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Ethnomedicine - Science topic

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Please answer as I am gathering literature on Protected Areas
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CAMPOS, JULIANA LOUREIRO ALMEIDA ; ALBUQUERQUE, ULYSSES PAULINO . Indicators of conservation priorities for medicinal plants from seasonal dry forests of northeastern Brazil. ECOLOGICAL INDICATORS, v. 121, p. 106993, 2021.
SILVA, JÉSSIKA PRISCILA COSTA DA ; GONÇALVES, PAULO HENRIQUE ; ALBUQUERQUE, ULYSSES PAULINO ; SILVA, Rafael Ricardo Vasconcelos da ; MEDEIROS, Patrícia Muniz de . Can medicinal use protect plant species from wood uses? Evidence from Northeastern Brazil. JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT, v. 279, p. 111800, 2021.
LIMA DA SILVA, TEMÓTEO LUIZ ; FERREIRA JUNIOR, WASHINGTON SOARES ; Paulino Albuquerque, Ulysses . Is there a biological basis in the selection of medicinal plants in the human species? An initial approach based on chemosensory perception of taste. Ethnobiology and Conservation, v. 9, p. 1-16, 2020.
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I just want to have a positive critique from experts in the field of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine on our recently introduced Index published as a journal paper under the title "A new ethnobiological similarity index for the evaluation of novel use reports" in the journal of Applied Ecology and Environmental Research 17(2):2765-2777
DOI: 10.15666/aeer/1702_27652777
Thanks for your time!
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Dear Dr. Sb
I agree with Dr. ARSHAD'S comments about the application of similarity indices weather new or previous due to
1. Cultural, economic, social, geopolitical and many other aspects(factors) vary from region to region and even in the same region the changing life style along with changing socioeconomic condition; all effect the knowledge, practices and wisdom of people who are owner and custodian of ethnobotanical knowledge. These variables are major contributing factors in determining the ethnobotanical practices/knowledge. In all said along with proposed index to determine similarity among MPs, the contribution of these variables is ignored/ measured.
2. Different researcher use and apply different data collection approaches to reach their objectives. So objective of study changes (and it really happens to bring novality, fill the gap). The studies with multiple objectives could not be judged by single tool. e.g objective of documenting TEK produces different results and objective to record declining trend of TEK generate different data set. Approaches also matter alot as open ended and close ended questionnaire, number of informants, demographic status of informants any many others; they are not same in any study. There is no uniformity in data of papers.
3. Taxonomic skill and local terminology of diseases are also not same in both researchers and informants which may result chaos in data sets.
Whereas for determining similarity index by JI or SI the procedure adopted to collect data about any target group is always predefined.
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Currently working on a project that will focus on Andrographis paniculata and andrographolide, me and my team is currently looking for supporting studies to establish a strong stand. The study will be highlighting the importance and relevance of andrographolide in modern medicine.
For the advancement of research!
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I am looking to study the Ayurvedic formula Triphala, how can I purchase it from serious source in India or from Europe??
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You can buy from raw material supplier in India and can authanicate them through pharmacopoeial standards.
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We always hear that herbal medicines don't have side effects beacuse they are natural. However, the synthetic drugs are associated with a lot of side effects. How true is this statement?
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Herbal medicines may produce negative effects such as allergic reactions, rashes, asthma, headaches, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhoea that can range from mild to severe.
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Hello,
in 2008 after my epidemiological thesis in biology/ethnomedicine I started the development of the FCMapper. About 2010 I started studying fine arts and worked in the field of Art&Science since then. 2018 I got a one year stipend from the state of Carinthia for developing FCM as an artistc method.
In which kind of fields do you plan to work with FCM in this project? Which kind of scientists and experts will be involved into this project?
It would be great to contribute to a bigger project to bring FCM out of academia - into museums and also public space.
Kind regards, Michael
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cool idea Michael! Allow me to brainstorm a little bit .....
Think of a 3d installation in a museum for example that visualises in real time the satisfation of the visitors. The visitors fill online satisfaction surveys and the 3d installation adapts its form and geometry with respect the FCM outcomes.
Serafeim
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Climate change is causing new types of diseases.
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Homeopathy is a specific training in which the underlying principle is that "like treats like".  The practice utilizes dilutions of herbs and minerals singly or in combination to treat anything form illnesses to mood disorders.  It is profound yet subtle treatment.  Homeopathy was the leading discpline in medicine in this country a hundred years ago and is still widely practiced in Europe where there are entire hospitals that use only Homeopathic medicines.  Hahneman Medical School in Philadelphia was originally a school of homeopathy.  (It has since been bought by a big hospital chain and had its name changed.)  You can buy certain homeopathic remedies in your local health food store, but there are practitioners who specialize in this area and can create individually designed remedies for a specific patient.  To promote oneself as a "Homeopath" requires no specific training, certification or licensure.  Caveat emptor.
Naturopathy is a field of medical care which utilizes foods and supplements as medicine.  The degree of ND is conferred in a school of naturopathy of which there are several in this country, mostly in Washington and Oregon.
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I was not satisfied with the not-scrupulous descriptions which were often used in many medical or ethnological or other scientific articles. Their goal was to describe the manual methods, the hand movements of a therapist, e.g. a bonesetter, during his or her treatment on a patient. I would appreciate your comments on my thesis of 1999 in which I developed a drawing method, "positiographical cinemanalysis". My goal was to study more exactly than before a film or video, to present the individual methods of any manual therapist. To draw  a film frame consciously with a detailed described drawing method, with bare hands, means studying of a view very detailed. It helps the scientific conceptualization and understanding of visual stationary or moving persons or objects.  My thesis: Hernesniemi, A: Presentation of bonesetter-patient collaboration through positiographical cinemanalysis (Oulu 1999) can be read at my profile at Research Gate. 
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 Thank you Faranack. Or is it so that scholars are satisfied with too general and poorly defined concepts ?
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If exist, an official copyright or patent agreement took place with the owner of the prescription, the informant in the article, by mediating the author(s)..
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Not any more. This was an effort that was popular in the 1990s. However, because essentially now new "high profit" plant derived drugs have entered the market since the development of taxol, pharmaceutical companies have all but abandoned this effort.
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How rational is to use/refer the non-native and non-indigenous plants interchangeably?
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This all depends in timelines. In Europe for example plants introduced from wherever prior to 1492 are often regarded as native, although they are technically pre-Columbian introductions, many of which have however been naturalized. Overall I would prefer "non-indigenous" species, simply for language reasons. Not all introductions are  invasive however. Also, an important aspect are local varieties - lots of crop plants have been introduced in many parts of the world, and have then been bred in distinct, local varieties. These are technically "non-native", but they are - as varieties - indigenous.
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I have to carry out hepatoprotective screening of few ethnomedicinal plants using alcohol as hepatotoxicant. I went through several papers, but none has mentioned the alcohol percentage orally to be given to rats. Kindly help 
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Dear Nissar, do you mean single or chronic administration of ethanol - chronic seems to be not very convenient for the screening and single may not lead to necrosis (we used a single dose of 9 ml/kg as 30% sol. while modelling lipid metabolism disorders, and this dose have not lead even to an increase in cytolisis as evidenced by plasma ASaT and ALaT activity)
Regards,
Olga
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I am basically using medicinal leeches for therapeutic purposes but getting very hard to arrange sterile leeches so looking for the help to establish a leech bank or small leech farm for their breeding and maintaining the standard storage conditions.
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Nice idea, in my view any institute should do such job, any how as a business you may do this, what type of help you need?
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I am currently working on snake venom enzymes inhibition by crude plant extracts. I found one of the plant extracts working very effectively in different enzyme inhibitions. When I communicate the same results in reputed Journal, Reviewers asked for standards or positive controls. During the experiment, I have used venom activity in absence of plant extract as a control and also the proper blanks were maintained. Now my doubt is that, what is the necessity to have positive controls when I can easily say whether the experimental design is correct or wrong with controls itself? Could anyone explain this?
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you need to test a group with venom and crude extract and observe whether the plant extract can prolong the duration of death or not in the animals.however the extract can not completly antagonise the effect of venom as that of standard ASV.If ur extract can prolong the duration of death ,you can substantiate it through different ezyme neutralisation mechanisms.
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I want apply different statistical tools (methods) to analyse my ethnomedicinal and ethnobotanical data and information.
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cross-cultural differences,  chi-square, Fishers test, RRI,etc.
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Ethnobotany, ethnomedicine, ethnopharmacology etc. all depend upon the traditional use of plant/plant parts at medicinal and other related purpose by the so called ethnic people. The obtained such knowledge from their ancestors. Presently we are validating such claims with the tools and knowledge base presently available. Can we say the claims are false or not true if we can not find any effect by our present way of validation which only covers the study of effects of extracted material of dry plant parts only? According to Charak Samhita, five type of extracts can be prepared from any plant part which are having different grade of actions. Presently we make extract from dry plant part by use of different solvents and study the efficacy of the solvent extracts on different models. Is it a complete, foolproof study? We can also study the medicinal plant parts at fresh condition just after collection from the living plant, as they are used by the ethnic people more or less in this form.
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we can't say the claims are false or not true easily. seldom we can imagine traditional condition , exactly.  in the post , treatment was based on easier and cheaper  methods which was adapted  with common people, therefore we saw water and oil solution
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He was an important investigator in the theory and methods of culture studies. When I began my own studies in ethnomedicine in Finland in 1981, I learned to know him. Living in Turku, he gave me advice at our yearly meetings until 1990's. Studying now musicology in Turku, I am again reading his articles about the practice and theory of ethnographic fieldwork.
I would be interested to know how you see his scientific impact at the moment ?
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Piret, thank you. I see Lauri Honko as a specialist in folk narrative and belief systems and their typologies. Because I am myself more interested about field study and material analysis methods, his approaches - although so thoroughly thought and presented - are some far from my own focus area. He encouraged me especially during the first years of my study in the 1980's. I respected him but never got very close to him. - By the way, here at the Turku University, his old "castle", Fennicum, is not anymore the place for Turku folklorists. They have moved to an other building nearby.  
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How to protect the traditional ethnomedicinal knowledge of the use of the particular species concerned? As a first step I have identified the chemical responsible for the particular therapy and have not published the paper yet. I first want to get a patent on that.
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Gautam, if you can identify any factor in your extract that can potentially enhance the potency of your key component then you do have an advantage there.
The use of your key constituent is proven. Let us assume that a country store in the State of New Mexico prints a small note as a flyer touting the benefits of a berry drink that they are selling; this becomes prior art.
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I want to see the relationship between plants and people (how indigenous plants and non-indigenous people or non-indigenous plants and indigenous people are interrelated). Again how do non-indigenous people deal with primary sites and indigenous people deal with secondary sites?
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Thank you Bruce Webber and Fabio Malfatti!
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A traditional healer is a person who is recognized by the community in which he lives as competent to provide traditional health care. They usually practices healing from generation to generation and uses traditional healing methods and medicine that are not scientifically tested. Most of these treatment methods are orally transmitted and have not been documented.
The knowledge of the traditional healers in Sri Lanka is currently tested by the Ministry of Indigenous Medicine by conducting a written and an oral test. The testers are usually Indigenous Medical Doctors who have scientifically studied Ayurveda, Siddha or Unani and have passed out from University.
My concern is whether such system of assessing traditional healers could really assess the knowledge of the healers? and What are the concerns in assessing the knowledge of the traditional healer who doesn't have a mainstream academic education in healing.
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Well, why assess the knowledge of a traditional healer? You want to be careful, tradiational healers often have very specific knowledge. This knowledge is often not meant or designed to be taken out of context. General remedies used by folks is often overlooked for what is known by traditional healers. Also, one group may have more then one healer that use very different means for healing. The spiritual aspects are more valued in the group and by the healer then by outsiders who overlook it because it can not be quantified. How does knowledge perform when it is assessed and extracted?