose, and how good are your input data. I give you an example I made from my Journey in Jordan : Petra in 3D http://dralucas.geophysx.org/stereo.html
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It will be used for surveying of wetlands and associated watersheds. I'm most interested in usability, reliability, and durability. Does anyone have experience with the "South" brand? They seem very reasonably priced but can't find any reviews.
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From my point of view, the Leica stations have a wide versatility. Also Trimble stations. It is probably for this reason that these stations may be slightly more expensive. The Japanese-made total stations tend to be somewhat cheaper and are almost at the height of the Leica or Trimble. I'll decide by Topcon. If the cost is very high, there is always the possibility to go to the second hand market, to a dealer who provides equipment warranty.
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See part of an alluvial plain (Russia) with meandering river
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Indeed you can't, but if you can work on the floodplain evolution, you could do some relative dating. If your abandoned channels and the rest of the floodplain is vegetated, you can always used dendrochronology to constrain your chronology.
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I am currently working on an application of logistic regression for lanslide susceptibility assessment. In order to extract predictors' values form raster layers, I generated equally spaced grid points in landslide area and landslide - free area. It is generally recognized that the point samples should be about the same size (number of 1 - landslide points = number of 0 - non-landslide points). If this is the case, then the density of points will be significantly higher inside the landslide area than outside the landslide area, because the landslide area is generally much smaller than the landslide free area. Some say this difference in density is a critical issue. How does it affect the quality and reliability of the computed regression model? Are there any sampling alternatives?
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I agree completely with the comment from Filippo! From my opinion, it is not necessary to take the number of landslide points and non-landslide points equally, as it is not the case in nature. It is good in some cases but not in others. What really matter is the ratio of landslides over whole area, e.x. if the landslides affected only 10% of your study area, then the appropriate landslide points should be somewhere at, saying, 10-20% of your dataset.
In the case of my landslide points are limited (scarce), after some trials and I see that my regression model depends heavily on the balance of landslide and non-landslide data, I will try other methods (like decision tree, neural network or simple index overlay, Bayes…)