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Fiction - Science topic

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Postmodernism is a wide area of explanation and deals with so many fields, such as literature, architecture, fashion,sociology, culture, art, and so on. Postmodernism is scrutinized as an appendage of modernism. It is an indicative effectof modernism in all fields, especially art and literature. These connotations are visible in fiction. In the postmodern age,fictions are filled with postmodern perspectives. (PDF) Research Trends in Postmodernism: A Bibliometirc Analysis. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/359258041_Research_Trends_in_Postmodernism_A_Bibliometirc_Analysis [accessed Mar 22 2022].
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Is it wrong or at least negative to IMPLICITLY include prose ( Short Fiction ) in your critical article ? in the sense to include a short fiction that is related to the evaluated topic bu include it implicitly and that prose is somewhat subjective, not objective ?
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I think that the inclusin of prose in a critical article depends on how and why you intend to use it.
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I have started reading Snow Crash and Daemon. Please suggest to me some other books which are intriguing and related to Meta-verse.
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(shelved 11 times as metaverse) avg rating 4.02 — 251,695 ratings — published 1992📷Snow Crash (Kindle Edition) byNeal Stephenson (Goodreads Author)
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(shelved 6 times as metaverse) avg rating 4.24 — 983,052 ratings — published 2011📷Ready Player One (Ready Player One, #1) byErnest Cline (Goodreads Author)
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(shelved 3 times as metaverse) avg rating 3.90 — 283,521 ratings — published 1984📷Neuromancer (Sprawl, #1) byWilliam Gibson
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(shelved 2 times as metaverse) avg rating 3.33 — 6 ratings — published📷The Age of Smart Information: How Artificial Intelligence and Spatial Computing will transform the way we communicate forever (Kindle Edition) byM. Pell (Goodreads Author)
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(shelved 2 times as metaverse) avg rating 3.78 — 468 ratings — published 2016📷The Fourth Transformation: How Augmented Reality and Artificial Intelligence Change Everything (Kindle Edition) byRobert Scoble (Goodreads Author)
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(shelved 2 times as metaverse) avg rating 3.57 — 7 ratings — published📷The Augmented Workforce: How Artificial Intelligence, Augmented Reality, and 5G Will Impact Every Dollar You Make (Kindle Edition) byCathy Hackl
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(shelved 2 times as metaverse) avg rating 3.79 — 11,712 ratings — published 2007📷Halting State (Halting State, #1) byCharles Stross (Goodreads Author)
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(shelved 1 time as metaverse) avg rating 3.98 — 292 ratings — published📷Experience on Demand: What Virtual Reality Is, How It Works, and What It Can Do (Paperback) byJeremy Bailenson
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(shelved 1 time as metaverse) avg rating 3.92 — 888 ratings — published 2017📷Dawn of the New Everything: Encounters with Reality and Virtual Reality (Hardcover) byJaron Lanier
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(shelved 1 time as metaverse) avg rating 5.00 — 1 rating — published 2021📷Exovelum (Kindle Edition) byNathan Kuzack (Goodreads Author)
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(shelved 1 time as metaverse) avg rating 3.40 — 221 ratings — published 2011📷Lucifer's Odyssey (Primal Patterns, #1) byRex Jameson (Goodreads Author)
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(shelved 1 time as metaverse) avg rating 3.72 — 643 ratings — published 2019📷The Simulation Hypothesis (Paperback) byRizwan Virk (Goodreads Author)
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(shelved 1 time as metaverse) avg rating 3.91 — 37,756 ratings — published 2013📷Lexicon (Hardcover) byMax Barry (Goodreads Author)
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(shelved 1 time as metaverse) avg rating 4.13 — 56,020 ratings — published 1992📷A Fire Upon the Deep (Zones of Thought, #1) byVernor Vinge
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(shelved 1 time as metaverse) avg rating 4.14 — 1,409 ratings — published 2011📷ログ・ホライズン1 異世界のはじまり (Log Horizon, #1) byMamare Touno
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(shelved 1 time as metaverse) avg rating 3.74 — 3,072 ratings — published 2003📷.hack// Legend of the Twilight, Vol. 1 (Paperback) byTatsuya Hamazaki
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(shelved 1 time as metaverse) avg rating 4.29 — 15,093 ratings — published 2003📷Masters of Doom: How Two Guys Created an Empire and Transformed Pop Culture (Paperback) byDavid Kushner
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(shelved 1 time as metaverse) avg rating 4.38 — 2,752 ratings — published 2014📷Sword Art Online: Aincrad Omnibus (Sword Art Online: Aincrad Manga, #1-2) byReki Kawahara (Original Story)
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(shelved 1 time as metaverse) avg rating 4.30 — 8,052 ratings — published 2009📷ソードアート・オンライン 1: アインクラッド [Sōdo āto onrain 1: Ainkuraddo] (Sword Art Online Light Novel, #1) byReki Kawahara
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(shelved 1 time as metaverse) avg rating 4.61 — 1,631 ratings — published 2021📷Noob Game Plus (Noobtown, #5) byRyan Rimmel
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(shelved 1 time as metaverse) avg rating 3.58 — 423 ratings — published 2020📷Otaku (Hardcover) byChris Kluwe
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(shelved 1 time as metaverse) avg rating 3.44 — 99,017 ratings — published 2020📷Ready Player Two (Ready Player One, #2) byErnest Cline (Goodreads Author)
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(shelved 1 time as metaverse) avg rating 3.48 — 810 ratings — published 2011📷Luminarium (Hardcover) byAlex Shakar
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(shelved 1 time as metaverse) avg rating 4.13 — 91,220 ratings — published 2017📷La Belle Sauvage (The Book of Dust, #1) byPhilip Pullman
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(shelved 1 time as metaverse) avg rating 4.24 — 136,743 ratings — published 2016📷A Gathering of Shadows (Shades of Magic, #2) byV.E. Schwab
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(shelved 1 time as metaverse) avg rating 3.81 — 292 ratings — published 2016📷The Legacy of Luther Strode (Luther Strode, #3) byJustin Jordan
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(shelved 1 time as metaverse) avg rating 4.09 — 2,311 ratings — published 2016📷Injection, Vol. 2 (Paperback) byWarren Ellis (Writer)
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(shelved 1 time as metaverse) avg rating 4.19 — 148 ratings — published 2016📷Hexed: The Harlot & The Thief, Vol. 3 (Paperback) byMichael Alan Nelson (Goodreads Author)
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(shelved 1 time as metaverse) avg rating 3.98 — 101 ratings — published 2015📷The Beast of the North (Thief of Midgard #1) byAlaric Longward (Goodreads Author)
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(shelved 1 time as metaverse) avg rating 4.23 — 1,009 ratings — published 2016📷Invincible, Vol. 22: Reboot? (Paperback) byRobert Kirkman
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(shelved 1 time as metaverse) avg rating 3.80 — 5,395 ratings — published 2015📷Injection, Vol. 1 (Paperback) byWarren Ellis (Writer)
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(shelved 1 time as metaverse) avg rating 4.13 — 374 ratings — published 2015📷The Private Eye, Volume Two (ebook) byBrian K. Vaughan (Goodreads Author) (Writer)
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(shelved 1 time as metaverse) avg rating 3.58 — 108 ratings — published 2015📷Sex, Book Three: Broken Toys (Paperback) byJoe Casey
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(shelved 1 time as metaverse) avg rating 4.03 — 286 ratings — published 2014📷The Manhattan Projects: Deluxe Edition, Volume 1 (Hardcover) byJonathan Hickman (Writer)
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(shelved 1 time as metaverse) avg rating 3.64 — 228 ratings — published 2015📷Sheltered, Volume 3 (Paperback) byEd Brisson
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(shelved 1 time as metaverse) avg rating 3.84 — 2,577 ratings — published 2015📷The Autumnlands, Vol. 1: Tooth and Claw (Paperback) byKurt Busiek
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(shelved 1 time as metaverse) avg rating 4.24 — 768 ratings — published 2015📷Rachel Rising, Volume 5: Night Cometh (Paperback) byTerry Moore
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(shelved 1 time as metaverse) avg rating 3.49 — 746 ratings — published 2014📷The New 52: Futures End, Vol. 1 (Paperback) byBrian Azzarello
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(shelved 1 time as metaverse) avg rating 3.74 — 318 ratings — published 2014📷Sheltered, Volume 2 (Paperback) byEd Brisson
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(shelved 1 time as metaverse) avg rating 3.52 — 195 ratings — published 2014📷Sex, Book Two: Supercool (Paperback) byJoe Casey
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(shelved 1 time as metaverse) avg rating 3.73 — 486 ratings — published 2013📷Bloodshot, Volume 3: Harbinger Wars (Paperback) byDuane Swierczynski (Goodreads Author) (Writer)
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(shelved 1 time as metaverse) avg rating 4.21 — 672 ratings — published 2014📷The Private Eye, Volume One (ebook) byBrian K. Vaughan (Goodreads Author) (Writer)
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(shelved 1 time as metaverse) avg rating 3.96 — 251 ratings — published 2014📷Translucid byClaudio Sánchez
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(shelved 1 time as metaverse) avg rating 3.93 — 5,463 ratings — published 2014📷She-Hulk, Volume 1: Law and Disorder (Paperback) byCharles Soule (Goodreads Author) (Writer)
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(shelved 1 time as metaverse) avg rating 3.56 — 668 ratings — published 2013📷Sheltered, Volume 1: A Pre-Apocalyptic Tale (Paperback) byEd Brisson
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(shelved 1 time as metaverse) avg rating 3.39 — 184 ratings — published 2014📷Death Sentence (Hardcover) byMonty Nero
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(shelved 1 time as metaverse) avg rating 4.20 — 1,240 ratings — published 2013📷Rachel Rising, Volume 3: Cemetery Songs (Paperback) byTerry Moore
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(shelved 1 time as metaverse) avg rating 4.20 — 1,241 ratings — published 2013📷Invincible, Vol. 18: The Death of Everyone (Paperback) byRobert Kirkman
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(shelved 1 time as metaverse) avg rating 4.12 — 112 ratings — published 2015📷The Activity, Volume 3 (Paperback) byNathan Edmondson (Writer)
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(shelved 1 time as metaverse) avg rating 3.89 — 654 ratings — published 2013📷The Legend of Luther Strode (Luther Strode, #2) byJustin Jordan
Best regards
Ph.D. Ingrid del Valle García Carreño
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For example, if we want to analyze the feminist style of writing in modern or post-modern fiction
#post-modern fiction#corpus#feminist analysis
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Thanks for the answers. Yeah, sure I will contact you if needed.!
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Can you give some examples to illustrate your opinions?
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It is the non-standard temporal axis that builds up moral ambiguity. The paradoxical power of time is transforming the borderline between "good" and "evil". By a somewhat simplified definition, this is an image of certain events in the past that can or should only occur in the future, which, in fact, is a goal, an obligation, but not a reality of the past. As a result, good turns into evil, and the other way round.
Did you ever observe other characteristic powers of abnormal temporal axis?
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Tell us how you perceive AI and its adoption.
AI- Future is here! Blurring the lines of reality and fiction.  A good 2 minute read on basics to help one start on their “pursuit of AI” Looking forward to the series @SandeepPandey Link to article:  https://lnkd.in/er-sWQK Link to post: https://lnkd.in/e7ANuJ7
Link to our paper on ROI computation for AI investments:
#AI #Artificialintelligence #transformation #datascience #RPA #ML #Deeplearning #machinelearning#future #enthusiasts
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Learning the hidden information in real time datasets related to economics and health. Both predicting and feature interpretation.
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I want to calculate an enzyme's energy of activation, but I don't have the enzyme's molecular weight to calculate the rate constant or the pre-exponential factor A. This is part of an assignement I have for a virtual lab of enzymology, we use this virtual lab https://www.ucl.ac.uk/~ucbcdab/enzass/enzymass.htm by ucl and the process of it is basically you choose one of 5 enzymes which are fictional enzymes from what I can tell, and then you can perform "expirements" to determine the enzyme's behaviour in different pH environements etc.
I've attached screenshots of the diagrams the virtual lab has produced about how the enzyme reacts to different temperatures. I've concluded that at around 50°C it produces the maximum amount of protein so I've calcuted the maximum velocity using that at 5.86μmol/min. I had to calculate this because since I don't know anything about the actual enzyme I have to calculate the energy of activation using this equation: logk = logA - E / 2.303 * R * T (where logk=logVmax), our professor told us that we have to use this to calculate the energy. She also told us to use excel to calculate logk and logA and create a y=ax+b diagram. I honestly am really struggling to come up with how to use excel in order to do that since I'm really unexperienced with it.
Please refer to the photos below if you want to see the data I have.
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If we assume that the cP obtained within 12 min is proportional to the enzyme activity, then the Arrhenius equation can be used, where k is replaced by cP. Another issue is the method of determining the values of ko and E. One can use the graphical method, where lnk is plotted against 1/T, one can use nonlinear methods.
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I am looking for texts on Reference(ing) and/or Referential Processes in Discourse, construction of referents. Works that explore these topics in oral narratives (fiction or real). Thanks.
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Please check some of the works done by Prof. Ganesh Devy
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science fiction, fantacy, animation series and movies are watched by children and a specific group of adults. does it signify any relationship with the personality type/ personality of the adult watching it?
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In my opinion, this is too far-reaching thesis. Science fiction novels, short stories, movies and series have a lot of fans. Are there studies that confirm that fans of science fiction novels, short stories, movies and series have significantly more people than the general population who exhibit personality disorders or other mental health conditions? I have not encountered the results of scientific research that could confirm the occurrence of this type of correlation.
Regards,
Dariusz Prokopowicz
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Hi I am currently doing a geography dissertation studying the representation of future space in climate fiction films thinking about ideas of capitalist hegemony and power inequalities in reference to gender and race. In terms of methodology im confused about the difference between textual and visual analysis (texts, at least in geography referring to pretty much everything), are they the same or is one better at analysing different aspects. Further in terms of actually carrying out the analysis how should my results be presented as due to it being on films i can't include parts of the film itself.
thanks
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You are quite right about "textual" and "visual" - one would usually consider the film as a text to include both its verbal and visual elements. In this sense and in lieu of further information, I would consider visual analysis as a subcategory of textual analysis, where the former focuses on the visual elements of the film alone and the latter on the visual, verbal, and narrative elements.
With respect to how to carry out and write the analysis, I usually begin by distinguishing between film form from film content and then describe either the overall structure of the film or specific shots, sequences, or scenes. There is an example using a novel, television series, and feature film here:
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I am looking for fiction (excluding fantasy and science fiction) drawing on preferably "Norse" or "Celtic" mythological sources other than the works by George Mackay Brown. 
Thank you!
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The Edinburgh Companion to Twentieth-Century Scottish Literature by Ian Brown, Alan Riach
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Is it possible to study the truth box within the narrative level in fiction?
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Good question
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I want to clear the postcolonial approach to read the literature. In my above-mentioned research, what are the basic (hypothetical) questions that should be addressed in research?
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The interconnected inquiries help me to approach literary Iraqi identity poetics as an integral part of a parallel discourse that is working to unsettle the dominant official 2003 poetry of “Iraqiness” as well as the sectarian essentializations of post-2003 Iraqi society.
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As time shows religion has made a comeback in the Middle East. But as far as time is concerned, religion has never been a factor in our poetry. They being more secular. It remains to be seen whether because of politics, poetry too will be effected by the change.
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What does the text reveal about the problematics of post-colonial identity, including the relationship between personal and cultural identity and such issues as double consciousness and hybridity?
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Try to read "Can the Subaltern Speak?" Spivak discusses the lack of an account of the Sati practice, leading her to reflect on whether the subaltern can even speak. Spivak writes about the process, the focus on the Eurocentric Subject as they disavow the problem of representation; and by invoking the Subject of Europe, these intellectuals constitute the subaltern Other of Europe as anonymous and mute. Reading Edward Said should help critics like you understanding this topic. All the best!
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Freud makes the philosophical argument that we cannot represent our own death because in trying to do so, we are always still left as spectators (Razinsky 2013, p. 16).
I'm looking for sources and theories to assist with developing:
How might this claim be destabilised when performers in TV shows 'act out' their own deaths? It is the viewer as spectator not the performer.
The actor Luke Perry passed away in the actual world and so they had to hold a funeral for Fred Andrews, the fictional character he played in Riverdale - what is the significance of this duality?
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Death does not and cannot constitute the continuance of ego in the same but another form. I have recently been reading on the results of dementia, which leaves nothing behind. Thereby the person effectively dies before their body, but the sense of loss here is the disappearance of all intelligence, memory and identity. Unless there are technigues or technical processes whereby human beings are caught at some point in their lives, prior to dementia, and that point is preserved, how can the person live on in any suitable form?
If the answer is given, god, an answer that exists prior to cognition as it appears all-purpose, can god get dementia too? When god dies, does everything of us die too?
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Fore instance, the hero is from a working class and another character, in the same novel, is a middle class. I want to study how each character can project his/her class membership.
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I do agree with the amazing answer and opinions of dr. Amjed 🌹🌺
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Historical novels or novels whose subject matter is about historical events like emigration or forced emigration. Tend to blend historical truth and fiction in their narrative, in this case the historic event serves as a background to, in some cases fictitious characters. This intersection I would like to know what is it i called or rather what might it be called?
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Nov 2, 2017 - Short stories, novels, myths, legends, and fairy tales are all considered fiction. While settings, plot points, and characters in fiction are sometimes ..
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In trying to set out the perameters of "social class" in the introduction of a text I am editing upon "social class' and "literature" for Routledge, I fell into a Lewis Carroll rabbit hole of wondrous conflicted definitions and claims about the fabulous Snarkish creature--class!
"
A granfalloon, in the fictional religion of Bokononism (created by Kurt Vonnegut in his 1963 novel Cat's Cradle), is defined as a "false karass." That is, it is a group of people who affect a shared identity or purpose, but whose mutual association is meaningless.
(“Granfalloon,” Wikipedia)
Vonnegut’s definition of a “granfalloon,” seems to fit the problematic semiotic state of the term “class,” as well. Northwestern University Sociologist Gary Fine suggested to me that what Wikipedia offered about “class” was as comprehensive as any other overview of this highly contentious, voluminous, multifaceted concept. Published definitions of social class, reveal a plethora of conflicting and overlapping traits and attributes that may suggest to some that class” is, in fact, a granfalloon. Yet the same may be said of all sociology’s categories to some degree. Granfalloon or not, we feel and experience very real class struggles that create pain in macro-level, full-scale armed conflicts. Micro-level class struggles go on daily, more or less peacefully, if annoyingly."
Would anybody like to shed more light, darkness, and chaos theory on this highly confusing topic? I am all ears and really need some expert opinion.
Thanks and looking forward to comments.
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I need to know a clear definition of free will and determinism.
And the influence of Thomas Hardy on D. H. Lawrence writings, especially his fiction
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They have the same tragic vision. Their characters, especially women, endeavour to free themselves from the confines of patriarchy, but these desires are thwarted by fate and society.
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im doing problem in QAP and i add one more matrix in that and i want to add one more fiction in the objective fuction using the 3rd matrix which is the minimum value in the matrix. but i didnt know how to write the function on finding the minimum value in the 3rd matrix
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I would like to suggest a simple rule on Matrix optimization as :
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This title might not be very clear, let me elaborate :
Let's say, you're a computer scientist on your browser. You innocently browse the web, looking for a new book about procrastination (or anything else). Suddenly, a click lead you to the homepage of EvilCorpWorld, a (fictional) company incarnating the opposite of your ethical views.
EvilCorpWorld isn't a "common evildoer", they blatantly make the world a worst place. According to your ethical views, they could be enslaving children, selling weapons to warlords, practicing tax fraud at country scale, they support network promoting racism and sexism...
On the homepage of EvilCorpWorld, you inadvertently notice a big security flaw. Something like "click here for rootshell (Admin only!)". For the sake of simplicity, let's say it's an actual flaw, not a honeypot or anything else.
Now you have three possibility :
  • to tell : email EvilCorpWorld to warn them about the huge flaw.
  • to poke : like with a stick, poke the flaw, trying to see how far you can get. Poking does not mix with wrongdoing on purpose or for benefit. It's more a playful activity.
  • to delegate : unsure of what to do, asking someone more versed in infosec what they think
What would be the most ethical-wise thing to do (maybe something other than three options)?
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Item 4 in a previous post, identity, is fundamental and at a certain level, un- provable as a absolute. We assume identity (this IS this) given evidence, but evidence too, is a form of identity (this PROVES this). The links "is" and "proves" are human judgement, and it's turtles all the way down. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turtles_all_the_way_down
Other than that, you have offered a lot of good ideas (and good questions and good comments) to unpack in your reply. Not sure what else I could add.
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This is my first project on Research Gate! Any helpful tips this community of researchers can offer me would be greatly appreciated. Thank you!
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Hello Nadia, thanks for your response. I will be working on my manuscript (novel length fiction) for my Thesis. I am interested in trying to find publishing opportunities/presses that prioritize multi-media, i.e. text and images? Thank you for your response. pm me if you would like to chat.
Best, Christina-Marie
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PA involves a child being influenced by a parent to reject or resist contact with the other parent for no good reason.
If fact what connection, correlation and contribution does it make to negative social issues such as historical trauma, family/whanau violence. What is the relevance of (PA) to social work?
Private troubles – Public issues, do they intersect in relation to PA?
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Through my views and from what I,have witnessed it is a fact. This occurs when partners are fighting or going through a breakup,separation or divorce.
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An interesting article by Geraci (2007) works with an early twentieth century theological claim that human reactions to the (perceived) presence of the divine is hallmarked by a conjunction of fear and allure. Geraci (2007) argues that SF literature by Philip K Dick, William Gibson and others (I would add Cordwainer Smith to the list) has positioned human reactions to advanced technology as reflecting a similar species of fear and allure in order to explore various themes.
Is anyone familiar with more recent publications on this or a related investigation of SF and religion?
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Translation?
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I need to find the sentiment of 
  • A paragraph of a fiction book.
  • Of the entire story book.
Have you any idea regarding the best sentiment analysis tool that we can use that is freely available (like SentiStrength)?
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You can use tm, ngram and NLP package in RStudio. These packages define various function which will help in sentiment analysis of novel or content in any book.
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Millennials see social media as a 'normal' process of everyday life. Is social media that engrained within society that the removal of it would essentially, for some, be the removal of 'reality'?
Jean Boudrillard identified simulacra as not being a 'copy of the real, but truth in its own right' or 'hyperreality' - Applying this to social media, we must surely be able to state that social media is a hyperreality, as it blurs the lines between reality and fiction by the content written upon it.
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We take “maps” of reality like television, film, etc. as more real than our actual lives.
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I am working on a piece of fiction with the Caspian Sea at the core as an ambiguous symbol. Have you come across any book (fiction or non-fiction) or a scientific paper that comes with some rare information? Any help will be appreciated, but no link to a book-seller's site please! :)
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Dont understand this question
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Many literary texts make some use of glossopoesis, or invention of languages. A few examples include Tolkien’s stories, Ursula LeGuin’s oeuvre, Thomas More’s Utopia, and so on. Most of them do not go much further than a conceptual level. So, how important it usually is to examine such “languages”?
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You can take this question from both ends. The language informs on the particular nature of the fictional world being built. But, as Tolkien argued so strongly, you also need an underlying world to give life to an invented language. You can go on all day long inventing artificial languages, but in order to have depth, historicity, layered meanings, and all these attributes that make a language interesting, that language has to relate to a given world. One type of error that children and people who learn a new language make is called "hyper-coherence", that is, trying to speak a language as if there were no inconsistencies within it. In English, for instance, a common children "mistake" is to treat irregular verbs as regulars, leading to sentences like "I goed fast!" ( http://mentalfloss.com/article/31648/10-language-mistakes-kids-make-are-actually-pretty-smart) which is exactly the way an hyper-coherent version of that language would sound.
The point (which Tolkien made so well) is that deep language-building requires interaction with a world, which brings accidents, exceptions, deformations, misunderstandings, etc... that impart life to it.
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Stephen King's name is synonymous with horror stories. Many consider King to be the most successful writer of modern horror fiction today. My question to you all are:
* How did you feel before watch horror movie?
* How did you feel when finishing the movie?
or
* Is there any positive or negative benefits we will get by watching horror movie?
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Dear سالم عبدالله أبو مخدة thank you for sharing your thoughts.
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Why are there still pseudo-scientific conspiracy theories that undermine obviously confirmed facts and scientific knowledge in the present era of publicly available large amounts of scientific knowledge?
Why in the present age of computerization, the digitization of knowledge resources and the huge scientific knowledge available on the Internet are still created pseudoscientific conspiracy theories, sometimes absurd claims of the type that the Earth is flat, that evolution is a fiction, that some people are aliens from outside the Earth etc.? For what reason and for what purpose are these types of irrational pseudoscience theories created?
Please reply
I invite you to the discussion
Thank you very much
Best wishes
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The so-called irrational is an essential element of human nature and a heightened if sometimes misjudged adjunct to scepticism. Disbelieving received or given knowledge and ideas is essential to scientific and philosophical discovery. Myths and story making are pronounced human traits.
But in the end many conspiracy theorists appear unwilling to do the hard work of finding genuine proof.
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I am almost finished with a first draft of a work of historical fiction set during the reign of Mary Tudor as the rumours of burnings are just reaching Bristol. I am now turning my thoughts toward either finding a publisher or a literary agent. Any advice, recommendations or guidance in this endeavour would be greatly appreciated.
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Self publish on Amazon https://kdp.amazon.com/
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How might one theorise Jouissance in relation to post-network television and televisual fiction?
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Dear Colleague Nicholas Jensen,
I have not encountered this term before and its definition below. I suppose I am a troglodyte for this lacuna in my vocabulary, but what makes you interested in linking 'jouissance' with mass media culture?
If I knew why this is important to do, then I could speak to the rhetorical methods of analysis.
Gloria
"physical or intellectual pleasure, delight, or ecstasy. "
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Hello,
I wondered if anyone would like to discuss ideas around The Lacanian Real and its relationship with Deleuze's Becoming?
In essence, the trajectory of my doctoral thesis is headed in the direction of the Lacanian Real with respects to the following:
If the Lacanian Real is impossible then is it possible/how is it possible to represent the Real on television?
In others words: How can that which is un-representable be represented?
A counter to Lacan as an obvious choice is Deleuze and he does not believe in the real-possible distinction as then it would reduce things to the ontologically lesser category of the impossible. He changes things to the virtual and the actual and says the virtual is just as Real as the Real world but it is not corporeal in an actual, physical, tangible sense. Thus, I am seeking to discuss:
1. The radical differences between Deleuze and Lacan (Deleuzian Becoming)
2. My supervisor has pointed me to the works of Tim Dean and Katerina Kolozova's Beyond Sexuality and the Cut of the Real. The concept of fiction also plays a big part in my intervention, so aside from all the stuff Zizek writes does anyone have any other suggestions for readings?
Finally, does anyone know where Deleuze states he has a problem with the real-possible distinction?
Many thanks and Best wishes,
Nick Jensen
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Michael Uebel and Aaron Schuster thank you for the recommendations. Do either of you feel that the Real could be applicable to other genres aside from horror? I am wanting to analyse Riverdale and two other fictional worlds and its characters from a Psychoanalytic perspective. I wonder if the metaphor of psychosis would be a valid way of representing the Real on television?
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Hn order to solve problems in physics, onas e can define time as field which is function of mass and velocityIf we can solve accurately any problem without defining time as a dimension why should we enter into fiction.. ow did it help physics by defining time a dimension. We know very well that it is not possible to do time travel. It is just a science fiction. Was it helpful to solve physics problem. I
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Velocity and mass are both energy expressions.
Kurt Wraae
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Is there a promise of technologies and inventions that will be developed in the future in novels and films of the science fiction genre?
In my opinion, in many science fiction movies you can find a preview of future inventions and technologies that will be implemented on the industrial scale. this is one of the main features of science fiction novels and movies.
In view of the above, the current question is: Is there a promise of technologies and inventions that will be developed in the future in novels and films of the science fiction genre?
Please, answer, comments. I invite you to the discussion.
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Dear Friends and Colleagues of RG
In my opinion, in many science fiction movies you can find a preview of future inventions and technologies that will be implemented on the industrial scale. this is one of the main features of science fiction novels and movies.
Do you agree with me on the above matter?
Please reply
I invite you to the discussion
Best wishes
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In electro-chemical sensors, graphene aggregation is challenging and functionalization is one of the methods to enhance graphene dispersion. Then which type of the stated functionalization is better to improve the over all performance of electro-chemical sensors?
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Dear Dr. Ahmed,
Thank you for the typical-error correction and answer.
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Historical fiction
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Pick your period and some historical figures.
Try word searching these names, places, and dates.
There are theorists around who specialize in biography and autobiography. They have methods you might adopt. Check Works Cited for essays more tageted to your topic.
Journal Article:
"Critical Mirrors: Theories of Autobiography"
CHARLES BERRYMAN Mosaic: An Interdisciplinary Critical Journal Vol. 32, No. 1 (March 1999), pp. 71-84
TITLE of ESSAY "Autobiography"
Helga Schwalm Created: 9. April 2014Revised: 11. April 201
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One of the best known formulas for character development of heroes is Joseph Campbell's monomyth, The Hero with a Thousand Faces.
Campbell identifies this recurring story outline in ancient myths, and many of today's books and movies use a similar structure of a young reluctant hero on a journey, fellow travelers, and an older mentor who is eventually "taken away" so that the young hero must defeat evil alone.
Is there any similar formula that has been used time and again for villains, or anti-heroes?
Some villains are written to be evil just for the same of being evil, which makes them one-dimensional. I am interested in more nuances villains who DO have some character development, and whether there are formulas used in constructing their characters.
I am thinking beyond archetypes and looking for formulas by which villains undergo character development, change, or growth.
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Perhaps not entirely relevant, but I think that taking a look at recent animated movies and live action Disney remakes might add an interesting perspective to your work. Whereas in previous animated Disney movies the villain was usually a one dimensional flat character (Maleficent, Lady Tremaine, the Red Queen, Shere Khan...), in more recent adaptations the villain has a more profound psychology, they are no longer evil for the sake of being evil, but as a consequence of some previous trauma or hardship. Furthermore, movies are being made about villains-turned-heroes, such as "Despicable Me" and "Megamind". Villains are recently being humanised - there is no such thing as pure evil.
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It is said that fantasy stories expand the child's perceptions
But at the same time face the problems of life
So the question is which is the best fiction stories or science stories or realistic.
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Two are helpful and balanced
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What are some of the fictions that seem to have appeared around regulation and licensing? The sources of these fictions are obscure but, from what I have seen, some vendors create misinformation in an attempt to gain a sales advantage.
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Thank you for bringing this up! Regarding the statement "Users must be of a class of professionals as designated on the labelling on the GPR instrument", which professionals qualify as GPR users and how is "professionals" defined in this context (someone who earns a living by using GPR, someone with a certain degree, education, training)?
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Dear Scientists,
do you consider it appropriate to introduce literary fiction as an example for the management/business practice to the study program of management concepts?
All the best!
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Experientially speaking, yes I think there could be fiction or semi-fiction of relevance to management education. Examples could include Oliver Stone's "Wall Street", Adam McKay's "The Big Short", Hirschbeigel's "Downfall", Scorses's "Wolf of Wall Street", "Founder" about McDonalds, and plenty others. Their role in reflexive management education could include history, ethics, crisis management and various behavioural lessons.
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As a teaching tool, I would like to publish a series of historical fiction books on the post-Roman period focusing on Britain. The "Arthurian" age has attracted too much fantasy from people wanting to tell a good story and not bothering with the cultural and physical elements of everyday life then and I'd like to rectify the problem.
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It's probably hard to beat Bernard Cornwell's Warlord trilogy even twenty years after he moved on to the days of Alfred the Great. But his publishers - St. Martin's Press in New York, as far as I can tell - might lend you an ear?
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Dear ALL
While fiction already shows it in movies, animal experiments have been completed, gene editing is becoming real do you recommend/suggest designer babies and babies being homed in artificial human wombs?
Every parents like superman, so I see this all going real very soon.
Kindly have your technical and ethical say on the subject
Regards
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It's realistic, but we do not know all the details. Such research is a strict secret. If they have adequate use, I have nothing against it.
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I'm currently working on book on applied measurement systems analysis, a friend who writes books on organistaion psycology, suggested that I should include a narrative thread within the book to make it more accessible. With this in mind, I have taken the approach of adding the narrative to the worked examples at the end of each Chapter.
This gives the following chapter structure:
- Introduce the topic.
- Present the analysis methods, formulas and key factors.
- Present the appliction of the discssed methods in the context of a fictional organistion and how the main character applies the method to resolve problems he faces.
What are people's prespectives on the the use of a running narrative theme and setting within thsi type of literature, what do you like to see, what do you dislike, and are there good or bad examples that you know of?
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Hello, Colleague Nenad Sarcevic,
I wrote to Ira Shor. Maybe he has published on chart to story. I saw it as a convention panel presentation.
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I'm researching the effectiveness of a (parser-based interactive fiction) game for second language learners, looking specifically at engagement and vocabulary retention. Ideally I'd like to compare it with traditional media. There are plenty of books on research methods in education out there, but what are the best ones (or papers) specifically focused on researching the use of technology in ESL ?
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Thank you Mohammed -
the article by Cornilie et al. (2011) was particularly useful.
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Wherever your chosen reading locale - beach, park bench, airplane, air-conditioned living room - make sure you’re curling up with the best books of summer 2018. From novels to short story collections, historical yarns to nonfiction titles drawn from the headlines, there’s something new for readers of all stripes to dig into this summer. Debut authors with buzzy fiction, teen activists marking a movement and historical experts populate this summer reading list for 2018.
My suggestions are (for now):
1. Female Persuasion by Meg Wolitzer
2. The High Season by Judy Blundell
3. Look Alive Out There by Sloane Crosley
4. Nedoumice by Dzevad Karahasan
5. Alfir by Irfan Horozovic
6. The Missing by Agatha Christy
Do yoh have suggestions?
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Gore Vidal's essays, without fail. Beautiful style, analytical and knowledgeable.
Gore Vidal's 'Creation', a novel about a point in time when great thinkers emerged and the world changed, as they say in all the good blurbs. Brilliant novel and brilliant history!
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On returning from a visit trip collecting stories and making college class visits at Purdue University and Indiana University regional campuses in northwest Indiana, I have been weighing the state of publishing and whether writers from the "Rust Belt" "Flyover Zone" have a hope of being read outside their local region. This is not only applicable to the United States "Rust Belt" and "Flyover Zone" but analogous zones across the planet.
A key to Thorstein Veblen's theory of "conspicuous consumption" in his study _The Theory of the Leisure Class_ is social emulation. Each narrow band of socially-stratified society looks up to a slightly higher band and embarks on a furious program of "emulation" or mimicking their "betters." And when this is accomplished the active agent moves on to emulate a higher rung. Veblen helpfully supplies comparisons to bird behavior and the rituals of pre-industrial society, such as the Inuit "potlatch" as analogous to the upper-class debutante's "coming out" ball.
So, in the United States instance, any editor in New York or on the East Coast will see a less-status-y setting and instantly know "Sorry. This is not for us. Good luck elsewhere." Yes, taste matters. As Veblen writes, "a beautiful article which is not expensive is not accounted as beautiful" ("Theory" 132). With a slight shift, we might add that "a beautiful text not placed in an expensive setting is not beautiful."
What effect upon cognitive development and the mental evolution of creative writers does this process entail? The embodied subject so often enthusiastically dissected in pages of the Modern Language Association journal says little about the bodies and Foucaultian embodiment in the "Flyover Zone" or "Rust Belt," although I have addressed the issue by starting a "Rust Belt Literature" group in the MLA online commons. The same "emulative" avoidance seems to be at work since our new "Rust Belt Literature" MLA group is relatively low-traffic. Seven members at last count. MLA groups for the lesser poets of the Scottish Hebrides of the late 18th Century often boast more members than this.
Some creative writing students have devised work-arounds such as (1) pretending to have lived in Paris or (2) writing in a vacuum where characters walk in a vague setting like dry ice fog in a low-budget film to disguise the less-status-y real setting. These texts show some initiative and focus in CW students. However, perhaps, creative writing classes could find a more accurate name in flyover country such as Evasive Writing? Does Veblen fit?
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Novelists didn't need to be told about conspicuous consumption and waste and the leisure class by the wonderful Veblen. Certainly he formulated them in a systematic way, but Dickens, Thackeray, Zola, didn't require his orderly exposition to make the point about patterns of wealth.
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I am looking for examples of interdisciplinary work/researchers who explore the relevance of fantasy and science fiction literature beyond the text, so how it can impact lives, promote wellbeing.
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Yes and no. It strikes me as a bit humorous that we write to each other via high tech Internet groups, take planes to conferences where we then proceed to list only the failings in present and future science and technology.
When I was in the Ph.D. program in English with a husband who is an astronomer, I did encounter this view over and over. I mean, the saying that "Science will be the death of humanity."
I love the writing of Karel Capek, of course, and note that he combined much self-deprecating humor with his visions. This allows some distancing--maybe like Brecht's Verfremdungseffekt--between the writer and his didactic points. "Maybe I am wrong or we can do something about this before this not-too-funny thing occurs," Capek says in his witty way.
The ethos problem exists not just in scientists like Victor Frankenstein but in all powerful figures. Science doesn't exist in a vacuum tube to be approved or condemned.
Rather science, its findings or inventions are poured into a vessel of some kind of governing philosophy, monetary gain option, level of societal corruption, and pressure to conform to needs of the state. While some scientists grow rich and use their innovations for personal gain even when dangerous, others stay poor and try to give away helpful discoveries (Nicola Tesla). Why?
I like to interrogate positions and draw out the systems pulling on a subject from as many directions as possible just as the best SF does. One example I have used in class is Isaac Asimov's 1941 story "Nightfall." That story proposed the coming of "night," which nobody in the society understood because it occurred only once in a thousand years. (Still a unique plot.) The ways science is applied and the reactions of various groups in the society is both enlightening and very droll.
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Hello, Colleagues,
I am having some success in mapping a pop cultural fiction phenomenon from small beginnings, to a circle of cognscenti, to a wild upswing in popularity.
There is a dark side to the fiction phenomenon in terms of dealing with human differences. So how can theory help in studying what appeals to the informal reader in this writing and what demographic segment makes use of this writing?
I have posted elsewhere about my case-in-point but now I am just wondering about the mechanics of the transmission and adoption of attitudes. Would cultural studies have theories, anthropology, sociology?
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Hello Gloria, greetings from Germany.
In the field of early European Ethnology , Hans Naumann suggested the theory of "Gesunkenes Kulturgut" in the early 1920s, saying that innovative powers in higher socio-cultural hierarchies create cultural aspects, which are then by time copied and adapted by what was then called "lower classes". Obviously, this theory didn't stand for long, as many examples of modern pop culture show us that culture may be transferred vertically bottom-to-top as well (Jeans, Tattoos, Boots with steel cabs, etc.). But nevertheless it is a considerable idea to begin with. It might also be worth discussing and adapting the Broken-Window-Theory by Wilson and Kelling or the characteristics of innovation diffusion stated by Hägerstrand for your work. Also defining the characteristics of the "Early-Adaptors" in diffusion processes and seeing different mechanisms in "vertical" and "horizontal" diffusion, using cultural expressions to include or exclude, might show a path to how a cluster of theories that might be helpful.
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Many of us have seen "Star Wars". Many of us like one of its main heroes - Luke Skywalker. He is ranked #14 among fictitious characters, see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luke_Skywalker
But the question is this: where does his power and strength come from? Clearly, he was born talented. He also has passed the magic school of Jedi. And he fights for good and against evil.
Is the magic education a necessary component of strength? Does fighting for good bring more power? (But there are examples of jedi who served evil)
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This question stems from a recent comment made by Guillermo del Toro, regarding his creation process: "A lot of people, when they design creatures, they reference [other] creatures. And that's the worst thing you can do, because then you're going to regurgitate somebody else's process and that's it." (on Vice News, Dec. 5 2017). This comment got me thinking about whether or not the same thing could be said about the creation of fictional societies and cultures. More often than not, they reference existing or historical cultures and societies. This practice has sparked many debates over the years, touching on the politics of representation, cultural appropriation, historical revisionism, or the 'right to dream' of other places and other times. But what are the alternatives? For the sake of argument, let's explore other avenues, other non-human sources of inspirations that have, or could, serve as templates for creating fictional societies and/or cultures. Animal behavior is an obvious candidate here, and we could think of a number of examples in which they have served as inspiration for authors. But machines too ; the movies "Tron", for instance present a society inspired by the workings of a computer. Can you think of other examples?
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Then we may also ask ourselves if our own (non-fictional) societies were not partially built upon animal behaviors as well. In ancient societies sigils and totems were often symbolizing a certain type of animal behavior that was deemed as virtuous by the societies/families that used them. But it is interesting to observe the virtues/values represented in societies that chose non-living or at least non-animal objects as their sacred symbols. What behaviors are inspired by such things as mountains or trees ? Our societies often personified/deified those objects. There is a projection of the human on the object, but there is also an observational inspiration that is drawn from the object. This exchange process gives us good insights on fictional societies building, imagining the "behavior" of the natural environment of a society can maybe help us to imagine and shape a culture that may spring from that imaginary environment. It is probably a longer process than drawing direct inspiration from human societies, but may lead to things that feel just as plausible, while being fresh and uncommon.
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Fiction can be a tool for opening up possibilities, alternatives, and aspirations. It would be interesting to build a bibliography of works that describe imaginative economic systems that help us think outside the box.
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I would like to comment on the suggestions made here and offer some of my own.
Samuel Butler's "Erewhon" is very clever and like the title - "nowhere," sort of backwards, everything is reversed - crime becomes disease and disease becomes crime. It's a satire, not a proposal for an alternative society. Important nuance there.
As for Eric Blair, known as George Orwell, "Animal Farm," which he cribbed from a story read on the BBC by Ignazio Silone (pen name of Secundino Tranquilli from my Abruzzo) is totally a satire of the Soviet system and in no way a serious proposal for an alternative society much less an economic system. How about reading the question instead of just spouting off? The same goes for most of the answers here. Gandhi did do some serious thinking about capitalism and his homespun movement undermined Britain's wool industry, but again that is not what the question is about, neither Thomas More's "Utopia," another satire of his times and not a proposal for an alternative society. someone mentioned Orwell's "1984" and "Brave New World," both cheerfully ripped off of Yevgeny Zamyatin's "We," by far the most original and disturbing of totalitarian dystopias, reflecting his disgruntlement with the Soviet Union. Again, not a proposal, but a biting satire.
While most utopias and dystopias are critiques of the authors' contemporaneous worlds or their presumed extensions, some of these utopias do propose another world, including an economic system. Tommaso Camponella's "The City of the Sun" is one such society and economic system. It reflects one of the oldest outlines for a different or better society, Plato's "Republic." Do these count as serious proposals for an economic alternative? Tough judgment - there are not enough details to really decide, I believe, in spite of some general parameters.
Most of the time, all authors are reacting to their times, whether satirically or constructively. Although I think Ayn Rand was a poor and tiresome writer, again reacting against the Soviet Union and its Communist philosophy with her political pulp fiction in "Anthem," "Atlas Shrugged," and "The Fountainhead," she inspired with her salon in California people like Alan Greenspan who become Chairman of the US Federal Reserve and in this sense, she strongly influenced the direction of US and world capitalism.
Vincenzo Di Nicola
University of Montreal &
The George Washington University
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I'm looking for specific novels to include in a chapter on my PhD thesis, and am trying to circumvent my wild goose chase. The novels should fulfil all (if possible) or as many of the criteria below:
  • published post-1980
  • written by a woman
  • British colonial context - thematically in the text or biographically outside the text
  • Thematically concerned with London (if only partially)
No suggestion is too obvious: please make any recommendations you can think of. If you can make clear which criteria they fulfil, that would be really useful.
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Ilavenil Meena Kandasamy is a poet, fiction writer, activist and currently one of India’s boldest and most badass young voices. Most of her works are centered on feminism and the Caste Annihilation Movement of the contemporary Indian milieu. She holds a PhD in Socio linguistics and has published two anthology of poems, “Touch” and “Ms Militancy”, and a novel “The Gypsy Goddess”. Her most recent work -“When I Hit You Or A Portrait Of The Writer As A Young Wife” is a dazzling and provocative novel of an abusive marriage.
,
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Good evening. Currently I'm in the middle of working on my essay. The topic is about sexual self-concept of fangirl who reads slash fiction. I would be grateful if anyone could help me to recommend any journal or book about sexual self-concept because I don't think what I gathered so far is good enough. Thank you before. Best regards.
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What would the people have eaten? What were the water sources? What did their shelters look like? How did they sleep? I am looking for good information on daily life during this period to lend realism to a work of fiction. 
Thank you,
DR
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Interesting question. I think there only a researcher who investigated this topic can answer with precision on this. 
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I'm doing research with fresh GO powder without any fictionalization in very little amount with cement composite.
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Graphene having superb electromechanical properties is a attractive material for advanced and smart cementitious composite systems. Although its newly was synthesized, there are several patents and research studies for its use in cementitious materials. 
I think the GO Powder can be defined as its dry solid form with high purity. The terms cannot be compared. The materials can be marketable in special solution with dispersing agent or as dry forms.
In my opinion, the platelets should be used in liquid form to allow its sufficient homogeneous distribution in cementitious composites rather than its powder form. However, dispersing agent type and amount of the solution must be checked in terms of suitability for cementitious systems.
Good luck.
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I'm researching Soja and Bachelard on spatiality and the poetics of space and am looking for two or three texts to use as application for their theories.
Thank you.
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You could use Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o, specifically his novel A Grain of Wheat if you want to focus on space from the perspective of Nationality and post colonial.
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I am doing literary analysis of Young Adult fiction addressing cultural issues. I have planned to address the themes but I think addressing the characters might be more effective. I wonder if someone has a better plan.
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To address the cultural issues, analyzing the impacts of the variables of Time (era), Size (depth of issue), & space (social environment & religion) could be beneficial.  
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Does it distort historical facts/trivialise history for children or is it a useful learning tool?
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Peter and Anastasia
Thank you both for your very helpful recommendations. I am delighted to get such a great start with my research.
Regards
Karen
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Do quantum function is decorated with some membrane like fictional and structural aspects as well?
Only the charges, position, velocity etc. are behind such makeup of Quantum membranes?
Can the concept of “Quantum Bubble” based on specified/directed energy capsule is characterise by quantum membrane, be a good idea for many mysteries behind some of today`s un-understandable phenomenon, especially with reference to metaphysics?
Do some minimum amount of energy is requirement for creation of movement in particle along a cover like quantum membrane? Beneath it is a free energy existence? If so then what can the energy level of most basic / fundamental particle?
Only wave-function can make functional existence of quantum bubbles similar to functional charges?
What can be the pros & cons of “Quantum Bubbles” formations?
If energy can get trap into Quantum Bubble then what can be its further applications?
Thanks
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The draw back my be in that this energy use may create voids in the background energy densities and cause ripple affects that we do not know what it will mean.  This could also be good as there may be ways to send information using this kind of voids but it could also be bad as we are not sure if live is dependent on the state of the quantum energy being the way it is???
There is much to be discovered.  I would love to help with that kind of research.. 
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Researching the development of Cornish Gothic and require texts (novels, travel books, poetry, film, television series, etc.) that gothicise the county as Daphne du Maurier did in her fiction. Her novels portrayed Cornwall as a peculiar, primitive and pre-industrial counterpart to the country and I'm looking for material that may be of use in the context of Gothic geography.
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If I may add a bit more, you should also check the writings of Richard Polwhele an adherent of Scott, for the Gothicisation of Kernow
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George Orwell of course most famously used animals as a literary device in one of his most well-known works, Animal Farm. However, animals are also a recurrent theme throughout many of his writings, both in his works of fiction and journalism.
Can anyone recommend any sources that discuss how Orwell uses animals in his fiction or non-fiction writing, or how he was influenced by his interest in animals and his rural upbringing? Not just in the most conspicuous example of Animal Farm, but also in his other works, such as Nineteen Eighty-fourSome Thoughts on the Common Toad, Coming up for Air (in which he discusses his love of fishing), his diaries and his essay Why I Write.
Thanks.
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Dear Charlie,
you will find many interesting interpretations of animal and other characters of the novel (smth like these:  http://www.newspeakdictionary.com/go-animal_farm.html ; http://cyberleninka.ru/article/n/conceptual-metaphor-in-george-orwells-political-dystopia-animal-farm , http://www.academicjournals.org/journal/IJEL/article-full-text-pdf/39296CD965 ), but one detail is often forgotten. The fact is that the biomorphic metaphors of every language have their specific meanings and connotations. In the discussed case - of the English language. And this feature is "lost in translation".
For example the Russian word свинья 'pig' has only the negative connotations (it refers to a dirty, untidy and stupid person) and never symbolizes wealth, riches, and so on. Pig Snowball is an oxymoron for Russians in some ways (because snow is the epitome of purity, of smth that is clean, fresh). Donkey is always a metaphor for a very stupid, uneducated and stubborn man, goat - for a windy, active, provocative woman, and so on. As a result, the perceptions of the text by English-speaking and Russian-speaking rearders (even if a translation is good) differ very much.
The systems of the English (or Russian, or any other) language biomorphic metaphors and symbols, allegories are fixed in dictionaries, so you can check, if Orwell changed the language meanings, creating the units with individual (original), authorial senses, or he didn't not. Some information on it is here: http://www.academicjournals.org/journal/IJEL/article-full-text-pdf/39296CD965 /
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 How can we look at this issue of changing relationships keeping in view the contemporary Indian English Fiction?
i am in need of answer for this question in postcolonial perspective.
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I am a single mom. I migrated (technically I am "sojourner", but I moved here without plans to return to the US) to China with my two daughters: I am currently still in China.  From experience, it changed my relationship with my older daughter.  After we arrived and were trying to adapt to a very different culture than our own (European-Americans living in China), my older daughter really struggled to fit in at school.  She was in 6th grade.  Her difficulty to adapt is partially a function of her age and development.  Leaving her friends was very difficult.  We all grieved, leaving the US behind.  But the transition was the hardest on her.  She felt an acute social isolation-- all her school mates were Chinese.  In contrast, I have colleagues and coworkers from the US to talk to and relate to.  My younger daughter has adapted fairly easily.  The change in the relationship that happened as my daughter got progressively anxious and depressed was that she withdrew from me and shut me out.  I ended up having to make arrangements for her to move back to the US with her dad, because it got to a point where I thought she was in emotional trauma.  Not having her live with me is a huge shift in our relationship.  I cannot talk to her every day or care for her.  Previously, we were very close.  The culture shock for us was deeply felt.  My children are followed, touched, stared at.  People follow us to take our pictures.  And social mannerisms are very different than we were used to.  Feel free to connect with me and ask me personal questions.  Best wishes on your project.
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When I studied literature i was flooded by incomprehensible  theories on deconstructionism, marxism and psychoanalysis. As a result, I never felt that I learnt the basics of narratology , how plots were constructed. I wish to return to "sane" and practical theories. 
I know that a lot of plot-gurus in Hollywood apply structuralist theories in their books. But I don't want to read all of them. I therefore wonder if there exists an easy to read introduction that sums of the various theories on how crime fiction & thrillers are plotted, acts, resolutions, set up etc. I would be nice if the work included the ideas presented by Robert McKee, John Truby, Syd Field and people like that with practical approach to writing. There are of course the archetype approach from Cambell/volger and other Jung derivatives. 
Please help if you know any easy-to-read book that summarizes what i have mentioned. 
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Another book that takes up plots of various works and analyses those is by Peter Brooks "Reading for the Plot: Design and Intention in Narrative". It gives a psycho-narratological perspective on plots.
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I got them, thank you
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Hello Issa
I recomend you the novel of G.K. Chesterton (1914) The Flyng Inn.
Best regards
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Some references for context:
Auger, J. (2013) Speculative design: crafting the speculation, Digital Creativity, Vol 24, Issue 1, 11-35.
Dunne, A. & Raby, F. (2014) Speculative Everything: Design, Fiction & Social Dreaming, MIT Press.
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Cameron Tonkinwise has recently published an article reviewing Dunne & Raby's Speculative Everything book. I think you may find his criticisms on their work very valuable:
Tonkinwise, C. "How We Intend to Future: Review of Anthony Dunne and Fiona Raby, Speculative Everything: Design, Fiction, and Social Dreaming." Design Philosophy Papers 12.2 (2014): 169-187.
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Thanks. 
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You should read the stories of Michael Ende.
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There's the narrative operations of the detective, the clues that refer to the unknown but soon to be signified story of the villain, and all the while the reader is constructing their own narrative about 'what happened'. Contemporary Detective Fiction writers narratively construct - through cultural discourses, plot, themes and characterisation - stories that are intended to influence their readers.    
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Cassy
Here is the Auden article: (on detective stories)... pretty old now though... :)
Cheers
JT
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The Spanish picaresque novel had its heyday in the Siglo de Oro, continuing into the 18th century. By the beginning of the 19th century the appreciation of first-person life accounts of the picaresque type seems to have declined considerably. I am looking for instances of picaresque narratives written and published in 19th-century Spain, regardless of their position within the literary field.
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"El Periquillo Sarniento" by Fdez, de Lisardi (1816), is the first Spanish-American novel, and a picaresque one at that, written before Mexico´s independence from Spain. .
"El doctor Centeno" by Benito Pérez Galdós, while not narrated in the first person, does contain much lively, direct dialogue. The main character, a boy who seeks his fortune (by trying, in this case to study medicine) but really does not succeed, passes from one scenario to another, each having to a degree a satirical aspect.
Interestingly enough, the picaresque novel was cultivated in Victorian Anglo-America by Samuel Clemens (Mark Twain): see "Tom Sawyer," "Huckleberry Finn," and others. Whether he was influenced by "Lazarillo" I do not know. I do know he read and loved "Don Quixote," with its picaresque elements (since Cervantes´s masterpiece makes a new synthesis of the picaresque with the chivalric novel).
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Archetypal characters, images and situations?
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I definitely think there are several classic charicatures being presented here: Catherine, the tomboy who becomes a lady. Heathcliff, the ruffian who wants to be something better for a girl he loves (e.g., the Disney Aladdin). Hindley, the abusive guardian (a la every evil step-mother out there).
However, one aspect I have always loved about Wuthering Heights is Bronte's ability to take classical cliche characters and characteristics and twist them into either emphasized or altered versions of themselves. For example, the relationship between Heathcliff and Catherine is, on the surface, the classic "true love" story; yet Bronte twists the story into something much darker and their relationship into something more metaphysical than the traditional in-love couple.
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I am currently analysing Edgar Allan Poe's stories using SNA in order to weight the importance of symbolic elements in groups of stories. Anyone doing something similar?
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Thanks Mr. Drago for your information. I have downloaded the article successfully and I will surely enhoy reading it. I was wondering if you yourself have any experience in the topic of SNA for literary works. thanks again.