Science topic

Environmental Bioremediation - Science topic

Explore the latest questions and answers in Environmental Bioremediation, and find Environmental Bioremediation experts.
Questions related to Environmental Bioremediation
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
8 answers
I sent my bacteria for identification by FAME analysis but the service provider only provided me the fatty acid profile of the bacteria. now how to identify the bacteria with only fatty acid profile information.
Please someone help me.
Relevant answer
Answer
Using FAME-MIDI analysis they assign to genera. But related bacteria can have different profile and the results depends on cultivation conditions and isolation source.
So, You will need 16 S sequence and other analysis for your identification.
Hope this helps
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
31 answers
Please, Could any one suggest for me a journal with rapid publication in the field of environmental science, health and pollution, a journal indexed in Web of Science, Scopus, low IF, and without fees, to publish my research paper.
Thank you.
Relevant answer
Answer
Please have look on our(Eminent Biosciences (EMBS)) collaborations.. and let me know if interested to associate with us
Our recent publications In collaborations with industries and academia in India and world wide.
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Universidad Tecnológica Metropolitana, Santiago, Chile. Publication Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33397265/
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Moscow State University , Russia. Publication Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32967475/
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Icahn Institute of Genomics and Multiscale Biology,, Mount Sinai Health System, Manhattan, NY, USA. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29199918
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with University of Missouri, St. Louis, MO, USA. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30457050
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, USA. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27852211
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with ICMR- NIN(National Institute of Nutrition), Hyderabad Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23030611
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with University of Minnesota Duluth, Duluth MN 55811 USA. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27852211
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with University of Yaounde I, PO Box 812, Yaoundé, Cameroon. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30950335
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Federal University of Paraíba, João Pessoa, PB, Brazil. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30693065
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with collaboration with University of Yaoundé I, Yaoundé, Cameroon. Publication Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31210847/
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, 48080, Leioa, Spain. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27852204
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Publication Link: http://www.eurekaselect.com/135585
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with NIPER , Hyderabad, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29053759
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Alagappa University, Tamil Nadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30950335
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Hyderabad , India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28472910
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with C.S.I.R – CRISAT, Karaikudi, Tamil Nadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30237676
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Karpagam academy of higher education, Eachinary, Coimbatore , Tamil Nadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30237672
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Ballets Olaeta Kalea, 4, 48014 Bilbao, Bizkaia, Spain. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29199918
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Hospital for Genetic Diseases, Osmania University, Hyderabad - 500 016, Telangana, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28472910
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with School of Ocean Science and Technology, Kerala University of Fisheries and Ocean Studies, Panangad-682 506, Cochin, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27964704
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with CODEWEL Nireekshana-ACET, Hyderabad, Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26770024
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Bharathiyar University, Coimbatore-641046, Tamilnadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27919211
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with LPU University, Phagwara, Punjab, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31030499
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Department of Bioinformatics, Kerala University, Kerala. Publication Link: http://www.eurekaselect.com/135585
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Gandhi Medical College and Osmania Medical College, Hyderabad 500 038, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27450915
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with National College (Affiliated to Bharathidasan University), Tiruchirapalli, 620 001 Tamil Nadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27266485
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with University of Calicut - 673635, Kerala, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23030611
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with NIPER, Hyderabad, India. ) Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29053759
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with King George's Medical University, (Erstwhile C.S.M. Medical University), Lucknow-226 003, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25579575
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with School of Chemical & Biotechnology, SASTRA University, Thanjavur, India Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25579569
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Safi center for scientific research, Malappuram, Kerala, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30237672
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Dept of Genetics, Osmania University, Hyderabad Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25248957
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Institute of Genetics and Hospital for Genetic Diseases, Osmania University, Hyderabad Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26229292
Sincerely,
Dr. Anuraj Nayarisseri
Principal Scientist & Director,
Eminent Biosciences.
Mob :+91 97522 95342
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
4 answers
I am writing a review article on Biochar technology and I would like to know what are some methods preferred to prepare biochar. If possible, kindly mention any drawbacks to employing these methods. That would be a great help. Thank you in advance.
Relevant answer
Answer
Gasification of organic material
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
7 answers
My name is Harry Bajwa and I am a student. I am doing a school project for oil spill clean up. I am not actually looking to buy these bacteria. It is only a hypothetical scenario where our team is hired to clean up a future oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.
For the economical analysis, I need accurate prices of bacteria samples. If you need the names of the bacteria specifically, I have listed them in the attached pdf.
Any amount of information would be helpful. Thanks!
Update: Glad to see many answers. I have submitted my final report now. It is 42 pages long and the biggest paper i ever wrote! Thanks again for your help.
Relevant answer
Answer
Even if @ Innocent Ojeba Musa did not answer directly your question, his answer has a lot to do with philosophy how to solve bioremediation in real situations. It is very common to use autochthonous microbial consortia for bioremediation of contaminated sites using biostimulation instead of bioaugmentation. It is also our practice in the company ABITEC s.r.o. which is engaged in bioremediation business 30 years.
Best regards
Vit
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
4 answers
I am looking for the detection of Cr (VI) during experiment of Cr reduction by bacteria using 1,5-diphenylcarbazide (EPA 7196A) method. So, can anyone suggest me that the control/blank in the experiment should contain which components? Thank you.
Relevant answer
Answer
Respected Sir Paul Milham, Thank you for your kind consideration. I'm using bacteria for the reduction of Cr (VI) into Cr (III) as literature read by me i.e., Young Hak et al., 2003, support that 1,5-diphenylcarbazide forms colored complex with Cr (VI). I'm using US EPA 7196A method which is for Cr (VI) detection and has been used by many authors for similar work of my interest. So dear sir, can you please recommend me some literature or protocols to detect Cr (III) with 1,5-diphenylcarbazide so I can further enhance my knowledge with respect to your directions and apply in my experimental work.
Thank you in anticipation.
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
4 answers
The diamides are the most recent addition to the limited number of insecticide classes with specific target site activity that are highly efficacious, control a wide pest spectrum, and have a favorable toxicological profile. Currently available diamide insecticides include chlorantraniliprole and flubendiamide, with cyantraniliprole already being sold in some countries as launch progresses.
Relevant answer
Answer
It is slowly, it is almost within three months
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
4 answers
For research regarding phytoremediation using cactaceae, specifically gymnocalycium.
Relevant answer
Answer
No Cactaceae have not the reputation to hyperaccumulate heavy metals.
Regards
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
5 answers
The composition of the BH medium is as follows:
MgSO4 - 0.2g/L
CaCl2 - 0.02g/L
KH2PO4 - 1g/L
K2HPO4 - 1g/L
(NH4)2SO4 - 1g/L
and FeCl3 - 0.05g/L
Thank you!
Relevant answer
Answer
This medium lacks nitrogen source, so it depend on the nutritional requirements and N sources is one of them?
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
5 answers
I'm working on remediation of heavy metal contaminated soils by soil washing method.I have read some papers that different researchers used complexing agents such as EDTA,EDDS,GLDA,SDS and citric acid but i now want to use a new and different complexing agent at this work.
Relevant answer
Answer
This is dependent to the metal that you want to leach. Different metals can be dissolved at different reagents. As a general answer, today using organic acids as leaching reagent is very attractive. Because these acids are environmentally friendly reagent, especially if they are extracted from microorganisms such as aspergillus niger or penicillium.
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
15 answers
Hello, any successful/ unsuccessful examples of Artificial Floating Islands in aquatic ecosystem restoration. Recently, I visited Lake Kasumigaura, Japan. & I saw AFIs well managed there.
If anybody working in AFIs, (Lake Kasumigaura, particularly) please share how far the success rate with AFIs? & how to choose AFI plants for a particular waterbody?
Thanks in Advance!
Best regards
Anila P Ajayan
Relevant answer
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
4 answers
Many researchers stated that Low bio-availability is restricting factor to uptake metals. On the other hand side, people try to control high bio-availability or mobility of metals.if they try to control then it will be limited, then phytoextraction potential will be less now which one is good?
Relevant answer
Answer
It depends on the toxic metal concentration of the soil and plant type, if the toxic metal content was below than tolerable level of certain plant, no need to control the availability of toxic metals.But, In the case of toxic metal surpassed tolerable level, you need to control the mobility in order to let the accumulation plants live in the substrata. no need to much worry about metal availability after the treatment, only the accumulation plant grow relatively well, plant rhizosphere will mobilize the metal
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
3 answers
I'm interested specifically in looking into the contribution of biomass in DOC (dissolved organic carbon), that means organic compounds that are smaller than 0.45 microns.
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear, have a look at this important attachment.
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
3 answers
I am working on tannery wastewater. Toxic chemicals (organic pollutants) and heavy metals mainly chromium present in tannery wastewater after secondary treatment process.Their wastewater discharge in to water bodies poses a serious threat to the living organisms inhabiting respective ecosystem and also tends to be accumulated in food chain. provide the details of  phytotoxicity, genotoxicity,and genotoxicity test on allium cepa for environmental safety.
Relevant answer
Answer
You can perform 2 methods: Comet Assay and Micronucleus test using allium cepa as bioindicator organism exposing it to tannery wastewater effluents, in order to measure genotoxicity.
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
5 answers
I need to analyse plant rinsate for analysis of heavy metals as part of a Mine spill contamination project. Do we have any standard protocol for plant rinsate analysis?
Relevant answer
Answer
Please follow EPA protocol for heavy metal analysis.
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
3 answers
organic contaminant have been discribed as timitant factor for metal phytoremediation. could anyone give me more information about the level. I mean in which concentration of Organic Contaminant is a limit for metal removal.
Relevant answer
Answer
thank you a lot. but my question was not on organic matter, although it is one of the key for metal reemedial, but Organic contaminat such us phenenthrene, pyrene,,,,,PAHs
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
17 answers
industrial waste water from CETPs
bioremediation
bacterial strain
Relevant answer
Answer
In my view there is no prescribed bacterial strains for bio remediation of industrial wastewater whether it is collected from a stand alone ETP or Common ETP. It is should be context specific and more appropriate way is to isolate indigenous bacterial strains from the wastewater to be treated and from the soil of that location and identify the potential bacterial consortium to remediate the targeted pollutants. 
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
12 answers
When I left the Pseudomonas on medium like cetrimide agar, kings medium for more than 10 days. I found root like pattern on plates. Please someone explain the reason for this.
Please see the attachments for plates picture.
Relevant answer
Answer
try reducing the quantity of cetrimide. Actually Cetrimide agar was meant for growing Pa obtained freshly from pathological samples and not from soils.
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
4 answers
We're trying to simulate the heavy metal concentration of a particular river and we want to try to add different metallic salts to nutrient agar which we will use to cultivate bacteria to see if they could survive under these conditions.
Relevant answer
Answer
I would not use nutrient agar for your experiment. Nutrient agar is an undefined medium, you do not really know the exact composition (e.g. yeast extract contains many chemical compounds), many of these compounds might interact with heavy metals and you might not be measuring the accurate toxicity (especially you are looking for effect in river water - unless the water is very polluted).
For heavy metals toxicological study, you should always use defined medium and also minimal medium. Experiments should first be carried out to modify the medium, reduce the effect such as phosphates and sulfates by cutting down the concentation to minimal (you cannot remove them completely, otherwise the bacteria will not grow).
Hope this helps.
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
3 answers
my research show fungi grew in PDA contained high concentration heavy metal but did not grow in low concentraion heavy metal, why this happened? Because in theory, the fungi did not grow in high conc. heavy metal. Heavy metal used is Zinc and Manganese. Anyone know it? Your opinion and suggestion is needed. Thank you.
Relevant answer
Answer
Zn nad Mn are not heavy metals. Anyhow, the isolates are resistant to metals tested
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
13 answers
I have gone through many research papers regarding composting and have observed that the reduction in heavy metal concentration is seen with an effective percentage but I have a doubt because a coworker of mine suggested that there is no reduction an the heavy metal concentration and they only transform from one form to other. The total quantity remains the same. These are two contradictory statements. I would appreciate if some light will be thrown on this issue.
Relevant answer
Answer
As heavy metals are elements they cannot be destroyed or removed from composted waste through alteration or degradation. The reply above is correct that, given suitable pH etc, metals will often sorb onto and be immobilised by organic matter. As I understand, the only way that the overall concentration might alter is if uncontaminated material is added to the compost to dilute the metal concentration or if specific techniques are used to remove contaminated particles (these are often the smaller size fraction of MSW). For the latter reason, metal conc. of composts produced from MSW have declined over time as processing technology has improved and sources of contamination have been physically removed, usually prior to composting. Hope this helps, there is plenty in the literature on this topic published by Bardos (2004) and others.
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
24 answers
My partner and I are currently doing a research in phytoremediation. I would like to know what are some beneficial uses of plants that have acquired heavy metals (lead and zinc) in their cells. Can they be converted into bio fuel knowing that they have these heavy metals? what are some other uses for plants subjected to phytoremediation?
Relevant answer
Answer
Thank you all for answering my question!
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
3 answers
Municipal and industrial wastewater often contains a cocktail of a multitude of heavy metals and nutrients. Bacteria present in such wastewater may develop multiple heavy metals resistance to cope with such heavy metal stress as an adaptive strategy. These bacteria with multimetal resistance property have the potential for remediating the wastewater or soil contaminated with multiple heavy metals. I expect some enlightening   and enriching inputs from RG friends and researchers.
Relevant answer
Answer
The case of bacterial multimetal resistance  is a bit different from resistance to single metal but is more worthy as a tool for bioremediation. I am particularly interested to tolerance and resistance strategy and the cellular, biochemical and molecular mechanism involved there. How does escape mechanism and tolerance in course of time evolves as an adaptive  strategy and means of detoxification and/or removal?
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
4 answers
Hi, 
I'm doing my thesis on the growth of Lemna minor in fish farm waste but can not find any information on the optimal nutrient ranges for lemna minor growth.
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
3 answers
Thanks in advance.
Relevant answer
Answer
I suggest you the researches of Roger Reeves, Jean Louis Morel and others.
A list of hiper accumulating plants is being made throught experiences and case studies but there are not so many information availables concerning a big number of plants.
Many studies are focused on tropical soils or anyway on old altered and degraded soils like laterites (for ex. New Caledonia)
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
13 answers
copper contaminated soil
Relevant answer
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
4 answers
I am looking for the gene sequence of above mentioned genes. Plz send the gene sequences Or else plz suggest me the way to search the gene sequences. 
Relevant answer
Answer
Thank You sir (Mr. Vrajesh Patel). I will al ways be grateful to you.
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
3 answers
Hi, 
This is a bi-exponential or double-first-order in parallel
(DFOP) model: (C = C0(ge−k1t + [1 − g]e−k2t)) 
where C is the concentration at time t, C0 is the initial
concentration at time 0, k1 values are degradation rate constants at compartment 1 (rapid phase) and k2 is for compartment 2 (slow phase), g is
the fraction of C0 applied to compartment 1.
Often the value should come k1>k2, which means rate is higher in rapid phase.I only saw one article who obtained k2>k1. I am also getting k2>k1, actually means show degradation has higher rate than rapid degradation. On the other hand, I am getting g value 60% which means ~60% of initial concentration is being degraded at compartment 1 i.e. in rapid phase. Is this a contradictory? Could anyone please share your experience and expertise here? it was a biodegradation of PAH in soil and this model is fitting with very good-fitting than single first-order, except this confusing explanation. Thank you
Relevant answer
Answer
Thank you very much Dr Salvatore and Dr Tarik for sharing your expertise. 
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
5 answers
Hi,
I am supposed to start experiment with Salix to remove Cu Zn and Ni from artificially contaminated soil. I am confused to choose at what concentration level EDDS is suitable to bind the metal for phytoextraction scope soil contaminated with  Cu 400 mg/kg Ni 30 mg/kg and  Zn 200 mg/kg. Is this EDDS applicable for the removal of heavy metals? 
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Muhammad,
You will have to do some pre-testing to determine the amount of the EDDS chelator required for Cu, Ni, and Zn removal using your specific soil and plant system. The trick is to maximize the amount of chelated metal taken up by the plant while minimizing the amount of cheated metal that moves downward to groundwater. I attached 2 articles that may help you with your experimental design. I hope this helps.
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
4 answers
Does anybody know of any species (of plants, fungi, or perhaps even bacteria) that can breakdown antibiotics in wastewater?
Relevant answer
Answer
How intriguing! I kept some fairy shrimp last year that I had sourced from the wild in South Australia. Unfortunately, they did not survive long enough for me to identify them. I have read that they can be identified by the morphology of the cyst shell; each species having noticeable differences under the microscope. I plan to source some more in the future from the same spot and try to identify them - but that could be a while off in the future. I would need to find out how to induce them to lay their cysts too - I presume I would need to replicate their natural environment (an ephemeral pool which dries up over summer). I notice your company: 'Fairy Shrimp Brazil Ltd'
What is the nature of your business? Using Branchiopoda as bio-remediator or just breeding? I am quite curious. Do you have any papers relating to your work with Fairy Shrimp?
Regards,
Kendall Francis
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
1 answer
Is there any company using bioreactors to mass produce arbuscular mycorrhiza, or the technology is just at the stage of patents and theory.
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Karim,
You may check Sopartec Making Science Investable.
Sopartec, the technology transfer company of the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), presents a new bioreactor for mass production of high quality arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi inoculants
Contacts & Access
Sopartec s.a.
Chemin du Cyclotron, 6
B-1348 LOUVAIN-LA-NEUVE (Belgium)
Tél. : +32 (0) 10.39.00.21
Fax. : +32 (0) 10.39.00.29
coordonnées GPS : 50.665492,4.624912
Hoping this will be helpful,
Rafik
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
6 answers
Share of plants in subsurface wetland efficiency? Your Idea?We know subsurface wetlands as a natural treatment, play important role in pollution reduction and there are huge research papers in wastewater treatment by wetland system. But usually we do not know how much is share of plant adsorption range in pollution removal in subsurface wetlands. off-course there are different data in research papers that depended on the different conditions (hydraulic patterns, climatology, Geometric configuration of the system, plant type and etc.).  
Did you had any study or research that specify shares of the plants, Rhizome, Gravel, Biofilms attached to the Gravels efficiency, separately in the subsurface wetland for wastewater treratment for organic materials, heavy metals and etc. for define condition?
Thanks a lot, if you can participate in this scientific topic. 
Relevant answer
Answer
Wetland based bioremediation is a very complex phenomenon which includes interactions of many factors which you have already included in your question. It is very difficult to find such study which included role of all the wetland components in pollutant clean up. There are some scattered studies which covered 2-3 components of wetlands such as role of plants alongwith their rhizospheric microorganisms and also role of gravel/sediment bed.
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
10 answers
While carrying out bio-remediation test with halophilic bacteria of Karnataka regions I found a few isolated were tolerating cadmium up to 700ppm. Among them some have shown pigmentation when exposed to cadmium. One of the isolates has shown a fluorescent greenish yellow pigmentation when streaked on to a nutrient plate containing 200ppm of cadmium.
Relevant answer
Answer
Many microbial pigments have defense anti-stress functions. The plating results of Sameer generally confirm this well-known fact. Two processes are involved: 1) nutrient media wit heavy metals select resistant organisms some [if not many] of them carrying genetic determinants for biosynthesis of anti-stress pigments and 2) presence of stress-factor stimulates pigments production through differential gene expression.
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
8 answers
I'm carrying on the part of soil and water analysis for my thesis and please consider the following questions;
Q1: Is there any alternative way for total nitrogen in soil instead of Kjeldahl?
Q2: for water analysis? what are the parameters should be analysis within 24 hours to 1 week after the sampling, as i have found various opinions about it with different ranges (from EPA and US Salinity Labs 1954)?
Relevant answer
Answer
SPD meter is very effective to be used an indicator of total N , and there is very good correlation  between them . Water quality analysis in terms of pH, EC , TDS , SAR/RSC ( If water is saline/sodic in nature ). But , I am not too sure about any distinct changes in these properties within 24-hourly interval , unless there is some possibility water getting mixed up with other source(s) .
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
3 answers
In case of high mixing ratio soil:compost, up to 1:1. In the literature this method is mostly applied to soil without organic amendments, maybe someone has more experience in this field?
Relevant answer
Answer
Chlorof fumigation for determination of microbial abundance  is generally not really precise. (Alessi, D. S., Walsh, D. M., Fein, J. B., 2011. Uncertainties in determining microbial biomass C using the chloroform fumigation–extraction method. Chemical Geology 280, 58–64.) Still, it is very common - because easy and cheap i guess.
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
11 answers
we have a site heavily polluted by heavy metals and we want current methodology of clean up either by Phytoremediation, using of Microbes, enhancing of the plants with bio-fertilizer and any other good info.
Relevant answer
Answer
 Dear Aransiola
According to my experience , special plants can rescue the soil, but first of all we should know the type of soil and then finding appropriate plants .Phosphate fertilizers could be good due to   enhance the precipitation of heavy metals in plant. 
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
4 answers
I am working on Bioremediation.
Relevant answer
Answer
Hi there !
Yes, you can your growth process with p-xylene like carbon source.
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
4 answers
I need  literature's about phytoremediation of petroleum contaminated sites with hybrid aspen and European aspen. 
Relevant answer
Answer
The literature on this topic actually is quite abundant, even when aspen is used as active species. Some references can be found in particular in:
O. Peter Abioye (2011). Biological Remediation of Hydrocarbon and Heavy Metals Contaminated Soil, Soil Contamination, MSc Simone Pascucci (Ed.), ISBN: 978-953-307-647-8, InTech, Available from:
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
5 answers
Hi,
I have grown my bacteria in LB media supplemented with 3mM TBT. TBT stock solution was prepared in ethanol as per the reference papers. But, When I add the TBT solution to the media, it didn't mix properly. It precipitate with media. I also try this with minimal media. In that I got the same results. Can anyone suggest me the preparation of TBT stock solution and media for the bioremediation of TBT using bacteria?
Relevant answer
Answer
Check the media described in the paper attached. Any media suitable for the biodegradation of hydrophobic organic compounds should work.
Do not autoclave, it decomposes.
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
6 answers
I am working on Bioremidiation What is the other chelating agent which behaves like EDTA in Bacterial media ?
Relevant answer
Answer
What is your pupose of using chelating agent 
What bioremediation study u r doing.
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
4 answers
Is Bioventilation in Bioremediation process different from Biosparging?
Welcome everybody to this discussion subject. What is the typical indicators for these process.
Relevant answer
Answer
Bioventing is the aeration of the unsaturated vadose zone to stimulate aerobic biodegradation. Biosparging is the injection of air into the groundwater to provide oxygen for groundwater remediation.
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
2 answers
1. There are different isoforms of this enzyme in swiss prot, would you mind  please help me to find out which isoform is better for expression in Pichia pastoris?
2. I want to use recombinant laccase for bioremediation of wastewater. Which isoform do you recommend for this purpose?
3. I want to do codon optimization based on the synonymous codon bias of P.pastoris and optimize G+C content for further improvement of the expression level of recombinant laccase. Would you mind please tell me which software and company should I use?
4. Can we use testament enzyme for laccase isolated from other different sources? (For example laccase from Pleurotus ostreatus (mushroom) sigma 75117)
Relevant answer
Answer
There are too many open questions and I would recommend to do an extensive literature search first.
There are several organism with several laccase isoenzymes you might start with. You should try to find out which enzyme will have best activity for your bioremediation under process conditions and then start to clone and express the enzyme.
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
12 answers
Once precious metals are sorbed on to the biosorbent, to recover the metal back, is it advisable to go for desorption by leaching using acids, alkalis, chelating agents or solvent extraction. These do not completely destroy the sorbent but may destroy their active binding sites. So in the subsequent sorption cycle the process may not be as efficient as in the previous cycle. Pyrolysis or incineration on the other hand will destroy the sorbent but the precious metal will be well recovered. If the cost of the recovered precious metal is >>> the cost of production of the biosorbent, is it right to go for pyrolysis or incineration rather than description by leaching or solvent extraction.
Relevant answer
Answer
The biosorbents  have some limitations although a lot of work is done and going on but comparatively few patents are  available that means that there are some problems either the field is not explored or there is a gap?
So far adsorption by living organism is considered it is of course not that much intensively studied as reference Prof. wang review can be studied (Biosorption of heavy metals by Saccharomyces cerevisiae A review).
Any way this is a good and long discussion and should be continued.
In biosorption the sorbent used in most of the cases is low cost and if its sorption capacity is appreciable the ideal way should be incineration because they are normally not reusable. 
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
10 answers
We researched about effect of bioaugmentation of leachate bacteria on COD removal from leachate as both suspended and biofilm forms but surprisingly, not only COD didn't decrease but also increased in comparison with control group (without bioaugmentation), and this result was repeated for aerobic and anaerobic condition. Probably, its more interesting to know COD of bioaugmented leachate was higher than sterilized leachate after 14 days. How is it possible? Acclimation process was performed over 25 days through increasing concentration of leachate
Relevant answer
Answer
You are right but if suspended bacteria caused to increase COD, do you agree biofilm form must have lower COD than that suspended form?. But vice versa, biofilm form had higher COD than that suspended form. What do you think about it? 
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
3 answers
To determine growth of anammox bacteria. 
Relevant answer
Answer
Thanks Mushtaq and Prof. Bashir. 
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
3 answers
This water is generated from MEE condensate & contains traces of  formic, acetic, propionic, butyric, valeric, and hexanoic acids; 2,3-butanediol, furfuryl alcohol, which acts as inhibitor of fermentation process if used process again without removal.
Relevant answer
Answer
To eliminate these wastes use the live baker's yeast in an amount of about 500 g / 10 m3 of waste water. Waste will CO2 and yeast sediment. The water will be clean, bacteria-free.
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
4 answers
The carrier is charcoal. It contains a consortium of efficient bacteria (10 to power 8-9 CFU/g). The soil was contaminated 7 years ago. The soil is clay loam, pH 8.2, low N, P and organic matter content.
Relevant answer
Answer
From literature I found that the optimum weight of the carrier based inoculum is  2% from soil weight in a pot experiment and the frequency of application was once for 150 days and the degradation% of TPH was satisfactory.
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
6 answers
Biodegradation, optimization, inoculum size
Relevant answer
Answer
Yes. It will define convergence of your solution.
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
1 answer
Need to carry out some investigations into the fate of struvite in pavement structures.
Relevant answer
Answer
There might be something abt this in the work undertaken by GRABOWLECKI at Edinburgh University. I don't have the papers in mind but will check if you can't find anything.
Regards,
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
8 answers
I have reviewed several papers in which this phrase is mentioned but not described why it is.
Relevant answer
Answer
Well lets answer your question in steps. First of all bacterial leaching is mostly use for low grade ores  or tailings, which are dumped over land. If bacterial leaching is not done, the ores will still get leached due to environmental conditions and weather conditions which can not be controlled. The leachate will pollute table water and adjoining land and fresh water bodies mostly by percolation. If a controlled leaching process is used then such pollution can be averted. Classical hydrometallurgical leaching is not affordable due to low mineral content. So is the case with other classical extraction processes. Therefore, economically  feasible process  is the bacterial leaching which does not need any major investment. Here even if the mineral can not be recovered, at least we have saved the environment and hence such a process is ecofreindly. I tell you this because basically I am a geomicrobiologist  myself.
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
4 answers
 I can't find any latest journal/unpublished articles. 
Relevant answer
Answer
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
9 answers
If I have oil contaminated soil and iI want to remediate it by using bacteria individually and with plants as phytoremediation. How can I use bacteria if it is in solution as media to remediate soil?
Relevant answer
Answer
Whilst adding an oil degrading microbial assemblage can help degradation rates much more important is providing inorganic nutrients, correct water relations and aerobic conditions. For references I suggest you look at the Clu-in website. Just do a google search on Clu-in and you will easily find it.
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
13 answers
Usually it is recommended to add glucose after sterilization of media.
Can anyone tell me, then how should we add glucose in the media?
We usually work on litres of media (4 to 8 L), for which we need 30 to 50 g glucose.
If we add solid glucose then there are chances of contamination.
Should we use microfilters?
Microfilters are very expensive.
Then what others?
In our experiments, we do not care how much glucose is oxidizing on heating in autoclave because our concern is to obtain enough growth of the culture for biotransformation.
Relevant answer
Answer
Hello, you mention the concentration of glucose is 30-50 g per liter or the total culture medium prepare. You can dissolve the glucose in 150 ml sterile water and filter through a millipore membrane, and that is the medium and add to a sterile laminar flow hood or directly the bioreactor with a peristaltic pump . The second way is : 150 or 200 ml autoclave sterilization at 15 lb / cm2 for 15 min and adicionas to the culture medium . The fact of putting glucose together with the other components of the medium, is primarily nitrogen source as it reacts with compounds forming glucasa inihiben microbial growth ( Maillard reactions ) if your medium does not have high concentrations of amino acids , proteins , ammonium salts put no problem glucose culture medium and esterilices together .
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
1 answer
I think acidotolerant bacteria will have wider pH range for survivality and growth, hence they can work over a wide range of pH along with helping in the solubilisation of metal from the soils, sediments due to acidic condition.
Pls add your valuable suggestion and related article......
Relevant answer
Answer
Polluted sites or sources have particular pH, acidotolerant will work better in acidic condition without much energy input.
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
6 answers
I want to study cover crop biomass application to the methanogenesis in rice paddy soil
Relevant answer
Answer
Actually, the ultimate ratio of CH4 to CO2 produced from the degradation of organic material is independent of the pathway taken. If for example hydrogen is produced from the degradation of glucose, it does not matter whether this hydrogen is subsequently directly converted into methane, or first converted into acetate with the acetate subsequently converted into methane. In either case the mineralization of one mole of glucose yields 3 moles of CH4 and 3 moles of CO2 (see below).
Classical pathway:
C6H12O6 + 2H2O --> 2CH3COOH + 2CO2 + 4H2
CO2 + 4H2 --> CH4 + 2H2O
2CH3COOH --> 2CH4 + 2CO2
SUM: C6H12O6 --> 3CH4 + 3CO2
Pathway where hydrogen is removed by acetogens:
C6H12O6 + 2H2O --> 2CH3COOH + 2CO2 + 4H2
2CO2 + 4H2 --> CH3COOH + 2H2O
3CH3COOH --> 3CH4 + 3CO2
SUM: C6H12O6 --> 3CH4 + 3CO2
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
4 answers
The articles can be related to reducing dross generation during the Lead refining process. The articles can also relate to other metals such as Aluminum. They can also quote references on chemical reactions during the dross generation process.
Relevant answer
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
12 answers
As more and more industrial effluents are being produced by developing nations with their development. It is carrying loads of heavy metals which are harmful/toxic to human beings. This waste water is being used to grow vegetable crops and entering in human chain. Different chemical procedures require a lot of expenditure where as it is known that some of the microbes could do this job very easily. Kindly, tell me whether it can be used on a turn key basis all around the world.
Relevant answer
Answer
There are some strategies to provide optimal conditions for microalgae to remove nutrients and heavy metals from wastewater. I would like to suggest you to read a review I wrote on Phycoremediation hoping that you could find some useful information:
Olguín, E.J. 2003. Phycoremediation: key issues for cost-effective nutrient removal processes. Biotech. Adv. 22: 81-91.(F.I.= 9.646)
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
8 answers
I isolated a some bacteria and want to use them for cleaning oil contaminated soil.
Relevant answer
Answer
you should be aware that your consortia will have to compete with natural soil microcosm, which will be especially problematic for older contamination with adapted micros.
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
4 answers
Can anyone suggest the methods to quantify the biofilm formed by diatoms such as Navicula sp. in 96 well microtitre plates?
Relevant answer
Answer
ya...i have decided to go with Chl a content after treating the biofilm with dimethyl sulfoxime (DMSO).
thanks for the articles.
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
2 answers
Hi all,
I was hoping that someone could tell me of a protocol to isolate DNA from soil samples collected at a mining site - preferably one that doesn't need a kit and could be achieved with a CTAB modified approach. The current techniques I'm using are more suited for humic soils (Verma and Satyanarayana, 2011) than for the gravelly heavy metal contaminated collected soil samples.
Relevant answer
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
7 answers
Among my options I'm considering using polylactate, fumarate, acetate, glucose, yeast extract or molasses. ¿at what concentration could work well?
Relevant answer
Answer
As you can see from the above replies, bioremediation is not a silver bullet for chlorinated solvents.
The real thing used in industry (at least in china!) is reduction with zero valent iron: simple iron shavings (wastes from machining metal objects) will tranform into iron chloride and decompose de halocarbons.
This can be done in situ using a reactive permeable barrier, in particular, a ditch filled with iron and other reducing substances (wood branches, organic matter, etc.) When the contaminated water flows through, the decontamination progresses, but this all depends on slope,, water table, etc. and probably needs engineering....
good luck!
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
11 answers
I am working on bioremediation. And one of my projects focuses on Cr(VI) reduction by Desulfovibrio vulgaris,Pseudomonas putida F1,Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, getting the bacteria seems to be a problem hard to get over for us. I have been working on it for a couple of months, but no progress. Do you have one of them? If you do and would you kindly offer us the strain, it would be very helpful for us. Of course, the strain will never be used for commercial purposes.We will acknowledge the strains resource and cite your papers in all our publications based on Desulfovibrio vulgaris,Pseudomonas putida F1,Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. We are also willing to put you into the author list if you're agree.
And I am Ding Chunlian,Microbiology Reseach Lab, School of Matallury and Environment,
Central South University,Changsha,Hunan,410083,P.R.China.
Relevant answer
Answer
Shewanellasp.,and Lysinibacillus sphaericus
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
4 answers
Harvesting of microalgae at large scale is too difficult
Relevant answer
Answer
Suspended air floatation method could be effective, but it is expensive one. see the attachment below.
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
2 answers
Is there any similarity between Mer genes sequence in all bacteria? i'm trying to isolate mer genes from unknown bacteria from gold mining site in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. If all of the mer genes have some kind of conserved sequence, then i guess it is possible for me to amplified those mer genes from these unknown bacteria. Or maybe there're some primers that can be used to amplified mer genes in all bacteria? 
Relevant answer
Answer
Check the following review. It's a pretty recent one about mer operon, though right now seems that the server is down right now.
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
5 answers
in Simplified X-ray film method for detection of bacterial volatilization of mercury chloride by Escherichia coli, When i read the abstract, i thought it was about Hg0 detection using x-ray film. But the result says that the foggy area was formed because of Mercury Chloride or HgCl2. I'm confused, since we add HgCl2 into the medium and as far as i know, they were using Mercury Resistant E. coli that will transform Hg2+ into Hg0. And also, in other research they were using this method as a confirmation method of mercury volatilization by the isolate
Relevant answer
Answer
Hg0 reacts with the Ag1+, reducing it to Ag0. It is just a redox reaction, and not specific.
What the author comments in several paragraphs is that:
  • some compounds may cause reaction even in absence of Hg2+
"Cysteine, glutathione, mercaptoethanol, and bovine serum albumin formed foggy areas on X-ray film even when Hg2+ was absent."
  • Some gases from culturing can have the same effect
"However, foggy formations were observed for all volatilizing
strains after reaction for 24 h at 35°C even when
mercury-free nutrient broth was used as the volatilization
buffer. High reaction temperature and long reaction time
also caused fogging by the non-volatilizing strains. These
results suggest that Ag+ contained in X-ray film can be
reduced by various gases released by bacteria, as in the
former case, or from thioglycolate, as in the latter."
  • the vapours produced from volatilising strains can be so abundant that can diffuse to close wells. This may give a false positive in a non-volatilizing or non-HgCl2 wells if they are close to those with a strong activity
"The large amount of mercury vapor produced by resistant
strains sometimes formed faint fog in the areas on the
microplate where sensitive strains had been inoculated. This
fog may have been caused by excess amounts of mercury
vapor which could not be trapped in one spot on the X-ray
film. Hence, the inoculation of bacteria onto the microplate
should be done with plenty of space between each inoculated
spot."
Perfect example of why you always have to run controls
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
12 answers
I have studied the biosorption of zinc using a fungal strain. In my work I have to perform the analysis such as FTIR, EDAX and SEM, ZETA potential, Isotherms studies. But everything have before and after so there are plenty of graphs and images. as per manuscript is concern how to make them proper that will fit for the manuscript.
Relevant answer
Answer
Find a quiet place and think about what kind of story you are going to have based on your experimental data. Once you determine your selling point, then try to organize your data to support the ideas your are trying to selling out. just my two cents.
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
8 answers
I have a mixture that contains toluene and bacteria culture. I want to know about the bacteria's ability to degrade toluene. Is there anyone who can tell me a simple method to check the toluene concentration in the mixture? Maybe something spectrophotometry-based.
Thank you for your help
Relevant answer
Answer
dear jacob, thank you :)
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
5 answers
I'm working on this but I find it hard looking for journal articles in line with this. Thank you.
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear I Jiereen,
If you have any question in this regards, I am at your services. this my email: ramavandi_b@yahoo.com
Best wishes, 
Bahman
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
8 answers
I am performing a pot experiment for the effect of heavy metals on plant growth and to see the role of bacteria in remediating the soil contaminated with heavy metals. I am confused regarding addition of heavy metal to soil. 
Relevant answer
Answer
One thing to bear in mind using this 'spiking' approach is that your experiment will only assess the remediation efficacy of your treatments to a recent spiking event. I am afraid this may or may not be particularly relevant for inference to long-term contaminated soils where a multitude of biogeochemical processes will have taken place in the environment. My advice would be to try to obtain a true contaminated soil, rather than making one.
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
3 answers
I'm using mercury reducing bacteria. I want to know if they're really reducing Hg2+ to Hg0. So far I got Hg0 detection assay using x-ray film. But maybe there's a simpler way rather than using x-ray film?
Relevant answer
Answer
maybe you can use lumix RA915+ to measure element mercury 
reference:Mercury Reduction and Cell-Surface Adsorption by Geobacter
sulfurreducens PCA
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
5 answers
There're so many publication about mercury bioremediation by using mercury reducing bacteria that reduce Hg2+ to Hg0. But Hg0 is actually pretty dangerous as well as Hg2+. So why is converting Hg2+ to Hg0 considered as a bioremediation?
Relevant answer
Answer
Though Hg(0) is pretty toxic, it is not even close to the toxicity of Hg(II) or Hg(I) both of which can form organomercurial compounds like methylmercury or dimethylmercury. This compounds, and similar, enter in the trophic chain and can bioacummulate, being responsible of the mercury content on fish. On the other hand, you could even drink or inject Hg(0) without severe complications, the only important entrance in the body is through inhalation.
And yes, Hg(0) is volatile and some bacteria can reduce the Hg(II) to Hg(0) as a mechanism of detoxification, promoting volatilization and removal from their immediate environment.
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
3 answers
Does anyone use 2,6-dichlorophenol indophenol as a redox indicator? I have bought this material from Merck company but it does not dissolve in water or produce blue color. In your opinion is this matter corrupt?
Relevant answer
Answer
Hello Rezvan I hope you have purchased Sodium salt of ,6-dichlorophenol indophenol from Merck which is readily soluble in water. Kindly check the same... Good luck and best regards: Deepti
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
7 answers
I am working phosphate soluble bacteria. I am interested in estimation of Phosphate soluble by spectrophotometer. But I am getting problem on preparing Pikovskaya’s Broth as it is getting precipitated. I am using double distilled water with TDS 3.
Relevant answer
Answer
Centrifuged the Pikovskaya’s broth before spectrophotometric estimation.
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
5 answers
It is possible only when hexavalent chromium is present in parts per million level using DiphenylCarbazide
Relevant answer
Answer
There is another paper published by my group, copy attached.
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
6 answers
As above.
Relevant answer
Answer
If you do not retain the bacteria longer than the water they cannot develop a effective degrader culture for the pollutants in the wastewater.
The definition of "activated sludge" doesn't apply if SRT isn't considerably longer than HRT.
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
1 answer
Pseudomonas putida KT2440 could accumulate cadmium using protein transporters such as CadA, and CaDB. But after exporting the Cadmium inside, how do they maintain other metabolism and not become disrupted by the cadmium inside? Is there any specific mechanism so that the cadmium won't interrupt other metabolism pathways? Or do they have some mechanism to transform Cd(ii) into some less harmful form of Cadmium?
Relevant answer
Answer
Hi ,
As per metabolic activity of microorganism (Say bacteria) heavy metal(esp., cad, chromium etc.,) will not take part in its metabolism. the only possibility is accumulation of those heavy metals in its cell wall or any other .. u can try out SDS page for the organism (you are using) or try out some biochemical changes owing to the Cad uptake with comparison to that of control experiments . this may help you to give some helpful picture about the changes in its metabolism. i hope there might be formation stress proteins in the bacterial cell wall.
  • asked a question related to Environmental Bioremediation
Question
2 answers
I am using arsenic transformng bacteria for reducing arsenate (V) to arsenite (I