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Hi.
I would like to ask whether I can find an original description of a fish species from the author who first found it.
For example, Pangasius hypophthalmus (Sauvage, 1878), where can I find the morphological description of P. hypophthalmus by Sauvage?
Thank you very much for your responses.
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During determining the geometric morphometrics using TRUSS network, the size effect has been removed either by applying different formulas or by superimposition in the literature. Which one of the both is better option to use. For superimposition which software is better to use. Thank you!
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Respected Miriam Leah Zelditch , thank you so much for such detailed guidance. I will surely seek for guidance from your recommended books and literature. i am confused about many things that would be resolved. Yes, I am learning many things with the help of literature and merciful scientists like you, as these techniques haven't been used in our country yet. Thank you again for your support and guidance.
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I am looking for a good reference textbook and/or atlas of (teleost) fish morphology, especially regarding the osteology and the musculature. Many thanks for any recommendations!
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In my opinion this book is quite good:
"The Laboratory Fish"
Gary K Ostrander
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Dear researchers, I need your help!
Here I am attaching picture of tiny Oxynoemacheilus sp.
I was wondering how is it possible to count number of scales in Lateral line when fish has got such tiny scales.
BTW. I have tried to look in binocular but could not see anything :(
Thank you in advance,
Otherwise I am hopeless :(
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If, and it seems so, these analyzes are post-mortem, you can fix the fish and stain the scales or the pores. There is a variety of stains that you can use, protocols are fairly simple so that should not be a problem. In this way, you should be able to determine the scales number and position easier. Hope that helps.
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In the attached file you can find picture with 13 LM as my suggestion. Many thanks in advance for all comments!
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Thanks Aleks!
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classical taxonomy...
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If you are asking how to construct a phylogenetic tree using fish morphology and meristic characters, then you are not talking about "classical taxonomy".
You have already received several comprehensive and helpful suggestions and advise from four colleagues. You have then been informed about different methods that you may use. However, all of those programs work with a matrix that you will have to build by yourself and this is a most difficult part because, and depending on the list of characters that you have and of their coding, the selected outgroup(s) to polarize characters, and also the composition of the selected ingroup, the results may be different.  
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Normally freshwater fish meristic character of fin ray counts example dorsal fin or caudal fin rays count variability of same within species it possible or not if possible why it occurred. 
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It varies within species. It is partly heritable, and partly dependent on a range of environmental factors during development affecting developmental rates, e.g. temperature. Meristic differences between populations of the same species can depend on different temperatures in the water when they grow up. If you search for "meristic variation" on Google Scholar you will find many papers on this.
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I saw the formula above the question, but I can't understand in detail, any one can explain in detail above the formula along with how to analysis with statistical software example using EXCEL or any other software is there pls explain...
Thanking you...
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Take the length in cm and weight in gm. Find the log values of both.Draw a scatter diagram and add the trend line . Find the extreme outliers and remove it. Then insert the trend line and get the regression equation. Simple excel you can do this
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I would like to know what are the most important fishing ports in Mexico. Ideally, the information would be broken down into commercial, sport, and recreational. In particular, I am looking into fish landings, number of vessels, etc. 
I was hoping to find some published piece of literature; however, so far I have had no luck. 
Any assistance would be greatly appreciated. 
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First ,quick and dirty aproximation: On pages 88 and 90 of Horacio´s link (Fishery yearbook 2013 the last one) you will find agregated figures for Sinaloa (Mazatlan port) and Sonora (Guaymas port) states in México. The total fishery production for Sinaloa was 328,586 tons for that year (Peaking to 339,848 tons in 2007 of a 10 year time series). Sonora landings were the same year 675,398 tons (with a peak in 2009 of 808,380 tons). Sinaloa was the second place in landings and first in value in the country while Sonora was the first one in Landings and second in value that year (2013). If Mazatlan and Guaymas are the most important ports in both states, and the historical Sinaloa peak (2007) is lower that year 2013 Sonora production you can conclude by analogy that Guaymas is by far more important than Mazatlan!!!...Aparently there is no port comparative figure on landings on the yearbook. I will try to find hard data conclusisive evidence!!!! Cheers!!!
Antonio
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For urine sampling and estimation of urine storage in a cichlid from the lake Malawi, maylandia zebra, I want to prevent urination for a certain laps of time (1 or 2 hours). In Tilapia, species with a micro-penis, the author tie the uro-genital papilla. But Maylandi don't have the same thing. Do you think that a biological surgical glue would work ? And do someone use them on fish even for surgical applications ?
Thank you very much
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Dear Imen 
Iwish this link is useful
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I am working on fish bacteriology band presently facing problems in analysis of SEM photographs
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There is a vast literature on this subject, including several textbooks. Try searching on BKD, bacterial kidney disease, or just use appropriate search terms in google scholar. 
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I need to identify the type of fish caught from fish images. How can I locate anchor points/landmark points to extract features from the image?
Namely, I want to locate eye position, dorsal and pelvic fin. Need to get Fish mouth length, Dorsal and Caudal fin length.
Right now I am trying with SIFT method to get key points.
Can someone suggest me how can I get the specific key points?
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As mentioned earlier, the TPS software suite very useful and user-friendly in placing landmarks and performing basic analyses. http://life.bio.sunysb.edu/morph/
My former adviser has also worked on computer-based species identification. This may be of interest to you.
Best of luck with your work
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I need to identify ornamented fish bone elements. The ornamentation is glossy like ganoin, in thick and wide, longitudinal striae on the outer surface of the bones. The bones themselves are similar to fin rays, however, I am not sure.
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During a research regarding the influence of salinity on Cyprinus carpio (checked metabolic rate on 2 different exposures 10ppt NaCl and 10 ppt Seasalt) we noticed that during the exposure of NaCl a lot of the carp lost scales on and near the lateral line. We think this has to do with the trans epithelial excretion of NaCl, but can't seem to find any literature about this. Can someone help?
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You should know the salt tolerance tendency of selected fish. freshwater stenohaline fish can't bear such level of salt and ofcourse excess of everything is bad! before starting experiment on these creatures you must know and read enough literature for successful output. 
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Dear All
I am nearly finished my book on the dangerous fishes of the east and southern Arabian Peninsula.
For this book, I need to put images for the species dealt with in the book. The total number of fish species mentioned in the book is 134. I managed to get 85 images and I need to get the remaining 49 images.
The book will be published by an international publishing house.
I would be much grateful for anyone has images for any of the species mentioned in the following list and would like to send to me to include it in my book. All images will acknowledged.
Images from the fish markets, landing sites and studio are all welcome.
List of fish species/ images required
1. Stegostoma fasciatum
2. Nebrius ferrugineus
3. Carcharhinus amblyrhynchoides 
4. Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos
5. Carcharhinus galapagensis
6. Eusphyra blochii
7. Heterodontus omanensis 
8. Heterodontus ramalheira 
9. Anoxypristis cuspidata 
10. Pristis pectinata 
11. Pristis zijsron  
12. Gymnothorax flavoculus 
13. Gymnothorax griseus 
14. Gymnothorax herrei  
15. Gymnothorax megaspilus 
16. Gymnothorax phasmatodes
17. Myrichthys colubrinus
18. Sphyraena acutipinnis
19. Sphyraena flavicauda  
20. Sphyraena qenie
21. Canthidermis macrolepis 
22. Melichthys indicus  
23. Rhinecanthus assasi 
24. Eupleurogrammus glossodon 
25. Eupleurogrammus muticus
26. Strongylura strongylura
27. Tylosurus choram
28. Acanthurus leucosternon
29. Acanthurus tennentii  
30. Naso fageni 
31. Heteronarce mollis 
32. Torpedo adenensis 
33. Torpedo marmorata  
34. Torpedo panthera 
35. Torpedo sinuspersici 
36. Anodontostoma chacunda 
37. Dussumieria acuta  
38. Thryssa hamiltonii 
39. Ruvettus pretiosus 
40. Cyclichthys orbicularis
41. Silurus glanis  
42. Colletteichthys dussumieri 
43. Bifax lacinia  
44. Pardachirus marmoratus
45. Himantura imbricata 
46. Himantura jenkinsii 
47. Aetobatus ocellatus
48. Netuma thalassina 
49. Scorpaenodes evides 
Regards
LAITH A. JAWAD
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Your welcome sir. I've just sent the photos here.
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I know about the paper of Divay and Murray 2015, which figures a vert of P. omiscomaycus, but I need other papers for comparative methods.
Thank You!
Márton
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The AMNH digital library web page was working for me yesterday, but is currently not responding, probably due to maintenance works.
Please try again tomorrow -- it should work for you then.
I tried to attach the paper here, but this did not work either (it has 113 MB!). Sorry for the inconvenience. If you don't manage to retrieve the paper in the next few days, please contact me again and we will find a way to get you the pdf.
-Ron
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I am working on research involving parasitic lamprey feeding, and want to look at if characteristics of a fish's lateral line system could make a parasitic lamprey more/less likely to attack the fish. 
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Hi Jeremiah,
This paper on the sea bass may be of interest to you.
One of the co-authors Marudio Kentouri is on RG, you may try to contact her.
Cheers,
Luis
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Hi,
we would like to have your expert point of view about the age of this pike's scale (Esox lucius).
We have our idea but I do not want to influence the judgment. ;)
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Accuracy of Using Scales and Cleithra for Aging Northern Pike from an Oligotrophic Ontario Lake
Arnold O. Laine , Walter T. Momot , Philip A. Ryan
North American Journal of Fisheries Management
Vol. 11, Iss. 2, 1991
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I estimate the otolith length, width and weight and i need to estimate the otolith area and perimeter? 
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To estimates the surface and perimeter of an otolith, you can use imageJ (https://imagej.nih.gov/ij/) that is an open source free software that do it easily. Just bear in mind that due to the irregular shape of otolith from som species, you really have to take care of the position of the otolith. It is also very useful to use ratio when looking at relationship between otolith size and total lenght of a fish. Some more sophisticate software linked to numerical microscope (Keyance for example) aloow you to reconstruct a 3D image of your otolith where you can do every kind of measure you want afterward.
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What is the morphologic difference between the Dasyatis pastinaca and Dasyatis tortonesei?
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McEachran & Capapé in Whitehead et al. (1984: 198) give the morphological differences as follows:
a) Membraneous fold on top of tail behind spine; distance between fifth gill-slits less than 1/2 their distance from mouth; 5 bulbous papillae on floor of mouth . . . Dasyatis pastinaca
b) A ridge on top of tail behind spine; distance between fifth gill-slits more than 1/2 of their distance from mouth; 3 filamentous papillae on floor of mouth  . . . Dasyatis tortonesei
References:
Capapé, C. 1975. Sélaciens nouveaux et rares le long des côtes tunisiennes. Premières observations biologiques. Archives de l'Institut Pasteur de Tunis 52 (1-2) (for Mar.-June 1975): 107-128.
Whitehead, P. J. P., M.-L. Bauchot, J.-C. Hureau, J. G. Nielsen and E. Tortonese 1984. Fishes of the North-eastern Atlantic and the Mediterranean. Vol. 1. UNESCO, Paris: 1-510.
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I will be very happy if you could provide some refferences for me
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Dear Christopher, thank you for your kindness reply.
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This is for the use of scales associated with fish remains in stomach contents to identify prey beyond just "unidentified fish."
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Charles,
Saltwater or freshwater? I assume you have looked in Stanley Olsen (1968), who has the bones and scales of a few common types of fish found at archaeological sites in the U.S.
I know that when we had a large collection of fish scales from an archaeological site in the coastal zone of south Louisiana our archaeozoologist used the comparative faunal collection at Tulane University to identify them. I recently read that either the University of North Carolina or maybe the University of South Carolina had a comparative collection too.
Stanley Olsen. 1968. Fish, Amphibian and Reptile Remains from Archaeological Sites. Papers of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Vol. 56, No. 2. Harvard University, Cambridge.
Richard Daniels. 1996. Guide to the Identification of Scales of the Inland Fishes of Northeastern North America. New York State Museum Bulletin 488.
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Dear colleagues! I will be very thankful for sending the photo(-s) of subopercular bone, as well as other cranial bones and pectoral spine of Huso huso.
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I try to derive mathematical models for fish sizing  using  single/stereo imaging techniques. The challenge in this work is how to calculate the depth of the object in the fish tank. I'll be appreciated if somebody has an idea about depth calculation.
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Check out the reference (Page 44 of the attached pdf).
Rzhanov, Yuri, and George Cutter. "StereoMeasure and StereoFeatures: measuring fish and reconstructing scenes using underwater stereo photographs." National Marine Fisheries Service, Seattle, Washington, NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS-F/SPO-121 (2010).
There are also other documents in this report which may interest you.
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just to collect some info about this species. anyone who know about any journals or citation about this species?
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You may also wish to consult the following paper:
Weber, C. , R. Covain and S. Fisch-Muller 2012: Identity of Hypostomus plecostomus (Linnaeus, 1758), with an overview of Hypostomus species from the Guianas (Teleostei: Siluriformes: Loricariidae). Cybium v. 36 (no. 1): 195-227.
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Currently, I'm working on golden spotted mudskipper (Periophthalmus chrysospilos) and found that M/K =2.6. Is this value is still acceptable? the suggested value of M/K should be in the range of 1 to 2.5 (Beverton & Holt, 1957).
if not what might be the suggestion for me to fix this?
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2.6 is very high and I would be very skeptical of whichever source you drew that from. The "standard" value for teleosts is 1.5. (Try a Google search for "Beverton-Holt life history invariants". There is a substantial modern literature.) Many species have other values of M/K but it should be possible to suggest reasons (such as protogynous hermaphroditism) for why a particular species differs. Estimating K is possible (though it is often very hard to get a precise value) but estimating M is rarely practical, so empirical confirmation of M/K is not often an available option.
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This benthic fish species was found very shallow sea grass bed of southern coast of Sri Lanka.
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Your identification as Istigobius ornatus (Rüppell 1830) (family GOBIIDAE) is correct.
You may consult the revision of Istigobius by Murdy & Hoese (1985), who recorded the species from Sri Lanka, for further information:
Murdy, E. O. and D. F. Hoese 1985
Revision of the gobiid fish genus Istigobius. Indo-Pacific Fishes No. 4: 1-41, Pls. 1-3.
Other species of the genus in Sri Lanka are Istigobius decoratus and I. goldmanni. Neither of these has several rows of dark streaks above the lateral line.
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These marine species were photographed during the field works. I have identified most of them but I some doubt on identifications. So I would like to have your identification too.. Thanks
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You are correct, this is rather Neoglyphidodon bonang, which has a single blue line on the head, and an additional small blue spot dorsally on the caudal peduncle.
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There are no studies reporting a hybridisation of Trachurus trachurus and T. trecae  known to me. If you are aware of any hybrids, this would be worth publishing.
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Does the size of fish, or other animals for that matter, affect their ability to feel pain?
The issue of whether fish feel pain flares up now and then with animal rights campaigns, especially around recreational fishing.  It affects views on the acceptability of practices like game fishing and catch-and-release fisheries.  A recent review (Rose et al., 2014; Fish and Fisheries, 15, 97–133) concluded fish were unlikely to feel pain.  But this largely reviewed research on fish the size of carp and trout or smaller.
The issue has flared up in my home state (Tasmania, Australia) around game fishing for swordfish, which has involved a small number (<20) of very large (~200kg) animals.  This has become a modestly political issue, yet the extensive recreational fishing of other species like trout appears to be viewed as being completely acceptable.  The only obvious difference is the size of the fish.  So, is there any scientific basis to believe larger animals are more likely than small animals to have the suite of nociceptors and cortical development necessary to feel pain?
Thanks!
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Hi Dan and Caleb,
of course, happy to help. Well, the easy answer is - we have no clue. We do not know for sure whether and what fishes feel. It is among the hardest thing to answer because we are humans not fish. Obviously, one can, as many people did, nociceptive reactions, physiology, stress, cognition, intelligence and whatever concepts suits, but we have no clue what that means emotionally even if fishes show reactions to noxious stimuli. The field is wide open, a really interesting paper you should read is the paper by Key (2015), see here http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10539-014-9469-4#page-1
Another one really interesting is on hooked cod, showing the cod show no reaction whatsoever when hooked without pulling the line, see here http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0100150 Maybe cod even felt something, but they showed no reaction, not even a stress response different from the controls.
Bottom line, we do not even know for small fishes and overall only for a handful of model species whether nociceptive responses are pain, let along for large-bodied species. If at all, I would assume that for evolutionary reasons top predators should be less sensitive than omnivorous fishes.What we know, however, is that struggeling on the hook might be more pronounced in larger fishes, hence stress responses might be more expressed, which in turn might render larger fishes less able to cope with angling-induced stress, see this paper http://fishlab.nres.illinois.edu/Reprints/Gingerich_et_al_Size_2012.pdf
I know this was not satisfactory, but honestly we have no clue about the emotional system of fish.
Robert
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I'm working on age of snapper using otolith, as I came across some articles some workers back-calculate and others did not.
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No, in fact I would suggest the simple length-at-observed age observations would be superior to back-calculations. One problem with back-calculations is that it over-emphasizes older fish because they will have more back-calculated lengths at ages. This can be handled statistically using mixed effects models, but these models are inherently more complex and harder to explain to non-statistical persons. Another problem with back-calcs relates to issues arising from Lee's and Reverse Lee's phenomenon (not fixed by using observed ages, but effect potentially lessened). So, bottom line is don't feel the need to back-calculate if you have a good sample size of observed lengths at age.
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Can anyone provide reliable information on species pairs (fishes are preferable) that have clear differences in morphological characters but show a little or no difference on the DNA level?
Species names in Latin would be nice.
References would be great.
Thank you!
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Coulson et al 2011 (DNA barcoding of Canada’s skates, Molecular Ecology Resources (2011) 11, 968–978) noted that here was a lack of genetic differences between Amblyraja hyperborea and Amblyraja jenseni. However, while very similar in appearance, morphology and most meristics, upper jaw tooth count is different between these "sibling" species. They also appear to have different growth and maturity and I am presently examining that aspect. They are largely geographically separate and what we may be observing is a recent separation. I agree that DNA bar coding is a useful tool but is not in itself definitive in defining species.
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So, as many of you are probably aware, there are several living groups of fish which are able to use electroreception to some degree to either passively sense the world around them or, in some cases, actually stun or kill other animals. In particular, I'm thinking of members of the Gymnotiformes (including the electric eel), the electric catfish (Malapteruridae), the torpedo rays (Torpediniformes) and several families of the Osteoglossiformes (Mormyridae and Gymnarchidae).
I was wondering if anyone knew of any evidence that a now totally-extinct group of fish may have possessed similar electroreceptive/generative abilities (that is to actually generate electric fields, rather than sense them as in sharks or paddlefish). I know that in South American knifefish (Gymnotiformes), the development of an electricity-generating system has strongly constrained the development of their locomotion, which makes me wonder whether a similar morphology among extinct fish (say, xenacanth sharks) might be indicative of such behavior.
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I vaguely remember that I heard some theories about Galeaspida or Osteostraci possibly having an electrogenetic sense.
But the only "reference" I can give you at the moment is just the page about Osteostraci on the tree of life project page:
I (or you) will have to dive more deeply into the literature aboput them to get some usefull, quoteable references.
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I am looking for records of conjoined twins (siamese twins) of fish in natural populations, especially of gobioid fish (Gobioidei).
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I have seen them in wild chum salmon that were reared in a hatchery.
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I'm looking to find the type specimens, if they still exist, for two species of skate found in the northwest Atlantic (Canada, US): Leucoraja ocellata Mitchill, 1815 (winter skate) and Leucoraja erinacea Mitchill, 1825 (little skate). Both were originally described in the genus Raja.
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I need to identify Parrotfish species in Southwestern Caribbean. Here are three genus: Nicholsina, Sparisoma y Scarus.
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Do you mean a field guide? If so, I highly recommend 'Reef Fish Identification: Florida, Caribbean, Bahamas' by Paul Humann and Ned Deloach.
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I am trying to image fish at 5 days but I am finding it difficult to position them into agar grooves without them floating away. I have tried decreasing the temperature and kept them at a lower temperature after 4 days and that delayed their development so they did not develop a swim bladder problem but some of them also developed edema. However, as I want to test them with compounds at 4dpf for 24 hours, I want the larvae to be healthy. Any suggestions would be welcome.
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Sundeep,
Zebrafish are physostomous, meaning they have a connection from their swim bladder to their mouth. Larve inflate their swim bladder by taking a gulp of air from the air-water interface. If you keep larve in a container and remove the air-water interface (fill it all the way up and put the lid on tight), they can't inflate their swim bladder. If there is even a small air pocket they will find it and inflate.
Hope that helps,
Dan