Science topic

Early Medieval Studies - Science topic

Anything and Everything to do with Medieval Studies from 400-1100.
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Most scholars involved in travel writing are from literature. As a historian working on travel writing, I feel that some theorisation of travel writing as a historical medium is long overdue. The only essay that tackles this question head on is  Mary Baine Campbell's essay in Youngs and Hulme's Cambridge Companion to Travel Writing. If anyone knows, I would be grateful for any leads. I am a bit far from action and discussions. Thank you
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Yes, I do admire that book, it echoes many aspects of my own thinking.
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Hello everyone ! 
I'm trying to make some research on the domestication of the ferret, especially during the middle age. 
I know it has been domesticated way longer before the cat in Europe, first to chase rats, and later for rabbit hunts. Fact is, I cant find any informations or real sources on the subjet. 
Do you have real archaeological, visual or historical sources for the ferret domestication ? 
Some say people lived from "animal husbandry" of ferrets, is it true ? 
What can you teach me about this animal ? 
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Illustrated 14th-century manuscript in the National Library of France:
Titre : Gaston Phébus, Livre de la chasse. — Gace de la Buigne, Déduits de la chasse.
Date d'édition : 1301-1500
Type : manuscrit
Langue : français
Format : Vélin. - Miniatures, lettres ornées
Description : 1° « Livre de la chasce, que fist le conte [GASTON] PHEBUS DE FOYS, seigneur de Beart ». Commençant par : « Ou non et en l'onneur de Dieu, createur et seigneur de toutes choses, et de son benoist filz Jhesu Christ... » et finissant par : «... tant de bien en cest monde et en l'autre comme il meismes vouldroit ».2° « Plusieurs bonnes Oroysons en latin et en françoys » (fol. 122). Commençant par : « Adonay domine deus omnipotens, qui fecisti ex solo verbo tuo... » et finissant par : «... qui vis et regnes puissaument par tout le siecle des siecles. Amen » .3° Les Déduits de la chasse [par GACE DE LA BUIGNE] (fol. 139). Commençant par : « Entens cy qui veulx savoir Des faulcons et les veulx avoir... » et finissant par : « Si s'en vont, à Dieu les command. « A tant je fine mon roman » .
Droits : domaine public
Identifiant : ark:/12148/btv1b52505055c
Source : Bibliothèque nationale de France, Département des manuscrits, Français 616
Provenance : Bibliothèque nationale de France
Date de mise en ligne : 23/03/2015
[The link below takes you directly to the page of the illustration copied below, however a PDF of the complete illustrated manuscript, in high-resolution colour, may be downloaded at this same link]:
[see quotation in following post, below, that describes the illustrated activity]
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I am looking mainly at the Mediterranean, between the 10th to the 13th century. So pre-Mamluk and Mongols. I am also happy to get any ideas referring for main period of expansion
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there are various accounts of them severing the enemy heads and using them to build mounds from which to preach the call to prayer, unfortunately I am away from my library so cannot chase up references at the moment, I would be surprised if you find many references to the treatment of the common dead on the grounds that the treatment of such tends not to be commented on by chroniclers unless it is particularly outstanding one way or the other
the Roman emperor you are thinking of was Valerian, after his death in 260 CE in Sassanian captivity his body was supposedly treated this way
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These sources can be St. Bernard himself and/or any individuals that have ties/ relationships with the Knights Templars. The time period must be 1100-1200.
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Tammy, you may find this book useful:
St. Bernard of Clairvaux : the story of his life as recorded in the Vita prima Bernardi by certain of his contemporaries, William of St. Thierry...[et al.] / a first translation into English by Geoffrey Webb and Adrian Walker.
Other Entries:William, of Saint-Thierry, Abbot of Saint-Thierry, approximately 1085-1148?
Webb, Geoffrey.
Walker, Adrian.
Published:London : A. R. Mowbray, [1960]
Description:130p : port ; 19cm.
Subjects:Bernard, of Clairvaux, Saint, 1090 or 1091-1153.
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Particularly the kinds of millstones especially Type Avenche, basalt?
Measure of the mill house?
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Hello,
There are several people working in the mills in France to the medieval period.
I give you some links but the websites are in French.
There are of course other people including one that is important but I do not have his bibliography in mind. I would do a search and I will provide its citation.
Best regards,
Marc Guyon
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In both the Queen Mary Psalter (f.162) and the Luttrell Psalter (f.152v) there are bas de page images of men (one Seated and one standing) with one foot pressed against the opponents foot in what looks like a form of foot or toe wrestling.Is that what is happening in these images? Has anybody heard or seen  anymore about about this kind of thing in Medieval life?
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"This feat tests a man’s stamina and balance. Clasp hands under your right knee and raise it up. Place your toes against your opponent’s toes. Push with your toes and try to force your opponent to lose his balance. First person to unclasp their hands loses."
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There's a lot of archaeological evidence of eating oysters in abbeys in Flanders and the surrounding, but most of it should date from post-medieval period. Are there archaeological or historical data upon oysters for the medieval times?
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Hi Jan,
here is an example from Switzerland:
Heidemarie Hüster Plogmann, Schlämmfunde aus dem Kloster St. Johann in Müstair. In: H.R. Sennhauser (Hrsg.), Müstair, Kloster St. Johann. 4 Naturwissenschaftliche und technische Beiträge, 2007, Zürich, 227·247.
(38 shells of Ostrea edulis from the medieval monastery: p. 240-242).
Best regards,
Stefan
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I am interested in riddles and curious creatures that may have metaphorical explanations; for example "flying snakes" (Herodotus) were probably locusts - both fly and shed their skins as they develop.
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Hello Laurence,
I have not found yet the picture of the huge honeycomb I mentioned earlier, but there is a report of a chimney sweeper about a 15 feet comb :
Further searching I discovered a Greek legend about the Melissani ! cave in Kefalonia, a place of worship of Pan and the Nymphes, who are often associated with bees:
“The underground lake of Melissani was known to it's surrounding inhabitants since ancient times. The ancient Greeks had climbed into the cave using a rope. According to a myth, thousands of years ago there wasn't any water in the cave and the only contact with the earth's surface was through an underground passage. Swarms of bees lived in the cave. Huge honeycombs in the shape of stalactites dripped honey. This is perhaps the explanation for the name of the cave "Melissani". "Melissa" in Greek means bee. After several earthquakes, however, cracks opened in the rock formation. Consequently, the passage to the earth's surface was flooded and disappeared.” (from
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Part of the Ricardo family was expelled from Spain in 1492. It is not a Jewish name, but they were Jews. I need suggestions about the origin of the surname.
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Yes, ii has a Gothic origin, or I would say a Germanic origin.
But I understand the issue which has been propossed here is related with a much later problem. It's related with the fact of a jewish Ricardo family (Ricardo as family name) who were expelled form Castilla in 1492. The original question was if somebody could give any idea about the origin of that name... as a Jewish name (because it is clearly not a Jewish family name). The problem is, then, how a Jewish family got that family name. it is not jewish, and it is not even a family name, but a personal name.
I think it is realted with a situation of "crypto-judaism": maybe they were forced to bapthize as Christians and they took the name of their godfather (there are other testimonies of that practice), or of their lord (or maybe both). There are also examples of some other personal names working in this same way, some times woth an article in fornt: (de) María, (de) Pedro.
Thanks, once more.
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Metamorphoses book 13 and 14
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I would look at book XV of Pierre Bersuire's (Petrus Berchorius's) Reductorium Morale, otherwise known as the Ovidius Moralizatus. Though the encyclopaedic work was written in the middle of the 14th century, it was quite popular and widely read throughout the 15th century, especially book XV dealing with the moralizations of the Metamorphoses. Engels prepared a typed edition in 1962 which is fairly widely available, and Glaucus appears on p. 170.
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Does anyone here deals with the Byzantine army and the barbarian tribes of the Early Middle Ages?
Looking for people who have similar research topic as mine, to share opinions and research material
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Dear Jelena Jarlc, concerning the goths, I would recomend the works of the spanish cientist Dionisio Pérez Sánchez: El ejército en la sociedad visigoda, (Acta Salamanticensia. Estudios Históricos y Geográficos, 57), Salamanca, 1989; El ejército romano del Bajo Imperio y su relación con los pueblos bárbaros, in: Studia Zamorensia (Segunda etapa), Zamora-Salamanca, 1985 Nr./Bd.6, S. 333-346; El ejército y le pueblo visigodo desde su instalación en el Imperio hasta el Reino Visigodo de Tolosa, in: Studia Historica. Historia Antigua, Salamanca, 1984-1985 Nr./Bd.2-3, S. 249-269. Of course, there exists the problem of language, but perhaps you can get in contact with him and get a summary of his mayor thesis in english. Sincerily yours, Alexander Bronisch
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Some say the “dark ages” in Western Europe are directly related to the lack of paper and difficulties to keep track of administrative, legal and commercial activities. Is it a valid argument and what sources infirm/confirm this point of view?
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Who is "some"? If this were true, how did the Romans, Greeks, Assyrians, etc manage their affairs quite efficiently, before paper was even invented?