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As the question states, I am currently doing some revisions for a paper on personal branding for artists. Although I have found enough theory in the influencer marketing area, I am interested in more narrowly focused work that focuses on graphic artists and fine art photographers. I am looking for literature references that address the position of the artist in a marketing-driven world. References can be doctoral dissertations, master thesis, bachelor thesis, or articles (not earlier than 2018).
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Dear Eduard,
What a great topic to do research, I wish you all the best. You may have a look at the below articles:
Dana, L. P., & Salamzadeh, A. (2021). Why do artisans and arts entrepreneurs use social media platforms?: Evidence from an emerging economy. Nordic Journal of Media Management, 2(1), 23-35.
Scolere, L. (2019). Brand yourself, design your future: Portfolio-building in the social media age. New Media & Society, 21(9), 1891-1909.
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Hi all,
I am curious to know if there are any fund management/wealth management firms who have already started including Fine Art as an asset class in the investment portfolios of Institutional Investors? Perhaps in the private wealth management sector, is there a possibility for such ideas?
Does not have to be physical art pieces, it can also include fractionalised shares of famous art pieces, or through the acquisition of NFTs.
Thanks.
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A very interesting and complex question, which is answered and problematised very well in the following article from Vera König!
Central points: The art market is evolving towards a capital market. (...) Demand is increasing (...) The emotional return is guaranteed, the rest is a chance for more (...) Art is not a quick investment. (...) As in the stock market, there are blue chips in the art market. These are works by well-known artists that sell well over the long term and consistently achieve high prices (...) Those who invest in young and unknown artists are acting more speculatively, but can achieve enormous returns.
(...) The "Old Masters" segment is considered one of the safest forms of investment on the art market. (...) Individual objects or art funds (...) Cryptoart, the digital art (...) The new trend is also accompanied by millennials as a new art target group. (...) The Corona pause on the art market was ideal for entry
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Any good journal in graphics, visual culture, fine arts, visual communication or related humanities? Preferably Scopus and web of science indexed.
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The purpose of an arts research degree is arguably to train makers and producers to develop closer links between theory and practice; and ultimately to contribute to the social discourse in the field. Are there any journals that you find continuously interesting and worth reading as artist researchers? Are you submitting to interdisciplinary journals or specialist interest journals? What is hot, what is not and where do you find the best international mix, or the most interesting dialogue?
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You might want to check also these two:
- Journal for Art Market Studies https://fokum-jams.org/index.php/jams
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I am a third year Fine Art undergraduate investigating whether my enhanced onset of artistic creativity was a direct result of my Complex-Post Traumatic Stress Disorder brain injury, (combat military active service, when aged 18). With the other option being a sub-conscious reaction, resulting in using artistic creativity as a distraction and coping mechanism.
Access to research information, conclusions would be of great value to me and very much appreciated.
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Thank you for your reply, I will check out Alice Miller.
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I am writing my master's degree about students with specific learning disabilities in fine art classes and I am looking for some literature on that subject...
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Every person is talented in one way or the other. Some may be good at studies, some may be good in sports, some may be good in fine arts etc. There are several ways and platforms to exhibit the skills. Getting recognized for the talent and getting appreciation from others also boost up talent and is much more important. In this direction, what are the best ways to exhibit skills.
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Work and show your results at the end. A smart person is patient
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I tried to publish in the field of Painting or fine arts but most Journals refuse because of that exact specialization
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Yes, there are recognized publishing for art... One of those is The Oxford Art Journal.
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The fine arts influenced architectural design in different methods during history. However, the application of such practice to concept of current architectural design has still without frame. Accordingly, I am in need to know your result of practice in design studio with architectural students. What type of application of fine art? how? and how to achieve creativity?
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This is an expansive and fascinating topic, containing many inherent subtleties which may need to be more clearly constrained if pedagogically applicable approaches are to result.
The modern differentiation between Art and Design , or the various schools of visual art, graphic design, fine art, textiles, sculpture, etc. are, to a large extent, artificial and have been  primarily shaped by the methods of training and production, resulting in a somewhat artificial specialisation. Evidence suggests that this situation dates back before the Renaissance, developing  perhaps from the protective practices of the ancient guilds. In the ancient world, while the concepts made manifest by art were highly venerated, the artisans who realised such works were frequently despised, and of low social status, and their employment precarious. These visual arts areas are underpinned by a common exploratory approach; observation of, and experimentation with the material world, which is, in turn scaffolded by a problem-solving cognitive framework. When this process results from a attempts to solve a practical problem, or is intended for use in a social setting it might be seen as design, when the exercise is carried out for its own sake or for the benefit the knowledge of a sole practitioner, then perhaps it might be thought of as fine art.  Both approaches are typified by the exploration of technique and media, deployed in a problem-solving methodology. This methodology integrates practice-as-research, theoretical contextual knowledge and critical thinking in a complex cyclic web. This web is powered and guided by the key elements of contextual awareness and formative and summative critical evaluation. For many practitioners this process is applied almost intuitively, but it can be schematised, communicated and learned. For a visualised outline of its complexity I’d recommend Smith and Dean’s Iterative Cyclic Web graphic.* It is this complex, reactive methodology that leaves the uninitiated wondering how results are ever achieved. Having established these considerations we might look at the question anew and ask how can these areas ever be viewed as discrete and separate? The problem-solving process is common, and whilst media differ, the methods of research and synthesis are largely the same, regardless of whether it is applied to design or fine art. Fine art clearly has much to offer the designer in terms of selection and application of media, technique and the parameters of representation. Its open-ended unorthodoxy produces very diverse results. Similarly design has a its own media, techniques and structure which strongly benefit fine art sensibilities, ensuring goals, targets and media constraints are met.  In my teaching experience, I have found digital imaging technologies as a very adaptive means of fusing these traditionally disparate areas. Practical results developed in a fine art setting are applicable in design settings both 2D and 3D, to surfaces and structures. This approach to learning, meshing practice-as-reasearch and academic theory with ipsative criticality makes for adaptive, highly-employable designers who are comfortable in a range of disciplines and job settings. My students have benefitted from this approach by gaining a flexible, cross-disciplinary skills base which enabled them to achieve employment in fields such as graphic design, illustration, game design, web-design, systems design, product design, prop-making for film, costume design, interior and architectural design or as successful fine artists. I’d argue that such knowledge is actually a useful life-skill. A key, but under-considered, aspect of developing fruitful, real-world results in these areas is play. Play is essential. Roger Silverstone rightly argues that play is the means by which we explore cultural limits and push creatively at boundaries. It enables the individual to be creative by embedding innovation and facilitating risk-taking in a supportive atmosphere. Creativity and visual arts risk-taking are reciprocal. The inability to take risks strongly inhibits creativity. Failure is part of the process. Beckett put it succinctly:’ Try. Fail. Try again, fail better.’ In terms of real-world pedagogy, I have had students explore practical media in a time constrained, but open-ended way in order to produce a range of 2D outcomes. These resources then formed the starting point for later application in design problem-solving exercises in a range of disciplinary settings, both 2D and 3D. In this way results from 2D practice-as-research form the basis for plans, surface treatments, lighting, signage and way-marking, even structures. I hope this goes some way to moving this interesting topic forward. *Smith, Hazel, and Dean, Roger T., Practice-led Research and Research-led Practice in the Creative Arts, (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2009), (p.20).
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Are the arts capable of keeping pace with technological development or separate from it?
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This is widely believed. However, if we draw accurately the golden section the center of the circle is above the navel, and therefore the circle is greater than Leonardo´s drawing.
If the navel is 1/10 above the center of the human figure, then the circle will be smaller .
Leonardo said legs form a triangle, and feet up 1/14, but does not say how the feet are separated.
If this separation is the golden section, the circles match.
Therefore, the navel is not golden section but is involved in position.
Regards
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New proposals! @Vitor Murtinho exposes hypotheses already seen and new ones. He proposes the Vesica-Piscis. What do you think?
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Since we face with heteronomy and self-censorship in the nature of traditional arts, can teaching handicraft, rather than fine art project, lead to different consequence in the quality of rehabilitation of incacerated men and women?
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Good question
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Since we face with heteronomy and self-censorship in the nature of traditional arts, can teaching handicraft, rather than fine art project, lead to different consequence in the quality of rehabilitation of incacerated men and women?
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Dear Prof. @Michael_Uebel I really thank you.
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Hello,
in 2008 after my epidemiological thesis in biology/ethnomedicine I started the development of the FCMapper. About 2010 I started studying fine arts and worked in the field of Art&Science since then. 2018 I got a one year stipend from the state of Carinthia for developing FCM as an artistc method.
In which kind of fields do you plan to work with FCM in this project? Which kind of scientists and experts will be involved into this project?
It would be great to contribute to a bigger project to bring FCM out of academia - into museums and also public space.
Kind regards, Michael
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cool idea Michael! Allow me to brainstorm a little bit .....
Think of a 3d installation in a museum for example that visualises in real time the satisfation of the visitors. The visitors fill online satisfaction surveys and the 3d installation adapts its form and geometry with respect the FCM outcomes.
Serafeim
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I want all journals Q1,2,3,4 SSCI
to check relevant journals for manuscript
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Dear all,
Please refer to this link, it contains related topics about writing a quality research paper
Regards
Samaa
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This question include all sort of arts : fine arts, visual arts, dance, theater, performances, architecture, cinema, videos, etc.
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Boundaries are basically a definition (the literal sense of the word). Definition gives shape and coherence, and with that meaning. If we all come with our own personal ideas of what 'art', or any other concept for that matter, should be, the result is chaos...
To find what the boundaries of art are (and to see how elastic they can become), it may help to ask the opposite question: what is NOT art?
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identity, modernity, globalization, universal style
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The art and heritage of Iraq remain glamorous in all times, despite modernity in art and architecture.
Greetings...
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I did my masters in commercial Industrial fine art majoring in sculpture. Can i cross over and major in painting for the PhD proposal and research?
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This is complicated. In principle one can develop a different PHD project from the Master project, as long as the Master provides a good platform for research skills. Somy Master subject was quite substantially different from my PHD proposal - I did printmaking for one of my masters, and a thesis on the ethics of terrorism for my other MA (in Philosophy). My supervisors accepted a proposal that combined drawing research with an ethical question about drawing nature (ecological) connected via John Ruskin; so yes the foundations were provided by my two MAs but the actual proposal was very different from either. So I would encourage you to go ahead with a new proposal, but with caution. Could you provide evidence of a sustained engagement with paint since you completed your MA? In my case having developed a professional profile in drawing since completing my two Masters no doubt supported my PHD proposal.
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Dear Khadija Fadaaq
I am an Fine Art student from Germany - Kassel and work recently on my master thesis about the shapes of arabic letters.
I actually need the exact round and straight lines of each and every letter of the arabic alphabet.
May I ask you somehow for help? Any type of help would be very kind and nice of you!
Thank you very much!
Sincerely
Meryem
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i am afraid that there is no "exact round and straight lines of each and every letter of the arabic alphabet"... it depends on the style (Kufi, Sini, Thuluth...etc). I suggest reviewing Ibn Mukla's work.
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During his editorship of School Arts Magazine from 1920 through 1950, Pedro de Lemos changed the direction of US art education from European fine art masters to a more global focus. There were no conventions of art teachers K- grade 12 until 1950, so all ideas were shared via School Arts Magazine. This important work is just now starting to be studied, along with that of Arthur Wesley Dow At the Columbia University Teachers' College.
In addition, de Lemos raised the crafts to academic notice in his magazine. He was profoundly influenced by the Arts and Crafts Movement.
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Thanks, Mr. Pal, and all who answered. I read that article.
Gloria
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Two articles published for a Magazine on the Marsh Arabs by Edward Bawden predate Thesiger's expedition by about ten years or so. This question popped into my head at the Ravillious & Co exhibition at the Towner yesterday. Is the connection a casual, idle one, or does it have legs? Would be interesting to pursue an artist and a traveller for an Art & Travel module in a current Art History MA programme if the connection is deeper than my idle speculation. All/any help would be gratefully received.
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Many thanks Timothy. I'll look into it.
Cheers,
Tom
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I have many nursing students in a general fine arts course.  This could prove helpful in relating course material to nursing students.
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I teach a course called "sketching ideas" with many students, I put exercises to sketch thinking, in various subjects related to science, society, psychology, law, engineering, etc. This way of posing the exercises allows high interdisciplinarity by inviting the student to pose and solve problems in equipment, in a cocreative way.
  It may be interesting that your students "diversify fields of knowledge", trying to develop skills and competences with diversity of thought.
The document "Design thinking for educators" may show you unusual ways.
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Need specific theories related on this subject matter. Thank you!
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I would look at Ernst Cassirer's Philosophy of Symbolic Forms and related works. See the summary at http://www.iep.utm.edu/cassirer/
And the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy at https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/cassirer/
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The fact that Brazilian Concrete Poetry had established itself artistic and historically as nascent in the early 1950s, and today knowing its affirmation in the national scene as a reference to rupture with the classic verse, its creative root: Haroldo de Campos, Augusto de Campos and Décio Pignatari - provided a consistent backbone to the movement, can one attribute such development and consistency to the fact that its actors are semioticians?
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Very good
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I am interested in whether and how artistic genres and styles will impact on children's perception and understanding of the story. When drawing illustrations for a story, how does the artist decide which style to choose? Are they aware of the affordances and constraints of each style?
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I worked as an illustrator on about 25 children's and adult books, mainly in literacy education.
How does the artist decide which style to use?
Illustrators usually each develop their own particular style over years of study and practice. This style will be informed by their interests but also by their chosen medium, which will have it's own physical traits and limits. Some media allow for fine control and a more prolonged period of making, while others demand broader marks and more abbreviated time period. For example watercolours are generally mush quicker than oils, but both offer fine detail control, whereas linoprinting or resist drawing use tools which are by comparison broader in mark, with other strengths.
That said, unless you are an author/illustrator, the style for any particular book is generally decided upon by the editorial team, who will discuss the emphases in the text and select an illustrator whose work accentuates those communicative spects to visualise it.
Are they aware of the affordances and constraints of each style?
The way any particular illustration communicates to its audience is generally the same. The use of composition, relative size, colour and contrast ( tone, pattern and texture) control where in the image the eye moves. These are transferrable skills used in all the visual arts, and whilst simple sounding, offer enormous sophistication in delivery of structured hierarchical information.
Of course these formal elements are subject to the limits of the medium they are presented in. When working on any visual imagery there are four main factors which inform the final image; ground, medium, tool and hand.
The surface ground will have it's own particular physical properties, texture, tensile reaction, permilability, etc.
The medium will similarly display qualities affecting delivery, clotting, viscosity, dispersal gain in some media, etc.
The shape of the tool transferring the medium to the ground will obviously have a shape, may contact the ground in particular ways, may be affected by size and flexibility by nature or design.
The last factor, the hand, manifests the intent and emotion of the illustrator, this is broken into two aspects; movement direction and speed.
The final aspect that effects illustration is the complex neurological and physical process by which the viewer perceives it. What the illustrator intends is not always appernet to the audience, and similarly, the audience may never notice things the illustrator has intentionally included. I know I hid many 'Easter eggs' in the work I did over the years, usually for fun but once or twice because I was sure the editor and publisher weren't actually interested in the work. Not one was ever noticed, probably because I'd made sure viewer's were focussed on something else in the image.
Hope this helps.
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Especially the understanding of artworks created by such individuals?
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This is an interesting question. While I am not an expert in psychopathology, I do have some expertise in art. I think that Jung's theory is most applicable to art in the sense of the archetypes represented in the narrative of the work. What kind of story is the artist trying to convey, and how does s/he make use of the traditional archetypes in the artwork to help the viewer construct meaning from the narrative nature of the piece. You may also want to look at Joseph Campbell's work in this regard along with traditional African mythology as additional sources for insights into the imagery of the artist. 
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Art is not based on evidence, but on experience. Art does not confine to logic, it is an expression of feelings. Literature is a form of art from which meaning are extracted that form the basis of certain forms of philosophy. Religious and spiritual books are expressed using poetry from which we get themes and messages on morality. Art does not work with hypothesis and does not need evidence and hence art is separate from science, although, there can be some overlaps, their goal is different. Artists try to express the reality through their intuitive understanding - they work on a creative future or with verse and colors try to express the meaning of life, scientists try to logical express it with investigation and evidence and engineers use it to develop solutions for certain problems. Some of the greatest engineering achievements of today come from creative works from artists few hundred years ago. Howsoever, the spirituality of today may become science of the future when with better technology and theories, scientists will be able to paint a better picture and holistic viewpoint of life.
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Dear Rohitash and friends, here are my comments from my point of view:
a) Where do they overlap
--Both art and science are interacting with reality through experiences(E) and ideas of that reality(I)
--Art links observations to experiences and imagination to ideas and science links observations with experiences and experiments with ideas.
--Both art and science have a component based on experience that we can call practice(P)
-But while science is based on theories(T) of the ideas of reality that are testable art is based on theories(T) of the ideas of reality than come from imagination.  So both maybe based on theories about the ideas of reality, but only the ones from science are testable
-Science has to respect the theory(T)-practice(P) consistency principle, art does not  requires that
b) what are their goals
--Both may pursue the truth, science as the scientific truth and art as non-scientific truth
c) who needs evidence
--Only science must be based on evidence, art does not have to.
Wish a good day to all;
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Speer was a Nazi war criminal.  He did admit to some of what he did.  He was in prison fro 20 years for his crimes.  Towards the end of the war, he stored some  valuable art work.  When he was released from prison, he retrieved the art work. Please let me know a monetary  amount for the value of that art work and give any bibliographic source material which you may have.
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I have done some trailing of webpages, in the first instance to refresh my memory of some historical facts, but also whether paintings were mentioned anywhere. In the 17 Apr 2005 edition an article by Henrik Hamrén appeared in <www.thegaurdian.com> based on his interview with Hilde Schramm, Speer's daughter. She was in the possession of three of his paintings. These she sold in 1995 for £70,000. With this  money she started up a new foundation, called Zurückgeben (meaning "giving back"). Do read the article as it gives a particular slant to your question.
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Dear colleagues, I'm looking for live-action films that show dream scenes; scenes of psychedelia, madness or hallucination; and fantasy or imagination scenes, made in stop motion animation. Ex. the film Frida (2002) presents a memory scene, Frida operation, in stop motion.
My research is about the imaginary representation in animation, in the Faculty of Fine Arts of the University of Lisbon.
 I thank anyone who can help me.
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Of Course, Mr. Hachero, I'll w\tch this Lynch's film that I didn't know.
And watched Albertina's film, and the site of Carla MacKinnon that Mr. Sapochnik talked about. And I think that they are right to my reasearch, Thanks a lot!
I did not have time to see other indications yet, but I´ll watch them.  
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I am a music therapist and part-time educator by profession.  I am seeking opinions from those researchers/members who teach in the fine arts, preferably at a post-secondary level.  Members who do not teach in the fine arts are also welcome to share their opinions.
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Have you investigated post-constructivism (which is largely arts-based)?
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I'm thinking, in particular, of undergraduate fine arts students.
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You should provoke the students capabilities by asking them to see other artists works. This will give them the chance to interact with the same aesthetic problems that other artists faced and solved. Creativity is the re-order of nature's elements inn one's style.
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Specifically thinking here of the context of Scotland as well as federated states.
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To a certain extent, the trivialisation of the country's creative process.
Works of art are not necessarily meant to turn a profit, which is the current intent of contemporary infrastructure. Once a work is placed in the current flow of works, it becomes a commercial commodity, and little else. It looses all other value, be it spiritual esthetic or even expressive value. What matters is the cash flow.
UIn short it subverts any values except financial.
This is by the way equally true for contemporary art anywhere, an not simply emerging cultures. The vast majority of contemporary art is a fraud.
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Do generalist elementary teachers understand how "purposeful" fine arts integration really is? Do they know where to go for resources? Have they had training? Do the administration support them?
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It appears you'd like to find answers in the general sense and possibly more specific. 
I have been a teacher for 15 years (within the US and internationally) and find today's school setting especially hostile towards integrating the arts (music, art, etc.). Generally, in the US, teaching to the test overshadows instilling the love of learning. Somewhere along the way the importance of supporting creativity and critical thinking have been lost.
I think many in the teaching profession are comfortable with integrating art. Budget concerns, administrative support and time are a bigger challenge than training (training to teach art was a portion of my certification program). It might be worthwhile to see if there have been any surveys on the topic. 
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I am working on research with students aged 13-14 that analyzes interdisciplinary production of artifacts (music and visual arts) in order to understand what is the quality of thought that these "works of art" express.
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Thanks András,
what is emerging from my research is that when the kids have the opportunity to build their own "works of art", through their creative action they are able to build a sort of "sensitive metacognition", a metacognition not expressed in words (... almost an oxymoron, but this is what happens). These (http://www.oradimusica.eu/wordpress/prodotti-elaborati-ottobre-dicembre-2013/) are the "works" I examined and created in classroom activities entitled "Impertinence between Music and Visual Arts".
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I'm looking to explore the perceptions and differences of the contemporary street arts in the world from the perspectives of the users, architects, and artists. How do the different groups of people view them?
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There are many cases where cities organise a graffitti festival, and graffitti artists create art on selected walls and buildings. The artworks are preserved to ornate the city.
In 2008 IIC London conference on conservation, entutled "Conservation ad Access", a couple of papers were presented about the efforts of conservators to maintain, preserve, conserve and restore graffitti work.
Graffitti culture is a growing one, and graffitti artists have a place in the pantheon of art.
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I'm trying to do a critical revision of the famous sign clasification of Ch. S. Peirce (regarding the relationship between representamen and object): icons (likeness), indexes (contiguity) and symbols (convention). It seems to me that we should think in the other options: more sign classes or less sign classes.
More possible sign classes: a) Signs based on the fact that they uniquely belong to a unique object, it is to say, not interchangeable signs; b) signs based on the fact there is no object to link (is it possible?); c), d), etc.
Less sign classes: a) convention is absence of a natural relationship, not a real relationship between representamen and objec (only natural links are significative links) , and b) likeness could be reduced to contiguity.
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I have read the answers regarding Peirce's semiotics with bemused interest. It is apparent to me that no one in this thread has achieved any sort of understanding,  even at the most basic philosophical level, of Peirce's semiotic research, which doesn't seek to reduce anything but seek to capture the dynamic process of inquiry, whether in humans or other minding beings, in ways that vastly open up inquiry. That Peirce does not capture intentionality, for instance, is an extraordinary claim that ignores his deep-rooted and broad teleology and everything he says about thirdness, while saying that he is only after logic betrays a severe misunderstanding of what logic is in Peirce's eyes (nothing short-mindedly formal and detached from the human or other organisms). Many are here in effect accusing Peirce of some sort of crass nominalism (or positivism, or scientism) while he is a champion of the exactly opposite attitude.
Peirce's classification of signs is no mere rigid list, and is not meant to be a table where anything can be pigeonholed neatly. Someone seeking to give a full account of proper names, for instance, would come to recognize that nearly all semiotic functions described in Peirce's "semiogram" (so to speak) are relevant, and not just one or two. To intimate  that Peirce's semiotics ignores the "context" is to ignore everything he has said about collateral observation and collateral experience, not to mention his theory of information, both in its early form (1865-67) and the later forms.
François Rastier's understanding of Peirce's triad as displayed in his "La triade sémiotique, le trivium et la sémantique linguistique" is from beginning to end a demonstration of his nearly complete misunderstanding of Peirce's semiotics. Apart from his criticism of Morris, whose transformation of Peirce's semiotics was severely damaging, there is much that is not excellent in that paper, in great part because there is nothing there regarding Peirce's triad that is correctly understood, not even the notions of object, sign, interpretant (which is not the same as the "signified"), and ground, and not even the graphical representation of the triad, which in Peirce can never be a triangle, since a triangle is simply made of three binary connections that fail to capture what is irreducible in triadicity. The limitations inherent to Greimas's semantic square come precisely from the fact that there is nothing triadic in it (even though its application is completely triadic, seemingly unbeknownst to the user): it is a collection of binaries, and binaries are indeed a hallmark of reductionistic nominalism; they simplify analysis with dyadic distinctions that are certainly useful to scratch surfaces, but not much more. Peirce's notion of iconicity goes beyond notions of similarity or resemblance, his notion of index goes beyond contiguity, and his notion of symbol goes beyond concepts such as convention or habit, all for the same reason: what Peirce's notion captures is a structure more fundamental than anything that those less fundamental concepts can convey.
That some have problems with the idea that triads are everywhere is only a result of not knowing the argument behind it, and that absence of knowledge produces the feeling that the claim is arbitrary. But that genuine triads cannot possibly be reduced to dyads, and genuine dyads cannot possibly be reduced to monads, has become incontrovertible (even though nominalists generally seek to reduce the triadic to the dyadic, and in so doing forget the human that Per Aage Brandt is right not to want to lose). And that polyads (higher than triads) are in principle reducible to combinations of triads (and triads only: no need to add monads and dyads) is  a mathematical theorem that has been demonstrated by different mathematicians using different strategies in recent years. This means that tetrads, pentads, hexads, etc., are perfectly fine in a Peircean outlook: they all ultimately rely on triads.
As long as some reduce Peirce's semiotic contribution to icons, indexes, and symbols in the simplistic, recipe-based, ways illustrated throughout this thread, there is no hope to do his work any justice. It takes years to appreciate what Peirce's fundamental work in semiotics (itself not detachable from his other philosophical pursuits) was all about. Trying to grasp him out of a few detached paragraphs from the Collected Papers (whether or not translated by Deledalle--whose understanding of Peirce was better than Rastier's) or out of someone's incompetent course or book about Peirce's semiotics can only lead to one consequence: dreadful dis- and mis-information about what Peirce developed. To understand Peirce, there is no shortcut: one has to capture the evolving continuum of his thinking, without reducing his thoughts to scattered or detached points arbitrarily marked off on a thin line.
In other words, just because someone does not see how to apply what he or she has read in Peirce to a particular object of analysis like the suffix "-ish" or a call for help (which is of course analyzable in a Peircean way once one understands how to apply the theory in all of its complex sophistication) is not automatic evidence that something must be missing in Peirce, but evidence that the said someone is likely not to have sufficiently studied and reflected upon Peirce's writings--all of his texts that bear on his semiotics, including those that do not discuss semiotics but have direct implications for a richer and deeper understanding of his semiotics and the vast project it represented.
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I really don't want aesthetics of politics, because I am well aware of this field of research. What I am really searching for is the connection of aesthetics and power. There were always some artwork which deals with the theme of gaining or misuse of power, and I believe that aesthetic interest plays some role of the understanding, recipe, attraction, worshiping or decline of power (as such and as the main theme of some works). A very good example is Faust.
So What I am asking for, are there some papers or researches of aesthetic reception of Power. Or am I mistaken to think that there is some relation (of course I continue to ask myself and am still trying to find a pattern)?
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A recent south american version of that, can found here
Against Typological Tyranny in Archaeology: A South American Perspective. C. Gnecco & C. Langebaek Eds. 2013
Pineda Camacho, Roberto. The labyrinth of identity. Symbols of transformation and power in pre-hispanic Colombia´s precious metalwork, 2005 [2000]
Also
Rowlands, Michael.The materiality of sacred power. In: Rethinking materiality. The engagement of mind with the material world. Eds. E. DeMarrais, C. Gosden & C. Renfrew. Pp. 197-203. Cambridge: McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, 2004
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Throughout the centuries and history of mankind, different cultures created the artifacts (in architecture, fine art, applied art, literature, poetry, language [sayings], music)  illustrating the concepts of approaches to disability. 
Do you know in your own or other cultures historical or current artifacts illustrating the direct or symbolic issues of following categories as social inclusion orsocial exclusion of persons with disabilities?
To bring this thread inspired me my dear colleague from RG Ans Schapendonk. 
Please share your comments and optionally photos. 
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Thought you might be interested in this blog
Downs syndrome represented in art;
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And this fascinating journal article;
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Regards,
Paul.
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 Art Historical analysis involving 'form' and 'content' usually generate controversies on how it should be rightly judged and graded. This is because research topics involving 'form' and 'content' are, perhaps, have multidimentional approaches that in most cases weaken the essence of the research. While 'form' represents the external features and general appearance of an art work, the 'content' is the meaningful interpretations that the researcher puts forth to match his/her projections. But this is mostly the case in fine art researches involving painting, sculpture, installation art, drawing, etc. Since most (if not all) ceramics products are supposedly utilitarian in nature, under going a study of form and content may require specific areas of  concentration to arrive at a good analysis.
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@ David, Monica and Lukas, thank you very much for your contributions. It is indeed invaluable to giving a conceptual direction to the research. The issue of function is quite important but I need a deeper and diversify approach to viewing it within the context of how form and content can be effectively utilize to understand the meaning and function of contemporary ceramics designs as opposed to the traditional pottery made for other reasons like rituals, sacrifices, etc. 
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Sometimes we can see abstract work in the gallery. We usually tell ourself I can do that as well. There must be some criteria to judge abstractions. Let's discuss the general criteria, can be both personal and formal.
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From a semiotic perspective, abstract art could be as hipo-iconic as indexical. There is no incompatibility between these two ambits.
I am going to use a painting of the spanish sometimes abstract painter Jose María Sicilia in order to shed a bit of light into the matter. Here comes a link to the mentioned painting: http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-D3OzPNELi1c/TyCCU4RKESI/AAAAAAAABCM/QgidXo0AiaA/s1600/tumblr_l3frb4mqsf1qaz0wuo1_500.jpg
In the hipo-iconic level the matter of the abstract art is the firstness of a thing as a quality, the quality of a thing in itself.
In the indexical level, the matter of the abstract art is the link between the colour-shape complex , and the mind, the hand, the arm, etc (in sum, the intelligence and the body of the painter ), and also the stuff and instruments, involved in the process
In both ambits, the criteria to evaluate the artwork only can be subjectives.
In the first ambit, my personal criterium could be the ability of this particular color to carry me to another red colour that is significative for me (for instance, the red of a poppy flower). Significative because the poppy flowers evocate the spring landscapes of my childhood. For instance.
In the second ambit, I value facts as the richness of the contour and its evident naturality. I wonder if the red paint was put after or before the black one. I wonder about the accidents that are present in the painting: the red bursting out of the contour in some points. I can aproach to the way that painting was performed, wondering why and trying a response.
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Arnheim wrote extensively on psychology and art. I would be really interested to hear what people on Researchgate think about his work now as his writing is getting to be rather old? How well do you think this has stood up to the test of time?
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Paul: I have had the same question in my head for the last few months. I recently added two of Arnheim's books to my library (having read them nearly forty years ago as an undergrad art student) together with a selection of recent texts on neuroscience. I am afraid I have about a year of reading and teaching to do before I can attempt an answer to your question. Meanwhile I shall read any answers that appear here with great interest.
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What role does memory play in the appreciation of fine art (paintings, drawings, sculpture, print-making etc). Is there research literature on this relationship or is anyone working in this area?
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A possible intriguing link between the creative process and memory:
- One romantic view about the personality of an aritist is that of a highly authentic individual, sensitive for subconscious shifts or absurdities in society, expressing this in his work and being ahead of his time, considered to be a misunderstood genius.
- Latent Inhibition (LI) is a measure in psychology for the the capacity to ignore irrelevant stimuli and to respond with relevant adaptation to the actual context. A high LI stands for high adapted behaviour.
- In shizophrenic patients LI is significantly reduced ("disrupted"). When treated with neuroleptics LI normalizes.
- In highly intelligent and succesfull people however, LI can also be lower, hence this test has been associated, not with madness alone but on the contrary with creativity also, as associative originality.
- It has become popular to link artistic authenticity, geniality to dissociate objects from their usual context in unusual associations with a personality trait in which LI would be lowered. Association between geniality and madness (1).
Central circuits of interest:
- A circuit playing a role in attention, selection and memory of contextual relevancy is situated in the medial forebrain (medial septum & vertical limb of diagonal (2) band of Broca) with the hippocampus (long term memory), is necessary for LI..
- Of course artistic expression can also be considered to be a learned skill, based on performantial memory (basal ganglia - cerebellum) in the relation from master to trainee in learning tradition and actualizing it in the present.
- Recognizing patterns has been studied in "adaptive resonance theory" ("ART") (3). But concerning aesthetic recognition of patters, this line of inquiry seems still philosophical to me (4).
- Work has been done to find correlation with neural foundations of esthetic appreciation with functional imaging (magnetoelectroencephaolgraphy): they found greater cortical synchronization when the subject perceived something as beautiful versus non-beautiful (5).
- Work has been done on affective preference due to recongition of symmetric patterns (6).
Neuroscience-memory-fine art: fascinating :-).
(1) Schizophr Bull. 2010 Mar;36(2):388-99. doi: 10.1093/schbul/sbn098. Relating schizotypy and personality to the phenomenology of creativity. Nelson B, Rawlings D.
(2) Learn Mem. 2014 Jan 17;21(2):105-18. doi: 10.1101/lm.032433.113.
Learning to ignore: A modeling study of a decremental cholinergic pathway and its influence on attention and learning. Oros N, Chiba AA, Nitz DA, Krichmar JL. Neural Netw. 2013 Jan;37:1-47. doi: 10.1016/j.neunet.2012.09.017.
(3) Adaptive Resonance Theory: how a brain learns to consciously attend, learn, and recognize a changing world. Grossberg S.
(4) A universal model of esthetic perception based on the sensory coding of natural stimuli. Christoph Redies, Institute of Anatomy I, School of Medicine, Friedrich Schiller University, D-07740 Jena, Germany.
(5) Prog Neurobiol. 2011 Jun;94(1):39-48. doi: 10.1016/j.pneurobio.2011.03.003.
The neural foundations of aesthetic appreciation. Cela-Conde CJ, Agnati L, Huston JP, Mora F, Nadal M.
(6) Emotion. 2012 Oct;12(5):1021-30. doi: 10.1037/a0026924. Implicit affective evaluation of visual symmetry. Makin AD, Pecchinenda A, Bertamini M.