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Has anybody done research on the possible relationship between the medieval taedium vitae, and the modern cultural fatigue? I touch upon this issue just passing by in a chapter entitled El ser para la muerte, de mi libro "Historia y Etnografía de la indumentari indígena en México"
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Thanks for your comment. Actually my interest started when somebody referred to an American anthropologist who used cultural fatigue to explain some social changes. I have rather related it to the philosophical development of existentialism, Heideggers death as justification for life, and Vattimo L´essere per la morte. I call that chapter being for death, as the English translation of "El ser para la muerte". In Medieval times apparently they had what they called taedium vitae, which I suppose is something like what you call burn out, depression, to languish, ,etc. I´m contending with the idea that being became associated with political power in a two thousend years process, and that truth has several forms of being expressed culturally.
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This Summer, I'm enrolled in a doctoral research course on ethnographic methods. My team chose non-participant observation of a popular location in a large city we can observe via Webcam.
Our research questions relate to how people interact in the location now that mandated CoVid restrictions have been lifted.
I am trying to locate literature that is on-point (CoVid-related) or strongly related (post-pandemic or catastrophe) and can support our findings.
We realize the nature of ethnography means there may not have been time for publication of relevant studies. However, there could be conference presentations or scholarship under review for publication.
If anyone can provide recommendations of material for me to search out, I'd be grateful.
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This research was developed by Brazilian researchers in the university context of the Covid 19 pandemic. Follow the link:
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Hello! I'm writing my (anthropology) thesis on the taboo of the prostate and how men's sexuality is shaped by patriarchal gender norms. This means I need to conduct an ethnography on my university campus, interviewing students about their sexual practices. Since this is a delicate topic and I'm not sure how to formulate my interview questions, I was wondering if any of you know of an ethnography/book/documentary/article/interview that I could use to get inspiration from. The sources don't have to be anthropological, any help is much appreciated :)
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I suggest Sabah Mahmood
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  • I am looking for an app (Android), which can facilitiate a qualitative, digital ethnography study with a main component of diary entries in form of visual, text and audio.
  • I plan to work with 10-20 participants based in Tanzania over a duration of 18 months.
  • I have so far primarily used WhatsApp (chat and call for both self-reporting and interview over video/phone) based on the idea of using a tool participants already are familiar with, but it is hard to structure/organise mixed data and many participants.
  • I have checked out dScout, Indeemo and FlexMR, but I have different kinds of doubt (approach and budget) + this earlier thread from 2014 https://www.researchgate.net/post/Is_there_an_existing_digital_tool_for_diary_studies
Any suggestions for free apps, apps particularly directed at ethnographic research (and not marketing) are very much welcome as well as any research papers on the use of diary studies combined with digital ethnography (preferably in Africa) and/ or the use of whatsapp in qualitative research in Africa (I am familiar with https://edoc.unibas.ch/51923/1/20161216110618_5853bc9abba73.pdf)
Thanks!
Pernille
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Marion Demossier, thanks for your question. For different other reasons I changed to fieldwork among the Tanzanian diaspora in Denmark, thus I did not have to work over the geographical distance with self-reporting. Also, I did not find any app which suited my case. I tested using WhatsApp for self-reporting - but that is another story (it is free, participants were used to it - but it takes
effort to keep connection on track). Perhaps this is useful https://edoc.unibas.ch/51923/1/20161216110618_5853bc9abba73.pdf
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I ask students in my methods classes to complete CITI training, this is an ethics training program supported by our university and approval is critical for anyone that will conduct human subject research. Would be interested to learn how people incorporate CITI training and ethics into their class.
For me, what started as an ethics week (many years ago) has developed into a part of the discussion throughout the semester. We focus on identifying not only ethics as defined by the university and CITI but also in terms of our roles, our connections to our respondents and so forth.
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Yes, I include CITI training in an ethnographic methods course and have found it works well. I have done it with and without inviting a representative from Research Compliance (IRB office) to speak to the class. In both cases all students successfully completed the online training and received the certificate for the course titled Group 2: social and behavioral investigators and key personnel.
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My PhD research examines the influence of pastoral leadership on community development. From a constructivist perspective, and having read scholarships to that effect, I intend to employ ethnography plus case study. Thus, the design includes observation, interviews and questionnaire.
Any thought on this methodology/method will be much appreciated.
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Mendeley and EndNote
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I have moved away from asking students in a variety of classes (ethnographic methods, introductions to anthropology as well as advanced courses) to develop unique projects. I have a few reasons for these changes and am interested in learning what others think.
In place of unique projects, I give students short "experiments" where they can apply effort to specific work. For example, in methods, I give students a subject and ask them to develop questions, analyze responses, think about ethics and about what does and does not work. My goal is to teach the conduct of inquiry and it is my belief that regardless of the project, there are some basic skills that will define success. Additionally, anthropological research does not take place in the span of a few weeks--and teaching students they can successfully complete a project in a semester is problematic to say the least. So, my question is how do you manage classes where students are learning methods or applying anthropological concepts? Do you give students free reign to develop a project they are interested in? Do you give students an assigned series of exercises? Or is there an alternative that works for you that I and others can learn from?
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Ethnography can help investigate very complicated or critical design challenges. A ... Ethnography was popularised by anthropology, but is used across a wide ... The aim of an ethnographic study within a usability project is to get 'under the ... As discussed above, ethnographic studies do not always require a long
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I am studying mobility and socio-cultural interactions among palaeohistorical hunters-fishers-gatherers in the Laurentian part of the Subarctic. My main research hypothesis is that rivers and watersheds are "vectors" that had a structuring role on mobility and social interactions. Since I am interested in examples that has been documented around the world, can you recommend me ethnographies, archaeological publications or researchers that have studied watershed in order to understand cultural or sociological phenomena?
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Dear Olivier,
You may want to have a look on the paper of my former colleagues Tomaž Podobnikar:
Kind regards,
Balázs
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I’m looking for recommendations.
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Sarah Pink, RMIT University of Melbourne. Does some good work on digital and visual ethnography. Watch Laundry Lives online- thats a part of one of her projects.
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I have observed events, i wanted to know are there any specifications on how long to stay in the field? And in case of events how many events are sufficient to cover? References will be appreciated.
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Stay until local folks don't look at you like a stranger and often invite you to dinner. And you are so comfortable you can walk into houses without knocking (and not get shot). When you feel like family and when neighborhood folks think of you as part of the community.
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Hello, is this study a qualitative research in the form of ethnography or case study done through immersion? Does it include policy analysis as well?
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hi
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Hi, I am looking for research that offers an insight into how Deleuze's ontology of time is translated to methodology( ethnography). I would be grateful for your insight.
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Ontology be it of Deleuze or any other philosopher, classical or "post-modern", cannot be "translated" into a methodology. Philosophy, including epistemology, ontology or even logic, are not a science or sciences, but rather teach us how to think. Thus, philosophy continues to think on the very same subjects, including time and its meanings. Deleuze time times three in which the present is "eradicated" as not yet comes clearly from Fernand Braudel triple division of historical time within his long-term theory. One can use ethnographic methods to research themes, as cinema time, discussed by Deleuze, but as part of a research question or problem from a concrete scientific field: cultural anthropology, sociology of cinema or any other domain for which ethnographic observation is useful. I hope that the following studies would be able to help your quest:
Bloch, M. 1989. « The past and the present in the present », Ritual, History and Power. London: The Athlone Press, pp. 1-18.
Chesneaux, J. 1996. Habiter le temps. Passé, présent, futur : esquisse d'un dialogue politique. Paris: Bayard Ed.
Gell, A. 1992. The Anthropology of Time. Cultural Constructions of Temporal Maps and Images. Oxford-Providence: Berg Publishers.
Malabou, C. 1996. Le temps, Paris, Hatier (coll. Profil 778, série Notions philosophiques).
Ricœur, P. 1983. Temps et récit, t. 1, Paris, Ed. du Seuil.
Tillard, B. 2011. Temps d'observation ethnographique et temps d'écriture. in: Les Sciences de l'éducation pour l'ère nouvelle : revue internationale, CERSE, Université de Caen, pp. 33-47.
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I am looking for texts on digital, virtual ethnography, and/or netnography. I accept suggestions for textbooks and materials that can be enlightening.
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Hi Alcione,
You should find the following books useful for getting started on your research:
Pink, S. et al. (2016) Digital Ethnography: Principles and Practice. Sage.
Hewson, C. et al. (2016) Internet Research Methods 2nd Edition. Sage.
Kozinets, R.V. (2015) Netnography Redefined 2nd Edition. Sage.
Hinton, S. & Hjorth, L. (2013) Understanding Social Media. Sage.
Hooley, T. et al. (2013) What is Online Research? Bloomsbury.
Liam.
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Can someone help me to understand the emic(insider) perspective in Conversation Analysis and ethnography? They should very different stances in different
It is explained in Ortega's book on page 228 but still, I need a clear definition
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On YouTube please watch and listen to Professor Maya Khemlani David on ethnographic research (emic/etic).
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Good morning all,
I am in the first year of my PhD looking at entrepreneurial opportunity and collective identity construction processes in socially-orientated start-ups.
I had planned to start data collection this coming September using traditional ethnographic methods, such as non-participant observations, interviews, story-boarding and content analysis. Given the current climate and the uncertainty regarding 'normal' working practices going forward, I may not be able to secure ethical clearance to be able to undertake such research due to the high level of risk for participants and the degree of uncertainty as to how such risks can be mitigated at this stage. Of course, I need to secure ethical clearance before I undertake any research and so in order to start collecting data in September as desired, I need to look to potential alternative methods.
Does anyone have any experience of conducting an ethnography of organisational studies utilising remote technologies or able to point me in the direction of useful papers on netography/ alternative ethnographic methods when face to face is not possible? Or, if you are in a similar situation, are you able to share your approach towards your ethnography research design and ethical clearance during the current climate?
I would be grateful for any ideas and suggestions.
Best regards,
Katherine
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Hi everyone,
As part of a project on (the postcolonial aspects of) the prediction of juvenile crime in the Caribbean, we are writing about the occurrence of silence in ethnography. We are interested in how the ethnographer's own stance and manners during fieldwork hamper the voice of participants, as well as in the postcolonial dimensions of this process. We noticed for instance that in our own study at a juvenile detention centre in Willemstad (Curacao), our own conceptions of childhood (and the way we asked questions about it) stood in the way of the young detainees to speak their mind.
Who has suggestions that can help us out with (more general) literature on the production of silences in ethnography? They would help a lot, thank you.
Kind regards,
Paul Mutsaers
Radboud University, the Netherlands
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Hello,
I am doing a research paper in which I will have to do semi-structured interviews to a group of SMEs from my hometown to analyze and define their needs and interests. Which tradition of qualitative research fits best here?
I discarded Grounded Theory because this would suit better a social research paper (mine is entrepreneurial). It is no use either to do a case study. Phenomenology might be too philosophical for my topic (circular economy: would SMEs have an interest to switch from throwing their glass bottles and recycle them to washing them?). So I'm torn between field research and ethnography. I don't know wich one is better. Does it make it more complicated to use both?
Thank you very much!
Barnabé
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Hello Barnabé. I would suggest you return to the books to gain a better understanding of the differences between "paradigms," "traditions," "analytic strategies" and "orientations," to name a few. "Field research" refers to the fact that the researcher(s) is present in the same space as the population of interest- they are "in the field" and not in the office. I am not clear on what has put you into a qualitative approach to your concerns, and not, for instance, a survey. The "entrepreneurial" definitely falls within the "social" sphere- how we provide for our physical necessities is a central organizing principal for our social life.
A suggestion: go back to the beginning and ask yourself
1. What do I want to understand/explore
2. What is the best strategy for learning about that? (information gathering through analysis)
3. How can I operationalize that strategy?
This should help you think about the structure of your inquiry. Good luck!
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I am seaching for a software that would enable me to create a database constitued of PDF files of older ethnographies of north american indigenous peoples. Here I'm thinking of ethnographies like those produced by the Bureau of American Ethnology or by the National Museum of Man in Canada. I want to classify the ethnographies by linguistic families and to be able to seach by keywords in the text of the PDFs (most files enables keywords research nowadays). The aim of this database would be to facilitate comparative work. So, ideally, the software or the platform would allow to add another level of classification, such as a typology (X-, Y- or Z-type of conceiving a given concept). Ideally the software would also allow the database to be shared with other researchers. I know Endnote would allow this type of work, with some limits. Maybe there would be better a better way to handle this ?
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Geoffrey is spot on. The Human Relations Area Files emanating from Yale U. has been compiling text, data and photos for years. Check https://hraf.yale.edu/. I know of no better resource.
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I'm a bit new to these aspects of survey design and analysis. What should I read and what are some approaches to the following situation and question?
Suppose:
  • We've a population-of-interest based on an affiliation, certain actions, or a set of ideas; (e.g., 'vegetarians' or 'tea-party conservatives)... call it the "Movement"
  • There has never been a national representative survey nor a complete enumeration of this group. There is no 'gold standard'
  • For several years we've advertised a survey (with a donation reward) in several outlets (web pages, forums, listserves which we call 'referrers') associated with the 'movement'
  • We can track responses from each referrer. We suspect some referrers are more broadly representative of the movement as a whole than others, but of course there is no gold standard.
This is essentially a 'convenience sample', perhaps more specifically a 'river sample' (using the notation of Baker et al, 2013) or 'opt-in web-based sample'. It is probably non-representative because of
  • Exclusion/coverage bias: Some members of the movement will not be aware of the survey (they don't visit any of the outlets or they don't notice it)
  • Participation/non-response bias: Among those aware (through visiting the 'referrers') only a smallish share complete the survey (and these likely tend to be the more motivated and time rich individuals). Some outlets/referrers may also promote the survey more prominently than others.
We wish to measure:
  • The (changing) demographics (and size) of the movement
  • Measures of the demographics, beliefs, behavior, and attitudes of people in the movement (and how these have changed from year to year)
Our methodological questions
Analysis: Are there any approaches that would be better than 'reporting the unweighted raw results' (e.g., weighting, cross-validating something or other) to using this "convenience/river' sample to either:
i. Getting results (either levels or changes) likely to be more 'representative of the movement as a whole' then our unweighted raw measures of the responses in each year?
ii. Getting measures of the extent to which our reports are likely to be biased ... perhaps bounds on this bias.
Survey design: In designing future years' surveys, is there a better approach?
Brainstorming some responses...
Analysis
  • E.g., as we can separately measure demographics (as well as stated beliefs/attitudes) for respondents from each referrer, we could consider testing the sensitivity of the results to how we weight responses from each referrer.
  • Or we might consider using the demographics derived from some weighted estimate of surveys in all previous years to re-weight the survey data in the present year to be "more representative."
  • As noted we subjectively think that some referrers are more representative than others, sSo maybe we can do something with this using Bayesian tools
  • We may have some measures of the demographics of participants on some of the referrers, which might be used to consider weighting to deal with differential non-response
Survey design
  • Would 'probability sampling' within each outlet (randomly choosing a small share within each to actively recruit/incentivize, perhaps stratifying within each outlet if the outlet itself provides us demographics) somehow be likely to lead to a more representative sample?
It's not immediately obvious to me why this would improve things. The non-response within probability samples would seem to be an approximately equivalent problem to the limited participation rate in the convenience sample. The possible advantages I see would be:
i. We could offer somewhat-stronger incentives for the probability sample, and perhaps reduce this non-response/non-participation rate and consequent biases.
ii. If we can connect to an independent measure of participant demographics from the the outlets themselves this might allow us to get a better measure of the differential rates of non-participation by different demographics, and adjust for it.
Some references (what else should I read?)
Baker, R., Brick, J.M., Bates, N.A., Battaglia, M., Couper, M.P., Dever, J.A., Gile, K.J., Tourangeau, R., 2013. Summary report of the AAPOR task force on non-probability sampling. Journal of survey statistics and methodology 1, 90–143.
Salganik, M.J., Heckathorn, D.D., 2004. Sampling and estimation in hidden populations using respondent-driven sampling. Sociological methodology 34, 193–240.
Schwarcz, S., Spindler, H., Scheer, S., Valleroy, L., Lansky, A., 2007. Assessing Representativeness of Sampling Methods for Reaching Men Who Have Sex with Men: A Direct Comparison of Results Obtained from Convenience and Probability Samples. AIDS Behav 11, 596. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10461-007-9232-9
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For hard-to-reach populations you might find participant-guided-sampling useful. Explore
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I am struggling to define the methodology for the qualitative approach of my research:
I just become familiar with phenomenology-based ethnography but not sure whether is the right choice:
My research project aims to explore the sense of belonging of immigrants through their spatial practice ( perception and use of public space).
The case study (which I am also a member of) is a group of immigrants from a specific ethnic in a specific city.
The research adopts a mixed-method, quantitative, and qualitative.
For the qualitative part:
Data collection is through semi-structured interviews and field research ( due to covid is on hold)
As I am a member of the same social group that I am investigating and considering the sense of belonging as the phenomenon in this research required strategies that can reveal data regarding the understanding of how the experience of immigrants in urban space, influence their belonging.
my questions are :
Is phenomenology-based ethnography is the right choice?
And within this methodology for data collection, the “life-world analytical ethnography” (Honer and Hitzler, 2015) is the approach.
Regarding the analysis of the data, it was suggested that the hermeneutical-phenomenological analysis (Soeffner, 2004) through inductive thematic analysis of the interview transcript is suggested
As all of these methodology and analysis methods are new to me, Am I mixing so many methods and approaches all together?
And what are your thoughts on how to avoid presupposition and prejudgement as the researcher within this analysis method?
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Great response from David. Mahgol - your proposed study seems 'somewhat confused'. I would not encourage it in its current format. Probably best to decide - it is phenomenological, ethnographical or mixed methods? The 'hybrid' that you present seems 'out of kilter'.
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I have just completed my PhD thesis - Adapting Photovoice to Visualise and Influence Environmental Behaviour across Australia, Bangladesh, and China (Monash University - Design), exploring using photovoice methods across multiple geographic sites to facilitate dialog between and amongst these communities using various participatory techniques, specifically with innovation in audience engagement.
The journey has taken me across 17 discrete participatory-action-research cycles
spanning 4 years, where I partnered with 19 local organisations to run 80 workshops, 8 community exhibitions, and 3 community interview events across 4 separate sites spanning Australia, Bangladesh, and China. Over 700 participants attended workshops and collectively created over 500 photo-stories. I focussed on environmental behaviour, but these methods - like photovoice generally - are applicable to a wide range of themes.
Now I have finally emerged from the tunnel of my PhD, I am looking for future opportunities to use these learnings in other projects and connect with like-minded peers.
Thus I am interested to see who else / what other current and future projects are working on similar methodological adaptations in photovoice or related visual methods?
I have attached the full thesis text here if it is useful to others. I am also happy to receive feedback.
thanks and all the best,
Michael Chew
Monash University
Melbourne, Australia
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This is really interesting. I do photovoice research with non-binary young adults. I am currently preparing a study that will have small groups in various locations. Small groups will regularly connect with and report back to the larger collective group. We hope that this allows us to explore region specific issues, along with more broad ones. I'm definitely going to dig into your work!
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It is much said about doing qualitative research and field study. I'm curious about your hints/experiences in doing ethnography in hostile environment touching sensitive topics (marginalized areas, communities involved in illegal activities). How you are working with researcher's positionality and emotions?
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Piotr, I'd say it depends on the source of hostility. If the source is the state or local criminal organizations, you'd best keep a low profile. If the source is the people in the community, then you'd do well to work with them, even tailor your research to be of use to them. I've had students work in the shadow of the Yakuza in Japan and of the Mexican government. In all cases they were open with the folks in the community about what they were doing, discussed their research with them and asked how it might be tailored to fit their needs. No pretensions of objectivity but honesty about orientation. In Japan those whose struggles were being studied were Thai bar women, in Mexico women struggling for water in poor barrios and in another place women struggling in foreign assembly plants. The results in all cases were interesting, of use to the folks in struggle and in two cases the dissertations became books - tailored to be of more use to those in struggle than to those hostile to those struggles. One such book:
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I have completed, and thematically coded over 300 survey responses. These have been screened to provide 15 interview candidates who were interviewed in their homes (semi-structured with accompanying field notes) as a second source of data. Interviews were reflective of survey responses given. Area of research is a social attitude towards a particular everyday practice.
Thank you
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eclectic approach is new to me and i personally would love to read about it too. thanks Dr El Sayed. however, what you do does fall under the purview of what an ethnographic research is. you may want to read my chapter on ethnography given below. here i explain ethnographic research from a non-western perspective. hope it helps you with your research journey. Dewan M. (2018) Understanding Ethnography: An ‘Exotic’ Ethnographer’s Perspective. In: Mura P., Khoo-Lattimore C. (eds) Asian Qualitative Research in Tourism. Perspectives on Asian Tourism. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-10-7491-2_10
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With the Mexican Circle of Korean Studies (https://www.facebook.com/CMEC.edu/) we are looking to build a latin-american perspective of korean studies, so we are wondering about the pioneer works and classic texts which are part of the korean studies in and outside of Korea. Thank you so much!
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The book that I remember reading with interest was: CHENG, Sealing. On the Move for Love: Migrant Entertainers and the U.S. Military in South Korea. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2013. Nonetheless, I have learned much more about South Korean cultures by visiting the astonishing National Museum of Korea in Seoul. After, one can complement the rich experience by going to the National Folk Museum of Korea.
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I am MBA candidate in Japan and studying about relationship between qualitative research ( ethnography and etc ) and ideation activity (such as brainstorming, design thinking workshop).
So far there seems to be NO academic essays regarding how the fieldwork for ideation should be like. Any tips or suggestion would be much appreciated.
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"What is the best Fieldwork for Ideation process?" The iterative ideation process is related to what idea(s) or problems you’re focused on. It has wide application usage depending on which direction you want to go, for example, design fields of varying descriptions, etc. However, the specific fieldwork you need to embark on depends on what you are focusing on. At this initial stage, it seems to me to be a difficulty in prescribing the fieldwork without the specific focus or definition of the research problem. It could also create a stultification of great ideas you may have without defining your particular research problem. So in looking at the relationship between qualitative research (ethnography) and the ideation activity, what are you aiming at? Again, once you define that, you’re good to go. That is why @Abdullah Al-Beraidi attempts to help define specific problems you could look at. Thanks
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I really appreciate the comments and responses to my question about ethics in writing auto ethnography. I still have it in me, ready to be let out on paper but I don't believe now that I can write it as auto ethnography.
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Dear Aviva,
Autoethnography is a form of qualitative research in which an author uses self-reflection and writing to explore anecdotal and personal experience and connect this autobiographical story to wider cultural, political, and social meanings and understandings. This is basically a set of qualitative methods that are used in social sciences that focus on the observation of social practices and interactions. Its aim is to observe a situation without imposing any deductive structure or framework upon it and to view everything as strange or unique. A popular and helpful categorization separate qualitative methods into five groups: ethnography, narrative, phenomenological, grounded theory, and case study. Autoethnography is an approach to research and writing that seeks to describe and systematically analyze personal experience in order to understand cultural experience. Classic ethnographic research involves a detailed description of the whole of a culture outside of the country of origin of the researcher. A researcher uses tenets of autobiography and ethnography to do and write autoethnography. Stepwise to better understanding, choose a culture to represent, generate & develop ideas, research assigned readings and discussion, gather Information from secondary sources, reflect on your own experience, and describe the language of your culture.
Ashish
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In the time of Pandemic, it is hard to spend a long time in field research. Carrying out ethnography is very hard in these hard times. Patchwork ethnography might be a good option but there are certain methodological issues too. One can share his/her better understanding here.
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The Corona virus pandemic provides a world wide opportunity to reset one's value system. Specifically via the understanding of one's Beliefs, Love, and Hope.
As such a forensic simulator has been built in which to provide for such and understanding. This understanding must satisfy the equation 1) which is derived from equations its subsystem made up of equations a) and b):
1) Understanding = Knowledge - (Truth + Lies) where
a) Understanding = Knowledge + Uncertainty, and
b) 0 = Uncertainty + Truth + Lies
Additional information from which the forensic simulator is designed is provided in the attachments.
Hopefully this information may be of value to you in your research.
Respectfully, Al Fermelia, Ph.D
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I am a PhD scholar of Humanities and my research is broadly connected to Anthropological studies and framework. I have also published with an Anthropological journal of global repute and looking forward to doing a few more. Will my PhD benefit me in Postdoc/Jobs in the field of Anthropology too? I am asking about its scope in India as well as abroad.
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Yes, your PhD is definitely going to help you out for applying in future. You can apply for post doc like ICSSR as well for TISS pdfs. For jobs, you will be welcomed in various state and central universities as teaching faculty for sure..
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My colleague and I conducted 19 hours of participant observation of an ethnography stud. We had to stop our observation due to COVID. Would this be enough for publication? How many hours are generally good for publications for ethnography studies?
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Hi ! In principle, there is no single fixed rule in the duration of participatory observation. It is due to the researcher's experience in assessing the reliability and depth of informations. The researcher can also avoid this issue by combining other methods of data collection. Standing at the proverb: Don't put all of your eggs in one basket.
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For example, the meaning attributed to "follow the phenomena" ¿could be deployed in relation to different places and contexts located in the same geographic space? Is it a multi-sited ethnography when we observe different and connected process, but they occur in different institutional contexts, places and involving different subjects?
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A multi-sited perspective in anthropology is also cultural; one can research in the same geographical territory different cultures, languages, and ethnical groups, which is still a main characteristic of research in countless places in Africa, South America, Southeast Asia, or the Pacific. One can also research in the same territory public or private hospitals, schools, etc. using multi-sited ethnography to address welfare or educational subjects, for example. The concepts of "context" and "connection" are complex. In social sciences, the meaning of context varies from discourse circumstances, authorship to social or economic structures. In ethnography, it is easier to keep as context an "institution", a "territory" or a "culture". Connection normally means phenomena in different places sharing some common cultural features. We use connective research when we can't compare since one can only compare what shares the same space and time dimensions. Other than Marcus indicated by our colleague Uchendu (Marcus, George E. Ethnography in/of the World System. The Emergence of Multi-Sited Ethnography, 2005), it also helps Falzon, Mark-Anthony (ed.), Multi-Sited Ethnography: Theory, Praxis and Locality in Contemporary Research, 2009, and, in a different perspective, Carter, Pam. Governing spaces: a multi-sited ethnography of governing welfare reform at close range and at distance, 2016.
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COVID - 19 is spreading rapidly. The government of India has now extended lockdown. And this is the situation in most of the countries. What the anthropologists, sociologists will do as they can not go to the field due to lock down and can not conduct research at the field level among the people due to the rule of social distancing. In this situation do you think that cyber ethnography is the only alternative left with us?
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I don't think it is the only solution
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This virtual workshop strives to highlight opportunities and limitations of ethnography for scholarly works on paradoxes. To meet this goal, we will first have an expert panel discussion, followed by short presentations and feedback on selected extended abstracts.
We invite you to submit an extended abstract (750-1000 words) of your ethnographic research studying paradoxes. Given the methodological focus of this workshop, themes are not restricted to a particular set of topics. Your ethnography on paradoxes might range from the study of organizational cultures, to grand challenges, to digitalization, etc. We especially encourage PhD students and junior scholars to join.
We will host two separate sessions to allow for attendance from different time zones.
Our exciting panel will vary per session and will include:
Eric Knight, Rebecca Bednarek, Tammar Zilber
09:00-10:30 (UTC+02:00) Amsterdam, Berlin, Bern, Rome, Stockholm, Vienna
Mark de Rond and Natalie Slawinski
16:00-17:30 (UTC+02:00) Amsterdam, Berlin, Bern, Rome, Stockholm, Vienna
You can find more information on this and other sessions at: http://leveragingtensions.com/ethnography-and-paradox/
And you can sign up and submit your abstract at:
We look forward to your submission,
Angela Greco & Katrin Heucher
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Dear Angela (and colleagues),
I am enjoying this discussion and was also glad to have the chance to look a bit at your work (titles and abstracts) to get a feel for the kinds of paradoxes and frameworks that you are addressing. Allow me to add some comments here that might attract some interdisciplinary discussion and also help to focus some joint research questions. After that, probably we can continue this as a separate discussion between us.
My thought in looking at your work (paradoxes in management decisions in the area of sustainable development) is that your research question on paradoxes is set within the framework of managerial decision-making and planning, with paradoxes in values where you assume actors are starting with a free choice. Probably you are working with the types of concerns identified by Kenneth Arrow, the Nobel Prize winner in Economics who noted the paradox in planning given interactions between long and short-term economic valuations and decisions. That also seems a bit like the problem of measurement in physics, of Heisenberg's uncertainty principle (and Schroedinger's cat).
The paradoxes in social science for prediction that I mentioned (outcomes that short-circuit the assumptions in the models of behavior, like "rational choice" from "economics" and "political science") works from the other direction, observing the behaviors and trying to find the right model that has predictive value of the outcomes. This is important when the existing models that have a supposed "logic" do not fit because there is actually another logic at work (that would also offend religious and ideological assumptions in our society and in institutions, like those of "rational actors" and "progress" so that we are blinded to recognizing them).
Ultimately, both approaches can come together in larger models that combine prediction (assuming determinism) with policy (assuming free choice) in trying to find how much of each are at work. While I see the focus of some of your work, the focus of your outreach is still unclear as to which of these levels you are inviting colleagues to discuss, as well as on other concerns.
Your outreach could better define the specific questions and disciplines and problem areas you are focusing on now since it looks like you are attracting everything and appears that these basic frameworks are being lost in a goal of attracting people rather than focusing on real problems and solutions. For instance, anyone looking at the list of sources in your bibliography, above, will note that it is based on just "subject" areas and categorical words ("studying paradox", "towards a theory", "ethnography") without stating any actual problem you are trying to solve, why it is important to solve it at all, whether you have any solutions and if so how they work and for whom. These are the basic obligations of scientific and applied disciplines. Otherwise you are just in the realm of philosophy and theology.
I know from you work on line that you, personally, are focusing on "sustainability" (a real public problem) and helping decisionmakers to overcome paradoxes in their values. We share that concern as you can see from some of my work (for example on the problem of the "prisoners' dilemma" of national decision-makers trying to do sustainable development planning but being forced to "grow" and buy weapons instead, in order to protect their resources, which creates a paradox of unsustainability and global collapse). I also look at it from the other angle of the deterministic framework logics that undermine free choice (like the logic of cultural suicide).
As to "ethnography", the word today has simply been redefined. We live at a time of Orwellian "Newspeak" where academic disciplines and public discourse uses words meaning their opposites in order to promote (and hide) underlying agendas. In the current era of neo-liberalism and neo-colonialism, in which "identities" are promoted but the actual cultures and environments that traditionally defined identity (the globe's 6,000 languages and the eco-systems where they developed) are being destroyed as part of an effort to urbanize, industrialize, homogenize and "integrate" everyone uniformly into global corporate culture, the only remaining "identities" are those visible or chosen in a single mass society. In avoiding having to deal with the reality of destruction of cultures/languages/environments and ethnicity, co-opted academics have worked to redefine "ethnography" to mean its opposite, by redefining "ethnic" in terms of everything from corporate and organizational identity to hobbies and choices (e.g., "vegetarianism" or "fast food" or "sexuality" or "cults" that are not ethnicities or cultures). Anthropologists have also been part of the elimination of their subject of study (through cultural genocide) so to find work, they need to claim that they still have a "methodology" that they can sell to others. You have been misled in your use of the word "ethnography" and have been drawn into an ideological redefinition that has ethical implications that probably you would want to avoid. The neutral word you want to use, to avoid the implication of "ethnicities" is "participatory observation" or "organizational study".
We all need to go back to basics in social sciences today to overcome the ideologies and blurring that is undermining disciplines, scholarships and applications. Rather than "citing" "authorities" (which is what religions do), we need to just start with what is observable, measurable, and commonly verifiable, starting with the simple building blocks like I suggest above with "participatory observation" and "organizational study", in place of words that have distorted meanings and categories that do not have explicitly clear content.
If you do want to introduce anthropological/ethnographic concepts, then you can define your research into paradoxes by looking at the differences between the cultures in which the differences are made to see what "cultural strategies" the actors use that fit into the larger strategies for achieving sustainability in their environments. While cultural differences are disappearing globally, you can still find many if you are trained to look for them (and to see the holistic, deeper structures).
Best,
David
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Dear colleagues, I am searching for recent papers in the field of workplace studies/studies of work that cover the topics sustainability, packaging, retailing, food, plastic, technological innovations.
Thanks in andvance for any suggestions,
Lukas Sattlegger
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I have no idea about this topic
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I am interested in learning more about ethnography and early education in the United States.Does anyone have any recommendations of ethnographic research focusing on this topic?
Thank you
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Hi Hannah - how you and Preston doing during this horrible time? There‘s lots out there, so it will depend upon what your interests are. As a start, i’d recommend Joe Tobin, Sally Lubeck, Rebecca New/Robert LeVine (more focused on child development), Beth Swadener, and others in the Reconceptualizing Early Childhood Education: http://www.receinternational.org Be we’ll! Mark
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I'm doing an insider ethnography and using mixed method approach among disaster survivors resilience. As I belong to the same population pool as that of participants, it is said that ethnography should begin with qualitative but based on my prior observation and experience of the incident, is it acceptable to use quantitative survey first and elaborate the concepts and constructs with qualitative method later with the same participants and settings later again?
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In mixed methods, the most common reason for starting with a qualitative methods is a "sequential exploratory design." The most frequent use for this design is to create quantitative measures, but it is also useful for generating hypotheses. This is often summarized as qual --> QUANT
Alternatively, starting with a quantitative method is often termed a "sequential explanatory design" and the most frequent use for this design is to help understand the results from a quantitative method. This is often summarized as QUANT --> qual
A less common design is to begin with a major qualitative study and then extend that with a smaller quantitative study. In that case, you might generate hypotheses with the qualitative study and then do a preliminary test with the quantitative study. This is can be summarized as QUAL --> quant, and here is a link to a paper I wrote on this third option:
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I am currently conducting a research on the use of online communities of older adults and would like to identify the themes in their community posts. I will be collecting their social media posts and is interested in using a qualitative analysis software. Any recommendations?
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I've used Atlas.ti and Dedoose extensively. I prefer Atlas.ti but Dedoose is helpful if you're looking to collaborate with others throughout the analyses
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Hi Everyone!
When we carry out qualitative research, we often mention a specific design, such as case study, narrative research, phenomenology and so forth. Do you think it is OK to design, carry out and report your study without reference to any specific qualitative research designs and just to say, "This is a qualitative study"? How appropriate is this? And are there any sources that support the use of such a study without a specific qualitative design?
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Specifying a study design is not the same as linking your study to a broad methodological approach, such as "case study, narrative research, phenomenology and so forth." Instead, a study design should begin with a research question or goal, and then specify the procedures that you will use to address your goal(s).
Undoubtedly the most common type of design in qualitative research is to collect your data using semi-structured interviews and then apply thematic analysis. Within that broad approach, you need to specify who you will interview and why, what questions you will ask and why, etc. etc.
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Martyn and Paul's widely read text on ethnography as a research methodology .
Please leave your comments on the book.
Thanks , Dr. Shahriar
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I’ve come across several articles explaining Qualitative Descriptive Approach in Health Sciences specifically where the reseacher is not bound to choose GT, phenomenology, Ethnography etc.
now what I’m curious to know is that can I use QD in social sciences where I could ask participants about their views using semi-structured interviews and thematic analysis as data analysis method.
Many thanks
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This paper might be useful for you! Mehra, B. (2002). Bias in qualitative research: Voices from an online classroom. The Qualitative Report, 7(1), 1-19.
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Dear researchers,
I am conducting a Netnographic study and looking for a solid model to adopt. Any suggestions.
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Are you thinking of a theoretical model or a model for performing the data collection?
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I would be interested in resources that pertain to how identity or the different roles we possess in dance making (dancer, teacher, spectator, mentor, etc.) influence creative processes in creating choreography. I am particularly interested in social dance, but any dance style examined with this research question in mind is warmly welcomed!
Thank you in advance!
-Olivia
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Using ideas that develop creative processes such as skills, planning and design, as well as the continuous encouragement of positive processes and correcting the wrong ones.
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I'm currently doing a literature scan on the potential value of ethnographic research with regard to creating social change, primarily in the context of how an ethnography has led to specific policy changes or how it has improved business processes (e.g. related to safety). Who can point me in some direction? I'd like to know about both the ethnography itself as well as the source that explains how the ethnography has made an actual impact.
Thanks!
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Ethnographic materials are actively used in the fashion industry, especially in clothing design. This is a strong trend and it is associated with the problem of erosion of national identity in many regions of the world. I attach the presentation of my report at a conference in the Ethnographic Museum of Sofia (Bulgaria)
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Dear colleagues and friends;
I am preparing a project of ethnography course for my graduating students, so i'm asking about the best and innovative practical and method to teach a methodological Course such as: The Ethnography?
Regards
Soufyane B
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Learning by doing is in my opinion an indispensable part of teaching ethnography. Let student on a small scale enter an (accessible) setting of their choice, collect data and analyse it with regard to some feasible research question. Even though students will probably run into some difficulties, the training effect will be tremendous.
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It is believed that children may not lend necessary cooperation to an “adult childhood researcher” for various reasons. One obvious reason is that s/he belongs to a different generation and therefore is not part of the children’s culture. Such a situation may prompt the “adult childhood researcher” to engage a “child researcher“ for his/her ethnographic writings. In case of such an engagement of a “child researcher” by the “adult researcher” for gathering quality field data for writing a child-centered ethnography, what are the preparatory steps that s/he needs to complete as part of research methodology and ethics?
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I think yes but without violating the ethical consideration of exploiting children.
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Do our inner narratives influence movement? If so, would movement then influence the narrative as well? What do our inner narratives reveal about culture and the world of movement around us?
Can the process of dance-making be described in ways that have utility beyond the personal narrative?
I am currently researching the role of the narrative in dancers and would be interested in resources as well!
Many thanks.
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here is an article i read recently though my interest in dance, the dancer/performance and subject matter in the artilce-outside academia. i will be glad to help you perform a literature review as i am sure there are many resources out there.
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I'm planning to do an ethnography study of male migrant workers' mental health (as part of a mixed-methods study). Any suggestions or good examples?
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Chapter 6 Western Configurations: Ways of Being in Martin K (2019) Psychotherapy, Anthropology and the Work of Culture 1st Edition ISBN-13: 978-0367182519, ISBN-10: 0367182513
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Observation (participant/direct) is one of the data collection methods in qualitative research (e.g.ethnographic study). I am just wondering how consent is sought in such a way that behaviors of those being observed will not be affected? What are the common requirements (or comments) of IRBs in using this method of data collection?
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If you are involved with a university, you can get that information from Institutional Review Board or if you are in a country that gives you permission to conduct the study. That form must be filled out by participants before you start research with participants or it can void your research.
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I am interested in research about the operational system of political decision-making and the barriers to good, longterm decisions. As to challenges like climate change, for example, it seems obvious that we would need cross-sectoral, systemic and solution-oriented collaborative processes instead of interested-based, short-term thinking (often along party lines and blocked between different ministries). Before we come up with proposals of institutional design we need to have a good empirical basis for where the barriers of good decision-making really are. Do you know of any? Perhaps research in ethnography or political anthropology?
Many thanks in advance!
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Thank you very much, Thierry.
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where are we heading when it comes to autoethnographic research? with ethnography being very well accepted in the academic circles and autoethnography slowly but surely picking up steam since the last two decades, what are your opinions of the future of autoethnographic research in social sciences.
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Why on earth do you have to denigrate quantitative research? I think you doth protest too much!
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Is it possible to incorporate narrative analysis approach (developed by McAdams) to analyse data obtained from an ethnographic research? Can we consider it as a analysis method in Life World Analytical Ethnography?
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Samitha - Yes, it is possible to incorporate narrative analysis to analyse data obtained from an ethnographic research. There is increasing recognition of the importance and usefulness of narrative analysis as an element of doing ethnography. Narrative is now seen as one of the fundamental ways in which humans organize their understanding of the world. Narrative inquiry is the process of gathering information for the purpose of research through storytelling. The researcher then writes a narrative of the experience. Ethnography provides a detailed exploration of group activity and may include literature about and/or by the group. It is an approach which employs multiple methodologies to arrive at a theoretically comprehensive understanding of a group or culture.
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The current climate protests are planned for at least 107 countries this friday (24.5). My research team in planning on doing ethnographical observations and interviews at the demonstrations in Oslo, Norway. Is anyone else looking at this worldwide phenomenon?
If so, what is your focus? Would love to discuss methodologies used to investigate this!
We come from cultural, and community psychology, so thats broadly the kind of focus we would use. Planning a mixed-methods project.
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An international team did surveys in March. Among them our Institute for Protest and Social Movement Studies. Information in German here: https://protestinstitut.eu/das-ipb-in-den-medien-fridays-for-future/
Others involved were: Göteborgs Universitet, Uppsala Universitet, University of Exeter, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Universiteit Antwerpen, Université de Genève, Université de Neuchâtel, Scuola Normale Superiore (Florenz)
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Does hate speech serve any positive functions in a democratic social order? Who has the power to define what is and what isn’t hate speech? Is the rise of extremism inevitable if hate speech is legally protected?
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Hate speech should never be protected. The constitution gives a person various rights including freedom of religion, speech, etc. But no right is absolute. If by hate speech one is offending another person, then what about the rights of the person being offended? Why should the second person have to read nonsense in the media and fear for his/her life? Doesn't the second person have the freedom (right) to pursue his/her own religion or lifestyle without being harassed or bullied?
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I am conducting a multi species ethnography about corvid-human relations. Anyone have any experience with ME involving avian species or more specifically corvids?
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Thanks very much!
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I have a few students working under my guidance for their masters dissertation. They have chosen social media related subjects. I am keen that they use social media ethnography as a method and as an approach to study content on social media. I am looking for easy and simple reading material for my students so that they can understand the method and apply it to their own work. It will be helpful even if there are a few studies that they can use to check how other researchers have used this method.
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Digital Ethnography: Principles and Practice (Pink et al 2015) and Digital Anthropology (Horst and Miller 2012) are both good on social media methods and digital ethnography.
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Hi,
I am doing online ethnography, need to analyse the content meaning, narrative and theme of people's social media posts on a specific social event.
The problem is: There are tens of thousands of posts need to collect, Simply copy them to a Word file cost too much time and I want to save all the data as soon as possible because it might be deleted suddenly due to censorship.
This social media is a Chinese one. Desperate to ask for help.
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NVivo software gives the opportunity to 'capture' posts, pages, twitters on the web through Ncapture.
In the following link, you can read information about installing NVivo12 and supported languages.
After importing data from the web, you have to check that the material you are interested in is captured.
This process allows you to be able to code contents in NVivo.
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In the research methods classes I teach students may ask why bother with the small sample size ethnographic type of study that produces data that is prone to error and subjectivity when there is big data that can be accessed and SurveyMonkey, Twitter, etc., which can yield more robust data from enormous samples? What would your answer be?
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I think of "big data" as wide but very typically very thin -- in this case, "scraping" is a good metaphor, as in "scraping the surface.' In contrast, qualitative methods, and especially enthnography, may be narrow but they go deep.
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Ethnography has been used in marketing and consumer research for many years. If you were designing a textbook for consumer ethnography, what chapters would you include?
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I am glad you find the chapters interesting!
George
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What is your understanding of ethnography? What approaches to research does ethnography encompass? How would you define or describe ethnography?
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Yes, ethnography is a systematic, comprehensive and topic oriented approach using observation and participation or particularly participant observation. I think the concept of ethnography as "thick description" as coined by Clifford Geertz is relevant here. Ethnographers can also study their own societies or communities, which might be more challenging than studying other foreign societies.
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I am looking for research that does not merely defend their choices of method and methodology but also describes and problematises the complexities and troubles in doing empirical work - in the ethnographic tradition of the field of "Science and Technology Studies".
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Marilyn Strathern "Cutting the Network" (article) and Partial Relations (book).
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Although I already finished one research project which includes visual data analysis I'm still looking for tips and tricks on visual data analysis.
How do You collect data?
How do You analyse visual data?
How do You interpret visual data?
What are your topics of visual data analysis?
And here you are piece of work which I am co-author:
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and Saras's Pink Visual Ethnography. Best intro. We have been using visual ethnography working with refugees. Unfortunately did not publish it in visual form. You can check in my works: Generation 1.5...
Best
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It has been said that ethnographies operate a dubious alchemy by transforming gold into lead, by translating the richness of field experience into a static text. Can we imagine ethnographic writing that opens possibilities, that acts as a generator of multiple meanings and narratives rather than as a trace of an interpretive process that has already passed? Plurivocality, co-construction of knowledge, and participatory approaches might address issues of authority, but in the end the ethnographic text still often feels as an end-result. What strategies have you employed, or would like to explore, that would rather make the ethnographic text a starting point for the production of multiple meanings?
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I think Michael Uebel gives a very good steer with Lingis, the affective texture of whose work is very strong. Katy Stewart, in Ordinary Affects, writes quite differently from her more conventional A Space by the Side of the Road, but multiple meanings are certainly present. Of course, multiplicity is a quality of the research itself, and ethnographic writing is as much about allowing it to be as it is about creating it reflexively. Text is neither the end point nor the beginning, but a snapshot, always in the middle (Stewart's take is Deleuzian). Her view is more fragmentary, more explicitly poetic than narrative, and narrative ethnographers (like HL Goodall Jr, for example) have explored different forms of text to open their accounts up. Others have moved to theatre and documentary (even art) film, and there's a substantial body of work on the latter.
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I am interested to learn about any publications and thoughts about the way indigenous knowledge systems and processes were disturbed and marginalised by the colonisation,imperialism and modernity in the colonised global periphery?  What responses social scientists and other activists are taking to address the situation?  I am familiar with the work of Connell, Santos, Comeroff and Comeroff (focusing on Africa), Alatas, Chen (focusing on  E.Asia) but like to know about other writings as well.
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india and othere countries in south asia WERE colpnized
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I am writing an essay on different types of qualitative research methodologies such as grounded theory, phenomenology and ethnography. I have to justify my eventual use of focus groups for upcoming research but I am not actually sure where focus groups fit into all of this?
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Phenomenology / Case study / Ethnography = Research Design
Interview / Focus group / Observations = Data Collection strategy
Thematic analysis / content analysis = Analysis process
Don't get confused 👌👌👌
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I have a question about the formulation of hypothesis in an ethnographic research? i read a couple of books and found opposing views. In her discussion of participant-observation method, Schilling Estes (2013) says  that we can "consider what we observe, formulating and reformulating hypotheses, then return back to the community for more focused observations based on our ever more finely tuned hypotheses" (p. 117), whereas Eckert (2000) notes that “Rather than testing hypotheses against predetermined categories, ethnography is, among other things, a search for local categories. Thus while survey fieldwork focuses on filling in a sample, ethnographic fieldwork focuses on finding out what is worth sampling.”.  I am a bit confused which one is more suitable for an ethnographic fieldwork in a sociolinguistic study? to proceed with research questions or to formulate a testable hypothesis right from the scratch?
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Hi,
Actually, there are opposing views in ethnography on this issue. Broadly speaking, If you prefered extended case method, you would start with a theory and go into the field, then go back to the theory to elaborate it. However, if you would prefer gorunded theory, you would enter the field without a specific theory and you would end up with a theory. For extended case method, I suggest you to look at Buroway and for grounded theory , as the previous answer mentioned, Glaser and Strauss.
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My study is about gender and sexuality education related to LGBTIQ community where, I used critical ethnography as the research methodology but I still in dilemma on presentation, analysis and interpretation of empirical data. Is there any specific style or method of data presentation and interpretation in critical ethnography?
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Dear Shree,
A combination of dense ethnographic description of your fieldwork combined with analysis as advocated by Cristiano Hamann is important. Please too consider relevant ethical issues because the identification of your research participants presumably is a sensitive matter. What is the age of your research participants?
The context is different, but there is a discussion of ethical engagement in the publication below (which is intended to explore issues rather than just report the findings of fieldwork):
Kunnath, George J. 2013 Anthropology’s ethical dilemmas: Reflections from the Maoist fields of India, Current Anthropology54(6): 740-752.
Below, too, are some suggestions to help you review the background of how anthropological approaches to gay/lesbian/transgender studies have emerged, in particular to the idea that families can be made and not simply acquired through blood relations. This short selection of publications might be of interest from a cross-cultural perspective in considering relationships between what people learn in their families compared with other educational settings:
Lancaster, Roger N. 1988 Subject honor and object shame: the construction of male homosexuality and stigma in Nicaragua, Ethnology 27(2): 111-125.
Muraco, Anna 2006 Intentional families: fictive kin ties between cross-gender, different sexual orientation friends, Journal of Marriage and Family 68(5): 1313-1325.
Stephen, Lynn 2002 Sexualities and genders in Zapotec Oaxaca, Latin American Perspectives 29 (2): 41-59.
Weston, Kath 1991 Families we choose lesbians, gays, kinship. New York: Columbia University Press.
Weston, Kath 1993 Lesbian/gay studies in the house of anthropology, Annual Review of Anthropology 22: 339-367.
That significant ethnographic accounts dating from the late 1980s, 1990s and early 2000s deal with San Francisco and Central America highlights notions of border crossings, since the border between the US and Mexico is such a hotly disputed social phenomenon.
On the theme concerning liminality in the expression of gender, you might like to consult this MA dissertation:
Purday, Kevin 2013 Shamanic gender liminality with specific reference to the NatKadaw of Myanmar and the Bissu of Sulawesi. MA dissertation, University of Wales Trinity Saint David. http://repository.uwtsd.ac.uk/433/1/Kevin%20PURDAY%20DISSERTATION%20edited%20version.pdf
Good luck in your research.
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The ambition of "co-producing" narratives with participants in a research is omnipresent in the social sciences. However, when the final outputs of a project take the form of texts, as they often do, sharing narrative authority is often more easily said than done. Collaborative storytelling is a promising avenue, and I would certainly like to learn more about experiences you might have had with this approach. Also, any thoughts on the possibility of maintaining participants' engagement of participants right through the authoring process would be most welcome.
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Fine, G. A., & Corte, U. (2017). Group pleasures: Collaborative commitments, shared narrative, and the sociology of fun. Sociological Theory, 35(1), 64-86.
Sclater, S. (2017). The Uses of Narrative: Explorations in sociology, psychology and cultural studies. Routledge.
San Pedro, T., & Kinloch, V. (2017). Toward projects in humanization: Research on co-creating and sustaining dialogic relationships. American Educational Research Journal, 54(1_suppl), 373S-394S.
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We conducted a research aimed at identifying patterns in the selection of images used by Digital News Media specifically in the political beat and the subsequent impact it has on the news consumers perception. We used content analysis to understand the images used in these news pieces and tried decoding a pattern and establishing themes for articles from each of the selected media houses. Further audience interviews were taken to understand the impact of these images on their perception of these news articles. Can someone throw light as to what qualitative design does this fall under amongst Ethnography, Narrative, Phenomenological, Grounded Theory and Case Study?
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Obviously you have read Creswell as the source of those five categories, but his list is by no means exhaustive. For example, he does not include content analysis, but that is one of the primary methods you have used. In addition, you have what would be known as a multi-method qualitative study, where you used the individual interviews to follow-up on and interpret the initial content analysis, which would also fall outside the set of possibilities that Creswell described -- even though it is a coherent and highly desirable design.
So, I suggest you stop worrying about someone else's rather arbitrary typology of approaches to qualitative research and concentrate on justifying why you did what you did. In other words, what were your research goals and how did you design your research to meet those goals?
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  • Would this be a topic that is too broad for a research study?
  • What conceptual design would work best? Phenomenological or ethnography?
  • When you picture a "flat organization" what comes to mind?
Does the perception of AI progression cause a lack of digital congruence, "thus" intensifying fear of risk within flat organizations?
Thank you for your opinions.
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By updating much of Huserlian phenomenology and epi-phenomenology, I have been conducting ample experimentation on this issue which Your Ladyship mentions in her question for the last 11 years. Thus, I have actually arrived at a completely fresh version of anthropology ............
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At this very moment (2 September; 22h00, local time), the National Museum (MN, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil), one of the most important museums of natural history in the world, is burning in flames.
In addition to the exhibitions open to the public, the MN housed some of the largest and most important scientific collections existing in Brazil. The collections of biological items included thousands of types (insects, reptiles, birds, mammals, plants, etc.).
To the taxonomists (and other colleagues): You could say how many specimens (mainly types) collected or described by you were deposited in MN? And to what taxonomic groups (family or above) these specimens belonged?
[In 2016, a coup d’état turned Brazil in a country with no future. Now, in his final months at the head of the Government, the President Michel Temer wants also to ensure that the country erase its own past.]
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I appreciate colleagues for the comments and for the suggestions.
The Brazilian press (newspapers etc.) is biased and shallow and I don’t take it too seriously. On the other hand, article published yesterday (4/9) in The Guardian had the following title: ‘Brazil National Museum: as much as 90% of collection destroyed in fire.’ At the moment, two considerations must be made: (i) this percentage should vary greatly among the different sectors of the institution (from 0% to 100% of loss); and (ii) the fact is that no one yet knows the extent of the losses.
I don’t work in the National Museum (MN) and I don’t even live in the city of Rio de Janeiro. However, a friend of mine who works at the MN sent me today (5/9) some enlightening information (especially about the biological collections), as can be read below:
(1) The so-called Imperial Palace housed most of the collections of the MN. In this building were, among others, the Department of Entomology (except part of Diptera) and part of the collections of mollusks and arachnids. Total loss: collections of insects, including several hundreds of types (e.g., about 1.300 beetle holotypes), in addition to the collections of mollusks and arachnids (but 80% of the types of mollusks have been preserved, because they were in a building annex). The departments of Geology & Paleontology and Anthropology also stayed in this main building. Total loss: the collection of Egyptian relicts (e.g., mummies) and the social anthropology library. However, some items (e.g., meteorites) are being found and collected. The building still housed an electron microscope.
(2) Outside the Palace are the following sectors: the central library; the departments of Vertebrates and of Botany; a small part of Archaeology and some laboratories of invertebrates. All are preserved.
(3) An annex to the Palace (‘Annex Alípio de Miranda Ribeiro’) was preserved. In this building are part of the the sector of dipterology and the collections of invertebrates (except mollusks and arachnids).
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two questions emerge:
1. can Autoethnography be done by 2 people at all?
2. are we not mutually making meanings and therefore influencing each other?
3. can we be reflexive in explaining our findings and thereby negating the effects of our influence on each other?
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There are interesting and inspiring articles on collaborative autoethnography and a journal on collaborative autoethnography I can recommend.
Interesting project and all the best!