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In the 1980s Bealer wrote Quality and Concept which presented a type-free first-order approach
to intensional logic to compete with other higher-order, type-theoretic and modal approaches.
The presentation (both in the book and in a published article) is very sketchy (some non-trivial lemmas are merely stated) and the presentation is not easy to follow.
I was so impressed and intrigued by Bealer's philosophical arguments based on his system that I took it upon myself to clarify the presentation of his intensional logic and to furnish detailed proofs of the soundness and completeness results, which I hope might interest a larger audience. I wrote a paper containing this material which gives a general philosophical motivation and points out some open problems. I was interested in being sure of the correctness of these results before advancing to purely philosophical discussions on the advantage of this approach.
What would be a good journal to submit this paper to ?
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Look at the journals listed in the bibliography of the entry for "Intensional Logic" in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy:
Some more recent work by Bealer is also referenced.
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Hi every one, 
                  I need your help to develop grammar rule for tamil language for my research.
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1) The answer to this for any language depends upon whether or not your approach is descriptive, in the way that many a reference grammar is, or "linguistic" (i.e,. consistent with some theory of language such as Head-Driven Phrase Structure Grammar, Construction Grammar (proper), Cognitve Grammar, Government & Binding, X-bar, Minimalism, Word Grammar, etc.; more generally I mean a framework like cognitive linguistics, functional linguistics, linguistic typology, generative linguistics, under which specific theories of grammar are subsumed).
2) Some grammarians (notably Bill Croft) have advocated that syntactic categories (nouns, verbs, etc.) are language specific and as he adopts construction grammar as a theory of grammar (Radical Construction Grammar), grammar is internal to constructions. Hence Joachim's advice is not just useful but supported by linguistic theories such as construction grammars, HPSG, (New) Word Grammar, etc. (see e.g., http://www.cfilt.iitb.ac.in/gwc2010/pdfs/15_tamil_wordnet__rajendran.pdf & http://www.sas.upenn.edu/~haroldfs/public/h_sch_9a.pdf). Grammars like Schiffman's A Reference Grammar of Spoken Tamil or Lehmann's A Grammar of Modern Tamil use antiquated terminology adopted from Latin grammarians (see the second link above for the problems with attempts to apply the "classic" cases to Tamil). Same with verbs (see e.g., http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2928482/).
3) For some discussion of Tamil syntax among many other aspects of the Tamil language. see here: http://www.infitt.org/conference_papers/ti2009_conf_papers.pdf#page=275
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I want to know what formal Linguists are thinking these days about uniform linguistic competence (in healthy individuals who acquire L1 under normal circumstances).  Is this notion debated?  What I really want is a good reference.  If anyone can point me in the right direction, I'd appreciate it.  Thanks
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Dear Polly,
Indubitably, formal linguistics led by Chomsky has opened up new venues that would have been otherwise impossible ! However, debates set against the uniform competence have run parallel with theories in formal linguistics. Concerned philosophers and linguists have been offering a different story for language. Austine, Searle, Halliday among others have proposed a variable competence rooted in contexts of situation and culture. Both views are worthy of speculation; however, one cannot be understood without the other, because despite differences, the complement each other. The book "On language and Linguistics" by Halliday can be a good starting point.
Best regards,
R. Biria