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Dear researchers,
Can someone help me with sharing a french translation of the MHQ-SF Mental Health Questionnaire - Short Form of Keyes?
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I cant afford such technical text now in view of time. Thanks
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I am working on my thesis on the representation of spoken French in selected Drama Books from the the region of Québec.
I would like to get more information on Language Representation so I would appreciate it if I could be directed as to which books to consult.
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Je vous suggère ces deux références (les deux sont disponibles en ligne):
BRONCKART, Jean-Paul. « Langage et représentation »s. In: Le langage. Nature, histoire et usage. Auxerre : Sciences humaines Editions, 2001. p. 303-308
 Philippe Malrieu. « Langage et représentations ». in La genèse de la parole: Actes du 16ème Symposium de l'association de psychologie scientifique de langue française, Presse Universitaire de France, pp. 89-130, 1977.
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I will be conducting an Event-related potentials study on word category processing in French, as well as on end-of-sentence predictability. As a control, I would like to measure behaviorally the language proficiency of my L1-French participants, particularly in grammar but vocabulary would also be informative. Thank you!
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The Government of Canada has a dedicated unit to do this type of evaluation run by the Public Service Commission. The following link will put you in touch with them and give some relevant info. They have an established  expertise on exactly what you are asking.
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I'm teaching an introduction to the literature of the XIX and XX centuries to modern language's students (french) at the university. I would find a good film based on a XIX novel. I've found a serie of Germinal but there are 2 or 3 dvds. 
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I think it depends of what of trend you try show. Germinal is a good novel, but it could not illustrate, let´s say, romantic literature from the beginning of XIX. In this case, I would prefer Les Miserables, or Notre Dame (Hugo) .
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I am working on an article in French on code-switching. Meanwhile, I want to be familiar with the terms used for the various sampling methods in French. Could someone recommend to me some research books in French which have covered the various sampling methods?
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You could find the answer in a French statstics or research methods textbook.  Legendre & Legendre (U of Montreal) also have an excellent French--English lexicon for statistics, available at http://adn.biol.umontreal.ca/~numericalecology/lex/lexique.html.
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Are there any Foucault scholars out there? I'm hoping someone can explain what the word "discible" means. Foucault uses this word in the following sentence: "The Visible was neither Dicible nor Discible"(Birth of the Clinic, p. 60). The original French reads: "Le Visible n'etait pas Dicible, ni Discible". Dicible seems to mean "speakable" or perhaps "able to be put into words". There is a nuance here I suspect, but can anyone help with the translation of "discible"?
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Hi everyone
I think there’s a need for a further update on this, I’m afraid. I’ve had some e-mail exchanges with Sanda over the weekend and also been able to consult with an acquaintance who is bilingual French/English.
Having had a chance to look at the various web sites that include the word ‘discible’, and from my associate’s experience, there does not seem to be evidence that ‘discible’ is a word in current French usage. As noted, it does not appear in any of the French dictionaries checked. Where it does appear, I suggest it is a spelling mistake or typo for ‘dicible’. Indeed, apparently this mistake is so common in student work that it is actually highlighted as a specific error to be looked out for by examiners.
This becomes clear when looking carefully at the meaning being transmitted in many of the occurrences of ‘discible’. For instance, as I noted in an earlier post:
‘N’avons-nous pas tendance à espérer une réponse pensable, discible?’
which appears at: http://macgyver74.free.fr/nd/nd_08_17.htm, makes most sense when translated as:
‘Don't we usually hope for a reply that is thinkable, speakable?’ In other words, given the accepted meaning of ‘dicible’ as ‘speakable’ or ‘expressible’.
‘Separable’ makes little sense here. Indeed, in none of the occurrences of ‘discible’ identified did the alternative sense proposed of ‘separable’ make more sense than this conventional meaning.
I want to turn now though to the example identified by Sanda that seemed to give a direct meaning for ‘indiscible’. This appears at: http://www.cheminsmystiques.fr/en_chronology.html and reads:
‘On est bien obligé d´apporter ici quelque précision en cernant l´in-discible en un : « ni ceci, ni cela » !’
Which I’ll translate as: ‘What’s essential here is some accuracy: to define the in-discible as "neither this nor that"
However, I now want to put this sentence in the context of the rest of the web page.
What the author Dominique Tronc is doing is launching into an argument about the nature of mysticism, and the first line of his discourse is to offer (for some reason) a definition of the ‘in-discible’ (a word that has not been used up to this point and is not used again in the rest of the text, though ‘indicible’ does). What follows is an argument that mysticism cannot be understood as this, that or the other, but rather (as he says at the end of his argument a few lines later) that:
'Il ne reste plus que le grand Rien, le grand Vide. ... « La mystique » en tant que corpus textuel ne fait pas partie du champ intellectuel, n'élabore pas de champs conceptuel ou de problématique : elle tente péniblement d'exprimer l'indicible par des mots’. (Note that this time the word is ‘indicible’).
I'd translate this as:
‘It is no more nor less than the great Nothing the grand Void. ... ‘Mysticism’ when set out in words is not part of an intellectual field, it does not elaborate a conceptual field, or a problematic: it painfully tries to express the inexpressible in words.’
So this is the context in which he has offered the preamble of defining indiscible as neither this nor that. The only purpose is to set up the argument that mysticism is beyond words. What this means is that he has not defined a separate 'indiscible' at all, he has merely offered a further more quirky definition of 'indicible' (the inexpressible or ineffable): note his exclamation mark.
Critically, once again, this is just another mistake in spelling: 'indiscible' should be 'indicible'.
So what do I conclude from all this? Basically, that there is not a word ‘discible’ in current French usage: it is merely a typo when it occurs. Foucault’s use of it in Birth of the Clinic is a neologism, and his is thus the only example of its being used intentionally.
On that basis, the only recourse is to try hermeneutically to understand 'discible' from the context of its use in Birth of the Clinic.
Sorry this is such a marathon
Nick
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Linguistic diversity
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I agree with Yaelle regarding the importance of cultural aspect. However, I think it depends of what the Ss are aiming. For academic English, for instance, which is strictly based on "standard English" some vernacular usage or slang in series could be quite confusing. I recommend my Ss watching documentaries (even if with captioning on) since I am running academic English courses. Also, in some series even the spoken English is so fast and unclear, that Ss might feel rather discouraged by not 'getting what is being said'. Still, especially for Ss who learn English as a second language (rather than additional or foreign) exposure to North American/Anglo culture could be definitely beneficial.