Science topic

Freshwater Biology - Science topic

The study of life and ECOLOGIC SYSTEMS in bodies of FRESHWATER.
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I want to learn as a species.
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I agree that Synedra is a likely ID but you may also want to consider Pinnularia. They are both pennate diatoms with a raphe and similar morphology. There are some slight differences in the shape particularly in the terminal morphology. When you encounter this taxa again carefully read the descriptions to tease out which genus you in fact have. A very good guide book to use is
Identifying Marine Phytoplankton Editor: Carmelo Tomas https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-693018-4.X5000-9
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This hydrophyte was collected from a fresh water reservoir near Visakhapatam, India.
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Thank you Dr Aref Wazwaz for your kind input
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Hello Everyone,
The past few years have seen a lot of new cyanobacterial taxa being described using a polyphasic approach. It will be interesting to know that what are the various good things about using this approach and importantly, are there some particular taxonomic groups/clusters that are still unresolved where the polyphasic approach is still to give any proper answer?
What further developments do we anticipate in the coming years? What are the new techniques/methods that can be further incorporated for a better understanding of cyanobacterial taxonomy?
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Although it is not my specialty, I advise you to read the following paper:
A polyphasic approach for the taxonomy of cyanobacteria: principles and applications, by Jiří Komárek (2016).
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Are there particular impacts on aquaculture?
Also, how does the increase in zooplankton abundance correlate with fish population? Is it also somehow related to the effects of eutrophication?
Will highly appreciate your response on this matter. Thank you so much and have a great day!
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Hi Kathleen,
With a high population density of plankton-eating fish, ie with an unbalanced fish stock, large species of zooplankton, especially daphnia (Daphnia magna, D. pulicaria), disappear, we take them here as a component above 0.7 mm, which have the greatest predation pressure on autotrophic organisms. Instead, a small zooplankton (D. galeata, D. longispina, etc. and the genus Bosmina) may multiply, the predation pressure of which is limited by size. On the other hand, even with the presence of large daphnias and at the same time sufficient nutrients, especially phosphorus, those species of autotrophs that are unable to filter out can and often do occur. These are algae and cyanobacteria that form colonies, cenobia or fibers, but do not form vegetation turbidity. Therefore, even after the revitalization of stagnant waters, when the supply of nutrients from the basin is not solved - fish, wintering, siltation, cyanobacteria can develop into water flowers, so the top-down effect may not work. With increasing predation pressure of fish, the share of other groups, mostly small, zooplankton - copepoda, rotatoria - also increases. However, the main cause of eutrophication is the excessive supply of nutrients, especially phosphorus, inland waters. In general, however, it is a complex problem.
Today, 15.12., Temperature 3 ° C, I found the evident development of cyanobacteria in the highly eutrophic waters used as fishing grounds, while the water looks clean and transparent with good transparency.
Emil
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The specimen originates from lake water in Sweden.
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Desmidiales - Euastrum sp
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How do you do to design an assay with primers and probes that function well and what program/platform do you use?
I'm using AlleleID now but I wanna try any other ways to design it.
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How can I optimeze a protocol like this? Shen-An Hwang
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I am currently planning to work on the Study of breeding biology of Glossogobius guris (Freshwater Goby) in particular reservoir (Rajdhala Beel, NetraKona) in Bangladesh for my MS thesis. I am interested to know how this study of breeding biology of Freshwater Goby in this reservoir can have socio-economic contribution. I will determine the GSI, Fecundity and Gonadal Histology, sex ratios, etc. of the particular population from the samples . Some past studies demonstrated that this species has good abundance in the reservoir. But no one worked on the breeding biology of this species in this area. How I can explain the socio-economic contributions of this study? I have already made some points of myself but additionally I need some strong points from the experts to make the objectives of the study more acceptable and more convenient in terms of benefit of people and the fisheries sector. Thanks in advanced for any kind of response anyone might provide.
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Any new observation may make species management more convenient.
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I'm thinking of purchasing one and am interested to hear others experiences, especially problems they may have encountered.
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Hi Scott et al.,
We have had generally okay results with a benthotorch but only after we learned to be pretty constrained in how we apply it. One major issue that we found is that the benthotorch underestimates standing stocks on rocks that are taken from full sun. My grad student wrote a paper about this (A cautionary tale for in situ fluorometric measurement of stream chlorophyll a: Influences of light and periphyton biomass in Freshwater Science last year) in which they found that you needed to have the rocks held out of the stream for 15 to 30 minutes before you get reliable numbers. The company was pretty unpleasant to work with when we brought up this issue with them. There are also potential issues with self-shading when standing stocks are high such that you get underestimates of the Chl a. We have found that it works well on tiles and on NDS glass frits and that is where we use it most. As long as you pull your rocks out of the stream and cover them for a bit or if you do your sampling in shaded streams or early in the day before the streams have had full sun on them, they work okay for natural substrates. Overall, we found that being able to take a high number of replicates makes it a useful tool for comparison within and among sites/treatments and it's probably worth getting for that. But, it is not as good if you are relying on it for a highly accurate measure of Chl a.
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Do you have any idea for to do research on this species? Maybe unexplored yet or needs more further study? Thank you so much ♥️
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Aaron Baxter has published on diamondback terrapins in estuaries of Texas :
google his names and terrapins for several pdf reports of his studies. Best, PZimba
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My name is Hairul from Selangor, Malaysia, 36 years old, 175cm, 66kg. I am looking for an opportunity to further study in PhD level. Any body here looking for a PhD student in research field such as wildlife management, conservation biology or life sciences. So far my expertise on breeding assessment, exitu management, terrapins/turtles, ecology and conservation.
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apply in wwf
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I'm very interested to obtain information about current state and further development of freshwater aquaculture (trends, topics, main problems, etc.). I will be very thankful for any ideas concerning this topic.
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Minimal water use aqua-systems, multi-trophic aquaculture, climate smart aquaculture, biofloc, feed preparation with local ingredients (insect meal), brood stock feed, genetics in aquaculture, waste reduction, biosecured aquaculture, live feed production, aquatic ornamental plant production etc- are currently given much importance in India.
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Can anybody help me with this freshwater snail? It was collected on 25.ix.2018 in a Ditch at Papenveer, The Netherlands by Nick Kroese (lat 52.186 lon 4.722) In The Netherlands we only have Physella acuta (=heterostropha) but this one is untypical. There is a garden centre nearby, so maybe a non-indigenous one? Any suggestions? It is photographed on frogbit Hydrocharis morsus-ranae.
Many thanks in advance
Ton van Haaren
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Ok!
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I have a long term dataset which includes a variety of chemical and physical water variables sampled from an inland river. These variables include: metal loads (Al, Ca, Cd, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mg, Mn, Na, K, Pb, Ni, Zn); in Situ measurements (Electrical conductivity [EC], water temperature, air temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH); water nutrients (Ammonium, Chloride, Nitrate, Phosphate, Sulphate, Total Organic Carbon [TOC], Dissolved Organic Carbon [DOC]); and others (Acid capacity, base capacity). Some of these variables (e.g. chloride, EC, ammonium, nitrate, dissolved oxygen, phosphate, pH, sulphate, TOC and water temperature) were sampled consistently and therefore have a good resolution, whereas others (e.g. metal loads [Al, Cu, Fe, Hg, Pb, Ni, Zn], acid capacity and base capacity) were sampled less frequently and therefore do not have the same data resolution.
With that said, the focus of my research is not exactly the chemical interactions of DOC and other chemical constituents per se, but rather the interaction and effect of DOC on freshwater macroinvertebrate taxa. I do, however, understand that the interaction of DOC with other water chemical properties is of vital importance and ones needs to consider these interactions.
Therefore, I would like to know what variables (from the lists mentioned above) are the most likely to interact with DOC within the freshwater environment. This will aid in my selection of the relevant variables that I will carry into further statistical analyses.
Any help in this regard would be greatly appreciated.
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Hi Nathan, we have high DOC and highly colored waters here in Maine. DOC is both an acid and contributes to alkalinity. We tend to have alkalinity even below pH 5 where the carbonate system is exhausted. DOC makes are streams and lakes more acidic for a given alkalinity, but DOC also supplies acid neutralizing capacity when pH is below 5. DOC is negatively charged and attracts and binds cations. This make heavy metals and Aluminum less toxic. Because lakes are solar collectors and because DOC is digested by UV light, there is a lot of clearing of water color in lakes. Maine streams are often tea or even coffee colored while lakes can be crystal clear. This digestion process releases Al, Fe and phosporus, generates alkalinity (or was it acidity? any chemists out there?), and precipitates TP as aluminum and iron compounds. Ferrous iron binds P, but will release it during reducing conditions (such as low oxygen conditions in the winter). Aluminum does not do that and is a permanent loss of TP in the bottom of the lake. Fish and macroinvertebrates benefit from DOC when soils are acidic and Al is mobilized. Ionic Al is bound by the DOC and particulate (POC) forms. Episodic pH drops can release Al and put in back into the toxic form and can lead to fish kills. Macroinvertebrates may also be killed and will drift downstream. So for the most part DOC is natural, important, and helpful for wildlife. Climate change probably increases the decomposition of organic matter in soils, leading to more DOC export from watersheds.
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I'm currently working on freshwater soil nematodes for my undergraduate thesis.
After sieving the soil to obtain nematodes, I've been having a hard time fishing them from the water/supernatant so that I can examine them on the compound microscope for identification. I have tried using a single "thread" of copper wire I got from our sound systems at home, but it seems too thick to fish out any nematodes. I've also tried using a micropipette, but it's very difficult to handle. Is there anything else you could suggest I use to fish these nematodes out from the water? Or is my method itself wrong?
Thank you so much!
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First remove the excess water with the help of a fine-tipped dropper or simply a disposable syringe with the smallest possible needle. I usually use insulin syringes. Then, with the help of a nematode fishing (also called picking) needle you can bring the nematode near the surface of water and then give a quick jerk just to break the surface tension of the water. While doing the above-mentioned process you should keep focusing on the nematode.
The picking needle can be prepared by using an empty ballpoint pen refill. Take a piece (nearly 1 inch) of hair (horse tail) and fix on the pointed tip of the refill with the help of glue or nail polish. Now cut the extreme tip of the hair obliquely so that you get a finely pointed tip.
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The lake is c.6.3 hectares and <1m deep. The lake has slightly elevated TP and TN concentrations and there is a concern that removing the invasive water soldier could cause a phase shift from a clear macrophyte dominated state to one that is turbid and phytoplankton dominated. Any comments or experiences about how to approach the issue are welcome. Also how realistic is it to fully remove water soldier so that it does not return?
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It has been a while, but I thought I would provide an update about management actions undertaken to help control the water soldier situation on the lake of concern. A phased removal of the water soldier using Truxor machines began in October 2016 and happened again in September 2017. In September 2017 a boom was also inserted to prevent its spread back in to the removed area. It was our intention to have the boom in from the start of the first removal phase, but limited funds unfortunately prevented this. In total c.20-25% of WS has been removed. Monthly monitoring has been taking place to inform chemical and biological responses, with the boom allowing differences to be observed between open water areas versus those dominated by WS. It would also allow us to observe whether any desirable submerged macrophyte species, which used to dominate / be present, will re-establish. We will continue to monitor the situation and assess the changes in the lake prior to deciding whether further WS should be removed again later this year. I have attached some photos showing the inserted boom (0991 & 0992 are September 2017 and 1019 October 2017). The red buoys are some of the monitoring points.
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Dear all,
I have a dataset of fish collected in different rivers over different years each of them sampled a different number of times during different projects . This different number of observations among rivers in some cases can be important: e.g.
River X = 1 project (1 observation=1 sampling x 1 year);
River Y = 5 projects (15 observations= 1 sampling x 3 years x 5 projects);
River Z= 15 projects (105 observations=1 sampling x 7 years x 15 projects);
I want to calculate in the all region (so not interested in specific rivers) how the abundance is related to Years, Latitude, Altitude and Anthopic pressures (APindex). I thought to use the following model:
lme: Abu~Years+Latitude+Altitude+APindex + (1|river/project) + corrARMA (form = time|River/project).
-What is the influence of RiverZ with its 105 observation compared to the other rivers which have less number of observations?
-Am I accounting for this unbalanced observations in the random structure (1|river/project)?
-Do I have to account in the model for the different number of observations with (weight=1/n observation for each project?)
Thank you
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Pure ANOVA is not good for an unbalanced study, but GLM (regression) is okay. Or the Brown-Forsyth test for skewed data. See: Analysis of Unbalanced Data by Mixed Linear Models using the mixed Procedure of the SAS System, DOI: 10.1111/j.1439-037X.2004.00120.x
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Need help identifying this filamentous algae
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Dear Kim,
I am sorry, but identification with these photographs are not possible. I do not thik this is Mougeotia, which belong to the Zygnematophyceae. The Form of cells look unusual with redard to cell lenght and with and even with fixed material you normally will be able to regcognize the plate-like shape of the chloroplast and the pyrenoids on it. Please find a typical picture below.
All the best
Antje
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Dear All,
I am looking for an identification manual that can be downloaded for a project regarding an inventory of freshwater gastropods.. any help is greatly appreciated...
Ferlyn.
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thank you for the information Sara Sayed
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What could be the reason of a massive single-night macroinvertebrate drifting event occurred in an sub-alpine stream after 2 days of a 4 week experiment performed in Mai 2014? Drifting rate of the night before and of the night after was 100 times lower then the one observed during the night of "the event". Moon-light intensitites? Ice melting? Thanks in advance
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dear collegue
According to my experience, seeing the big difference of drift between the previous night and the next, I suspect two events:
- an sudden abnormal water release from some retention structure (dam etc.)
- a spillage of toxic substance during the night
Maybe you can check out these events
cheerio
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I am attempting to grow a strain of Synechocystis, that was originally grown in enriched seawater media, using BG-11 media. They are being grown at 25C on a shaker under about average room lighting (as suggested). The only thing  have changed is the media. I am seeing growth and am able to keep living cultures but they are not as "vibrant" as I was hoping to be able to produce. Is there anything I can try to keep them stable in this media before moving to enriched seawater media?
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You will get some results but definitely not 100%. Freshwater organisms are better adapted to freshwater media. It's like my experiment of feeding catfish larvae with Artemia nauplii cultured with sea water and got 40% larval survival as against 98% with freshwater zooplankton besides the artemia nauplii died within 30 minutes in freshwater medium and consequently became unavailable to the fish larvae but rather constituted pollution to the freshwater. Your result would have been worse if it was freshwater plant being grown on seawater media coz there'll have been much dehydration. 
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Hello,
I am looking for help with a presentation I am doing for my Microbiology class. I am doing a research presentation on tardigrades (aka water bears or moss piglets). As part of this project, I decided to "hunt" for some tardigrades of my own and successfully found some in a Spanish moss sample collected nearby a local lake. In the sample, I noticed several cells that appear to be peritrichous with an "x" shape in what appears to be a nucleus. The tardigrades appeared to gather around these cells and even possibly cling to them. I was wondering if anyone could give me some ideas as to what they could be so I could do some further research and maybe describe a possible relationship between the tardigrades and these cells. For some reference, this was viewed under a compound light microscope with a 40x ocular lens, for a combined magnification power of 400x. These cells appeared to be over double the size of the tardigrades and were stagnant. Any help is greatly appreciated. You can see the "cell" pictured her. It is hard to make out, as there is algae gathered around it. I also keep calling this a cell, but given it's size, I'm not sure if it's single-called, or a multicellular organism. Thank you.
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Thank you so much! I actually already have given my presentation, but was asked to give it again for another class, so this is right on time for my follow-up presentation! Thank you once again.
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A co-worker found this unknow flatworm along a citycanal in Amsterdam. We have no idea what this might be, so any help is welcome. It is probably non-indigenous. It was collected using a pondnet in the canal, but it may prove not to be aquatic after all.
Thanks, Ton
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Hugh Jones identified it as M.adventor
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This organism found in our Freshwater Studies lab and seems to be somewhat arthropods.
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It seems a calanoid copepod, but it is not completely shown in the picture.
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Are there aquatic species? Or are they strictly terrestrial?
I found some winged oribatids in sediment samples in caves. Thank you!
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Thanks Tom!
It has been very useful to me.
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Dear colleagues,
We are pleased to invite you to the 5th meeting of Fresh Blood for Fresh Water. The meeting will be held this April in Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic. The idea is to connect young students (bachelor, master and PhD) and early career scientists from all around the world.
Present your work, exchange ideas, start new projects and collaborations with a glass of beer in a relaxed atmosphere. Details are available on the website:
Abstract submission will be CLOSED on 20th of February! Find all necessary information on how to apply:
Check our key note speakers:
Please send your abstracts and related questions by e-mail:
We look forward to seeing you in April!
Organizing committee of FBFW
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Dear all
The deadline for submitting abstracts to FBFW 2017 is 20th February.
thank you all for your interest!
best
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The pictures below are 400X magnification of lake water sample taking in winter in Quebec, Canada. On the scale, each line is 2 um. The 3 first pictures are different views of the same organism and the 2 pictures fallowing are different views of the same organism.
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Exactly not Tintinnids! No any typical house. But, yeah, I can suppose protist as exist some cavity. Therefore 3 first photos can be protists Rhizopods (Testacea). Some species (mainly from larger Difflugia Genera) living in plankton. Some representatives of Testacea under 20 mkm.  Several representatives can appear in plankton due to gas vacuoles, and in shallow areas from the bottom after storm. Looks like small Centropyxis (can be degenerative form) as existing spines. Third is photo of cavity. Cavity is not of central location (1-st photo). Identification key is attached (in Russian but for today it is the best). 
Andrey
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a testate amoeba belonging to the Euglyphidae. benthic-periphytic.
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Can some one help me identify this species of freshwater
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identification to species level impossible
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Are Atlantic sturgeon known to enter the tributaries of the rivers they use? I imagine these tributaries might be too shallow for spawning, but do juveniles utilize these areas?
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Thank you for these helpful responses.
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While working with fresh water DIATOMS this structure was observed before and after the acid digestion also. As per my knowledge this not Diatom. Can any body identify this thing. 40x and 100x
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Few days back there was a discussion about a photo like this one. Some experts emphasize it would be scale of butterfly. I have had some specimens like this and I am satisfied with these answers!!!
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Can anyone identify this freshwater species please found in a pond on our green roofs please?
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Although not a clear picture, it certainly distinguishes the genus Daphnia.
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My feeling is that the amount of decomposition attributable to shredders is less in lentic habitats, but I don't have much supporting evidence. 
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Researched this awhile ago and came up with almost nothing. Batzer's work is the closest I came. I actually did some pilot work comparing leaf decomposition of the same species in lentic and lotic habitats for the same period of time, same time of the year, etc...turns out litter decomposition in streams and wetlands were about the same...
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When sampling freshwater sediments (with corers and dredges), we will occasionally pull up sediments that are more water than sediments for the very top 5 cm or so.  This top layer is easily poured, thicker than milk but thinner than a good thick milkshake.  In limited experience, this tends to happen in ponds that are isolated from flows and wind.  Since the firmer sediments are now several cm below this layer and, the thin and underlying thicker sediments layers tend to be black and probably low in oxygen, I am wondering what, if anything, could be living here.  Anyone familiar with these sediments? 
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Its name is the sapropel, and organisms inhabited can be named as sapropelebionts. Amongst them exist the very interesting representatives of the free-living ciliates from anaerobionts for which the oxygen is poison! I'm studying long time these creatures, so you can find some papers on my site. As well I recommend perfect articles of Alfred Kahl, J. Finlay & T. Fenchel.
Meanwhile also invertebrates are inhabiting this biotop, but they have differenbt adoptions for the specific surroundings...
As well you should know that in some biotopes like sapropel (it is characteristic especially for some lakes) anaerobic metabolism is much more typical than aerobic...
Andrey
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Please find the attachments of full view and dissected parts of cyclopoida. 
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Thanks for your prompt reply. Paracyclops fimbriatus is found in Indian Waters. I'll contact the mentioned copepod specialist and confirm the species. 
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I have got one diatom for identification for my colleague. but I could find it. please  any one identify it. freshwater form..please help me in this regard..
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Dear Elaya.
It is Terpsinoe musica, a freshwater diatom. In your photograph, the ribs are like musical notes. This species is typical of clean water with high content of carbonates or other minerals.
Regards
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We are experiencing high mortality with our Galaxids die at around the 14th day after hatching. I thought it could be that they are not able to inflate their swim bladder. In the wild they spawn at sea/brackish water and at around week 12 they migrate to freshwater. Does anybody know what sign to look at or if there is another reason. The lab didn't show any pathogen and said most fish had empty guts. I think due to their inability to swim properly made them not able to catch the live food we offer.
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Try brine shrimp
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This organism was found in freshwater lake and was collected by using 20 µm mesh size plankton net. Thank you. 
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hi 
I am sure it's Staurastrum arachne
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Working on the ecology of streams and the effects of land use changes on aquatic biodiversity
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Hi Peter. Because microorganisms as microalgae are easy dispersal, invasive species can reach even pristine places as I have already found Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii, an invasive cyanobacteria in remote areas in Amazonia.
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A microfilaria -like larva was detected by one of my student in a monogenean worm. Have you heard of a similar observation published in this field.? 
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Dear Mohamed,
Look, please, CESTODES OF CESTODES OF PERUVIAN FRESHWATER STINGRAYS, I'm attaching for you. Interesting if larvae can develop and hatch?
I know about the same fact with parasitic Nematode from Amphibians & Reptiles - Spironoura babei Ha Ky, 1971 (Nematoda: Kathlanidae).
SEY O., MORAVEC  F. 1986. An interesting case of hyperparasitism of the nematode Spironoura babei Ha Ky, 1971 (Nematoda: Kathlanidae). Helminthologia-Bratislava 23:173–177.
But I have no PDF of this article.
Andrey
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but it is better ,if i can use universal indices and indices that can be use to south Asian region as well.In addition indices should be included to cover species richness,species evenness,species heterogenity (3 aspects of Species diversity)
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Universal Indices are good start, though I hate the word universal. What you have to do is to to run separate indices and compare them with each other and their correlation with environmental variables. Also, you need to find out what index(s) better explains the variation in your benthic communities and significantly correlates with  your environmental data. Some sort of Ordination analysis is in order. However, your correlations must be sound, meaning that what you observe in your system is confirmed by your correlation. Assuming, by freshwater you mean both lentic and lotic, your task can be a bit hard. I would keep each freshwater type separate. This is because diversity and abundance of certain taxa is higher in streams and rivers compared to lakes and ponds. For instance Odonates and Hemiptera are more diverse and abundant in lentic habitats than in lotic, Ephemeroptera and Plecoptera are mainly lotic. Therefore, lower %EPT in your lentic environment does not necessary mean your environment is polluted. You can only assume this when you compare two or three physico-chemically comparable lentic habitats.
All of these depend on how much background information you have about the study region. 
Hope these help.
Armin
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See the attached files. Zooplankton was collected in a large reservoir in Ukraine. Length approx. 0.2-0.3 mm.
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I made a mistake, Anton Brancelj got the bull's eye! I payed more attention to picture 000:9 and I saw the two-branched antenna...
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As the question states I am looking for papers detailing the impacts of recreational boat traffic on benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages. Much of the research material I have found thus far is focused on marine and brackish waters. Are there any papers available specialising within lentic freshwater environments?
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Good question with heaps of ramifications Alex!
In identifying impacts on macroinvertebrates.... our watershed research program has identified a range of deleterious impacts that grows and grows... like Topsy! We engaged overseas experts in macroinvertebrate research to assist us with objective assessments ~ we carried out systematic sampling of our streams and rivers..between 1999-2003
What we found has not been published... there are too many loose ends and the visiting macroinvertebrate scientist from Canada failed to deliver his sampling statistics and final report...  However, you may find the following helpful..
Ecotoxic impacts ~ among the most serious include de-fouling paints and  agrichemicals applied in the watershed (pesticides, herbicides, insecticides etc) Dr Ron Griffith from Guelph Uni Canada may be able to help with this aspect)
Engine impacts ~ outboard motors discharge very high percentages of the fuel expended directly into the waterway ~ often as high as 50% according to Marine authorities in Australia ..  you may wish to follow this line with Marine researchers..
Physical impacts ~ works and measures by river engineers are listed among the three most serious impacts on macroinvertebrates as a result of severe physical disturbances occasioned by these works and measures.... ecological repair processes may take between 15-30 years to completely heal the habitat damage
Livestock impacts ~ grazing livestock can completely change the macro-invertebrate community by changing the sediment, nutrient and stability status of their habitats...
Willow removal programs ~ these nescient programs have impacts similar to all the above combined... for published research on this topic, refer Dr Michael Wilson Murray Darling Authority Canberra Australia...
Change of Flow/temp impacts ~ irrigation abstractions and diversions change the flow regimes so much they alter the energy balance of in-stream ecosystems with consequences for habitats and their communities... eg reduced flows often mean warmer flowing waters and algae blooms
and there are more ... good luck !!
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Please send me the link on distribution map of Brown trout (Salmo trutta) and other related species, native for the Europe and Asia.
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Hi Oleksandr,
you might want to check out AquaMaps:
There you can search for distribution maps for several fish species.
Hope that helps you getting started,
Michael
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Dear all,
I need to collect a maximum of information on projects dealing with reduction of silver eel mortality at hydroelectric facilities by the method of catch & transport. All information collected will be shared with all contributors afterwards.
Thanks to contact me in private if you are interested.
Damien 
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You might check the Sustainable Eel Group (SEG) (www.sustainableeelgroup.com). They may have at least an overview . Contact at best Andrew Kerr, their chairman: andrewkerrseg@gmail.com
In Germany, they perform T&T in the River Mosel since years (https://www.rwe.com/web/cms/mediablob/de/345994/data/0/6/aalschutz.pdf).
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Mostly biotic indices I have found all based on lotic ecosystems. Only Nepal lake biotic index (NLBI) is the only index I came across that can be used in lentic ecosystems.
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Hi there, in Germany/Europe the Water Framework Directive has led to the development of a relatively new method for the ecological assessment of lakes called AESHNA. The corresponding method for rivers (called PERLODES) has been in use for several years now and delivers very good results about the moorphological degradation, saprobical conditions and water acidity. I have not worked with AESHNA yet, but I guess that it will provide a similar holistic view on the macrozoobenthos, assessing different metrics like diversity indices, trophical indices or habitat assessment.
You can find a brief overview (in English) here:
And there is a short list of publications in English as well:
Miler, O., Port, G., McGoff, E., Pilotto, F., Donohue, L., Jurca, T., Solimini, A., Sandin, L., Irvine, K., Aroviita, J., Clarke, R., Pusch, M. (in press): Morphological alterations of lake shores in Europe – a multimetric ecological assessment approach using benthic macroinvertebrates. Ecological Indicators
McGoff, E., Solimini, A., Pusch, M.T., Jurca, T., Sandin, L. (early online): Does lake habitat alteration and land-use pressure homogenize European littoral macroinvertebrate communities? Journal of Applied Ecology
Lyche-Solheim, A. Feld, C. , Birk, S., Phillips, G., Carvalho, L. , Morabito, G., Mischke, U., Willby, N. , Sondergaard, M., Hellsten, S. , Kolada, A., Mjedle, M., Böhmer, J., Miler, O., Pusch, M.T., Argillier, C., Jeppesen, E., Lauridsen, T., Poikane, S. (2013): Ecological status assessment of European lakes: a comparison of metrics for phytoplankton, macrophytes, benthic invertebrates and fish. Hydrobiologia 704: 57-74
Porst, G., Bader, S., Münch, E,. Pusch, M.T. (2012): Sampling approaches for the assessment of shoreline development based on littoral macroinvertebrates: the case of Lake Werbellin, Germany. Fundamental and Applied Limnology 180: 123 – 131
Brauns, M., Garcia, X.-F., N. Walz & Pusch, M.T. (2007): Effects of human shoreline development on littoral invertebrates in lowland lakes. Journal of Applied Ecology, 44, 1138-1144
I hope that helps you getting started.
All the best,
Michael
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These cyst like structures have been recovered from surface samples collected from a tropical lake bed in high abundance.
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I agree with Jyoti Srivastava. Arcella is a genus of testate amoebae usually found in freshwaters. They occur in rocks of all ages, ranging from Permian to Recent.
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It is a freshwater copepod, this seen in the microscope in 4X.  measuring about 2 mm. 
Images are ALIMVI laboratory, of the Department of Aquaculture the University of Córdoba. Colombia 
Aprecio su opinión.
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De acuerdo con Iris, se requiere aislamiento de un especimen macho (antena geniculada) y extraer 5º pata, esto puedes hacerlo bajo stereo; sacas una fotografía de la 5º pata usando microscopio. Disculpa pero recien he visto tu solicitud de apoyo. Si aún necesitas puedes enviar foto, y apoyarte quizás con la sp. o enviandote claves.
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Collected from the Freshwater body. 
Thanks in Advance !
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Number 1: Closterium;
Number 2: probably, a Cosmarium.
Number 3: looks like a Centritractus.
Number 4: looks like a Treubaria.
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Please provide me any keys, guides or references so that I can Identify my unknown diatom members (Freshwater). 
Thanks in Advance!
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Dear Anila,
You could find usefull some interactive keys to diatoms.
- Diatoms of Souther African Rivers
- Interactive key to Antarctic marine diatoms
- Multy access key to common freshwater diatoms of Britain and Ireland
  (Key doesn't start, but you can browse the taxa)
- Keys to common genera of Australia freshwater diatoms
Or see the "Diatoms of the US" website:
Kind regards.
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We tried many unsuccessful techniques to remove alien pumbkinseed fishes from our places. Maybe wrongly, we used net, electrical fishing, hooks. The only success was the heavy technique of drying a water pool. Use of piscicide may be a problem on a protected place, but please share your expertises and good idea. This sunfish threaten many rare amphibian larvaes and invertebrates .
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The use of physical removal techniques such as netting, electrofishing, etc., will most definitely not yield 100% effectiveness in the removal of any fish species, but they can be useful tools in beginning the process. By setting up a rigorous removal schedule using various techniques, and alternating your approach every time you will be surprised as to how many fish can be removed. Perhaps these techniques coupled with a campaign for the harvest of these fish by anglers, water drawdowns, etc., can be effective. What predator fish do you have in the water body? Is there anyway to augment there population to increase predation on pumpkinseed? Not being familiar with all the native freshwater fish in France, are there any native species that may be staunch competitors with the pumpkinseed? If so, the bolstering of those fish along with all the removal techniques expressed here and by others, may give you a boost in trying to control and potentially eradicate. Success is dependent on size of water body, ability to dedicate time and resources to the goal, angler compliance, as well as educating the public or stakeholders about the dangers these fish pose to native ecology. For example, if you are successful in the removal of these fish, it will be important to inform the stakeholders, public, anglers, etc. about the risks they pose in order to deter reintroduction.
Just my 2 cents.
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David Murray is right - LMB. As for food, this is a voracious and opportunistic predator. It is probably eating smaller fish but they've been known to eat snakes, frogs, small mammals in the water (mice) and you can find many Youtube videos of them eating baby ducks. As a matter of fact there's one classic (but very old) video of one that ate a baby duck (the video followed this drama underwater as the baby duck struggled, its head in the mouth of the bass, pushing with its feet to try to pull its head out. The video ends as the baby duck is successful and it pops back to the surface and paddles back to shore and safety). You can watch the clip at this web site by the videographer:
As for the plants, I've seen Valisneria, Callitriche, Egeria,....lots of different things there, the photo is insufficient to make an identification. Florida is seething with aquatic plants. Your best bet is to call the park and ask them what's dominant right now.
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The present study should take place in a subtidal environment with rather large current speeds and waves action. The question is mainly about the exchange rates between the interstitial water and the water column that might decrease the retention of the local DNA rich extracellular products and increase the import of products from elsewhere... In advance than you for your answer! Kind regards, Vincent
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I'll let you know :-)
Cheers, Vincent
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Quantitative and qualitative assay methods for xenobiotic pesticides persistent in fresh water lakes surrounded by several flower farms that uses pesticides and fertilizers that leaches into the lake.
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Dear Saphan, 
the two methods suggested by Dr. K. Mophin Kani are certainly the best solution. It depends on your budget: I think that GC/MS is more accurate and reliable, but it is a bit more expensive than HPLC.
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My partner and i are trying to study the foraging behavior of Hydrophis semperi, a freshwater sea snake. Not much is known about it so we're just basing our study on the foraging behavior of other snakes. We are planning to use search and handling time as a factor. Other than that, we only have descriptive data. Are there other aspects we can quantify?
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If possible you could try stomach content (See Mushinsky et al., 1982 in the attachments).This would give data on prey species and might show different food sources at different life stages.
I don't know what kind of data you are going to collect, but foraging patterns (and moving patterns anyway) would be interesting to take a look at. This data can be analysed in many ways. However, this might have to involve sticking transmitters on the snakes.
A last thing I can find right now is habitat use (see shine et al., 2003 for an example on this).
This seems like a very interesting and unique species to research! I hope this helped a little bit, and good luck!
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There are a large number of samples to test and the study site is a significant distance from labs.
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The Murphy-Riley method is sensitive and most likely the only usable at concentrations below, say, 30 microg/l (as P).
The manual method is easy to transform to an automatic one such "Autoanalyzer". With a sampler you can determine about 20 samples per hour. Its possible to set up such a machine at a decent cost.
Else you can always use a set of volumetric flasks or E-flasks. We used about 10-20 bottles for each batch and syringes for delivering the reagents.
IC is not very sensitive for P and you will probably have interference when you determine total-P after digestion.
Good luck
Anders
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Standing water bodies like ditches, canals and (small) lakes that are shallow (< 1 meter) can have a bad ecological water quality with high nutrient concentrations and algal blooms. I am looking for studies that describe the relationship between water depth and water quality and possibly also the underlying processes. Any suggestions?
Edit: I would like to emphasize that i am looking only for scientific or 'gray' papers that i can use as a reference for the relation between water depth and water quality. I am currently not looking for research suggestions or sampling protocols.
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I'm sure you already have this one, but , Robert Wetzel's Limnology, Lake and River Ecosystems, 3rd Ed., 2001, is, at the very least, worth having in your library. Chapter 20 is specifically about Shallow lakes and ponds, and, as usual, there is quite a bit on the flora and fauna of these systems. If you don't have it (and most likely you do), I'd add that to Eugene's excellent suggestion of Marten Sheffer's book. Best wishes...Bob
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ichthyologist, freshwater fish, taxonomy
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Then it may be Schistura chapaensis Rendahl 1944, which was originally described from Sapa, Lào Cai Province.
Rendahl, H. 1944. Einige Cobitiden von Annam und Tonkin. Göteborgs Kungliga Vetenskaps-och Vitterhets-Samhälles Handlingar (Ser. 6 B) v. 3 (no. 3): 1-54.
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Hi everyone,
I am working with Daphnia magna and meet serious problems:
1/ 24 hours after feeding, medium started to be oily and have opaque light green (fig 2).
(3 months ago, I fed the same concentration of food (Chlorella vulgaris and YTC) but medium have very clean light green color after feeding 24 hours).
Concentration of food can be clearly observed in fig 1.
2/ Daphnia suddenly have smaller size than before although feeding is same.
3/ Daphnia have many eggs (brown eggs) but they stay long time in brood chamber until turn into "white eggs" (white color) (fig 3) and broken (death). So they can not hatch into babies.
Maybe it's caused by brood parasites? How can we solve this problem?
I am very thanksful for your help.
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Dear all helpers,
I finally found out that my problem is in algea.
I tried to put 4 beakers as follows to check my troubles:
1/ only daphnia water
2/ daphnia water + YTC
3/ daphnia water + algea
4/ daphnia water +YTC +algea
then put all 4 beakers into chamber for 2 days. But no thing strange happen, so at that time I can not find the solution.
After that, I kept feeding old algea and changed new YTC but culture condition was still not good.
Then I kept feeding old YTC and changed new purchased algea (normally I use my available algea inoculated in my lab). Fortunately, daphnia population recovered strongly with many eggs/ clutch, and the babies after hatching swim activately.
Condition is still good until now.
So recently I  just try to overcome algea culture system while still use purchased algea for my daphnia's safety ^^
Thank you for your help!
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See dropbox link to video of thousands of goldfish (wild Carassius auratus) in the outlet of a lake. Madness!
Images courtesy of Matt Brady from Hawke's Bay Dept. of Conservation.
Any thoughts on what is going on would be much appreciated. Anyone seen this before?
Their gonads do not appear to be overly ripe. Certainly not running ripe.
This is the outlet to a shallow eutrophic lake (<2m deep). -39.574925, 176.761165
Speaking to some NZ scientists, our best guess is conditions became unsuitable in the lake and flushed fish are recovering in outlet. There was a recent cyanbacteria bloom, though toxins were not detected. Temperatures have dropped going into winter. Algae and macrophytes likely dying back. From helicopter, fish appear to have congregated in clearer flowing section of stream.
Have you seen similar congregations?
Any ideas/explanations welcome.
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I apologize for my English, and I hope that you at least understand something
In my practice, I have seen several different cumulation gibel carp Сarassius auratus s. lato. I work in the waters of the river basins of the Volga and Don near the city of Volgograd (within 200 km). Almost all reservoirs are so many gibel carp. Some reservoirs have a population of carassius, where part of the fish painted as a goldfish.
Examples carassius painted like a goldfish.
In water body where I work during the spawning gibel collected in dense cumulation of single-species and actively moves along the littoral. At this time, it comes in a lot of small rivers, streams, creeks, and as he goes along with the flow in the ducts, which watered pond-fish farm. He is looking for suitable spawning grounds. His active movement along the littoral, gibel carp is different from all of our fish. Nothing like other fish are not observed.
The stream of water flowing from the spillway of the Rostov NPP since the beginning of its operation in 2010 of Tsimlyansk reservoir come in gibel carp and almost exclusively. This is a very striking sight. It is my article, but in Russian
I placed in the same video applications in researchgate
I hope, will soon be here, but also in Russian, Vekhov D.A. Gibel carp in flowing water bodies of the Don River basin and the lower Volga basin // Povolzhskiy Journal of Ecology
Data on occurrence of gibel carp Сarassius auratus s. lato in flowing water bodies of the Don River basin and the lower Volga basin are discussed. It is shown that gibel carp actively seeks habitats with flowing water and it is capable to remain prolonged periods of time in streams with current velocity of 1.0-1.3 m/s. Furthermore gibel carp is able to climb fast flowing (2.6 m/s) and shallow (depth less than its body height) rapids. On this basis is proposed that gibel carp eurytopic fish. The massive appearance of this species in streams is associated with its spawning period, when he moved in search of spawning grounds. It is assumed that these movements can contribute to settling up the rivers.
Due to possible spawning migration I have a question.
When your local spawning goldfish? On the basis of which it was concluded that the state of the gonads? How many fish examined, as it has been opened? As the development of secondary sexual characteristics - breeding tubercles and shape of the belly?
To test the hypothesis of adverse factors need to have more information.
What share in% of goldfish, including fish of this reservoir. What happened to the other species fish (especially wild carp). How often carried out a survey of the lake and out of the lake, to find out whether this before, and if it was, what preceded this event.
Our fish gibel carp is one of the most sustainable fish to oxygen deficiency, high temperatures and toxic water pollution. I have not had time to see the ponds, which killed a lot of fish. At the same time over the pond it was often the stench, but the victim was not gibel carp. In some cases, the gibel carp was so active that even caught on fishrod.
In Tsimlyansk reservoir mass «flowering» of cyanobacteria are common, when they are concentrations of 0.5 or even 1.0 g / l and a water temperature of 25-30 C in the littoral zone is often a lot of fingerling gibel carp. Although other species of these places go, or even die (neogobius).
One time (15.12.2010) was in a place where the pipe that discharges stormwater runoff from the territory of the city Volzhsky chemical plants fell into the canal. At the exit of the pipe on the surface of the water was thick oil film, which was a lot of dead carp, and as recently deceased, and already half decomposed. Then the water from the pipe is on the many kilometers of canal to the pond, and as self-cleaning movement. I know that lives in the pond gibel carp, wild carp and crayfish. I examined the duct 0.5 and 1 km below the water discharge. The 0.5 km below the pipe fish are not noticed the oil slick was not. 1 km below the pipe was seen for many hold on the flowing gibel carp, but the bodies and the oil slick was not. Thus, the carp could choose a better environment, but it is concentrated in the most polluted place and died.
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When undertaking some chironomid exuviae work on a lake choked with water soldier, some of their leaves were found with rows of some form of seeds growing through them (see attached photos). I know it might be difficult to establish exactly what it is, but their elegant positioning in rows caught the eye. Incidentally, I have also attached a photo showing the choked lake for context. I have previously asked a question about people's experience of removing it.
Thanks Drew.
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Hello Drew,
I have shown your pictures to my colleague, who is aquatic entomologist and he identified the eggs as laid by the water bug Ranatra linearis. If you google for "Ranatra linearis eggs" you will find a few pictures. So the mystery is solved :-)
Best,
Michal
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The shells have been found in the foundation of a building in Germany and I am interested to find out if they have a marine or freshwater origin. The shells are between 0.5 and 2.0 cm large.
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Hi Florian,
definitly freshwater gastropods (Planorbidae and Lymnaeidae).
Best regards
Johannes