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Emotion Regulation - Science topic

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It is available for free on the internet. However, I need explicit permission before i can use it as a tool for my thesis. Any help will be appreciated. Thank You!
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Hi.. were you able to reach the authors ? I am also planning to use it in my thesis. Pls let me know how you contacted them?
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Dear colleagues in the filed of psychology and similar disciplines,
Do you know some open call for cross-cultural project regarding post-COVID effects (or what is happening after the 2 years of pandemic) on various aspects of mental health (life satisfaction, stress, anxiety, optimism...), emotional status, interpersonal relationships, risky behavior, conspiracy theories and other beliefs, etc.?
Thank you.
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Dear Prof. Dinić!
I found the following websites hoping you consider these of value:
1) Coronavirus and COVID-19 Related Funding Opportunities from Research Professional and Pivot, Research Professional News is part of Ex Libris Group. Available at:
In this list I noticed the following: CDC-RFA-IP22-2203 "Tracking the burden, distribution, and impact of Post COVID-19 conditions in diverse populations for children, adolescents, and adults (Track PCC)" Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control - NCIRD
Current Closing Date for Applications: Mar 07, 2022  Electronically submitted applications must be submitted no later than 11:59 pm ET on the listed application due date. Estimated Total Program Funding:$45,000,000
Further details are available at:
I really think these funds are also available for EU institutions as well.
Yours sincerely, Bulcsu Szekely
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For a project in my assessments in counseling course.
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Good evening! Sometimes what you are looking for is included with the article. If you know who created the instrument, you can look him/her up and find what you need. Another option is to contact the person who created the instrument, if you have his/her name. Finally, you can request the article, for example through Springer or similar type source.
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Are there distinct or unique physiological responses to humorous stimuli? Of special interest is political humor such as in editorial/political cartoons. Such political humor also has been posited as generating anger responses so a second question would be if there are differences in humor and anger responses that can clearly identify the source of the humor/anger response.
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Lee: Check out this PowerPoint about Laughter and Smiling:
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IJHRM has called for a special issue on the subjected-topic. If anyone is interested in working on this special issue, please contact me. Scholars should have a grip on comparative analysis and have published papers on emotional labour or relevant constructs.
This ‘Call for Papers’ entitled New HRM models for supporting managing emotional labour during emergencies invites HRM scholars to submit papers that develop new models and conceptualisations of HR’s role as the employee's champion, especially in relation to emergency workers. Consequently, we are interested in empirical papers that:
  1. Demonstrate the role of HRM in supporting front-line emergency workers, including those employees who undertake high levels of emotional work in potentially stressful environments.
  2. Integrate the role of HRM in the employee wellbeing-employee performance continuum.
  3. Develop and analyse HRM models that conceptualise the role of emotions in fostering employee wellbeing and the performance of emergency   workers confronted with high levels of emotional labour.
The provisional timeline is as follows:
  • ‘Call for Papers’ announced June 2020
  • Full papers due by June 2021
  • First round of revision
  • Articles to the publisher
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good luck dear
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I am reviewing studies that assessed stress. The most commonly used tool is the perceived stress scale. I am attempting to interpret the data which is reported as a mean score. I haven't found any studies that have cut off scores related to levels/intensity of stress. I have read internet articles where scores are interpreted in terms of intensity e.g. but they don't give the research behind the cut off score, see below  
I would be grateful if somebody could guide me to research that validates cut off scores for each level/intensity of stress.
Thank
Lloyd  
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1) Perceived Stress Scale PSS (attached): 
  • Scores ranging from 0 to 13 are considered Low Stress
  • Scores ranging from 14 to 26 are Moderate Stress
  • Scores ranging from 27 to 40 are High Perceived Stress
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  • Brain tomography and nuclear magnetic resonance emission tomography, are able to identify areas of the brain that are activated during more participatory learning, and these are related to emotions?
  • Learning and verbal memory is the least remembered the short term?
  • The brain area of emotions in students are not activated or are refractory to the classroom lessons, lectures or conferences?
  • The emotions related area is more active when the student participates in learning and this is related or meaning to the real world?
  • Videoconferencing algorithms, allusive outlines a certain topic with brief captions; and mental and conceptual maps the brain area activated more emotions, that lectures and master classes?
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Sure
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Hello everyone, I am conducting a research on academic performance(n = 261). My three independent variables are:
1. Personality factors (BFI used; 44 items ad 5 subscales)
2. Academic Motivation (AMS used; 28 items, 7 subscales)
3. Emotion Regulation (ERQ used; 10 items, 2 subscales)
All of these subscales have a cronbach's alpha of above 0.58.
The dependent variable is GPA (out of 4.00)
When testing the assumptions for multiple regression analysis three of the assumptions were not met:
1. The Durbin Waston is 0.409
2. The graph plot of my data shows heteroscedasticity (The variance of residuals is not constant)
3. The Normal P-P plot of my data is not aligned with the diagonal line (i.e. the values of the residuals are not normally distributed)
Is there something I can do with my data to meet these assumptions?
Then, I ran hierarchical multiple regression on my data, and the results for most of coefficients of the subscales were insignificant (p<0.05). Is there any way I can fix this?
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The MAIN issue here is that your quest to FIX this is bad science. It sounds like you are trying do what you can to achieve p < .05. This is called p-fishing and is one of the major reasons why there is a replication crisis, which is one reason for the distrust in science among many, and why many people in some countries support people who make decisions counter to science (e.g., political leaders not wearing masks). I am not saying that you are solely responsible for these global concerns or that are doing this with intent.
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I work with Lorna Myers, PhD in the area of PNES. We are always looking for new ways to research this group. I think this questionnaire would be helpful for us in the area of understanding issues with emotional regulation.
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Emotion regulation, the ability to control emotional experiences and expressions, is essential for positive adaption across the lifespan. Individual and contextual factors contribute to emotion-regulation variance between and within different age groups. Individual factors include, for example, genetic dispositions and neurobiological vulnerabilities. Contextual factors involve opportunities to learn about and practice emotion regulation. In infancy and childhood, the family is especially important for assisting in regulating and teaching about emotions. During adolescence, physiological and socioemotional changes can contribute to transient instability in emotion regulation. Throughout adulthood, favorable average well-being trajectories co-occur with increases in pro-hedonic motivation. Emotion-regulation abilities are maintained into old age, but towards the end of life, stressors may overtax individuals' emotion-regulation capacity. This chapter reviews key developmental theories and empirical findings on emotion regulation in childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. It also highlights shortcomings and gaps in the available knowledge and points towards future research directions.
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I work with Lorna Myers, PhD in the area of PNES. We are always looking for new ways to research this group. I think this questionnaire would be helpful for us in the area of understanding issues with emotional regulation.
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The roots of emotional intelligence (EI) stem from the notion of social intelligence. Thorndike (in Intelligence and its uses. Harper’s Mag 140:227–335, 1920) regarded EI via the lens of social intelligence, stating that social intelligence is the capability to empathize with others and perform sensibly in human relationships (see Goleman in Working with emotional intelligence. Bantam Books, New York, 1998). Nonetheless, his opinions were not greatly welcomed until years later. Emotional thought was viewed to be in the domain of intelligence.
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I developed a stand-alone, self-report scale to assess social desirability/ positive impression management in juvenile delinquents being evaluated for legal disposition purposes.  Based on very preliminary, small sample size field testing, this scale was found to have high correlations with other scales, e.g., the Defensiveness scale of the Personality Inventory for Youth, the Denial Scale of the Jesness Inventory-Revised, and moderate, inverse correlations with scales such as the Externalizing, Rule-Breaking, Anxious/Depressed scales on the Youth Self-Report. Does anyone have the interest and resources to field test this measure with larger samples to examine convergent and discriminant associations?
Robert Semel, Psy.D.
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Hi Robert
My one student is conducting research on role of family factors on juvenile delinquent behavior in Pakistan. I wonder how much your instrument will be helpful in using it in the field.
You can share it on sanaullah.panezai@gmail.com
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Emotional regulation is known to be .associated with Non-suicidal self-injury. In order to understand this phenomenon in a systemic context we are looking for measurement tools that evaluate emotions and their regulations from a systemic perspective. Any lead would be appreciated. Thanks in advance.
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This article may interest you:
file:///Users/scheung/Downloads/55-107-1-SM.pdf
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I tried but I could not find suitable one for my study.
Relationship Between Emotional Regulation and Attachment and
(Their) Differences in Collectivist and Individualist Cultures.
I used correlation for relationship.
but their differences in Collectivist and Individualist Cultures?
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What is your sample size?
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Hello, i was wondering what was the difference between emotional contagion and interindividual emotional regulation in a group. It seems that emotional regulation "comes first" and is the behavior someone will have towards other's group members to regulate people's emotions, and emotional contagion is when members adopt the same affects. Am i wrong ?
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It has taken me a while to fathom the nature of your question. Here is a definition of emotional contagion from one of the papers Stephen Cheung mentions:
"Emotional contagion has been defined as “the tendency to automatically mimic and synchronize expressions, vocalizations, postures and movements with those of another person’s and, consequently, to converge emotionally” (Hatfield et al)
Another way of saying this is mirroring - this can be deliberate or automatic. Often when one does it deliberately, it can lower emotional tension as the person feels heard. When this happens, the emotional quality of the situation is often reversed.
Let me give you an example: a friend of mine who is the person who admits emergency cases in a children's hospital. One evening a man came in and when he heard there was a long queue for the doctor, he got very cross. My friends, instead of saying you should not be cross, said: "I see you are cross and I can understand it - you are very concerned about the health of your child and having to wait to see the doctor is very difficult for you" . With this, the man started to cry ...his emotion has been mirrored and accepted with no judgment. This changed the atmosphere in the room, and all realized they were all under tension as they were all concerned about their children and it was OK - that is how things were at that moment.
Warm regards Tina
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Hello everyone, I am interested in the role of the body (or corporal dimention) in the educational context, specifically the interactions between teacher and students during the teaching-learning process.
Thank you
Best regards,
Paola
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thanks to everyone for their enriching suggestions.
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Dear Colleagues,
I hope you are all well.
I still need to get 30 more responses for my dissertation project by the end of next week before I start analysing data. Could you please fill in my questionnaire as part of my dissertation research project in my final year BA (Hons) Business Psychology course at the University of Greenwich? I will need academics as my participants, who are currently teaching in Higher Education (HE). The purpose of my study is to find out how academics in HE react to student feedback.
I would greatly appreciate your contribution! The participation is voluntary and it is completely anonymous and confidential. It will take you approximately 10-15 minutes to complete the questionnaire.
Many thanks,
Adiya
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Done
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I'm looking for publications on the alleviation of fear (or any negative emotion) not from a therapeutic, but rather a functionnal, cognitive approach. Ideally some fMRI recording of subjects experiencing a feeling of relief.
If the reverse has been done on the feeling of disappointment, that'd be great too.
I'll take anything from cognitive neuroscience, neuropsychology, anatomical clinical method, and cognitive psychology.
My eternal gratitude to whomever can help.
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There are many books out there on the control of emotion. Work I did years ago delineated how the training of combat soldiers had such an effect.
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I am looking for a validated instrument that measures Life skills as defined by WHO (1933) : "Life skills are abilities for adaptive and positive behaviour, that enable individuals to deal effectively with the demands and challenges of everyday life".
The core set of skills are the following :
- Decision making
- Problem solving
- Creative thinking
- Critical thinking
- Effective communication
- Interpersonal relationship skills
- Self-awareness
- Empathy
- Coping with emotions
- Coping with stress
Is this possible ? Do you know any validated tool ?
Thank you very much!
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There is a standardized tool for measuring ten core life skills of World Health Organisation (WHO) developed by Dr. Radhakrishnan and Ms. Subashree.
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I’m preparing an article about oxytocin and development. I'm curious about the differences in levels of oxytocin and possible influences by the subsequent life events.
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Is there any data on oxytocin levels changing through the lifespan? Do they go down with age like testosterone levels (after puberty)?
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What is the meaning of blind love? how the view of you about this cases in our person life? Can the blind love to be true love in the future? 
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Dear Hengki Wijaya,
In my opinion, this is the sociobiological effect of the evolutionary processes, i.e. it is a trait in some sense atavistic that we inherited from our ancestors from thousands and millions of years ago.
Best wishes
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While describing ER strategies, literature usually say that it's better to evaluate ER strategies in various contexts to know its status whether it's adaptive or maladaptive in that specific context. So I want to know what are the factors by observing which I can say that the strategy is adaptive or maladaptive?
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Every therapeutic tool has to be adapted to each patient and his/her personality traits. As a psychotherapist you should to decide which exactly tool you will apply. In general, every ER strategy is good but you have to ensure that a strategy you choose is good-enough-effective for this specific patient and his/her personal needs
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Respected RG fellows,
Why is it hard for us to control our emotions? Why do we often tend to listen to our hearts when its about admiration and amicable situations while we listen to our minds when we are irked or in agony?
I would be really obliged for your views on the same.
Thank you.
Regards,
SQ
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Dear Sahar Qazi
Let me explain:
Emotional reactions are coded in our genes and while they do vary slightly individually and depending on circumstances. See what I mean? Emotions are a “lower-level” response by our brains. (Left side of the picture)
Simple example: “When a magician amazes a crowd with a great magic trick.” A large percentage of the crowd watching the magic trick, will be awed. “Or when you feel hungry” “When you fall, get hurt, and feel pain.”
Emotions require of two things: The emotional state (awe/hunger/pain) and the experience (at magic show/ didn’t eat/ falling down).
A feeling is the mental portrayal of what is going on in your body when you have an emotion. It is the byproduct of your brain perceiving and assigning meaning to the emotion. (Right side of the picture)
Feelings play out in our minds only. Feelings, like emotions, cannot be portrayed or displayed. Feelings are often fuelled by a mix of emotions, and last for longer than emotions.
What I am trying to get to is: Although popular opinion says that we are able to control our emotions, we are AS GOOD/PROFICIENT as we claim to be. Why? They are partly coded to help you cope with this world. You can control some of them, but some them just happen subconsciously (coded) due to evolution of us as a species. As for feelings, let them flow - they are less prone to control and manipulation than emotions.
Lets look at this flow chart:
Experience → Emotion → Feeling → Naming → Acting on the information the emotion provides.
If you really want to “master your emotions” it is good practice to identify any of your shortfalls - e.g. I get angry too easily when someone gives me feedback. Try to think - Why is that? How can I manage it better? What else can be done?
You can plan for that and avoid falling to your old habits.
It is crucial, for us, to be able to distinguish between emotions and feelings. Google “control your emotions” and you’ll see countless articles/emotions. Yet, if you Google “control your feelings.”.
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Dear all,
I would like to find some papers which explain what are the main factors of emotion regulation strategies? (fpr example individual and environment factors)
Thank you!
Pauline
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Thank you!!!
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I am working on manuscripts related to auditory processing difficulties (SCAN-A, SCAN 3) among incarcerated adolescents.
Given some of our preliminary findings, I am looking for suggestions about resources and papers that might illuminate connections between auditory processing deficits and emotion regulation difficulties, particularly with regards to the impact on school performance. Perhaps even links with executive dysfunction (cognitive, behavioral or emotional).
There are a number of older papers on behavioral problems among school aged youth with speech and language deficits but I am not really finding anything specific on links with auditory processing problems, especially with regards to how emotion regulation and executive dysfunction are currently conceptualized. Maybe I am using the wrong search terms, but I would be grateful for any input!
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Vladimir A. Kulchitsky - thank you for the recommendation. Emotional Prosody is quite interesting, and I'll read carefully though it may be too far a stretch for emotion regulation.
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I am struggling to find an established scale to measure fear of crime or worry about crime. Any suggestions?
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Hi Natalie,
Maybe this will provide some insight:
Have a great day!
--Adrian
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Dear all,
I hope you are well.
I am doing my dissertation on how acadmeics in Higher Education percieve student feedback. It is a moderation model, which comprises of independent variable IV (academics perceieved negativity of students feedback), moderation (emotion regulation), and dependent variable DV (academics' negative emotions). The research question is: Does Academics Perceived Negativity of Student Feedback (IV) trigger their negative emotions DV? What is the moderating role of Emotion Regulation in academics’ coping with negative emotions?
My hypotheses:
1. Academics’ perceived negativity of student feedback is positively related to academics’ negative emotions.
2. Emotion Regulation (ER) moderates the relationship between academics’ perceived negativity of SF and their negative emotions, such that the relationship is positive for academics with low levels of ER and non-significant for those with high levels of ER.
One of my questions is regarding the second hypothesis. It is a bit confusing as I am using the words negative and positive in the same sentence. Can I change positive where it says 'such that the relationship is positive for academics with low levels of ER and non-significant for those with high levels of ER' to negative and change it to 'such that the relationship is NEGATIVE for academics with HIGH levels of ER and SIGNIFICANT for those with LOW levels of ER' ?
or would it be better for me to substitute the word POSITIVE with STRONG?
Many thanks,
Adiya
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If you feel that readers might potentially be distracted by the use of negative and positive in the same sentence (I did not find it distracting), a suggestion I have is to employ synonyms for "negative" with regard to SF (e.g., using "constructive" rather than negative) and with regard to negative emotions you might describe them as "unpleasant" or "dysphoric" rather than "negative." I do not see anything inherently wrong with describing a statistical correlation as "positive" but bear in mind that a "positive" correlation can be weak or strong. I hope that my response is helpful.
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Dear Colleagues,
I hope you are all well.
I only need to get 23 more responses for my dissertation project by the end of this week before I start analysing data. Could you please fill in my questionnaire as part of my dissertation research project in my final year BA (Hons) Business Psychology course at the University of Greenwich?
***YOU CAN ONLY PARTICIPATE IN MY QUESTIONNAIRE, IF YOU ARE CURRENTLY TEACHING IN HIGHER EDUCATION***
The purpose of my study is to find out how academics in HE react to student feedback.
I would greatly appreciate your contribution! The participation is voluntary and it is completely anonymous and confidential. It will take you approximately 10-15 minutes to complete the questionnaire.
Many thanks,
Adiya
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completed the survey, All the best.
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Dear Colleagues,
I hope you are all well.
I would like to ask you for a big favour to fill in my questionnaire as part of my dissertation research project in my final year BA (Hons) Business Psychology course at the University of Greenwich. I will need academics as my participants, who are currently teaching in Higher Education (HE). The purpose of my study is to find out how academics in HE react to student feedback.
I would greatly appreciate your contribution! The participation is voluntary and it is completely anonymous and confidential. It will take you approximately 10-15 minutes to complete the questionnaire.
Many thanks,
Adiya
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Thank you so much everyone! I am really grateful to all of you!!!
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Dear Colleagues,
I hope you are all well.
I would like to ask you a big favour to fill in my questionnaire as part of my dissertation research project in my final year BA (Hons) Business Psychology course at the University of Greenwich. I will need academics as my participants, who are currently teaching in Higher Education (HE). The purpose of my study is to find out how academics in HE react to student feedback.
I would greatly appreciate your contribution! The participation is voluntary and it is completely anonymous and confidential.
Kind Regards
Adiya
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Best of luck Adiya! My best input would have been to add an open eded item for qualitative data & analysis...
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Dear Colleagues,
I hope you are all well.
I would like to ask you a big favour to fill in my questionnaire as part of my dissertation research project in my final year BA (Hons) Business Psychology course at the University of Greenwich. I will need academics as my participants, who are currently teaching in Higher Education (HE). The purpose of my study is to find out how academics in HE react to student feedback.
I would greatly appreciate your contribution! The participation is voluntary and it is completely anonymous and confidential.
Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!
Kind Regards
Adiya
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Done..al d best dear💐
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I've been really taken with Michelle Schoenleber and Howard Berenbaum's paper on "Shame Regulation in Personality Pathology", and I'm developing a bit of a bias toward their 'solution'. But I am curious what other researchers make of the idea that dysfunctional shame processing in particular is a central or core problem for this population. What do you think (and why do you think it?)
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I suspect in those cases where neglect and abuse occurred in childhood that the damage was complex. And I further suspect that the young mind struggled to make sense of the treatment they endured. I would think that the 'core problem' would relate more to the manners in which the person would try to cope and function over the coming years. What further and deeper damage occurs when the individual uses unhealthy ways to exist and avoid more pain?
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Would anyone know how I can test this question. Patients with Cardiovascular disease complete the DASS - depression scale and also the Cognitive Emotional Regulations Strategies scale which has 9 predictors (strategies). I want to know if Cognitive reappraisal  (CRA) moderates the relationship of depressive symptoms in men and women with Cardiovascular patients? Does anyone know how I would analysis this? Depression is the DV, gender dichtomous variable and CRA continuous IV.
Or should I be saying gender moderate the relationship between CRA and Deperssion?
thank you
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i would recommend PROCESS software for SPSS, it's free. you can test both your hypothesis there
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Suppose we want to group subjects using the “Emotion Regulation Questionnaire” (Gross and john, 2003). First, is there any reported cutoff points for this scale? and second, if there is no any cutoff, how can I use this scale for grouping subjects. This questionnaire has two subscales: “suppression” and “reappraisal”. Please let me know is this possible to group subjects into four categories, regarding to low or high scores in each subscale? for example using mean or one standard deviation as a cutoff point!
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There are two approaches to cutpoints. The first, as noted, is statistical. You define quantiles of the distribution. These depend on your interest. If you want to define people with a problem you might cut off the worst 10%, while if you wanted to define people with a significant psychological resource you might take the highest 10%, or 20%. 
The second approach is to use an external criterion. If you had depression ratings, for example, you could classify scores based on the probability of being significantly depressed. 
So the purpose of your classification – the theoretical model informing your work – is very important. And whether or not you have some external criterion against which to calibrate the scores. 
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Suppose we want to group subjects using the “Emotion Regulation Questionnaire” (Gross and john, 2003). First, is there any reported cutoff points for this scale? and second, if there is no any cutoff, how can I use this scale for grouping subjects. This questionnaire has two subscales: “suppression” and “reappraisal”. Please let me know is this possible to group subjects into four categories, regarding to low or high scores in each subscale? for example using mean or one standard deviation as a cutoff point!
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Hi Ali,
I have previously used this scale and there are no well-established cut-off points for this scale. I would recommend where possible to not reduce the sensitivity of the measurement by changing interval data into categorical data.
Best wishes,
Tom
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I am wondering if I could measure cognitive functioning through smartphone EMA, so I can look at changes in cognition throughout the day/week. Any suggestions would be very helpful!
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 Hi Jade, not sure if this is of any help with your research but if not already, might be worth checking out this research study http://www.hungrymindlab.com/moo-q/ and the company that help built the app: http://www.psyt.co.uk/research 
Good luck with your work. N
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What is the best time intervals between pre-test and post-test to avoid testing effect (Simply recalling the information from pretest)?
Based on my experience, one month is sufficient time interval but are there any literature support this claim?! 
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Perhaps I can help.  Got this reference about minimum time lapse for test and retest  using pencil-paper instruments (also applicable to pretest and post-test ) from:
An Introduction to Educational Assessment, Measurement and Evaluation ,2nd Edition (2008), Authors: Gavin Brown, Earl Irving and Peter Keegan..   Pearson Prentice Hall
Rosedale, North Shore, New Zealand (ISBN: 978-1-4425-0069-30
In page 82,  ..  the authors wrote .. concerning time to time comparison (test -retest ) for estimating relaiblity ...
' Do people get the same score on a test at time 1 and time 2? ...  If there is no learning from practice, no recall of responses from the first time and no fatigue from repeating a test, then the true ability should not have changed. Thus scores should be very similar across repeated administration of the test. COMMONLY IF WE REPEAT A TEST SOMEWHERE  BETWEEN 3 TO 6 WEEKS STUDENTS SHOULD NOT HAVE LEARNED MUCH NOR REMEMBERED HOW THEY ANSWERED THE FIRST TIME.  
From my interpretation of the test above, even though, in the duration of 3 to 6 weeks, students would have forgotten nearly all of the pretest questions and answers to replicate the same answers  in the post-test, 
my opinion is,  it is safer ( to defend  yourself in a VIVA)  to  do it after 6 weeks has elapsed . eg. if if you conducted a pretest on the 2nd day of the first week of research, then  the post-test can be done on the 2nd day of the 7th week of research.  This gives researchers using an interventionist /treatment programme a minimum 6-week period to do their intervention/ treatment .
Hope what I am writing is relevant to the your questions. 
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Can any one send me a good scale for Emotional Regulation for adolescents (18-21) ? or at least direct me to read any informative article about Emotional Regulation ? Besides, I got a question from one of my students asking me "what is the difference between Emotional Intelligence and Emotional Regulation", can any one help me in this question ?!
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We use the Emotion Regulation Questionnaire by Gross & John (2003). I've added the link below. There is a version of this scale for adolescents and children also.
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We are interested in adding vagal tone to an upcoming study involving emotional regulation. Is spectral analysis better than beat to beat latency in calculating heart rate variability (vagal tone)? Is so, what is the rationale?
I am also interested in the methodology you are using.
Thanks!
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Dear Rodney,First, please do not confuse heart-rate variability and vagal tone. They are different things, although under very circumscribed conditions, the former is sometimes a reasonably accurate marker of the latter (and only cardiac vagal tone, not general vagal tone, at that); please look at my comments and other ResearchGate traces for clarification.  Secondly, can you more precisely define what you mean by beat-to-beat latency? It is true that cardiac parasympathetic effects upon the heart are much quicker than sympathetically, but this is the basis for HRV respiratory sinus arrhythmia spectral calculations. 
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I am interested in assess emotional regulation as a part of adaptation process. Can anyone recommend a validated emotional regulation scale?
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Dear all,
Many thanks for answer this question and provide me good information!
Kind regards
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Hello,
Do can you recommend any research about the integrative approach of acting out (among adolescents of young adults) which crosses data from :
- Attachment theory
- Mechanism defenses
- aggressive or violent acting out
- emotional regulation
Thanks,
O. Moyano
PhD
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Thank You Pat !
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Bottomline is a broadly defined term. I an seeking to examine and determine relationships between individuals emotion regulation perceptions and an organizations bottomline.
I would like to examine various tools for measuring bottomline to determine suitability for such a study. 
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I believe that you would have to operationally define "bottomline" before proceeding to search for standardized scales. If you are chiefly concerned with  net earnings, then correlating net earnings with an appropriate sample of employees who have completed job satisfaction scales may be an avenue for you to pursue emotional regulation. Could you define "bottomline" with more veracity? 
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I would like to contact with any researchers that work with Biopac for measuring facial EMG (orbicularis oculi), and implement subroutines of analyses for startle eye blink parameters (peak amplitude, onset latency...) using Acknowledge v.4.1 or v.4.4.
In the past we used the algorithms implemented in different softwares such as VPM, which includes the parameters suggested by Balaban et al., (1987), for data acquired with other systems (e.g., Coulbourn).
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Hi Andi! thanks a lot for your detailed answer! We have been analyzing startle EMG data with Acqknowledge with a very similar analysis routine but using a time constant of 20 ms for integrating raw orbicular EMG, and it worked out quite well. Do you still believe that 10 ms is better for data acquired using this software? We are using a portable Biopac MP36R. Thanks again!
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I am considering a study on leader emotional regulation. More specifically a leader’s work emotion and identified transrational values that associated with a leader work emotion.
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Do you also take into respect cultural differences? I would be interessted to learn more about that issue. Best. Christoph
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This measure is based on the EC301 used to assess number processing in adults. It has been used to study number processing in children in Greece, Brazil, France, Switzerland, and Belgium. I have not found if the measure has been used with English speaking children. 
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Hi Rachael,
At this time, I have not been able to obtain an English version.  The Test of Early Math Abilities, Third Edition seems to be similar in some aspects in the description.  I am still looking for an English version. 
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We have performed an RCT study of the effect of a video feedback method in a Norwegian sample, and would appreciate to learn from other's experiences with the scales.
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There should be some empirical information in the following: Emotional availability (EA): Theoretical background, empirical research using the EA Scales, and clinical applications.
By Biringen, Zeynep; Derscheid, Della; Vliegen, Nicole; Closson, Lia; Easterbrooks, M. Ann
Developmental Review, Vol 34(2), Jun 2014, 114-167.
Emotional availability (EA), as a construct, refers to the capacity of a dyad to share an emotionally healthy relationship. The Emotional Availability (EA) Scales assess this construct using a multi-dimensional framework, with scales measuring the affect and behavior of both the child and adult partner (caregiver). The four caregiver components are sensitivity, structuring, non-intrusiveness, and non-hostility. The two child components are the child’s responsiveness to the caregiver and the child’s involvement of the caregiver. We first describe this relationship construct, look at psychometric properties in basic and prevention/intervention efforts, then review the extant empirical literature in order to examine the scope of studies assessing EA by using the EA Scales. We also explore its use in clinical practice. Throughout, we critically evaluate the knowledge base in this area as well as identify areas for further growth. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
Emotional availability in a sample of mothers with a history of abuse.
By Moehler, Eva; Biringen, Zeynep; Poustka, Luise
American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, Vol 77(4), Oct 2007, 624-628.
Maternal history of abuse has been proposed as a risk factor for child maltreatment, but the background of this "cycle of abuse" is as yet poorly understood. As a contribution toward a deeper understanding of this phenomenon, this study analyzed whether emotional availability is altered by maternal experiences of physical or sexual abuse during their upbringing. Mothers were contacted by mail and presented with the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. To form the index group, women who reached a cutoff for severe sexual and/or physical abuse and whose children were term babies with APGAR scores 7 were included in the study. The women were invited to the laboratory when their infants were 5 months old. Emotional availability was compared with a group of mother-infant pairs matched for infant gender, maternal education, marital status, number of infants, and birth weight. The results show that 5-month postnatal mothers with a history of physical or sexual abuse were significantly more intrusive toward their children than were control mothers. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
26.
Journal Article
Perceived Parent-Child Alienation: Empirical Assessment of Parent-Child Relationships Within Divorced and Intact Families.
By Moné, Jennifer Gerber; Biringen, Zeynep
Journal of Divorce & Remarriage, Vol 45(3-4), 2006, 131-156.
Parental alienation refers to a parent's attempts to distance a child from the child's other parent. We examined (1) the effects of "feeling alienation" upon college students' recollections of their childhood relationships, (2) the effects of "feeling alienation" on perceptions of adult parent-child relationships, and (3) the likelihood of alienation in intact and divorced families. A sample of undergraduates (N = 227) completed the Relationship Distancing Questionnaire and numerous other relationship questionnaires. Results suggested feeling alienation is inversely related to the quality of parent-child relationships during childhood and young adulthood and can be found in intact as well as divorced families. Findings also indicate parental conflict is a better predictor of whether alienation occurs than parents' marital status is. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
The Emotional Availability Scales: Methodological Refinements of the Construct and Clinical Implications Related to Gender and At-Risk Interactions.
By Easterbrooks, M. Ann; Biringen, Zeynep
Infant Mental Health Journal, Vol 26(4), Jul-Aug 2005, 291-294.
Emotional Availability (EA), is described as the "connective tissue of healthy socio-emotional development". The series of empirical articles in that volume linked attachment (behavior and mental representations) in infancy, childhood, and adulthood to EA in mother-child relationships, both concurrently and longitudinally. Each aspect of EA, including parental sensitivity, emphasizes the quality of emotional dialogue between partners and the relational or systemic nature of these qualities. The six articles comprising the present special issue include two studies which address issues related to the refinement of EA methodology, one that takes into account the importance of time and context of assessment and the other describing a new way of compositing the six EA dimensions to reflect the dyadic nature of the assessment, with clinical implications of these methodological refinements. These two articles are followed by studies that examine issues of gender, clinically at-risk, economically at-risk, and developmentally at-risk interactions. This collection of articles reflects the growing maturity of the construct of EA as it is operationalized in the Emotional Availability Scales (EAS). They examine some of the emerging questions about EA, in terms of refinements of methodology and exploration of clinical implications, as "next steps" in EA research. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
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Thanks for posting the full article. After reading about your experience, I share your frustration with the lack of cooperation with 911 dispatchers. However, I have to wonder if there is more to the story. I've visited the local call center recently on a number of occasions and find the tension in the room palatable. I noticed my arrival in the room raised a half dozen heads instantaneously, with a few looks that seemed to indicate annoyance. I have to wonder if what you experienced had anything to do with the high stress of the position who use the least trained and paid staff, with "civilian" status in an environment where psychological support is not readily available, even frown upon as a sign of weakness. So perhaps their lack of cooperation was instead a "cry for help" or a protest message to management.
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I agree. It is a cry for help and not knowing how to handle this situation. we are planning a new training with employees of the same company and will keep you posted. 
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Where can I find the SN 59 questionnaire in Spanish language?
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I am running a research project with adolescents who are diagnosed with conduct problems. I am eager to administer Family Environment Scale (FES) to find out the family environment. Unfortunately, this scale is costly for us. Can anyone suggest me any free alternative of FES. Thanks. 
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Hello Sam,
Oh, I see. In that case, I found a version of the FES, I've attached it, I hope it helps.
Daryn
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There are few studies regarding schadenfreude (feeling of joy on unfortunate event of others). Most of it is often associated with the dark triad personality as individual differences, envy as emotion, and defense in self-esteem as self-evaluation. In a new light of viewing schadenfreude as a moral emotion, would it be elicited from justice sensitive people following an unjust situation to promote prosocial or antisocial behavior?
A study (https://www.researchgate.net/publication/236875636_Moral_Emotions_An_Analysis_Guided_by_Heiders_Naive_Action_Analysis) analyzing moral emotions described that schadenfreude is predominantly elicited when other persons' negative goal is not attained or positive goal is attained with low effort. The identified events which elicited schadenfreude seemed to be attributed as an injustice. Assuming that it is true that schadenfreude is elicited by an unjust event, schadenfreude therefore may possibly be associated with justice sensitivity of a person. According to a neurological perspective, (see at http://www.jneurosci.org/content/34/12/4161.full.pdf+html) people who care about justice or people who scored high in justice sensitivity questionnaire are swayed more by reason than emotion. Would this then imply that schadenfreude is an elicited moral emotion following a rational thought of evaluating injustice? Why is it then often associated with evil?
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It fits to every stage of the human development, helas!
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I wanted to ask if there is a theory which states that negative emotions can be lowered by positive emotions?
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There is a theory that states humans can be in a state of mixed or dialectical emotions - Wilken and Miyamoto have a comprehensive article that covers its origins, how positive and negative emotions have been mainly measured differently, and how research has developed towards measuring emotions of opposite valence (e.g., happy and sad) at the same time can occur.  They state that positive and negative emotions can co-exist in harmony and occur simultaneously, better known as the concept of dialecticism, which was first introduced by Peng and Nisbett (1999). 
There's also research that suggests a correlation between positive and negative emotions.  Check out Tugade and Fredrickson (2004) and their reference page for help: http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/psp/86/2/320/
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i hope you can provide me with some insights, resource materials,etc,  and i will be thankful if someone can guide or suggest me with training modules.
i have gone through training modules of self regulated learning in academics.
but my work is training of teenagers to modify their risk taking behavior in substance abuse, sexual behavior, eating habits and handling peer pressure.
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Dear Riddhi,
that is an interesting topic. If you are also interested in risk taking resulting in road accidents in adolescents, you could have an interest for the attached paper.
Hope it is useful.
Bye
Silvia
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Which questionnaires do you suggest for test anxiety & self-esteem? I prefer to evaluate both state/trait test anxiety but I also want to know the best questionnaires in this area.
Do you have any suggestion or recommendation?
Do you think there are other variables that should be measured too?
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Hi Zeinab, both Nils and Julio offer some good standard measures. They are well used and valid. If you are not using them in English, you do need to be careful about possible linguistic or cultural factors that might affect results. Checking them through exploratory factor analysis, Cronbach's alphas, etc. can ensure the scales and all items functioned adequately.
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Assume that  we are measuring the mood trend of an individual for the whole week. In general, what would be the ideal mood trend as a comparison?
There are 3 issues regarding this:
1- If we consider the constant positive mood for the whole week, doesn't it mean the person has Manic traits? So, it seems it can't be an ideal trend.
2- If we consider the constant negative mood, the person has depression, so obviously this can't be the ideal case.
3- If the mood swings (as it does for all individuals), and the rate of mood swing is high, we may consider the patient as bipolar manic-depression. 
So, the question is: What could be the ideal mood trend based on time? If it should swing, what is the ideal rate of mood swinging with respect to time?
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 Dear Beatrice,
Thank you for your informative answer.
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In my experiment participants played a horror video-game, while EEG, heart rate and skin conductance measures were taken. According to Davidson's approach-withdrawal model, the frontal EEG alpha asymmetry* (FEA) value
should increase in a fear inducing situation - in my experiment anticipation of fear was proven by heart rate and skin conductance values.
Although, FEA showed no significant correlation with heart rate or skin conductance values, a phenomena was observed right after the fearful stimuli: a significant FEA drop (towards approach tendency). As the frontal areas could only tell not the anticipated emotion, but how the subject handles the given emotion, I would suspect that the moment of fear regulation is captured - when the participants calmed themselves down. That would explain the asymmetry change indicating approach tendency. Also, video was recorded of the participants' face during gameplay; around FEA drops participants tend to (subtly) smile.
Still I'm not sure how to interpret this phenomena and if there's a neurobiological explanation for it.
*(calculated by subtracting the right hemisphere alpha power from the left hemisphere alpha power)
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I wrote a blog post on the results (link below) and uploaded videos of the participants coupled with the gameplay. Although, it looks promising, I need another experimental design to elicit fear down-regulation explicitly in subjects to come to a extensive conclusion.
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Completing a MSc in Child Psychology, I am asked to do a systematic review in the areas of attachment and emotion / emotion regulation. Generally, there seems to be a paucity of research, and i could not as of yet identify a fruitful ground for a systematic review. Any suggestions would be much appreciated!
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Here is a bibliography made by one of my students.
Regards,
O. Moyano
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I am taking part in a study that aims to enlighten the different impacts of group psychotherapy on alexithymia and emotional regulation for all comers patients in a day hospital.
The design appears simple. A patient enters in the hospital and some demographic information are taken in order to construct his/her personal, family and medical history. Then, he/she completes a battery of tests (MMPI-II; TAS-20 for alexithymia; Perceived social support;  and DOE-36 for emotional openness). After this, he/she takes part in the proposed group activities. When the support end, the patient completes the same battery of tests, without the MMPI-II. 
The main purpose of this work is to find signicative predictors of progression on TAS and DOE measurements. More precisely, we would like to be able in the future to obtain a base line of quantitative data (according to scores on MMPI-II, age, sex and scores on alexithymia and emotional openness) that would provide information for a better support (ideal lenght of stay; a recommended number of activities; medication; and perceived social support).  
I would like to perform multivariated regressions but I haven't found an effective way to take into account the repeated measures. If I apply a delta on these repeated measures, I lose the position of the subject on the scales.
Does someone have a suggestion of statistical analyses to perform ? 
Many thanks in advance.
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Good advice from Stephen.
Other options is that trying variable selection using the Lasso if you have a lot of features (variables) and no prior information is available.
If you are worrying about the multicollinearity, use the elastic net instead of the Lasso. It can take care of this problem. If you want to read more about it, I recommend to go to the book "An introduction to statistical learning with application in R" which is freely available online. The authors also have online course on Coursera which is very nice.
Hope it help.
P/s: I also used the Lasso, the elastic net for variable selection in my problem. You can work well in R. Many online document about this is available.
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Are there any scientic evidence in favour of practicing meditation? Are there any differences due to the technique used?
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As is apparent in the replies to your question, there are both a variety of definitions of meditation and a variety of meditation techniques.
Two respected researchers' names I'm not seeing so far mentioned are:
-- Richard Davidson, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, whose work (primarily in the area of brain-imaging) has largely examined Tibetan Buddhist meditation techniques. One summary of his work is here:
-- Willoughby Britton, at Brown University, who has done studies with Vipassana and mindfulness (including work looking at some of the difficult, "negative" experiences that meditators sometimes have). A select listing of her work is here:
Both Davidson and Britton also have TED talks and other videos online.
Britton's Research Gate profile is here:
.
And there are increasingly many books and studies on applied uses of mindfulness and meditation in, for example, psychotherapy. Two books I happen to have on my desk at the moment are:
Mind in the Balance: Meditation in Science, Buddhism, & Christianity, by B. Alan Wallace (244 pages)
Clinical Handbook of Mindfulness, ed. by Fabrizio Didonna (523 pages)
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I need scales for "Fear of heights" or "Fear of snakes". Does anyone know of such scales? Preferably I need a German version, but I would be happy to know from an english (or any other language) version too.
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Thank you all for your links and hints! I just developed some items on fear of height, because it seems to be no such scale in German language (although in english).
Measureing fear of snake I found the SNAQ.
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Hello
Children`s emotion management scale( Author : DR .Janice zeman )has  three sub scale of emotions :anger ;sadness;worry.
Does anyone have initial validation articles of CESM ? Actually I find initial validation articles of sadness and worry ,but I need an original article about anger !
Thank you 
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Zeman, J., Shipman, K., & Suveg, C. (2002). Anger and sadness regulation: Predictions to internalizing and externalizing symptomatology in children. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 31, 393-398.
Shipman, K., Zeman, J., Nesin, A., & Fitzgerald, M. (2003). Children’s strategies for displaying anger and sadness: What works with whom? Merrill-Palmer Quarterly, 49, 100-122.
Penza-Clyve, S., & Zeman, J. (2002). Initial validation of the Emotion Expression Scale for Children. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 31, 540-547.
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Is anyone aware of long term effects of electroconvulsive (shock) therapy? Does it cause brain damage and/or reduced executive functioning or altered emotional regulation? Other side effects? 
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ECT can cause not just transient but long term memory problems; but it also can save lives and, as expertly discussed above, prevent the impact of untreated depression. 
Non dominant hemisphere unilateral ECT causes less memory problems than bilateral.
While more studies are needed to establish efficacy/safety, hopefully we will have more affordable and accessible TMS, as well as rapid acting antidepressants based on the ability of ketamine to cause rapid amelioration of depression. 
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Online programs for clients to complete at home would be helpful. Articles would also be helpful. Thanks in advance.
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This is a good program that children can complete at home. It's from Phil Kendall, referenced in some previous responses. I believe there is also an analog for older children.
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Hello, I would need a task to induce fear and disgust in a comparable way. Both tasks should elicit emotions for a few minutes (I need to measure psychophysiological parameters). It is very important that no fear be present in the disgust condition (e.g. blood or insects may elicit a mixed reaction).
Any suggestion?
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Yes Susan
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doing a research on the relationship between religiosity and fear of death
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Hi,
Just to follow up on this, our team has been working on newer measures too, liked below. Do get in touch for more information.
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Preferably one which is sensitive to age differences. I am aware of The Awareness of Social Interference Test (TASIT).
Thank you!
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Dear Louisa, 
Former colleagues of mine developed naturalistic video-based tasks to measure (and train) emotion-related mentalizing. Might be of interest for you. 
Best, Stefan 
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Seeking the latest in positive psychology & coaching resources
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Can you please elaborate a bit more on what it is you're looking for in these fields?  Any particular topics? You might find Sonja Lyubomirsky's research on happiness interesting.
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Any book, article, intervention or experiences can be helpful.
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The task is for a project that will study associations between executive functions and emotion regulation in older, midlife, and younger adults.
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Dear Rebecca,
Very interesting question for us. We are working in normalization of the affective words originally translated by Hinojosa. Our normalization is being held in México with the affective words in spanish, we are measuring emotion-attention interference.
I am now attaching the affective-word database that we are using, the words are both, spanish and english. We built up out attention-emotion model using SuperLab, based on the Stroop effect.
Hope this can be useful.
Best regards.
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My department is studying the effects of listening to music on the anxiety of childeren undergoing adenotonsillectomy and I am needing a scoring tool to help with using this scale.
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You can go on their website through which will get its details . As few years back we have its downloaded version.
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Hi - was wondering if anyone may be examining the neural substrates of moral emotions particularly shame and guilt. I'm particularly interested in any new research using imaging studies. Many thanks.
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Many thanks Beatrice.
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just any research or task on the recognition of self-conscious emotion ( via social stories, scenarios, moral dilemmas, ...)?
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Hi, Aude,
I don't know if this can help you, but my last paper (2015) present a method to show hybris (hubris). Teachers becomes conscious of their narcissism by empathic survey, filled by their pupils and them, (It is in my profile, but I attach).
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Moving is often described as one of the major risk factors related to affective and anxiety disorders. In my clinical practice I have found it sometimes as well, but, could be the eventual loss of space the clue of this kind of stress? Is there any statistically significant difference between depressions after moving to a bigger or smaller house?
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Change in residence and change in living conditions rank pretty high in the Holmes and Rahe Stress Scale of life events that produce distress. The effect of size would, I think, depend on its symbolic meaning - smaller size  a sign of declining social status perhaps for some or of children leaving home for good; for others small size may be welcomed - less to clean, fewer house guests, an opportunity to get rid of useless baggage........
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Hello everyone
I'm working about child's emotion regulation (8-12).I would like to know what  scales can be used  .Dose anyone have a suggestion about it ?
best regards
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The most comperhensive review perhaps is by Adrian and others. 
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Our patient complaining of anxiety preoperative, we will start new project to prevent this complaint.
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Hello Hani,
This is an interesting area that the nurses at the Surgical unit discussed in their Nursing Journal Club months ago. They've discussed the same review article that Abdulqadir attached for you.
They were thinking to conduct an Evidence-based project to look for literature to allievate pre-surgical stresses. Interestingly, the issue raised after observing high blood pressure readings and taccycardia the night before surgey.
There is many feasable interventions that can be done such as (1) pre-operative structured visits the night before the surgery; (2)  Patients' round to Operation theatre before surgey. The latest might be argumentative, however there might be a turn around in bringing the theatre to them :) such as providing a friendly-booklet with real pictures and discription of the operation theatre environment.