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Entomology - Science topic

Discussion about latest research in Entomology
Questions related to Entomology
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Other than the dead heart?
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Thanks much
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I have insects stored for morphomolecular species identification in ethanol (EtOH). These weevils (Larinus spp.) were stored in 100% EtOH at the recommendation of more experienced entomologists. Now that I am trying to pin these weevils, they are quite brittle and difficult to pin without cracking an elytrum. It was suggested to me that I could dilute the EtOH in the storage vial to ~80% to 95% to rehydrate the weevils enough for pinning, but I am concerned this may result in DNA degradation.
Has anyone experienced a problem like this? Other than removing a leg prior to rehydration or pointing the weevils, does anyone have some advice on how to deal with this problem? Thank you in advance!
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Remove legs (1 or 2) prior to rehydration.
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Good seeking capacity, a vast prey range, the large number of pests devoured in a lifetime, overwintering as an adult stage, and adaptations to different locations are all potential qualities of spiders that make them effective biocontrol agents. Recent agricultural trends have highlighted the importance of spider conservation in agro environments, positioning spiders as a viable natural pest control tool. How far have spiders been incorporated as a pest biocontrol agent and has it been successful and efficient?
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Yes.
Have a look at this useful RG link.
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Hi everybody,
we are using circular pitfall traps (regular yogurt cups) since many years, and unfortunately, sometimes we encounter mice and lizards as by-catch in our samples.
These animals fall in the pitfall traps, are not able to climb out of it and drown...
Researches (e.g. see link attached) and personal reflections resulted in the following possible easy-to-install preventive measures:
1) covering the pitfall traps with a thin, wide-meshed iron grid, so it is too thin to "grab and climb" for invertebrate, but slippery enough for insects and spiders
2) using funnels with a slippery surface, so small vertebrata can't enter, while insects can fall into it
I personally like more solution 1, but I wanted to ask you to share your experience :-)
We aim mostly on spiders, centipedes, millipedes, beetles and other surface insects.
Thank you and greetings,
Michael
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We know there are indices like house index, Breteau index, Stegomyia index for Entomological survey for dengue . However in practical situation we see Multi-storeyed buildings in institutes/ campuses . How to go about standardizing them in calculating the various indices or there is any framework for such situation with different indices?
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Groups (clusters) can be assessed using the Moran's I index. The Moran Index will help locate spatial correlations between areas and identify typical and atypical habitats
Regards, Sergey
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Because there is no any vaccine for COVID-19 until and in past insects have transmitted number of diseases like; chikungunya virus, yellow fever, dengue fever,Lyme disease, plague,malaria, sleeping sickness, leishmaniasis, filariasis. So, what do you think, could it be possible for COVID-19?
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SARS-CoV-2 cannot be transmitted by mosquitoes.
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Does it act as a visual deterrent for predators or serves a purpose in the body's physiological processes?
Also, is there any similarity between the Sphingidae caterpillars and the larvae of Trilocha varians (Bombycidae) which also has a horn-like structure in the larval stage ?
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The horn is absolutely not for defense. I’ve tried super hard to get hurt on the horn but the horn does nothing at all. It’s too floppy to do anything defense-related. I’m guessing it has something to do with sensory functions or tricking predators. This would be a cool capstone research project for anyone interested!
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It is the agri entomology experiment conducted in two different contrasting locations for two years and two seasons per year. The data collected from the experiment was number of eggs, larvae, pupa, adult insect
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I would suggests you can use multivariate analysis, correlation analysis , anova using sas software accordingly you can see the intraction effect.
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I would like to test a biological method of screening vegetables/fruits for the presence of pesticide residue. Since a biological agent is used, the extraction solvent should be non-toxic.
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QuEChERS sample preparation
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Thyrinteina arnobia (Lepidoptera: Geometridae) is the major defoliator of eucalyptus plants in Brasil in the last 50 years. 
Since them, no parasitoid had been recorded for eggs of this pest in the field. In te lab we demonstrated that some kind of substance on the surface of these eggs protect them.    
In 2017, we a found a parasitoid in eggs of Thyrinteina arnobia (Lepidoptera: Geometridae) in the field.
I would like to know who can identify this parasitoid. The quality of the photo is very poor but I can take better ones if necessary.
Best regards,
José Cola Zanuncio
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Hi Murilo Fonseca Ribeiro, try reaching out to Erinn P. Fagan-Jeffries at Uni of South Australia - she works on Microgastrinae. Might be worth a shot.
Best, Andy
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Can anyone help me in identifying larvae based on Video clip and photographs?
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It is most likely a species of the family Yponomeutidae, perhaps of the genus Yponomeuta. Knowing the name of the host plant should be easy to ascertain the name of the specie.
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I am researching the geographical distribution of the most common cosmopolitan springtail species. Can you recommend sources related to collembola phylogeography?. It would be nice if we collected a significant number of references on this issue.
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Dear Nikola Z. Grujic . See the following useful link:
Sun, X., Zhang, F., Ding, Y. et al. Delimiting species of Protaphorura (Collembola: Onychiuridae): integrative evidence based on morphology, DNA sequences and geography. Sci Rep 7, 8261 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-08381-4
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Looking to id below beetles, Photographs attached.. Expert comments would be appriciated
Location: Bhaderwah, J & K, India
1. Image 1949- Which Cicada Species ?
2. Image 1663- Is it june beetle ?
3. Image 1644- Have no Idea for this one
4. Image 1919- is it dung beetle ?
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in the last photo i think - Polyphylla alba
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Complete entomology newbie here...
I am analysing a large data set of nocturnal aerial insects from light traps to look at their temporal abundance across seasons/years. I am unable to sample for diurnal aerial insects given the complications of doing so with conventional means (i.e. I don't have access to radar/lidar equipment). I am therefore hoping to find studies that compare diurnal and nocturnal aerial insect abundance (or that of insects more generally), to see if I can relate my findings on nocturnal insects abundance to that of diurnal species.
Thanks in advance!
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Dear Tyson,
This looks as an interesting topic to be discussed. So, I made a survey to maybe find related papers. You know it is so difficult to find publications that directly dealing with the issue of comparing nocturnal diurnal insects populations. But, I just found two papers one published in 2004 discussing day and night sampling of airborne insect fauna, the other one is published in 2019 discussing the effect of urbanization on diurnal and nocturnal insects abundance and species diversity.
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Thrips is serious pest in chilli. To develop thrips resistant or tolerant genotypes, it is essential to screen germplasm. Thrips lacerates abaxial surface of leaved. Can we a hedonic scale for damage assembly and use the score to discriminate genotypes. Is there any image analysis software available for such screening.
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My package pliman might help you with this. Please, see an example of plant disease severity quantification. If the severity of thrips damage has a contrasting coloration, it will be fairly easy to quantify it.
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Especially in favor of females in this case.
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I want to assess the infection status of Aedine mosquitoes with regard to dengue virus in Zambia. Very little is known about the prevalence of the disease in the country.
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I once attended a virtual event from one of the entomology societies in Europe. They say they are doing research by rearing locusts in the laboratory and then releasing them into nature for conservation purposes.
Why do you think they did that? Can you explain to me or share information regarding this?
What if one day the locusts that are released into nature actually migrate and cause harm to local agriculture and or even attack agricultural crops in other countries?
Please give your best opinion.
Thankyou. Best Regards!
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Locusts in natural ecosystems are an integral component. She plays an important role and ultimately - useful. In agroecosystems, locusts are harmful. The term harmful and useful insect was coined by man to describe the role of each insect in relation to man. But there are no harmful species in nature. The problem of locust harm lies within ourselves. An agroecosystem is a monoculture. When plants are grown in a small area field that are a food source, this causes a surge in the number of the locustes. Not all locusts harm the fields, only 3 species potentially cause crop damage.
Regards, Sergey
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Can you suggest some plant species having high mosquito repellent property?
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Ocimum tenuiflorum (Naai thulasi) plant is used for repelling the activity of mosquitoes. It is highly used in the village side.
Ocimum basilicum
Siriyanangai
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In early 2022 I'll be completing a length field campaign, collecting Lepidoptera, Odonata and Hymenoptera in a very humid flooded forest in central Africa. Due to the nature of this work we will not be able to use conventional drying boxes, and will not have access to any electricity (we are not taking a generator for logistical reasons). What is the best approach to drying and preserving these specimens (which will number in the thousands) in the field?
Our proposed solution currently is a makeshift drying box with an air intake we will position over a fire, before storing in tupperware with silica crystal. However, this method is difficult to maintain and ensure equal and not excessive drying. One proposed solution is direct immersion in silica crystal, but this is not possible with delicate specimens which will later be analysed for pollen loads (contamination an issue). Alternatively, one could dry specimens in direct sunlight, perhaps under black tarpaulin, but our habitat type is not convenient for this. Drying is necessary (as opposed to e.g. alcohol immersion) due to other aspects of the research.
Entomologists have been collecting tropical insects for hundreds of years - what did Russell Wallace do?
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I use indicator silica gel inside small plastic containers that can be sealed (for katydids, abdomen content replaced by cotton and enwrapped in toilet paper). The silica gel (blue when dry, pinkish with accumulated moisture) can easily be dried in a small saucepan on a stove or open fire. I keep using the same silica gel for many years.
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I am involved in setting up an entomology lab in Portugal, and we are currently looking for starter colonies of Aphis fabae, Tetranychus urticae and Dermanyssus gallinae to purchase and rear in the lab in order to conduct efficacy and behavioral studies.
Suppliers in Europe are preferred.
Any help or suggestion would be much appreciated.
Regards,
Robert
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Dear Robert,
Nice advices to hear from colleagues, but in my opinion you may contact with specialist of your requested group of arthropods from natural history museums around Europe.
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.
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You can read these papers
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Found in Turkey on peony flower buds.
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Yes, is Tropinota squalida
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I have prepared a MS dealing with a review about behavioural pest control using HIPVs. Which journal (not open access) would be better suited? Please suggest. The journal must not take much time for decision making
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Journals of Entomology
1.International Journal of Entomology Research
2.Journal of Asia-Pacific Entomology
3.Journal of Insect Behavior
4.Annual Review of Entomology
5.Agricultural Entomology and Pest Management.
6.Ecological entomology
7.Journal of Agricultural Entomology
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In designing an experiment to investigate regional influence of these elements (temperature, humidity) on decompositional stages and insects colonization of pig carcasses, how would a control be setup for the elements given its uncharacteristic nature to be carried out in a laboratory?
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Hi. I hope the folloeing article website help you:
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Hi,
I notice that oppose to many other Heteroptera, Sciocoris move their antenna fidgetly. I assume it related to an antennal sensory organ. Does anyone know why does it do that and if I can expect to fine any unique structure on its antenna compare to antenna of other Heteroptera which doesn't act like that?
See example to antennal movement in attached movie.
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Dear Assaf Nir
This effect is also observed in other insects.
I can assume that this is related:
1. When the insect is frightened: by chemical irritants or in case of danger to life.
2. It is possible that an individual examines a new stop using antennas.
Regards, Sergey
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I focus my research on Wasps in Greece.
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Is there any publication so far?
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Dear Entomologists, I need to pick the swarm brain.
I'm planning to mark moths with fluorescent dust for better observation and recapturing at night. Can anybody provide experience with DNA extraction from insect marked with this kind of dust? Or point me towards suitable publications? I can't seem to find any. There is lots of mosquito marking, but without subsequent DNA extraction.
Thank you, swarm :-)
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@Patrick Gorring
Thanks for your answer and making me realize that my question is not clear. Should have seen this from David's answer already. My concern is the contamination of the extracted DNA with the pigments, not with DNA from unclean dust. In the past, we had trouble with eye pigments inhibiting PCR, for instance.
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I am planning on starting grad school in about a year and a half but you can never start researching project advisors too soon!
I am interested in investigating the use of fungal parasites of insects such as Cordyceps in integrated pest management. Unfortunately, this seems to be an unpopular field of study, as so far in my searches I have only seen professors who study plant-insect relationships in IPM, but not fungal-insect relationships in IPM. Ideally, I am hoping to stay on the west coast of the US. My undergraduate background is in ecology and evolutionary biology, but I am currently broadening my skills in molecular lab techniques.
Faculty pages on university websites cannot always represent the scope of a professor's research interests. That said, can anyone recommend a recommend a colleague of theirs who might be looking for graduate students in a year and a half, and with a background in mycology, entomology, and IPM?
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I work with entomopathogens fungus in biological control with avocado, berries and citrus pest. But I'm in Mexico, Universidad de Guadalajara.
In the USA, the Californian Universities has a lot of tradition about thouse topics (Berkley, Riverside, Davis, etc)
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It was collected in Colombia, the larva sticks the leaves and feeds on coffee plants (Coffea arabica). It measures approximately 1 cm. Probably  genus Platynota sp.
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Agree with Houda Kawas
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Kandy (7.270 80.600 E 467m msl), Central Province, Sri Lanka is the type locality of Tetragonula iridipennis (Smith) a stingless bee species reported to occur throughout India. I need samples of these stingless bees from this type locality. If any one can send me samples of these bees from this locality, it would be a great help for my studies. My address is as follows
Shashidhar Viraktamath, Department of Entomology, University of Agricultural Sciences, GKVK, Bengaluru 560065, India.
Many thanks.
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How can you get it from other country?
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Biological experiments are nowadays being added as preprint in different archives such as biorixv.. Can an author add taxonomic descriptions as well before published as a journal article?
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Publishing descriptions of new taxa as preprints is definitely a bad idea.
(i) the name would very probably not be made available through use in a preprint
(ii) others could start using the name before the description has been officially published, causing confusion with regard to priority and date of publication
(iii) as Thierry Bouyer pointed out, someone else could come in and quickly describe the same taxon using their own name. Taxonomic vandalism is a thing...
Under the rules of the Code, nothing could modify that (although herpetology has challenged those rules in recent years).
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i need to identify the wild species existing in local area especially  which help me to identify Tetragonula iridipennis  species in wild . can i get the details how to identify this species in wild ? . please do the need full .
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I am searching for Tetragonula iridipennis for the last four years. Still I have not come across this species.
Does this species really occur in India is a debatable question.
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I’m Shengbin Chen, from Chengdu University of Technology in China. My team is conducting dung beetle research along an altitudinal gradient in Mountain Emei, which is near Chengdu City.
To make comparison on dung beetle communities among different localities at global scale, we make great effort to gather references.
The 5 works listed below were published early and in regional journal. I tried by can’t get them. So, could someone please kindly send me a copy of each of the five papers (if possible)?
1. Avila, J.M. & Pascual, F. 1988. Contributión al conocimiento de los escarabeidos coprófagos (Coleoptera, Scarabaeoidea) de Sierra Nevada: III. Distributión altitudinal y temporal. Bollettino Del Museo Regionale Di Scienze Naturali Torino 6: 217-240.
2. Celi, J., Terneus, E., Torres, J. & Ortega, M. 2004. Diversidad de escarabajos del estiercol (Coleoptera: Scarabaeinae) en una gradiente altitudinal en la Cordillera del Cutucu, Morona Santiago, Amazonia ecuatoriana. Lyonia 7:37-52.
3. Hanski, I. & Niemela, J. 1990. Elevational distributions of dung and carrion beetles in northern Sulawesi. In W. J. Knight, & J. D. Holloway (Eds.), Insects and the rainforest of Southeast Asia (Wallacea). (pp. 145-152). London: The Royal Entomological Society.
4. Hanski, I. 1983. Distributional ecology and abundance of dung and carrion-feeding beetles (Scarabaeidae) in tropical rain forests in Sarawak, Borneo. Acta Zoologica Fennica 167:1-45.
5. Lumaret, J.P. & Stiernet, N. 1989. Inventaire et distribution des coléopteres scarabéides coprophages dans le massif de la Vanoise. Trav. Sci. Pare Natl. Vanoise 17:193-228.
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Shengbin Chen and the article by Celi et al. 2004 seems to be on RG:
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I would like to observe/ record insects behavior under webcam setting at night. So we are looking for some suitable infrared(Red light) lamps or IR LED to do this. Can anybody recommend us some proper products?
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Hi,
In the paper attached, we used DC-Infra, 620.5–645 nm LED. It's not infrared per se, but it's red light, close to the IR spectrum. It was enough to keep our carabid beetles undisturbed by the light source.
In another project on aphids, I have used Sima 36-LED (Hauppauge, NY, USA) and Vision Technologies IR-130 (Houston, TX, USA) infrared lights, coupled with a full spectrum Sony A6000 camera. It worked nicely and we recorded nice footage of insect behavior at night.
Hope this helps,
Kevin
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Hi, i have been working with Canada balsam as mount medium for Thysanoptera slices, but it´s too old and thick, i´ve tried using xylene to dissolve it, but it´s not working. So my question it´s maybe someone has tried using other mount medium for Thysanoptera species?
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A mixture of acrylic resins in xylene may be suggested. Drying time 20 - 30 minutes. Does not form bubbles. Ideal optical properties, the refractive index is 1.5. Stable when exposed to moisture, temperature, UV rays.
These are such mounting media as: Elyashev's environment, Kolbe's environment, Hyrax, Pleurax, Styrax, Caedax, Naphrax, ZRAX, Styraplus, Dammaplus
For preparations with Euparal, Malinol, water or oil immersion is not terrible, there is no crystallization.
Regards, Sergey
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These mites were found on strawberry plants (Belgium). Anybody an idea of the Family or Superfamily? Or recommended keys of mesostigmata?
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I confirm it is a soil mite of the Macrochelidae family
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Dear RG friends,
I am providing a complete H. armigera diet for larvae and maintaining the eggs in the growth chamber as well as in-room conditions. But since three months, eggs laid from the moths are not at all hatching. Could anyone tell the reason?
Thanking you.
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Dear Kariyanna B. you're welcome. Please also see this potentially useful article entitled
Rearing the Cotton Bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera, on a Tapioca-Based Artificial Diet
This article is freely available as public full text on RG.
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Earth have diverse group of insects, if a species of insect got extinct, how we can assess and identify them? What are the criteria’s to follow?
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Dear Kariyanna,
I believe that several other replies here have added useful information for attempting to define this. Though I had some entomology courses and instruct a bit of this in my zoology teachings, I work largely with mammals. Extinction can be difficult, if not impossible, to verify for many species, so a consensus, such as the IUCN description is a useful working application.
In graduate school, a fellow researcher worked on a possible population census of wolverines in the state of Oregon. Though it was assumed that wolverines exist in Oregon, none were definitively sighted for several years. The research was based upon trace evidence - burrows, hair, tracks, and alleged sightings or predation of this species.
I myself assisted a colleague on trace evidence and reports of the thylacine (Thylacinus cynocephalus) in Tasmania. Largely considered to be extinct, but with continued reports, some from reputable sources. Is it extinct? Most mammalogists would say yes, but I am still uncertain with some of the reports and a large amount of suitable habitat that is difficult to access. On the other hand, species such as the Great auk, the passenger pigeon, and Steller's sea cow have no doubt that they are extinct and no sightings have been reported for a century or more.
Here is one reference for insect sampling and potential declines: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7069279/
Regards,
Jeb Bevers
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Based on the many publications from several decades, we came across many classifications of Insects. Among them which one is more updated and approved classification that can be used for research, academics and teaching purpose?
Thank you.....
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The most recient is the Book "Insect systematics and principles of cladoendesis", wich is published in Russian in 2020. English version is in preparing. Information about the adopted basic classification is here: http://www.insecta.bio.spbu.ru/z/sys-ins.htm
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I am working on a paper that looks into the dynamics of the spread of Wolbachia and its potential impact on dengue transmission, particularly in the Philippines.
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Interesting research, although not in my field of work. I have heard about Wolbachia infections in other Diptera possibly causing melanistic non-fertile females. Is this the main reason for the slowing of the spread of Dengue? Is there any research on how Wolbachia will affect other insects?
Best wishes,
Jeroen
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Expect a savage answer and being reported to ResearchGate Admin if your answer clearly shows you did not read the whole question and you are scamming the points system by answering with an irrelevant answer!
I've just spent the last 3 hrs searching for information about dried Santolina species and their ability to repel moths, especially the greater and lessor wax moth and their larvae.
I've also looked for information about the possible toxicity of dried Santolina species on bees.
Good info is hard to find. There is info saying Santolina species repel silverfish and clothes moths but everyone copies everyone and there is little science behind it.
I'm wondering if I can use dried Santolina species inside my weak beehives, to help them resist wax moth.
Has anyone seen what I'm looking for or perhaps done the research themselves? Or has anyone seen another plant I could grow and use for this purpose?
Failing that, is anyone interested to take on this as a research project?
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I know only these sources of literature
  • International Plant Names Index. 2017. Santolina. Published online. Accessed Dic. 01 2017.
  • The Plant List 2013. Santolina in The Plant List Version 1.1.
  • Tropicos.org 2017. Santolina. Missouri Botanical Garden.
  • Hassler, M. 2017. Santolina. World Plants: Synonymic Checklists of the Vascular Plants of the World (2019). In: Roskov Y., Abucay L., Orrell T., Nicolson D., Bailly N., Kirk P., Bourgoin T., DeWalt R.E., Decock W., De Wever A., Nieukerken E. van, Zarucchi, J., Penev L., eds. 2017. Species 2000 & ITIS Catalogue of Life.
Regards, Sergey
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I looking for live specimes Ctenolepisma longicaudata. I need live specimes, can someone breeding?
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Dear Aleksandra Wójcik,
do you still need Ctenolepisma longicaudata alive?
You can send me an email to CDressen@gmx.de for more details.
Best regards,
Christian
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I am an student of entomological field, I am interested to work on DNA barconding of beetles, I have some fresh collection and some Museum specimens as well. I am not much clear that whether Museum specimens are suitable for DNA extraction or not. I will appreciate your kind and valuable suggestions.
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Sergey Viktorovich Pushkin right statements. It really depends on the age of the samples. During my PhD thesis, I was dealing with old alcohol arthropods with an age of 15 to 30 years and it was impossible to extract DNA from them as I was really eager to do that. Instead I used a DNA extraction method to clear these specimens to inspect them under microscope for accurate identification for further biodiversity calculations. Just check the link below:
Maybe it is interesting for you colleagues in soil zoology.
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I want to rear locust (Schistocerca gregaria) in great quantity: at least 2000 a month. Does somebody has an idea which sizes a cage should be the best? is it better to use a great cage or some small ones?
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Dear Dr Lamia,
the size of cages usually based on what you want to do and how many replicates you will use and if you plan to work on a population setting or just a lab colony for experimental work.
I think we need more details about the experiments to tell you the right size and setup.
good luck
Wesam
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I would love to hear what people have come across in relation to language accessibility in publications. Ideally the journal focuses on Entomology and/or biodiversity, but I am also just curious on a broader scale if language friendly journals exist.
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Dear Erin Krichilsky I'm just wondering why you are looking for "a journal that accepts publications in two languages or at least is bilingual friendly". What is it good for to publish in different languages? We used to publish our research papers in German back in the 1970's and 1980's, but then we realized that the papers were not read by many researchers abroad. Then we switched to English to make sure that our papers are read worldwide (and eventually cited).
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I will be working on stream amphibians in Sichuan in 2020, and part of the work will focus on the diet of some aquatic species and prey availability. I thought I'd identify macroinvertebrates with a key to North American or European aquatic macroinvertebrates, but I would like to use the closest key possible to avoid possible mistakes.
I don't know precisely to which taxonomic level I can identify available preys and prey items, certainly to Order, and hopefully to Family with intact invertebrates from the streams. I trained with North American Plecoptera and Odonata from France under a microscope, and it seems reasonnable that I could go as far as Family level with an adequate key.
Another way of putting the question can be : do you think I can identify these prey items and intact insects to order or family level with a key to macroinvertebrates from North America or Europe ?
Thanks in advance !
Benjamin
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Yang Liangfeng (Naning Agricultural University) and John Morse (Clemson University) published a book with keys on the aquatic macroinvertebrates of China for water quality. This publication already mentioned is in both Chinese and English editions. Author: John C.More & Yang Lianfang & Tian Lixin Language: English ISBN/ISSN: 7563002405 Published on: 1994-01 Paperback
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Ethanol and propylene glycol are both used to preserve mites, and each have their drawbacks (i.e., evaporation and specimen distortion). Some people add a small amount of glycerol to vials of ethanol to prevent samples from drying out over time if containers prove less than perfectly airtight. Does anyone have experience with the long-term performance of ethanol/propylene glycol mixtures as preservatives for mites, and particularly for oribatids?
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Dear Kara,
The usual concentration for ethanol is 70%. The more percentage makes specimens fragile in long-term even in short-term. About propylene glycol, I should say it may not go to the bottom of vials and it helps to reduce the evaporation of ethanol.
Best, Elaheh
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Dear all,
I would like to ask for help in identifying this species of beetle from Sarawak (Malaysian Borneo). The total length is approximately 3 mm. It is sampled from a peat swamp forest near Kota Samarahan. Resources for identification is also welcomed and very much appreciated.
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Hello,
Family is Nitidulidae, genus Stelidota, species probably Stelidota multiguttata.
Please check the following articles:
Regards,
Athanasios
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An overall ranking of the flax genotypes is done for the morphological/ yield contributing characters and incidence of insect pest as per the rescaling index method suggested by Iyengar and Sudarshan 1982
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SenseFly's drones lineup includes a UAV, whose equipment is aimed at
use in applications related to agriculture. The main feature of the drone
is the presence of a digital camera Canon S110 NIR with a resolution of 12MPix, capable shoot in the range extended towards the near infrared (NIR).
The most famous and common method for assessing the state of the
cover applied to the data, collected using aerial photography, is the calculation of the so-called index NDVI, or Vegetation Index.
NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) - relative quantity photosynthetically active biomass, calculated by the formula:
NDVI= NIR-RED
_______
NIR+RED
where NIR is the reflection in the near infrared zone;
RED - reflection in the red region of the spectrum
This formula is based on the fact that high photosynthetic activity, as a rule,
associated with dense vegetation, leads to a decrease in the reflectivity of the object in the red region of the spectrum and to an increase in the near-IR region. Thanks to this, the ability to carry out mapping of vegetation cover based on aerial surveys, ofdentify areas covered and not covered with vegetation, assess density, germination, the state of plants, and with the help of regular monitoring to observe the development of processes in dynamics.
According to the above formula, the vegetation the index can take values ​​from -1 to +1, the value for vegetation it cannot be below zero. Knowing spectral characteristics of certain objects (snow, ice, water, artificial materials) and characteristic for them, the index values ​​can be recognized and classify them on multispectral images.
Data collection with drone eBee AG company senseFly is no different from the previous one eBee models. As a result of aerial photography, the user receives a set of multispectral images in the format TIFFs that are processed by standard means software package for post-processing of UAV data PostFight Terra 3D.
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One of my friends from Germany was curious to know if there are similar keys like those published by the Royal Entomological Society and other entomological groups in Australia. The only ones I know are usually targeted to a specific family and published in the form of individual research publications.
Are there any extensive and reliable keys for the different orders of Insects?
I can imagine that given the rich biodiversity in India in comparison to Europe it is very difficult to make keys like those which can pin point to the species level ID. However, if you know any then please list them here.
Thanks.
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Hello,
Below you can find a paper regarding to the study of insect fauna associated with tea gardens in India:
You may get help from the authors (e.g. Bulganin Mitra: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Bulganin_Mitra/projects) of this publication and you may also refer to the references of this article.
Good luck, Elaheh
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I am trying to find a topic for my PhD thesis. I've done two MSc; one in Landscape Architecture (about Ecological Landscape Design and Permaculture) and one in Forest Entomology (about Lepidoptera). Now I want to study further both of them in PhD. Can you help me find a topic that icludes both and woth studying.
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Elaheh Daghighi Dear professor, thank you very much for your answer. I wasn't aware of their work. I am going to read their researches and try to communicate with the professors.
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I need to publish my paper as soon as possible in scoups jouranl related to Agriculture science, Biology, Entomology, Insect science, for Urgent in any Jouranl listed in Scopus. as it required for my Ph.D.
Appreciate any help.
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I recommend the Egyptian Journal of Biological Pest Control.
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On July 20, 2020 at 2 p.m., 20 days before his eightieth birthday, the heart of Andrey Lvovich Lobanov stopped beating.
ANDREY LVOVICH LOBANOV - Leading Researcher of the Laboratory of Insect Taxonomy, Candidate of Biological Sciences, founder and permanent editor and webmaster of the supersite "Beetles (Coleoptera) and Coleopterologists".
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Everyone hopes that his project https://www.zin.ru/Animalia/Coleoptera/
will live
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I am doing a survival analysis of insects to various sub-zero temperatures where I want to correct mortality in my treatment groups by mortality in my control groups (not exposed to low temperatures). I have corrected mortality in all of my treatment groups to the control using the Henderson-Tilton formula (as opposed to Abbott's because some of my groups have unequal numbers of individuals) where:
Corrected % Mortality = (1-((n in control before treatment*n in treatment group after treatment)/(n in control after treatment*n in treatment group before treatment)))*100
I next want to analyze the data using probit regression, so I need to convert these corrected %s back into counts of binary 1s or 0s. The problem is that most of my "normalized count data" are not whole numbers (eg. in one treatment group I have 0.27 dead and 9.729 alive). The only way I can think of to correct this issue is by rounding to the nearest whole number, so in my example I would have 0 dead  and 10 alive. Is this consistent with the standard of how this analysis is done? Am I missing something here? Any advice would be greatly appreciated!!
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following
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Given your specific discipline. Have you ever irretrievably lost data of an ongoing research project? How did you handle it? Thanks in advance.
(Also, this is my story. A couple of years ago, in a study that included collection, preservation, identification and weighing of soil invertebrates, after an unfortunate event in the laboratory, the notebook that contained the weight notes of one of 10 sets of collected organisms, which belonged to the control group, was lost, so were the preserved organisms. I'm tagging this with an entomology lablel, so in case you're familiar with this topic: Would you consider trying some method of reconstructing the weight data or is there just nothing to do? There is no way to recover the notebooks, nor the preserved organisms).
Thank you.
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Javier García Reynaud, I first try my best to store it in multiple locations and drives so as to prevent any data loss. if it happens to occur, though, I use some recovery apps like "recuva" for instance.
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Hi,
I am looking for the e-mail of the current curator of the Museo de Entomologia of the Universidad Nacional de Lambayeque (Peru).
I need images of two holotypes deposited there, but I can't find a way to contact the collection.
Thanks,
Alexandre.
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Muito obrigado Ronald!
Irei entrar em contato, muito obrigado pela ajuda!
abraços!
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Male squash bees choose to sleep/rest in pumpkin/squash flowers.  Perhaps the microclimate within wilting flowers provides temperature cues to male squash bees that make the flowers attractive and cause the male bees to become more sedate.
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Yes, this year 2020, we will be restarting this work (if you read a previously posted answer to this from me, the system added some nonsense that I couldn’t delete/edit) on commercially grown Cucurbita peso (pepo not autoincorrect peso). If others are interested in being part of a team from anywhere in the world, we can share ideas and collaborations.
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The insect was sighted in Mbarara - Uganda (Tropical Climate).
Coordinates of region sighted: 0.6072° S, 30.6545° E.
Feeding: The insect seems to be a pest preferring spicy vegetables and plants such as Rosemary (Salvia Rosmarinus), Spinach (Spinacia oleracea), Vegetable-Dodo (amaranth), & mint species.
Observable traits (see photographs attached): 3 pairs of Legs, a pair of short antennae (2 – 5 mm), no pronounced wing growth, and exo-skelton or outer cuticle soft to the touch.
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Hi Nelson. At last, I am almost 100% certain of the species of these nymphs. They belong to Dictyophorus griseus, the grey foam grasshopper. Once you upload a photo of an adult, we can confirm this without doubt.
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I would need them urgently for some feeding experiments.
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Can you provide me with a Callosobruchus maculatus lab strain? TY
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I need to know the heat and moisture production of any silkworm larvae period for supplementary heat.
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Here is a useful article for your query.
Management of Climatic Factors for Successful Silkworm (Bombyx mori L.) Crop and Higher Silk Production: A Review
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What do you think about this?
Can entomological collections and research collections result in the loss of rare species?
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No. If a number of insect species were really rare in the wild in terms of low number of individuals, they would have become extinct alone - as they couldn't find easily an opposite sex individual to mate and reproduce - and wouldn't wait for a collector-entomologist to do this. ''Rare'' in insects actually is ''hard to find in the wild'', cause of lack of knowledge on their biology or behavior, of difficult to approach/dangerous habitat, etc. All insect species at the right habitat form big to huge populations, from tens of thousands of individuals in a locality for the rarest species, to millions per locality/population for the commonest. Below I will repeat my answer to a similar question here, a few months ago:
''Collections are absolutely necessary and valuable for science.
As proved by so many studies, habitat destruction, climatic change, the tons of pesticides and the general environmental pollution, are the real threats to biodiversity.
As far as I know, in Brazil insect collecting even for scientific purposes is almost totally prohibited (permits very hardly issued), but Bolsonaro's government is burning the Amazon -along with billions of insects- to convert the rainforest into agricultural land.
And it's a total nonsense to compare elephant populations with insect populations.
Ornithoptera alexandrae is threatened with extinction in PNG, cause a great part of its habitat has been converted into palm oil plantations, but CITES ''protects'' it from collectors, doing nothing to protect its habitat, that would be the only way to save it.
Hypocrisy mixed with ignorance..''
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Dear researchers,
what is your opinion about climate changes and forests pests?
there is an increase or reduction of damage caused by insects and mites on trees?
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I'm searching for articles dealing with the detection of phytoliths in insect guts. Most of the search return papers working with extinct fauna, mummies and so on. I need data derived from modern insects (extant) and I am facing difficulties to dig it. If you know a good paper or are working on this area please let me know. Thanks!
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Carlos; Here is another citation that might be helpful. Jim Des Lauriers
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I am looking for an efficient way to collect a ground-nesting bee at its nest, so that when encountering a ground-nesting bee nest, I could determine what species created that nest. Ideally, I was hoping for a fast method that allows to lure the bee out of its nest (can you suck it out maybe? or otherwise force it to leave its nest?). Alternatively, I was thinking about using a mini emergence trap (something like https://www.nhbs.com/mini-soil-emergence-trap), but would prefer a more direct method, like extracting from its nest. Has anyone experience at collecting ground-nesting bees at their nest?
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Dear James, thanks again for sharing your experiences. Yes, I think I will create them myself using stuff you can readily buy. Cheers, Philippe
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i injected immunized hemolymph of larvae into FPLC (fast protein liquid chromatography)
to separate peptides from each other.
every peak of protein separated in a falcon tube in 5 ml of Sodium chloride buffer.
next step is lypholization , after samples were lypholized , protein powder plus sodium chloride crystal is precipitated .
should i do desalting for protein to have a pure protein or can i use it as a whole for inhibition assay fro bacteria??
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It is important to evaluate the activity of a pure compound. You could use RP-HPLC fractions would be monitored by mass spectrometry. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is useful to directly determine the exact mass of the antimicrobial peptide in RP-HPLC fractions. Characteristic charge state patterns of the protein or peptide compound upon ESI-MS analyses will reveal further structural information about the the compound. Because ESI-MS is highly sensitive towards the presence of salt, analyses of ion exchange-HPLC fractions requires elimination of inorganic salts, either by the use of volatile buffers or reverse phase cartridges for each separate fraction. In the case of cation exchange-HPLC, salts are required for protein elution. Because several antimicrobial peptides are salt sensitive, there will be a principal risk of getting false-negative results. In some cases, it is possible to overcome this problem by using unconventional, pragmatic conditions for cation exchange-HPLC using volatile buffers such as ammonia salts at an acidic pH. For details see:
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I was wondering if anyone ever studied the group-survival of ants as a function of group composition;
For instance, suppose you have a group of N ants, composed of 3/4 of minor workers and 1/4 of major workers. How long could this group survive? And how longer than a group composed of 1/2?
I would be really glad to know if there is any paper published that dealt with this problem.
Thanks.
Igor
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I think the aggressors will win. Remember Lord of the Flies?
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I don't really have access to make a complicated process for this, but I was wondering if there was a way to conduct PCR on an entire group of cells if I already have primers specific to the bacteria I want to conduct PCR on.
Would it be possible to skip isolating the template DNA?
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Not sure. I don't work with pathogens, so I don't know what the difference to an ordinary extraction kit is.
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Hello,
I am seeking the exact publication dates of the different fascicles of the Handbuch der Entomologie, from Bürmeister. Can anyone provide me with this information?
Many thanks
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Thanks for these answers. Unfortunately, I can't find it in the animalbase. What I would like to find is something like this paper :
The Handbuch is treated, but only for fascicles dealing with Coleoptera. What I seek is the day, month and year of publication of the fascicles dealing with Orthoptera, to establish priority between two names, published the same year but not by the same author, so I can decide which one has priority (or whether I need to reverse priority, as authorized by IUCZN)
regards,
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Hello,
I am building low-cost terrestrial emergence traps out of tomato cages and polyester no-see-um mesh netting. The traps are about 2 feet tall and have a white collection bottle at the top. I have a choice between black and white mesh netting. Which would be best? I have attached a picture of the prototype with white netting.
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black is the best netting trap
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Can you suggest me some references, that can be helpful for Morphological Identification of Mouth?
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Hello Faisal; If you tell the community what region of the world your specimens are from they will be able to help. Best regards, Jim Des Lauriers
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Do you have any studies on the possibility of predator attraction by volatile organic compounds and identification of specific compounds as attractants for Tuta absoluta predators
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Thank you Rawa
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How can i recognize larva 2 age of tuta absoluta?
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Larva of second stage is creamy colour and 2,6 mm long
It has narrow black band on pronotum
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We are conducting a study on mangrove insect diversity. We want to know the specific kind of bait depending on the diet of the insect. If they are carnivorous, or if they are attracted to sugar solutions, what can we use for bait? Thank you!
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Hello Trisha; The project you propose is VAST! And to make it more complicated there are many different methods to collect insects that are pretty selective in which groups any particular method targets. Here is a little list of examples that might work in the habitat you are interested in.
1. Pan trap. A low pan with water about 1 cm deep. A drop of dish soap will increase the effectiveness. Pans of different colors attract different groups.
2. As Mr. Duarte suggests, fish is attractive to flies and some beetles.
3. Peanut butter, bits of canned meat, or cookie crumbs smeared on the bark of trees will attract many ants.
4. Fermenting sugar is attractive to a large array of insects.
5. Feces in a little cup placed in the bottom of a larger cup attracts several groups of beetles. Not all feces are equally attractive! It depends on what the collector has eaten recently!
6. At night a bright light sitting on a white sheet will be amazingly attractive.
The list goes on. There are various books on collecting methods. Here is one example. https://www.cabdirect.org/cabdirect/abstract/19941104344
Happy collecting! I envy the diversity you will encounter, Jim Des Lauriers