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Early Intervention - Science topic

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Excruciating experience such as sexual harassment, pressure of academic work due to shorter semesters caused by incessant strikes, inability to pay school fees, exam stress, bullying, death of roommates or fellow student in the hostel, depression, attempting and/or actually committing suicide etc. are not uncommon among students in tertiary institutions, but this is particularly on the rise in the low and middle income countries. Stressful and traumatic experience expose students to intense emotions which makes them vulnerable to risk of mental health conditions. It can bring about a state of sadness, low spirit, loss of interest, low self-worth, unpleasant sleep or appetite, low energy, poor concentration all of which can have devastating impact on student’s academic achievement. Do you see tertiary institutions being mandated to provide early intervention support to address the emerging wellbeing concerns of students?
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Indeed a VUCA world (i.e. volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity) which can be anxiety provoking and stress inducing. For the youths in tertiary institutions, the negative impact can be huge not only on their wellbeing but also their academic performance..
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Criminalistics forensic science is a traditional scientific speciality which has long played a supporting role to law enforcement around the world, in the fight against crime and providing supporting evidence for courts of law. Crime scene examinations and scientific evidence are typically utilised as a reactive tool to explain, or clarify, what has occurred in a crime scene: therefore assisting juries and court officials make judgements of culpability of those on trial.
Nonetheless, there is a strong argument that forensic science, and the resultant forensic intelligence, should not only be used as reactive evidence, but also as a proactive means of gathering advantageous actionable intelligence for the ‘deterrence and reduction of crime’(Almog, 2014, p. 325), in the prevention of attacks, and possibly, for the early intervention and protection of future targets.
Is Criminalistics Forensic evidence/intelligence being proactively exploited as a intelligence tool to identify actors, targets and possibly prevent terrorist attacks?
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Dear Ahmet, I totally agree and a change is required.
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Hello, I was searching in literature if there is any recommendation about the onset of early intervention. I found in a systematic review of Bessell et al. (2013) about Effectiveness of Early Interventions:
Most studies suggested beneficial effects of the interventions on speech and language outcomes, but the review was unable to provide any evidence to support any specific model of SLT intervention in relation to theoretical perspective, duration, age, setting, intensity, and delivery.
I am very interested in the most recommend age to start early intervention to prevent speech and language problems. I tought that I once saw a study that recommended early intervention from birth onwards, because of the problemes that parents may have with the emotional adaptation to the anatomic condition of their child. These difficulties may have an negative impact on attachment and bonding, mutual eye contact and interactions in general. But I can not find the article or passage in a book anymore.
I was wondering if someone knows a study that could deliver an answer on my question. Thanks ahead, Mie
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Meinusch, M. & Romonath, R. (2011). Early language intervention for children with cleft lip and/or palate: A systematic review, Evidence-Based Communication Assessment and Intervention, 5:4, 197-215.
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Did you measure the speed of the police officers response to the physical attack? I have a sample of hundreds of police officers. I'd like to compare it.
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Appears interesting study to me! Usually we go by split-syndrome to understand the police officer's response to any type of threat!!
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We are interested in implementing an intervention program which aims to improve reading skills amongst children in secondary schools. We want to investigate whether the program improves the children’s reading skills (both for advanced and less advanced readers), and whether there is a significant difference in effect size when comparing advanced readers to less advanced readers.
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One group non randomised
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Crime scene examinations and scientific evidence are typically used as a reactive tool to explain, or clarify, what has occurred in a crime scene: therefore assisting juries and court officials make judgements of culpability of those on trial. Nonetheless, there is a strong argument that forensic science, and the resultant forensic intelligence, should not only be used solely as reactive evidence for judicial environments, but as a proactive means of gathering 'grey' intelligence for the ‘deterrence and reduction of crime’(Almog, 2014, p. 325), to help in the prevention of attacks, and possibly, facilitate early intervention and planning disruption and allow the identification of future methods and targets. Is Crime Scene Forensic evidence/intelligence being proactively exploited as a intelligence tool to identify actors, targets and possibly prevent terrorist attacks?
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Some times are possible and others do not
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Basically I`ve done a review of the literature on disengagement from Early Intervention Psychosis services using systematic methods. There was heterogeneity across the studies, no RCTs and I`ve used `vote counting` to make sense of the results
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According to Cochrane's handbook, there are two main concerns about using vote counting to make sense of results: by considering each study on its own you are not allocating different weight to them, and too much emphasis is given to significant/not-significant, without considering range of effects (e.g., CI) (https://handbook-5-1.cochrane.org/chapter_9/9_4_11_use_of_vote_counting_for_meta_analysis.htm)
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I am interested in the impact of adversity on individual and community resilience against crime and victimisation. There is a breadth of literature examining Adverse Childhood Experiences, Brain Injury, Neuro-Deversity, and Poverty in relation to the links between inequality and crime/victimisation/exploitation. The emerging picture seems to indicate that adopting a trauma informed approach to policing helps with early intervention problem solving and prevention.
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We have both in play, we have already completed some SSD work and have begun to test and expand our stat program. Early days but good fun.
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Why is considering implementation early in intervention development a contentious scientific topic?
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Designing interventions where they will be implemented is the way to go. Engage with and design for the end user, fail faster, and innovate. From this social
work clinician-scientist’s perspective, we save so much time and energy this way, but I’m an implementation scientist at heart and others prefer to design and test in a controlled environment first.
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I plan on working on a project to implement the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) for standard use in the pediatric setting for assessment of postpartum depression (PPD) symptoms. The goal is to identify and provide early interventions.
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There are now recommendations that pediatric providers screen for PPD in the pediatric setting, but as you know, many pediatric providers are reluctant to do so. I do not see any adopted guidelines but the AAP to do so, although plenty of publications have focused on this topic. I wanted to make sure you found this most recent publication:
In addition, there is now discussion on how the timing of those screenings. Our work has shown that PMADs can occur anytime in the first year after birth. I see them increased during weaning and significant changes in breastfeeding patterns (such as returning to work, etc). I am glad you addressing this topic for your DNP project and hope you will mention the rarer PMADs disorders as well, including PPP.
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Hi everyone!
I'm working on an article on that problem. I want to know if you have any document that talking about drop out, desertion, non retention of children from social intervention initiatives or government project or any kind of social work practice... On Spanish is very hard to find something. Can you help me please?
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The perspectives of clinicians/health professionals on this means of early intervention, their thoughts on the limitations and benefits.
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Hello Gemma, I'm attaching an article that may be of interest, and hopefully of some use.
Rachel.
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Assessment of Peer Relations.
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Hi, I do not use,,, but this link may help you
regards
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Hi!  I am studying the cognitive distortions of mothers (IV-predictor) and how they relate to these four DV-outcome variables: 1) maternal perceptions of child behaviors, 2) competence in implementing early intervention strategies, 3) stress levels, and 4) depression levels.
The main purpose of my study is gaining an understanding of how parent-specific cognitive distortions relate or are associated to the outcome levels of these four dependent variables.  All variables will measured on test measures specific to the construct (values).
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Dear Maranda,
parametric assumptions apart, the MANOVA window in SPSS has a box for covariates.
If your independent variable is continuous, put it in that box. I think this is a proper procedure to build and assess a multivariate (not multiple) regression model.
However, I am not totally sure and I address you to the article attached.
Please let me know.
Best regards,
Mauro
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I am writing an article about two children with disabilities (Autism and cognitive disabilities) that experienced domestic violence.
Could you help me with any research references on that topic?
Thank you.
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Dear Kamil, in the book The Moving Researcher by Ciane Fernandes there is a chapter on child who experiences strong and prolonged trauma, and develops autism. although it does not specify the kind of trauma, i suspect it could be home violence. you might be able to contact the writer and get more info.
good luck
Milca Leon
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Many researchers claim that children with Down syndrome learn to count mechanically. According to them, they do not have conceptual understanding of numbers. A proof of their claim is the fact that when a child with Down syndrome is interupted while counting he/she cannot continue from the last number, he/she has to start counting from the begging. According to other researchers, they learn to count by principles. This research reinforces the second view. According to our research children with Down syndrome cannot continue counting from the last number and start over again because of their Short-term Memory deficit. The early intervention designed for their memory development could be proved to be of major importance to their entire cognitive development.
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 Thank you very much for your valuable contribution to the discussion. 
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This is actually the initial longitudinal study to be conducted with bio-feedback. The purpose for the research is to see best practices of of breaking the cycle of incarceration in at risk families; what is the best time to do intervention of pregnant women who are incarcerated or facing incarceration; what is the method of  proposed interventions'; should the intervention include pre/post release programs to include parenting classes, home economics, educational support, healthcare, mental healthcare, and is so what should be the time limit to show the change. The study also proposes that each of us are what are parents are at the time of conception. From gestation to birth the babies in uteri are constantly being impacted by the mothers bio-rhythms as a natural phenomenon with pregnancy. We submit that the biorhythms of incarcerated women or those facing incarceration can through the subjective transfer of those interventions mentioned above impact a generation to break the cycle of incarceration.              
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Hello Silvana, That paper is one of the best at distilling the science of risk and resilience. That working group is working toward disseminating this research to estanlish evidence based early childhood policies and funding I'm glad you found the link helpful. The site has some incredible resouces, videos,policy briefs etc.  Best Rose
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Are there any interventions to enhance the self-determined behaviour of children between 2 and 5?  Can you think of anywhere I can look.  All the interventions I am finding are for 'school age children'.  Thank you.
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Hi Merisa,
Given your question, I think you'll find this model most interesting: http://tec.sagepub.com/content/33/1/38.abstract
The model highlights 3 foundational skills of self-determination to foster in early childhood:
1: Choices/Problem-solving
2: Self-regulation
3: Engagement
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I am preparing a systematic review on the effectiveness of social and emotional curricula in encouraging self-determination.  It is very difficult to use traditional strings to find curricula however there are articles that list and compare curricula, how do you justify using them as the basis of the review in the methodology? I am specifically looking at 'early years' defined as up to 5 years in preschool settings.
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What I do is after starting with traditional clear search terms and conducting an exhaustive search of the literature, I conduct a secondary search utilizing terms or phrases that were found during the initial search. These often include specific program/curricula names. That is the basic justification, that in conducting the initial search this is what was found. Targeting your systematic review is acceptable as long as you allow the data to speak for itself, so in this case you found specific curricula, now search for that curricula. If you started out by searching a specific curricula then your systematic review would be about that curricula only and not about the effectiveness of this type of programming.
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I am looking for an observational tool that can be applied to video-taped observations of parents and their infants (2 to 24 months) interacting during free-play in the home.
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You may find our measure useful: 
Prime, H., Browne, D., Akbari, E., Wade, M., Madigan, S., & Jenkins, J. M. (2014). The development of a measure of maternal cognitive sensitivity appropriate for use in primary care health settings. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.
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As part of an evaluation I want to conduct an initial survey to assess how previous users of a service have beneffited from it. My concern is that competitors of the service being evaluated may access the survey (it has to be widely promoted to reduce bias in the sample) will provide dummy answers to skew the results. Is there a way to control for this?
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If you use a service like Surveymonkey you can set it up to capture the IP address of the respondents. You can also set it up that each answer has to be submitted from a different computer, so it becomes more difficult to submit batch answers. Another option is to look into services like the Measurement and Analysis Service offered by CanChild - see link attached
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I work in acute mental health services and would like to do some research surrounding personality disorder and domestic violence. 
Patient type: Females aged 16+
Diagnosis: Borderline Personality Disorder preferred however all personality disorders are of interest. Suspected personality disorder are also of interest. 
Patients must have experienced some form of domestic violence (physical, sexual, financial or emotional) past or current. 
Thank you in advance, your help is greatly appreciated. 
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Hello Isla
There are several points I will try to summarise in regard to your questions before suggesting any studies.
There is indeed a vast majority of empirical evidence showing  adverse mental health outcomes (not necessarily "illness") linked to domestic violence/partner abuse victimisation/perpetration. One of the most common reasons some activists, mental health professionals and researchers do not link disorders found in the DSM is because of the fear of "pathologising" partner abuse and how this could take away accountability for perpetrators, particularly in legal settings (e.g. courts of law). Whilst some research (gendered perspective) focuses on control and structural gender inequality differentials (and to a lesser extent other factors) to explain partner abuse aetiology, other research pioneered by family violence researcher shows a constellation of factors  (amongst them individual factors such as personality features, psychopathology) within an ecological model impacting victims and perpetrators (NOTE here I say mental health indicators have been tested as VARIABLES. This is important to clarify because a great deal of (if not all) studies will test certain mental health CORRELATES  (not causality, e.g. PTSD, depression, anti-social or borderline behaviour, etc.) and partner abuse.
Another point to clarify is that most intimate partner violence is not often only targeted at one person (at least not in countries such as the US, Canada, the UK). You review the studies of Murray Straus and collaborators, John Archer's meta-analyses, etc.
Certainly, history of violence in the family of origin is one of the strongest factors linked to adulthood experiences of partner abuse victimisation/perpetration. You can check the Dunedin longitudinal study by Terri Moffit and colleagues. Researchers such as Murray Straus, Denisse Hines, Michael Johnson have conducted studies investigating  adverse mental health  conditions focusing on women and men by victimisation type. Typological research (focusing also on perpetrators-e.g Holtzworth-Munroe & Stuart, John Gottman, etc) will also shed light on these matters.
 Hopes this helps 
Esteban
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Behavioural challenges and behavioural disorders, How are these two terms different ?
which of these common disruptive behaviours shows the most significant impact on students learning?
Any suggested recent studies subjective to these concerns ?
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When we speak of challenging behaviors we put put the stress on the context: The challenge is on us to understand the behaviour, what tiggers it, what actions do we take _ the context- that increase its probability of apparition or that help to fix it once the bahavior appeared.  All behaviours have an intention, a communicative intention and a purpose. It is shift inthe way to look at it.  the strees in not on the child but the adults around him.
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Is there a specific model that helps develop these children's learning process? I am trying to find the most suitable model that incorporates learning as well as welfare aspects for these children.
An interesting fact about the Malaysian education system is that not every child is eligible to go to school. Those who cannot take care of themselves will be referred to the Welfare Department to be placed at Community Rehabilitation Centres owned and managed by private individuals. There is no integration between the two systems.
I feel that there is a need for both the Education Ministry and Welfare Ministry to collaborate and join their efforts in introducing a new and more suitable policy and model that emphasizes the learning as well as self-development of the children with disabilities. Can anyone share how children with disabilities are developed in your country?
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In Germany, most children with severe SEN are sent to special schools. We have recently investigated how these differences between the UK's (integrative) and Germany's (segregative) educational systems affect children's attainment chances and indeed early inlcusion in normal schools combined with special support seem to make a huge difference (paper under review). Both the UN and the EU are currently enforcing more inclusive schooling Germany.
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I am researching with parents with ID most of whom say their assessments were inadequate
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parents with an intellectual disability show that most parents can improve in one or more skills. Some mothers with intellectual disabilities have been taught to increase their demonstrations of affection, descriptive and reflective statements, stimulating conversations and behavior management skills. The subsequent increase in a parent's skills will lead to an overall improvement in their child's development and behavior.
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When writing clinical assessment reports targeted at children under the age of 5, are certain organisation/writing styles preferable to others?
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suggest you look at the work done around the neighbour hood early years and early support.This was a joint project done with the dept of education and skills , dept of health and supported by surestart. Individual organisations suchas down syndrome educational trust and scope were involved. consultation was done on this topic , you also may find Peter Limbrick helpful with his work on the team around the child.
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Whilst there is currently a good source of literature documenting parent-based language interventions for children there is little, that I can find, discussing the positive effects of early behavioural parent training for enhancing parenting skills and thus child language outcomes. I am looking particularly for parent-taught programmes, such as the Incredible Years series, that were designed specifically for enhancing the parent-child relationship that have also been shown to improve outcomes for children's developing language.
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There is a recent meta-analysis of programs of this type that I think speaks to your question:
Roberts, M. Y., & Kaiser, A. P. (2011). The effectiveness of parent-implemented language interventions: An meta-analysis. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 20, 180-199.