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Please, Could any one suggest for me a journal with rapid publication in the field of environmental science, health and pollution, a journal indexed in Web of Science, Scopus, low IF, and without fees, to publish my research paper.
Thank you.
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Please have look on our(Eminent Biosciences (EMBS)) collaborations.. and let me know if interested to associate with us
Our recent publications In collaborations with industries and academia in India and world wide.
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Universidad Tecnológica Metropolitana, Santiago, Chile. Publication Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33397265/
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Moscow State University , Russia. Publication Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32967475/
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Icahn Institute of Genomics and Multiscale Biology,, Mount Sinai Health System, Manhattan, NY, USA. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29199918
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with University of Missouri, St. Louis, MO, USA. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30457050
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, USA. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27852211
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with ICMR- NIN(National Institute of Nutrition), Hyderabad Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23030611
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with University of Minnesota Duluth, Duluth MN 55811 USA. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27852211
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with University of Yaounde I, PO Box 812, Yaoundé, Cameroon. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30950335
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Federal University of Paraíba, João Pessoa, PB, Brazil. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30693065
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with collaboration with University of Yaoundé I, Yaoundé, Cameroon. Publication Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31210847/
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, 48080, Leioa, Spain. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27852204
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Publication Link: http://www.eurekaselect.com/135585
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with NIPER , Hyderabad, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29053759
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Alagappa University, Tamil Nadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30950335
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Hyderabad , India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28472910
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with C.S.I.R – CRISAT, Karaikudi, Tamil Nadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30237676
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Karpagam academy of higher education, Eachinary, Coimbatore , Tamil Nadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30237672
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Ballets Olaeta Kalea, 4, 48014 Bilbao, Bizkaia, Spain. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29199918
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Hospital for Genetic Diseases, Osmania University, Hyderabad - 500 016, Telangana, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28472910
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with School of Ocean Science and Technology, Kerala University of Fisheries and Ocean Studies, Panangad-682 506, Cochin, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27964704
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with CODEWEL Nireekshana-ACET, Hyderabad, Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26770024
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Bharathiyar University, Coimbatore-641046, Tamilnadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27919211
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with LPU University, Phagwara, Punjab, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31030499
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Department of Bioinformatics, Kerala University, Kerala. Publication Link: http://www.eurekaselect.com/135585
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Gandhi Medical College and Osmania Medical College, Hyderabad 500 038, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27450915
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with National College (Affiliated to Bharathidasan University), Tiruchirapalli, 620 001 Tamil Nadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27266485
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with University of Calicut - 673635, Kerala, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23030611
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with NIPER, Hyderabad, India. ) Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29053759
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with King George's Medical University, (Erstwhile C.S.M. Medical University), Lucknow-226 003, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25579575
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with School of Chemical & Biotechnology, SASTRA University, Thanjavur, India Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25579569
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Safi center for scientific research, Malappuram, Kerala, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30237672
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Dept of Genetics, Osmania University, Hyderabad Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25248957
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Institute of Genetics and Hospital for Genetic Diseases, Osmania University, Hyderabad Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26229292
Sincerely,
Dr. Anuraj Nayarisseri
Principal Scientist & Director,
Eminent Biosciences.
Mob :+91 97522 95342
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We are conducting research into how environmental risk assessment is carried out. If you have five minutes and work in a university research lab we'd love to hear your thoughts on environmental risk assessment in your work!
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الموقع لا يفتح سواء عبر الهاتف او عبر جهاز كمبيوتر.
ممكن انه محجوب عن دول افريقيا
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Dear Colleagues,
Let me invite you to publish the results of your scientific work in a special issue of the journal Sustainability (IF 2.576). The special issue is focused on Environmental Risk Assessment in Transport. A complete overview of the call for papers can be seen at: https://www.mdpi.com/journal/sustainability/special_issues/environmental_risk_assessment_transport
In this Special Issue, the focus will be on the current green transport policy—specifically, sustainable transport aimed at environmental protection that creates social balance and economic sustainability. The content of this Special Issue can be divided according to the types of transport (air, sea, ship, rail, road) or according to other subdivisions into individual and public, and passenger and freight. Intermodal approaches that contribute significantly to reducing the impact of transport on the environment are especially welcome. A key area of ​​current research is the application of SMART solutions throughout the logistics chain, as well as the challenges of intelligent transport systems, which have grown in importance in the last twenty years. We expect a minimum of 20 articles from different European countries in this Special Issue.
Zdenek Dvorak, Zoran Cekerevac, David Rehak
Guest Editors
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Dear dr Rehak,
It will be a pleasure to contribute to the special issue of the Sustainability journal. Please let me know the deadline for submission and will send you asp Abstract focused on Environmental Risk Assessment in Transport. All the best,
Darko
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In our country, a lot of water sources are found to be contaminated with arsenic (As). But, here, experts said that, using arsenic contaminated water is not harmful for us, we can use it in our daily needs except drinking.
My question is - using arsenic contaminated water for our daily needs, have any risk of bioaccumulation by surrounding biota? Does it have any associated human health risk?
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Drinking-water containg Arsenic increases the risks of cancer in the skin, lungs, bladder and kidney, as well as other skin changes such as hyperkeratosis and pigmentation changes.The effects on environments include death, inhibition of growth, photosynthesis and reproduction, and behavioral effects. Environments contaminated with arsenic contain only a few species and fewer numbers within species. If levels of arsenate are high enough, only resistant organisms, such as certain microbes, may be present. If arsenic poisoning occurs over a brief period of time, symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, encephalopathy, and watery diarrhea that contains blood. Long-term exposure can result in thickening of the skin, darker skin, abdominal pain, diarrhea, heart disease, numbness, and cancer.
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Currently, I have a set of LCIA values reported in IMPACT 2002+ format. For sake of comparison, I would need this to be converted to ReCiPe 2016 format. Anybody have an idea whether this is feasible?, If so, how?
The valid contribution(s) will be greatly acknowledged and appreciated.
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I am not sure how helpful my answer would be. But if you used an LCA software like GaBi or simapro, you can then select the LCIA methodology you want and it does not require that you change your inventory at all. Using GaBi, you can copy your plan and evaluate the impacts based on ReCiPe, or you can just change the LCIA methodology in the same plan. However, to do the comparison itself, you may need to transfer your results to a spreadsheet.
I suspect that you will find significant difference between the results as most LCIA methodologies are developed using similar concepts. What you may find, however, is that the two methods don't cover exactly the same impact categories.
I hope it helps.
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Greetings.
My paper requires me to collect data regarding usage of pharmaceutical products/uncommon drugs in three local hospitals. Research can only be done through emails, calls and generally virtual communication due to the COVID-19 lockdown that is still ongoing. These are the data I could obtain:
1. Top 10 most utilized pharmaceutical products/uncommon drugs (all forms- capsules, iv, etc) from each hospital (total= 30)
2. Usage/purchase of the mentioned drugs within 5 years (2015-2019)
3. Consumer of mentioned drugs (adult/children/elderly)
4. Other details of the listed drugs which can be searched online: chemical compound, density, concentration, forms, stability, etc
I have some problems on finding for the right risk-assessment equations that can be used with only the data above. I was thinking of risk quotient (RQ) formula but it requires the concentration of respective drug in surface waters/environment in the equation, and I'm afraid I'm not able to come down to the lab anytime soon to analyse environmental samples. I also included the exposure dose (D=[(CxIRxAFxEF)/BW] since the data may be obtainable , except for the consumer's body weight but I might approximate it into general weight (like, adults 61.5kg). However, calculating for 30 kinds of drugs may be a bit tedious, hence I'm not sure if the equation is suitable or not for my research aim, which is to develop approach to prioritize pharmaceutical products in natural environments.
Please suggest any formula/methods on conducting environmental risk-assesment with only details regarding the number of usage over the years. If there's anything unclear, ask away. I apologise for the lack of knowledge, but feedbacks are very much appreciated.
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Dear Maryell,
The acute toxicity tests, most tests are conducted to determine the nature of any toxicity that can be produced by repeatedly dosing animals over an extended period. NOAEL and LC50 and LD50 are quite popular method. The highest exposure of a chemical, determined in toxicity tests etc., having no adverse effect (e.g., onset of sickness) even when the chemical is taken (exposed) daily for the rest of one’s life. In practice, mice, rats or other animals are forced to take a chemical for a certain period of time. This test is repeated several times at varying dose levels. The highest dose level causing no adverse effect in these tests is adopted as NOAEL (No Observed Adverse Effect Level).other related terms you could use in your study like; LOAEL (Lowest Observed Adverse Effect Level) NOEC (No Observed Effect Concentration) and LOEC (Lowest Observed Effect Concentration)
Risk Assessments for Understanding Chemical Effects
Use this formula for your concern. (NOAEL (No Observed Adverse Effect Level) value calculation.
Toxicity studies etc., / UFs (Product of Uncertainty Factors) [ to convert it to human NOAEL (Unit converts in e.g., mg/kg/day)].
TDI (Tolerable Daily Intake)=
NOAEL (No Observed Adverse Effect Level)
UFs (product of Uncertainty Factors)
ADI (Acceptable Daily Intake) and RfD (Reference Dose) are also used as terms having the same meaning as TDI.Graph you ca take between frequency of hazards vs chemical exposure.
The LD50 is defined as the lethal dose at which 50% of the population if killed in a given period of time; an LC50 is the lethal concentration required to kill 50% of the population.
Ashish
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I'm trying to assess the Brazilian manufacturing and supply chain capabiltity in order to evaluate how ready it is for Concentrated Solar Power industry development. To do so, I need to assess the local (brazilian) manufacturing and supply chain capability.
Thanks!
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Following.
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Comparison of EIA Process in different country, any study could shared here.
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you can visit the website for EIA and you will see all the data you looking for
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For example, the PM 10 value is 20µg/m3 and the environmental limit is 25µg/m3. Can we compare directly?
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To convert the different average time values, we use Peak to Mean Factor concepts that developed by Smith, 1973 and improved by Pringer et al., 2007. They are originally for odour, however it can be used for the other kinds of pollutants.
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Hi. I am doing environmental risk assessment of heavy metals in wastewater. I used three standard trophic levels (Daphnia magna, green algae and fish) to calculate EC50. I am not sure what will be the best value for uncertainty factor to calculate PNEC values. Can somebody explain?
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True, but I think the problem comes from the fact that you're using acute data which typically will entail a factor of 1000. It's not clear from your question if you know what the heavy metals in your mixture are. if you don't then I think that 1000 is not unreasonable to be conservative. If you know what they are then you might consider adjusting your AF according to the (known) relative toxicity of each metal (e.g. Zn should carry a lower AF than Ni) but you'll still need to justify why you reject the more conservative AF.
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environmental engineering ,environmental science, soil risk assessments,health risk assessment, chemistry
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Yes, i can possible in highly polluted soils.......
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environmental risk assessment
quantitative risk assessment
microbial risk assessment
ecologial risk assessment
enviromental risk assessment of microorganisms
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You are welcome 
And I will try to find it 
Kind regards
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I was wondering if anyone can direct me to some good sources regarding US EPA requirements on groundwater risk assessment for inorganics. Specifically I'm looking at how regulators and the industry deal with the uncertainties and variabilities involved in assessing certain natural attenuation mechanisms such as precipitation and sorption. I'd also like to know by what process regulators assess the plausibility of proposed conceptual models. 
Any links to standard industry practices and regulatory guidelines/requirements that include nitty-gritty and technical details would be greatly appreciated. (The links I found at the EPA site were just too broad and generic)
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please try this one.  You need to do web search with EPA website.  there are so many.
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Nepal is taken a good example of bio-engineering for erosion control and slope stability. Species like Alnus nepalensis (tree), Cymbopogon citratos (herb), Eulaliopsis binata (herb), Thysanolaena maxiama (perennial grass) are few widely used plants. Are there any research on performance of commonly used species including aforementioned ones taking consideration of their efficiency in decreasing pore water pressure and also increasing soil strength of the instable slopes?    
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Interesting discussion...
Vegetation helps stabilize forested slopes by providing root strength and by modifying the saturated soil water regime. Plant roots can anchor through the soil mass into fractures in bedrock, can cross zones of weaknessto more stable soil, and can provide interlocking long fibrous binders within a weak soil mass. In Mediterranean-type climates, having warm, dry summers, forest evapotranspiration can develop a substantial soil moisture deficit which can reduce both piezometric head and slope mass. Pore water pressures change seasonally in response to precipitation and are often the driving mechanism which ultimately leads to slope failure. When trees are cut, the root system begins to decay, and the soil-root fabric progressively weakens. The loss of root strength or increased soil moisture content or both after-tree removal can lower the slope safety factor sufficiently that a moderate storm and associated rise in pore water pressure can result in slope failure. After trees are removed, the frequency of landslides can increase. Source :Robert R. Ziemer,
Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Forest Service, U.S. Dept. of Agric., 1700 Bayview Dr., Arcata, CA, US A
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I need to know this term Centile in CTD.
From 1st and 5th centile how can we get screening point values?
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Hi Ishaq,
The following papers may help you with this:
Williams, E. S., Berninger, J. P., and Brooks, B. W. (2011). Application of chemical toxicity distributions to ecotoxicology data requirements under REACH. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry 30, 1943-1954 http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/etc.583
Brain, R. A., Sanderson, H., Sibley, P. K., and Solomon, K. R. (2006). Probabilistic ecological hazard assessment: Evaluating pharmaceutical effects on aquatic higher plants as an example. Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety 64, 128-135.
Centile is just a shortened version of percentile, and means the same thing.
The screening point value is some measure of toxicity that you choose to decide whether there is a toxic hazard. In the Williams et al. paper, they have chosen the first and fifth centiles as their screening point values.
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with some models or equation?
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May be using particulate emission factor (PEF)?
Reference:
US EPA ,United States Environmental Protection Agency, 2002. Supplemental guidance for devoloping soil screening levels for superfund sites. OSWER 9355.4-24, Washington, DC: Office of Emergency and Remedial Response.
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for toxic metals (for ingestion in soil and food)?
In the Who 2006 , we have only the value for drinking water but not for soil and food , especially, leaf vegetables.,
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Dear Carmela
for some heavy metals such as lead or cadmium, the RfD is different according to the kind of food, but the references which our friend mentioned seems helpful: 
Best Regards
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I have reposted this question given the larger Researchgate membership in hopes of finding an answer. Originally posted in March 2013.
A lot of studies lately are calling the exposures/concentrations/doses they test as "environmentally relevant" yet the actual test doses seem considerably higher than any human exposures could possibly be, in some cases. Are there any references or books that define criteria for concluding a dose level as being "environmentally relevant"?
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The environmentally relevant concentration is that which affects the ecosystem, independently of human exposure levels.
Here is the definition from the DHHS Environmental Health & Toxicology website:
Ecotoxicologically (environmentally) relevant concentration (ERC)
Concentration of a pesticide (active ingredient, formulations, and relevant metabolites) that is likely to affect a determinable ecological characteristic of an exposed system.
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Dear colleagues,
I am conducting a research project in the field of environmental psychology.
In this respect I am searching for a construct, which captures one's dispositional willingness to bear or accept environmental resp. ecologocal risks, i.e. one's risk-propensity regarding risks for the environment (as opposed to risk perception, which is one's perception of risk).
Research suggests that a person's risk propensity is domain-specific (for instance finance, social, ethics, etc.) and although there are some validated scales that measure one's risk-taking tendency for multiple domains - for instance the DOSPERT Scale - I did not find any scale that specifically measures risk-taking tendency or attitude in an environmental context.
I have considered taking the ETHICS-Subscale of the DOSPERT Scale, however, not a single item on the subscale comes even close to the field of enviromental or ecological risks. So, I think, this attempt would not be very promising.
I am thankful for any cues, how to solve this problem.
Thanks so much for your insights.
Kind regards,
C. Neumann
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As you are looking for any clues:
You might want to consider if risk taking propensities apply to all environmental risks, or, to sub-sets, etc.
For example, some decisions might not be processed in terms of risk per se, and some might not be processed in terms of risk to the environment.
Examples:
A person might change their car's oil, and decide to dump it into the nearby storm sewer at his curb rather than store it for later recycling.  Was doing that potentially based on their propensity for taking risks that could harm the environment, or, on their propensity to take risks regarding getting caught polluting?  Etc.  (Short term/own actions/risk/benefit issues/variables regarding political leanings, etc)
A person might vote to preserve green areas and not to allow development in an area.  Is that potentially because they have a propensity to not take risks with the environment?  Is a vote not to preserve the land, and to allow development potentially due to a propensity to take risks towards the environment?  Are the votes more aligned with their political leanings than an actual risk taking propensity? (Long term/other's actions, etc.)
Are the propensities above truly tied to risk taking disposition, or, to simple pro/con environmental biases?  You may need to establish that their actual conceptualization is actually processed in terms of environmental risks.
IE: IS THERE a risk based PROCESS that applies to environmental risks, that can BE modeled...and which would not simply be an overlay of political/socioeconomic factors, etc.
THAT might be the primary issue to resolve, teasing out a disposition that is not in line with those other factors, and which can be unique to the environment...or, at least potentially, to a sub-set of environmental issues.  Finding sub-sets with usable data may be job #1.
Does that help?
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How can I use these quotients in arsenic exposure assessment through drinking water?
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Personally, I think they are the same concept.  There are caculated as ratio of the exposure estimate over an acceptable effect level, which used for lower tiered risk assessment. 
In addition, you can learn more methods of risk assessment methods in the follow reference.
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There has been significant development in Transport Sector in recent time, e.g., development of autonomous vehicles. What is role of Chemical and Environmental Engineering in these sector?
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Generally speaking, environmental engineer should do environmental impact assessment for any project including the transportation systems, participating in planning phase, risk assessment studies, nature protection, and sustainability. as any new project has direct impact on environment and Eco system. As we considering autonomous car many questions will rise such as is there any special services for such cars? Any extra infra structure? How do they interact with environment and its elements? Lastly, Environmental engineering is related to civil engineering in educational levels so both can have many overlaps.
On the other hand, chemical engineers can participate in control systems for example controlling the combustion rate of fuel; develop more efficient fuel types for autonomous cars.
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Thermal treatments, like incineration, are consolidated methods to treat waste to recover thermal and electrical energy. Flue gas treatment technologies, if well operated, can permit to control pollution.
Public opinion and politicians sometimes claim that incineration plants or similar sites create serious problems to people's health, without citing scientific basis.
I would like to know if there are recent studies, from all over the world, about this topic, that can describe what happened when the site was monitored and exposure risk was calculated, or references to full scale studies (national level). I add a very interesting article which treated a specific case in Italy.
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This may be of interest: The Impact on Health of Emissions to Air from Municipal Waste Incinerators RCE 13
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I am exploring technology that can result in a low cost, onsite assessment of aquatic invertebrate behavior (movement) as an endpoint for ecological risk assessment.  If statistical analysis can confirm a difference between movements of individual aquatic invertebrates upstream, in, and below stream of point discharge, could this be of use for phase 1 or other studies of risk assessment?  Thanks, Lou
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Movement is definitely a possible endpoint with ecological relevance. It is often used in ecological assessment and mode of action studies using fish, fish embryo or invertebrates (e.g. nematodes). For practical reasons it is mostly done in laboratory settings using tracking camera's and software, either 2D or 3D. Using it in the field, seems to me, a difficult task. Maybe it is possible to transplant invertebrates from a pollution gradient to a lab situation and register differences, but that remains to be tried.
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Could you please help me with finding references regarding combination of probabilistic risk assessment studies with air pollution modelling?
For instance, probabilistic safety assessment conducted for ammonia pipeline combined with the results of dispersion modelling can be used to assess annual costs of losses caused by accident. I met such works regarding groundwater pollution (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304389413008005), however not so much regarding air pollution, or maybe I am wrong?
Thank you in advance.
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dear Ivan i send you one of my paper about risk management. i think that you can find something of interesting
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More specifically, the desired assessment should target the use of these compounds as flocculants and coagulants to limit erosion (i.e. export of suspended solids) from construction sites/activities nearby water bodies.
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Dear Marc,
Under an ecotoxicological point of view, there are some indications that acrylamide may pose significant threats, likely following prolonged exposure to "low" concentrations, to aquatic vertebrates and invertebrates. By low concentrations I mean a few mg/L (ca. 1-10), which is found only at wastewater outlets. We have a publication coming out soon with a study on mussels. I'll render it available as soon as possible. The main effects we found so far relate to oxidative stress and gonadotoxicity, in females. However, the effects of chronic exposure in aquatic wildlife are not yet well understood. In general, acrylamide acute toxicity is low (e.g. LC50 = 400 mg/L in some freshwater fish).
Cheers
Pedro
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In our research project INDYCO (Integrated Dynamic Decision Support System Component for Disaster Management Systems) we are coupling situation/risk assessment and workflows of workforces. As a common ground we are searching for natural hazard ontologies/taxonomies that are also integrating corresponding control and mitigation measures. If you have any hints, please let me know.
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You could check out The Environment as Hazard by Burton, Kates and White. Also, Patricia Martel, a PhD student at Wilfred Laurier University, Ontario, Canada is doing her thesis on disaster taxonomies, and might have some useful information for you.
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I am in a dilemma to consider these as variables which involve uncertainty.
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Certainly you can, provided you have a proper time series for each. These variables are measures of a part of the climate system, hence they have stochastic and stationary components in their time behaviour which make them suitable for statistical analysis involving uncertainty.
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I am trying to find out methods for forest fire risk assessment. Could you please help me to find methods that have been applied to access forest fire risk.
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Yes, thanks.
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I am often involved in issues of sediment contaminated with PCBs and PCDD/Fs that can be combined in a number of ways to generate a Toxic Equivalency (TEQ). Now I realize that toxicologists really only guarantee the usefulness of the TEQ concept when it is determined in an organism that a human or another animal might consume. Nonetheless, I know that practically people find it helpful to look at the TEQ for PCBs-PCDD/Fs in many kinds of abiotic media (e.g., wastewater, suspended solids, sludge, bed sediment, soils, and urban runoff).
My question has to do with standards that people use and/or find preferable for PCDD/Fs, PCBs, and TEQ in bed sediment in surface water. Does someone like the TEQ concept in bed sediment, and if so do you have a level that you like to at least use as a reference? Does someone prefer mass or molar concentrations of PCDD/Fs or PCBs? Do people even like to have standard, or do you find it preferable to look at everything on site-specific basis? In the US, there are not really any bed sediment standards for most of these pollutants that are legally enforced, but it would still be helpful to have a way to characterize the general level of contamination and risk without doing a full-blown food web risk analysis every time. Any suggestions?
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Nevertheless, personally I do not support the use of TEQ in sediments. Dominant compounds in this compartment may not be taken up evenly by organisms. Moreover, CCME guidelines are based on toxicity to sediment dwelling organisms, while dioxins toxicity is much more of concern for vertebrates, in particular mammals.