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Hey there!
Anyone can provide me a Geological Map of Rawalpindi-Islamabad on local level, please?
If anyone has, kindly do share it with me.
I can include your name in my current research work.
Any kind of help will be highly appreciated.
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Let me check with the Geol Surv Pakistan. But only for support, not authorship.
Pl send me your email. Mine is <mqjan@yahoo.com>
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I am looking for geological map of Iran, either 100 000 or 250 000 quadrangles. Looking also for corresponding explanatory notices.
I am looking especially for Gazik, Shahrakht and Taybad 250 000 maps and explanatory notices in the Seistan Suture Zone.
Some contacts or addresses ?
P. Maurizot
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Dear Pierre
hi
did you get the maps you needed
Naser
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Planning to conduct some research on Mars and Venus. Targeting tectonic/large scale structural features on Venus and potential mineralisation areas on Mars. What are the available (preferably free of cost and reliable) data sources?
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Hi! if you are interest to study Venus and Mars, there are a lot of sources and ways to do it. For images there is PILOT (Planetary Image LOcator Tool) where are avaible all images from planetary mission, Inside this platfomr, you can choose (after selected images that you need), how to download (BATCH command for ISIS and other). You can realize Gis mosaic for to study surfaces and map their. In, add, how other says there is PDS and other USGS services. You can find for Mars also the CTX global map (http://murray-lab.caltech.edu/CTX/index.html) and other (NASA website or others).
You're welcome
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what is the relation between machine learning and remote sensing and how can I integrate between them? where should I start to study machine learning? what are the most used software to integrate between machine learning and satellite data ?
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Remote sensing images are used for mineral exploration in two applications: (1) map geology and the faults and fractures that localize ore deposits; (2) recognize hydrothermally altered rocks by their spectral signatures. Remote sensing in geology is remote sensing used in the geological sciences as a data acquisition method complementary to field observation, because it allows mapping of geological characteristics of regions without physical contact with the areas being explored. Remote sensing is a valuable tool in mineral exploration, thanks to its ability to save time and money while providing helpful information. It is best used for the discovery of high-value commodities such as diamonds and gold, which are becoming more difficult to locate.
Also this paper will help you:
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Dear All
Can anyone have the Geologic Map of the Kohat Quardangle Pakistan in GIS or Digitized form. I need it very badly and urgent. if anyone have, please provide it.
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Dear Aamir,
Better go to the National Centre of Excellence in Geology library. If they do not have, request the Geological Survey of Pakistan (GSP) office in Peshawar. If I remember correctly, at least a part of the quadrangle was remapped by Professor Sajjad Ahmad, now Director General GSP.
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can we use table lateral earth pressure for driven jet groting piles  of NAVFAC DM 7.2, Foundation and Earth Structures, U.S. Department of the Navy, 1984. for grouted sand in effect of pressure of grouing in bondzone area of micropile
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That is a good question.
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Paleomagnetic studies show that the South China block was moving northward continuously from 300 to 260 Ma and has experienced an overall ∼27° clockwise rotation since then (Huang et al., 2018) ,and assuming a stationary Emeishan mantle plume, so if I want to do a numerical simulation of the geodynamics of the Emeishan mantle plume based on the above conditions. How can I do it?
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Hello dear;
I didn't research on Paleomagnetic studies, but i know 2 methods in order to behavioral study between two things. K-means clustering and Artificial Neural Network (ANN). you can read this combination method in this paper :
good luck
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Hello community,
does anybody know where I can get a shapefile of the geological map 1:250000 of Sri Lanka?
Much appreciated
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Thank you Karl-Jan Erstad but that was certainly my first guess. I was hoping that someone could point me to an "un-google-able" source or better yet, they have it up their sleeve.
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I need Geological maps to discover the predominant type of soil or rock on the site by UPM
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If you are working in India, then go for GSI online maps of geology. https://bhukosh.gsi.gov.in/Bhukosh/Public
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Basically, I want to create a simplified geological map to accompany the description of a Palaeontological locality, as seen in many publications. I wouldn't want to concern myself with GIS since I want something more simplified and I already have a proper geological map of the area. I was thinking maybe of a designing software to use with layers?
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QGIS
Saga GIS
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I know and used CorelDraw together with Canvas.
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Surfer by Golden Software is my favorite, https://www.goldensoftware.com/products/surfer.
In addition to having all the map-drawing tools, it links to numerous data repositories, and its support is unmatched in the industry.
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I have generated a kmz. file of a scanned geological map. But when it is opened through Google Earth, the resolution is very low and cannot zoom in with clear colours.
Is there any method to this?
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Layer_output_scale in ArcGIS
For raster layers, a value of 0 can be used to create one untiled output image. If a value greater than or equal to 1 is used, it will determine the output resolution of the raster. This parameter has no effect on layers that are not raster layers.
Here also the details:
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Hi all:
Any idea of the identification of these fossils?, SW of Valencia (Montesa). Late Cretaceous according to the geological map. Maybe an echinoderm?
All the best
Jaime
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Hello Jaime,
At least several fragments in the three images correspond to radiolitid rudists (Bivalvia, order Hippuritida, family Radiolitidae). The celluloprismatic structure of the outer shell layer (you can see it in the fragments), is currently considered a main diagnostic feature of the Radiolitidae.
Saludos!
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I need to create a geological map of an area overlapped with topography to attain a hillshade effect for lithological layers.
an example is given in the following figure
( source: Transactions - Geothermal Resources Council 36:1345-1354)
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( I want to create a Geological map with Gneiss as a base layer. but the same unit is present within the boundary of an upper layer of Charnockite. I need to draw each without overlap)
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edit and clip.
Remember to select the specific layer for editing.
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If we are interested in carrying out the geological mapping of a certain territory, then, how could we use aero-geophysics and to solve which tasks? Of course, we could also consider satellite information available. Opinions?
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Henrique Joncew,
It is true that geophysics is a tool, but it has specific and general tasks that cannot be solved by conventional geological methods.
Geophysics allows, in conjunction with geology, to solve numerous aspects in geological mapping. For example, conventional geological methods can only explain what is seen directly by the surface geologist. In its aid, geophysics makes it possible to propose geological features that cannot be seen with the naked eye: geological strata and bodies at certain depths; presence of the water table; presence of contacts or faults that do not emerge, etc.
The advantage of aerogeophysics is given by its speed and the possibility of covering large areas where, at times, it is unlikely to develop land campaigns. The rapid development of remote sensors has come to the aid of Geosciences and their combination with aerogeophysics, undoubtedly, allows solving tasks that just a few years ago would be unlikely.
In Cuba there is a 1: 50,000 aerogeophysical survey of the entire territory and certain areas at a scale of 1: 25,000. So, the idea of ​​the question is to exchange experiences with colleagues in other latitudes and thus improve our results.
Thank you very much for your help,
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We are collaborating in the preparation of the 1:50 000 geological map of the Republic of Cuba and we would be interested in suggestions on how to use satellite images in this task. Which would be the most appropriate and why?
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Multispectral imaging and thematic mapping allows researchers to collect reflection data and absorption properties of soils, rock, and vegetation. This data could be utilized by trained photogeologists to interpret surface lithologies, identify clays, oxides, and soil types from satellite imagery.
ASTER (15m) Satellite Images
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I am interested in the local karst systems (Krubera cave ecc).
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Hallo, I would like to know better lithological-stratigraphic characteristics and local karst. The area is name BZYB. I have found some informations yet, like the map in attach, it is interesting
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The samples were collected from aquifer with the following lithology:
- Conglomerates, calcareous limestones sand red and green clays 
- Marls, clays and white limestones
- Clays and gypsum;
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use this paper for more
Significance of saturation index of certain clay minerals in shallow coastal groundwater, in and around Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu, India
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I am interested in working on Geological mapping such as lineaments and geohazards
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I'd be careful when using Google Earth to analyze temporarily varying things like landslides. The Google Earth cloud free image is stitched together from different scenes at different times. While it should be no problem mapping slowly evolving features such as faults, for landslide mapping this could become an issue.
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It seams to be a very complicated and time consuming task...Was it done manually and then digitized?
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Dear all: Yes, geology was done in the field when no satellite imagery was available many decades ago. I belong also to the "pre-digital" era, since I entered the Geology Department ar C.U.V. in 1976. In my country, Venezuela, when I was a student and in the beginning years of my career, many places didn't even had topographic maps in low scales, and some still haven't! Most of these remote places were accessible only through creeks and rivers, no roads whatsoever, not even dirt roads! All one had were 1:100.000 or larger scale maps of part of the territory. So one had to "draw" the creeks and rivers using topographic equipment, beginning with some reference point, usually a church bell-house in small towns. And then put the lithologic contacts, structures and the like on the newly drawn map!
I don't agree when somebody says that field mapping was perfect, or 100% perfect. There is nothing perfect in geology, to say so is to be really naive ir extremely optimistic! No matter how good outcrops one might find, no matter how well the sampling is done, no matter how sophisticated equipment is used for chemical, isotope, and radioactive analysis, we never will be able to describe 100% of the geological events happened in the past. It is simply impossible! We can give educated propositions of geological history, but not the 100% of the facts. Let's be a bit modest, right?
Moreover, a great part of geological history has been erased by that villain called erosion, so no continuous sequences exist anywhere. It is like a CSI crime scene where some intruder takes away valuable evidence from the site! In tropical countries mapping is very defective, since thick lateritic soils, heavy forests, and wide alluvial deposits cover most of the terrain. In mountainous areas all one can have is outcrops in creeks and rivers, and many of them are quite difficult for access, as they have falls, cataracts, rapids, and all sort of obstacles. Even road outcrops get quickly weathered and become useless after a few years! But, as I said before, and I always remind to my students at the beginning of each semester: even in the best outcrops you might find in Greenland, Canada, Siberia, and desertic areas, more than 70% of the geological history has been erased by the erosion villain! Regards, Sebastian.
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I am working on Ririwai ring complex using aeromagnetic and aero-radiometric data. I have generated different maps but i need to generate the temperature of formation or curie temperature of each rock unit to augment my conclusion .
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Dear Damilola Avioye:
Even though, there is a need for studies to estimate the Curie´s temperature from aeromagnetic data, I would like to comment why this approach is faulty and the use of the magnetic data is inappropriate if you are trying “calculate curie temperature of each rock from magnetic anomalies” such as you said. My observation first addresses the data use in this study-case reading the geological and geophysical background (1), then ideas how the analysis was performed (limitations) (2) and finally presents an scenario of numerical examples (3) to illustrate the limited and misleading results that could be generated.
1) Following Raimi,J., Dewu, B.B.M. and Sule, P. (2014) An Interpretation of Structures from the Aeromagnetic Field over a Region in the Nigerian Younger Granite Province. International Journal of Geosciences, 5, 313 - 323. http://dx.doi.org/10.4236/ijg.2014.53031, your study area is largely covered by basement rocks and ring complexes Ririwai, Gamawa aand Zuku, Banke, Ningi and Tibchi-Yeli outcrop in the area. There is a high resolution aeromagnetic data by tne Nigerian Geological Survey Agency (NGSA) were acquired at a flight altitude of 80 m, along NE-SW flight lines that were spaced at 500 m. The authors, used the Euler deconvolution to estimate the depth and position of the main structural features explain: “The results of the Euler solutions indicate that the depth of the ring complexes range from outcrop to 1800 m. For the inferred unexposed ring complex, the depth range from outcrop to 1200 m. It also revealed tightest cluster of solutions along inferred folds with depth that range from 0 to 1800 m.”
2) On the other hand: Curie point depth is a theoretical surface with a temperature in order of 550 °C / 580 °C and can be considered an index of the bottom of a magnetic source, due to ferromagnetic minerals converting to paramagnetic minerals. Geomagnetic anomalies, which are retrieved from magnetic survey, can be utilized to study magnetic structures above the Curie point depth (Bhattacharyya and Leu, 1975; Byerly and Stolt, 1977; Blakely and Hassanzadeh, 1981; Blakely, 1988; Smith and Braile, 1994; Tanaka et al., 1999; Chiozzi et al., 2005; Eppelbaum and Pilchin, 2006; Trifonova et al., 2009; Aboud et al., 2011). On the other hand: you need to reduce the influence of boundary conditions and edge effects, avoid the high frequency noise caused by structures near the surface, and the spectral analysis of the magnetic data described by Spector and Grant (1970) estimated the depth to the top of magnetized rectangular prisms (Zt) from the slope of the log power spectrum, and using this spectral method, Bhattacharyya and Leu (1975, 1977) further calculated the depth of the centroid of the magnetic source bodies (Z0). Okubo et al. (1985) developed the method to estimate the bottom depth of the magnetic bodies (Zb). From the slope of the power spectrum, the upper bound and the centroid of a magnetic body can be estimated. The lower bound of the magnetic source can be derived (Okubo et al., 1985; Tanaka et al., 1999) as Zb = 2Z0 - Zt.
Since Zb is the lower bound depth of the magnetic body, it suggests that ferromagnetic minerals are converted to paramagnetic minerals due to temperature of approximately 580 C. Therefore, the obtained bottom depth of the magnetic source, Zb, was
assumed to be the Curie point depth. To relate the Curie point depth (Zb) to Curie point temperature (580 C), the vertical direction of temperature variation and the constant thermal gradient were assumed. The geothermal gradient (dT/dz) between the Earth’s surface and the Curie point depth (Zb) can be defined by Eq. (8) (Tanaka et al., 1999; Stampolidis et al., 2005; Maden, 2010): dT/dz = 580 °C/Zb.
Another critical issue is the size of your ZOI that you need to use as input in the Curie´s temperature from magnetics: the depth simulations suggest that the optimal square window dimension is about 10 times the estimated depth. For example, you must take square subregions of 200 km by 200 km; or 250 km by 250 km, in a shifting increments of 10 km respect to each other.
The lasted idea to say to you is the vertical resolution of this geophysical method: it is in order of hundred meters, also, it is almost impossible to “calculate curie temperature of each rock from magnetic anomalies” (Please, see the textual comment by Professor Alan Reid at bottom) such as you said.
3) In synthesis: If the results of the Euler deconvolution cited by Raimi,J., Dewu, B.B.M. and Sule, P. (2014) are correct, it is almost impossible to reach the Curie´s critical temperature at this shallow source and the size of your magnetic survey relationship. Thinking if you are in a region of shallow Curie Point Depth such as 10 km, it means that there is a high geothermal gradient, e.g., 60 °C/km and present heat-flow value (200 mW/m2!!!). Is your geological – scenario like this?
"...It is important to understand that the spectral methods are great in the right hands, but you´d better read prudently the Spector and Grant foundational paper (1970). Remember they give averages over the spectral window, and you need to beware of the Power spectrum calculated this way. The one you get with RAPS has a lot of its power from the grid tapering outside the data (to make the edges match), so it´s biased. You need to calculate the power spectrum yourself with internal tapering to get edge matching and no grid extension outside the data". (Alan B. Reid, 2015).
Best regards,
Mario E. Sigismondi
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Normally, the lithosphere thickness is thicker in craton than tectonic areas. But in subduction zones, the lithosphere thickness of overriding plate is inaccurate and rough. I did not find any papers or publications that give a relative accurate vales for this thickness. Who can give me a link or paper regarding that?
As I know, the surface wave (love, Rayleigh wave)can reach the deep part (over 100km) of Earth and reflect some information by seismic technology ( maybe tomography earthquake seismology). The classical model of subduction zone is that the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary of overriding plate should be over the position of primary melt in subduction zone, should it be? Or it is possible that this boundary is below the position, where the primary melt happen. In other words, the primary magma could be in the lithosphere of the subducted plate?
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Dear László and colleagues:
It is not an easy answer your doubt, even more: it is my doubt too. Keep in mind that certain of plate boundaries are not defined so simple than others by earthquakes, such as the South America – Nazca – Antarctica example that I made to Jeffrey´s original question.
To try to answer the László´s question, "What is the Lithosphere thickness in ‘subduction zones’ of Mediterranean?" I researched using satellite data from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) and I got an estimate of the Crust – Upper Mantle boundary. Also, I use the earthquakes database from the USGS to map the main earthquakes between the period 1919 – 2019.
Please, allow me to share with you and colleagues four images of the results obtained, in the PDF file attached in this answer: 1- gravity anomaly; 2- Moho depth; 3- earthquake depth and 4- earthquake magnitude.
If you have a specific database of Europe region in mind it might be worth looking up these data. It’s also worth noting that I will help you to understand better your question. This means your focus should be on getting quality gravity and, also, magnetic data, I will do my best job.
Best regards
Mario E. Sigismondi
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What is the conceptual difference between Geological Map and Stratigraphic Map?
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The geological map shows the distribution of the formations and their contact ( different kinds of rocks and faults).
There are three major types of maps they use: topographic, cross-sectional, and structural.
A structural map shows the geologic features of an area. Its appearance is similar to that of a topographic map, but a topographic map displays elevations of the Earth's surface and a structure map displays the elevation of a particular rock layer, generally beneath the surface. a geologic map shows the distribution of geologic features, including different kinds of rocks and faults.Rock units or geologic strata are shown by color or symbols to indicate where they are exposed at the surface. Isopach maps detail the variations in thickness of stratigraphic units.
A cross-sectional map shows the cross-section from the side.
So you can't talk about stratigraphic maps, but rather structural maps at different stratigraphic levels,
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Deleted research item The research item mentioned here has been deleted
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I am the head project and there is not any map for the area by the Egyptian geological Survey, I have been collected the samples only without any person. I only made a geological map for area. I will no give any other, I have got fake paper and PH.D.
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Exploration of Salar brines (containing high concentrations of dissolved salts like Lithium, Potassium, Magnesium, etc) found below the surface of dried lake-beds (Playas) is generally carried out through surface geological mapping, geophysical surveys and brine sampling through drilling.
Whether characteristic biota - both living & fossils - can be an added exploration tool?
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First of all, they must be able to extract water for their salt water metabolism, that is, filter the salt and harmful elements, and they must also be able to resist UV radiation, which is high in these ecosystems.
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I am looking for the latest geological map of Ethiopia. And, I hope some people may have it at hand. So, please share me if you don't mind! You can message me, if you don't want to share it on public.
Thanks in advance for your cooperation!
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Any one who can share me a book on tropical environment ?
thanks
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The paleostress orientations inferred from the orientations of dikes (see attached figure) indicate that none of the principal stress axes is oriented at neither vertical nor horizontal orientation, rather all of them are oriented at the intermediate orientation between the vertical and horizontal orientations. Hence, the fact violates the Anderson theory of faulting, where one of the principal stress axes must be vertical due to the stress boundary condition at the surface of the earth.
What could be the plausible explanation?
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Anderson's Theory assumes one of the principal stress axes to be vertical as the earth's surface (i.e. air) has no shear stress (like every fluid). Only normal stress is acting. Thus, the theory is only applicable at the earth's surface, not in deeper parts of the crust (where shear stress increases).
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When I build 3D geological modeling, I use 2D (3D) geology-geophysic forward modeling profiles (constrained by prior geological information such as geological mapping and drill hole), because those profiles have clear geological significance. Although I can calculate 3D inversion constrained by 3D forward modeling (by using UBC and Modelwision software) there is still difference between 3D geophysical inversion 2D profiles) and 3D forward modeling (2D profiles). How to deal with this difference between geophysical inversion and forwarding in my modeling and prospecting.
What's the advantages and disadvantages of geophysical forwarding modeling and inversion in 3D geological modeling and prospecting?
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Forward modelling is well suited to iterative modelling and testing of geological concepts. You learn a lot about the sensitivity of different free parameters. For complex models, inversion is your assistant to reduce the time it takes to get the best solution for a given set of free parameters.
I work on the principle that the smallest number of free parameters that will satisfy the data and your constraints is the best point to stop.
If your match is still not good, then you need to explore the underlying geological assumptions and constraints such as those suggested by Leon. This is a general response to a broad range of geological problems that needs to refined for specific geological styles. For example, mineral exploration models and seismic section work flows are very different.
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There is a project plan to provide a 130m deep well in this area but I am concerned about the transmissivity of the underlying granite. I have no info on the condition of the rock, or any aquifer it contains, potential yield etc. Any evidence as to likely success in this formation would be welcome.
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To All who provided answers and insight to my question above: thank you. Your suggestions are entirely sensible and valid, and clearly come from good knowledge of relevant disciplines, and from experience. I apologise for my delay in replying. Our concern at the time was the seemingly random recommendations and 'geophysical survey' results we had received. But then we discovered a company who had previously drilled several boreholes in the area without success. Even though I suspect they did not use any advanced techniques to identify the locations, this did not bode well for our project, which had enough for a single drilling effort only. But the village in question does have access to a surface waterhole in a shallow ground depression, so I think this was the most obvious way to address their water security needs - even though it needs treatment. Many thanks again - I just thought I would give you feedback on how it turned out. Kind regards.
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Kindly, could any one let me know how to fix the value of concavity index (-0.4) when use TecDEM software. fixing this value is very important to extract the steepness index which could be depend on in the evaluation of tectonics?
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Dear Nisarg,
Although I've never used TecDEM, I've calculated the steepness index manually by extracting area and slope data using ArcGIS. I wrote the entire technique in my recent paper, published in Arabian J Geosciences.
In case, if you want to compare steepness index of many streams, you've to normalize the steepness values using a reference concavity. To easily compute the normalized steepness index you may follow the stream profiler tool and the MATLAB codes developed by Kelin Whipple and his team.
Cheers.
Sumit
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This is more an update, not really a question. But did you know that Harris et al. (2014), doi:10.1016/j.margeo.2014.01.011) have done a great job with making a worldwide map of marine geomorphology? The map may be downloaded (as zipped shape files) from http://www.bluehabitats.org/
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Wow, many thanks ! Indeed a piece of sweet cake for my project (Mariana Trench, Pacific Ocean).
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This is for a current research project.
Thanks
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Avijit:
Have a look at this map:
Best
Syed
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Hello Respected researchers.
I am looking forward to you about coal body modeling in Surpac software. I have less amount of boreholes at one side of body with geological map of that area. I don’t have any geophysical data of that area. Is there any possible way to build a model with comparing the borehole data with cross sections.
Thanks
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How to interpret the TRe model age of mantle peridotite if it was proved to be highly metasomatised by the S saturated magmas? 
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How may I use the Research Gate platform to communicate with the person known as Sameera Lasantha? Sameera has requested a "full text" felated to my masters thesis geologic map of Mineral Hill District in Idaho. A printed message stated that I can only communicate with researchers whom I follow.
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Thanks James Varghese,
I eventually got a coouple sentences out to Sameera, and presently attempting to send a partial text to him and another person, soon.
Jeff Spence
7/5/18
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How to conduct and compile relationship of satellite data and geophysical data for minerals exploration and which geophysical survey data is most suitable for minerals or geological mapping with remote sensing data?
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Please have a look at enclosed PDF...
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To perform the planned project, you have to know the exposures of the Oligocene rocks in Duhok. Since the already existing geological maps show no Oligocene rocks as outcrops, and to study the Oligocene rocks, as planned, then how you will sample the rocks to study them?
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According to Buday's (1980) Oligocene Facies Distribution Map(Page 289 in the Regional Geology of Iraq Volume 1), the Oligocene rocks either eroded or not deposited in Duhok area.
Please see the attached map.
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I am working on a project to develop a regional "Electronic Geotechnical data base? I have done Boring in mesh grid pattern. Grid size is 20 km 20 km. Now to interpolate , Engineering Soil Classification within the grid i need to define certain parameters which can be obtained without any physical work as no budget is available for it. any GIS based Solution , Remote sensing technique , geological map of the area is available.
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I am not sure, what type of subsurface data you want to correlate with remote sensing techniques. However there are various proxies that can be used to correlate elevation, terrain classes, geology to the surface information. But these are not global correlation, for example, you have to first see if any such correlation is available for local conditions, then you may use , but in absence of that, you have to develop correlation for DEM, elevation, geology with subsurface data (for few sample measurements), then you may apply that correlation to overall local ground.
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It is an effort to prepare a geotechnical map of an area...just like we have geological maps for different areas
what should be the technique to convert point data to make a surface
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I did not say that they would all be placed the same!!!!! The idea is to gauge how much lithological change occurs within a determined distance and then base your grid on that.
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I am mainly concern about how to know the formation and the depth of each formation for a non geologist?
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The above answers involve trigonometry. To show a non-geologist, try drawing a cross-section. To do that you need topographic contours and a bedding dip reading. It is not rocket science, nor does it require mathematics. In some areas you could assume that the topography is flat (or approximately flat).
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I am looking for the geological map (any scale) of northern Libya to establish the continuity of the mesozoic outcrops of southern Tunisia; detail paper or description if possible.
Thank you
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I think I have some maps around Khaleej Sirte
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Links or any other method
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Thanks Meryem.
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ArcGis 10.2, 10.3 etc. I will be very thankful if someone send it to me.
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I am seraching for different maps for Uttarakhand area.
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I think these maps will be available from the GSI. YOU CAN COPY THE MAPS AND THEN SUPERIMPOSE THE uttrakhand boundaries. Soil.maps avaible from Soil Department.
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I have data sets of the strike of multiple joints. Additionally, I have the data set for the dip of the joint plane. I would like to know about the plotting of this data on a geological map. Each location has two to three sets or joints (or even more). The density of the location is also very high (I have lots of location and its data). Can anyone share some literature where this kind of data is shown and interpreted?
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You can plot your data on stereonets and rose-diagrams for each location or any other way that fits your purpose. You can use any of the many programs that you can find online (some have already been suggested) to create your diagrams. Then you can add the diagrams on your map. Alternatively or additionally you can use the appropriate geological symbol and plot your structures (or the average orientation) on your map directly. See this for an example: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/322438484_Contribution_of_geological_mapping_in_road_construction_an_example_from_Veria_Kozani_national_road_Kastania_area
The interpretation of your data is a more complex task and it depends on the purpose of your investigation, the knowledge of the regional geology, the quality of your data etc.
Regards
George
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In remote sensing, the RTM method seems to have some advantages in geological mapping, where can I get Rotation-Variant Template Matching algorithm for ENVI? Thank you for your help.
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I don't have much knowledge about that algorithm but it mainly works for the edge or boundary detection in the mineralized region.
through this you get some help but it is not done by using ENVI software.
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We have been seeing many countries still don't have good resolution geological maps of their territory. In such situation remote sensing is an alternative for independent researchers. Understanding of Photogeology is the most for this.
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1. Revision of the scale of last North American glaciation Part 1. Southern Rocky Mountains
2. The origin of lakes and sandy deserts of mountains during the melting of glaciers –Taklamakan and Gobi deserts (EN)
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I’m a specialist of vertebrate tracks. During a long stay at Kinshasa, I discovered a number of tracks of early mammals, on slabs of purple sandstone. The tracks are of bad quality; however, they are interesting: they would be the first vertebrate tracks in Congo, and they are very similar to Brasilichnium elusivum and similar tracks, from Botucatu Formation and Caiuá Group, LK, in Brazil. Those sandstones are very common at Kinshasa, also on the sidewalks. They came from natural outcrops and quarries inside W outskirts of the town of Kinshasa, on the banks of Congo river, in the quarters of Kinsuka, Mbudi, Pompage. I could not find in situ or in internet any detailed Geological map of the Phanerozoic of Congo and of Kinshasa. To publish these tracks, I need the name and if possible the dating of this formation. Can any colleague help me? Thank you. Giuseppe Leonardi
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Dear Dr. Leonardi,
even if you could only provide us with a limited insight into the surface phenonmena of these sandstones I would discard the idea of being biogenic in origin and I would rather attribute this kind of sandstone structures to what might be called sensu lato as parting (lineation). It is not uncommon at outcrop and when used as glading it shows this man-made way of exfoliation. You might find these structures in some otherwise monotonous arenaceous series such as those created by turbidite currents.
With kind regards
H.G.Dill
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Dear all,
I'm trying to obtain topographic maps of the island of Naxos in Greece. Our aim is to conduct an undergraduate course in geological mapping at the scale of 1:10,000. Ideally we would need maps at the scale of 1:25,000 as a base map, such as issued by the official cartographic survey.
I'd be very grateful for any weblinks or contact addresses.
Thank you all in advance,
Kamil Ustaszewski, University Jena
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u may try downloading from following link:
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Some author proposed that there are two enriched reservoirs, with mantelic characteristics, in the continental crust. However it is not clear if these storage influence the surronding source rocks from lower crust.
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I believe that EM-I end-member is strongly influenced by the recycling of ancient lower continental crust. On the other hand, EM-II end-member is more likely associated to recycling of subducted sediments.
See attached some articles of mine dealing with this argument.
Cheers,
michele
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Provide me information for obtaining Geological, Soil, Geo-morphological, Lineament map for Latur district, Maharashtra, India.
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Get District Resource Map (DRM) of Latur District from Geological Survey of India office Nagpur. The main map is in 1:250K scale. Can also Check GSI Portal for online purchase of  DRM.
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The info required for zone 5 and building is in Himachal Pradesh.
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friction
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Dear all,
Does anyone help me to get this paper "Accuracy of displacement monitoring at large dams with GPS" ?  Nuno Lima, J. Casaca, M.J. Henriques. Geodetic Deformation monitoring: From Geophysical to Engineering Roles, Volume 131, pp 239-243.
Many thank in advance!
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GPS isn’t good technique for geodetic monitoring of structures, like dams or bridges due GPS low accuracy, shadow zones or dead areas in the satellite observation of structures.
I don't prefer to use such technology for this aim unless we improve the GPS accuracy.
Please check the attached files.
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I am very interested in geothermal energy investigations in Jamaica. Mainly with reservoir characterization, simulations etc.
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Very interesting topic
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I'm looking for a simple and reliable rockfall model for rockfall zonation mapping for a mountainous  area.
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Here you can find several tools to assess rockfall hazard: http://www.ecorisq.org/ecorisq-tools. For an accurate mapping it is better to use Rockyfor3D but it demands some field works.
As said before you can also use RAAMS.
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I am trying to get information about locations, in order to create a map, of massif type anorthosites and charnockites that have been studied so far. I want it to be the part of my master thesis introduction chapter. Thanks.
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Tomasz,
Two references that would be useful are those of Lew Ashwal (1993 and 2010) on anorthosites generally. The AMCG complexes are mostly of the Proterozoic massif-type variety of anorthosites, I believe.
Ashwal L R, 1993, Anorthosites. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Germany.
Ashwal L R, 2010, Canadian Mineralogist V48, P711-48. DOI: 10.3749/canmin.48.4.711
The book would have maps and locations, the later article on temporality of anorthosites has an updated list of massif-type anorthosites with all the major occurrences and their broad locality (country/region/state).
Dave
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I am presently working on the evolution of a part of the basement complex rocks in Nigeria. The area is marked by shear zones. My field visits have shown that the shear zones cut across granitic gneisses, pegmatite (extensive and comprises mainly feldspar) and some mica schist. A part of my objectives is to determine the strain (quantitatively) by way of field and laboratory analysis. I need guide and may be peer-reviewed papers that have addressed such case(s). Thank you.
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Dear Mr. Adeoti,
I am currently studying basement rocks rife with pegmatites and aplites. I would like to re-direct your thoughts to the classical field work combined with a meticulous analysis  of your planar and linear architectural elements using the stereographic projections (stereonet diagrams) for interpretation. Before making use of a lot of papers and trying to find everything there in your study area too, I recommend some good textbooks on structural geology for field and laboratory work, unless you are a trained structural geologist.
A wealth of  information how to come to tackle this kinematic issues is published in the books of Van der Pluijm & Marshak (2004), Fossen (2010),  Lisle et al. (2011) and Davis (2013).
Good luck
Harald G. Dill
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it is requested to send me the papers entitle" Primary Production Characteristics of a Himalayan Lake in Kashmir
Authors
Dr. Ashwani Wanganeo" 
also "Comparative limnology of nine lakes of Jammu and Kashmir Himalayas"
please send me thses papers
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thank you sir
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May i please know what does the term Quaternary signify in 'Quaternary Deposits' i would also like to know if it has similar meaning in case of 'Quaternary Landslides'.
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The history of the term "Quaternary" is well explained above by Mr. Dill. So in an old way of earth creation classification, Quaternary was the fourth phase, and maybe the etymology is from Italian language "Quarto".
Arduino was firs to use it, when studying the geological cross section of north Italia observed four kind of rocks, which began from ultramaffic rocks (primary) to recent unconsolidated depositions (fourth or quarto).
The acceptance of this concept was very difficult, but at the end the Quaternary is the only therm survived by the fourth class classification.
Today is accepted than Quaternary begin 2.6 million years before now, and is subdivided into Pleistocene -2.6Ma to 11.7 ka, and Holocene from 11.7Ka until present.
The main characteristic is the appearance of Homo Sapiens during this geological Period and the glacial inter-glacial oscillation during Pleistocene (four significant).
Quaternary deposition are deposition that belong to this period, younger of which belong to Holocene. Quaternary landslides is a therm that I encounter for the first time, but I believe they are actual and active landslides and that this must be the correct terminology. I don't believe a landslide can be collected with an entire geological period, as we can do it with tectonic activity.
But it must be in the concrete framework. if they are some landslides, created by sea level rise during the Holocene transgression, you can use a term like Holocene landslides, but the correctness of this term is to be evaluated.
 
 
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Dear all, 
Currently, I am working on seismic-microzonation by integration of PGA, Vs30, amplification factor, predominant frequency, geomorphology, lithology and Liquefaction potential index.
I have to give AHP weights for all of the above mentioned layers, could you please suggest me, what is the criteria I have to follow in this case.
Any suggestion from experts.
Thanks for your attention. 
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 This reference may be of interest for you: Iwasaki T.,Tokida K.,TatsuokaF., Watanabe S., Yasuda S., Sato H. (1982)Microzonation for soil liquefaction potential using simplified methods. In: Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on microzonation, Seattle 3: 1310–1330.
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about Tethys Sea
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Are you referring to northern border of the Indian plate, or the present day political border of India? The latter is not easy to answer very simply. As you know, India is a large country and its geology shows considerable change from Assam to Kashmir. There are juxtaposed fold-thrust belts, suture zones, HP-UHP rocks, island arcs, Asiatic (formerly Gondwanic) blocks and of course the Siwaliks. 
You might like to contact Wadia Institute of Himalayan Gelogy, Dehradun, India, and Dept of Earth Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee, India. Their e-mails should e available on the internet.
Best, Qasim
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Hello!
I need a global (or for Brazil) map of soil surface porosity. Could someone tell me where I can download it? I need the map so that I can work with it with some GIS to extract specific coordinate data.
I downloaded the 'GLHYMPS' from http://crustalpermeability.weebly.com/glhymps.html, but I found it a bit strange because the porosity of the soil for a whole state is only 0.01%.
If someone could help me by indicating some place to download, I will be very grateful.
Good week to everyone!
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Here are some links to refer , please:
LDAS | Land Data Assimilation Systems - GLDAS Soils
Mar 16, 2017 · The basic soils information used in GLDAS was derived from the global soils ... on the FAO Soil Map of the World linked to a ... Soil Porosity.
A glimpse beneath earth's surface: GLobal HYdrogeology MaPS ...
Official Full-Text Paper (PDF): A glimpse beneath earth's surface: GLobal HYdrogeology MaPS (GLHYMPS) of permeability and porosity
SOIL STRUCTURE, DENSITY AND POROSITY
SOIL STRUCTURE, DENSITY AND POROSITY Ifthe mixture ofsand, siltand clay ... soil and increasing the porosity of the soil, particularly the macro porosity..
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Dear all, 
I have a gravity anomaly map, Bouguer and terrain corrected, from which I wish to estimate the crustal thickness. Is there a standard formula with which I could do this? (Given an assumed density for the crust). Anomaly is in mgal. 
Thanks in advance!
Robin
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Dear Robin …….we applied many equations to estimate the Crustal thickness of the Earth in Iraq using Bouguer gravity values. These equations and our obtained equation were summarized in table one in our paper entitled "Crustal thickness map of Iraq deduced from gravity data", that published at 1994.....some of these equations are  T(km)= 33- 0.055 g(mgal) (Worzel and Shurbet 1955), T(km)= 32- 0.08g (mgal)(Woollard 1959)  . A Crustal modeling that depends upon Seismological data was used to constrain the gravity models. We hope you will success to achieve your study…good luck. Prof. Ahmed S. Al-Banna
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I am working on GoogleTM Earth images.The geometry of dykes makes difficult to count the number accurately. Interested to prepare the rose diagram.
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Simply save the GoogleTM Earth images as KMZ. Then import them to Global mapper.
 Then export them to shape file to Arc Gis. 
 Run Geometric calculate. you will find satisfy answer. 
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I need a global geological basement map (top of a basement). Preferably in GIS format.
Does anyone know the source of this data?
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I was about to say USGS  portal but James Varghese has already mentioned that. 
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Are you interested hydrogeological responce to the earthquakes (Toxoku, Nepal) in the other geological structures (for example Moscow syneclise)?
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yes, sure.
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I am working for Proterozoic Carbonate reservoir, where primary porosity is nil/or very low (~0-7%), gas reserves are in fractures. We want to estimate amount of gas reserve .
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I suggest the following procedure, based on my long experience with naturally fractured carbonates.
- establish matrix properties (if the irreducible water saturation is not too high, you can have movable gas in the largest pores of the matrix; also, vuggy porosity is sometimes  distributed in the matrix, and can be important even if the number is small, because of the typical low irreducible water saturation in large vugs, and the recovery can be high if the vugs are connected to the natural fracture network; the Net/Gross Ratio can be an important factor).
- establish the properties of the natural fracture network (you can use FMI log and core calibration of the FMI, plus a Discrete Fracture Network simulation built from the FMI results; all the rock is more or less fractured, so that the Net/Gross ratio for  fractures is 1; irreducible water saturation in the natural fracture network is going to be very small to insignificant; fracture porosity is usually very low say 0.5% to 1% as a reservoir-wide average , but the single "pores" are tens of meter long; storativity in the fracture system is very important and the fractures are extremely permeable, say tens to hundreds of Darcies, i.e. 10,000 to 100,000 mD and more; look out for leaching, because leaching enlarges fractures and results in considerable fracture porosity (0.7% to 1.1% and enhances greately the fracture permeability);
- consider that the gas recovery factor of matrix is going to be less than the gas recovery factor of the natural fracture network (both can be rather high, say 70% from the matrix and 80-90% from the fractures);
- total recoverable gas reserves are going to be the sum of matrix gas plus fracture gas.
I can help if you need.
Roberto
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The importance of the River Nile cannot be underscored enough. The Nile, which is 6,853 km (4,258 miles) long, is an “international” river as its drainage basin covers eleven countries, namely, Tanzania, Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi, Congo-Kinshasa, Kenya, Ethiopia, Eritrea, South Sudan, Sudan and Egypt. In particular, the Nile is the primary water source of Egypt and Sudan. It flows from Lake Victoria to the Mediterranean, and covers an area of at least 3,349,000 square Kilometers.
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It is possible to start by helping to spread awareness concerning the importance of the preservation of the quality of this river's environment for the benefits of the region in Africa and also the world. Scientests can use the popular information platforms and media to help enhancing the general awareness of the public and decision makers.
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Dear colleagues, 
I am interested in any reference for aridisol (desert soils) properties such as SPT values for the Semnan province in Iran.
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I want to determine the sediment rate of N and P in water volume for small reservoirs covering less than 3 ha.  The referenced documents  are old , and i can not download them. Who can give me some good suggestions? Thanks
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Dear Zhou:
looj to this link you may find some thing and good luck:
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I need as much information about wells from the PA region in order to complete comparative simulations using GSM-Gem. I am looking for maps, topographics, dimensions, well depth, ext. Any information for Hydraulic fracking of the Marcellus. 
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Thank you!
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Hello
For estimation of local recoverable reserves in open pit mines which one of “drill holes spacing” or “blasting patterns dimensions” for panel size and SMU size” or “ blasting pattern dimensions” or “blasting holes spacing” for SMU size could be suitable selections?
Thank You
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Drill hole spacing for panel size and SMU size may be a good option.
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I was wondering if reconstructing paleo depths of a subduction zone (with P-T-t path) would be possible to understand what was the original dip of that subduction zone and in which direction it went roll-back. 
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I think it could, but the depth is so much, I do not know if any kind of equipment could reach it.
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The area in question is underlain by a thick sequence of dark/black shales. However, lead/zinc deposits in the area are most located in faults/fractures within this thick layer of shale.However, most of the fractures especially with certain trends are barren> This scenario most often makes it slightly problematic to locate the minerals using geophysical methods especially electrical resistivity methods because of the masking effect of the shaly horizon.Can the mineralization in this scenario be detected directly using the Forward Gauss VR8000 detector? Are there specific/typical range of resistivity/magnetic/gravity values that can be used for the lead/zinc in this case?
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Dear Dr. Opara,
the element association  is not the crucial issue alone. It is its presence either as non-sulfidic or sulfidic ore, the structural features/textures of the ore you expect and the geophysical constrast  between ore, wall and country rocks. It may be a pure fissure vein or a vein-like dissimination. The contrasts may sharp or there may be a gradual transition and last but not least the thickness of the ore body counts. Given sulfides play a significant part, SP is a technique of choice. In general, electro-magnetic and electrical methods are the most promising ones to be successful in delineating an ore body.
I wish you much success.
H.G.Dill