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Disaster Response - Science topic

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To Everyone out there - thank you for your comments in advance. I welcome all comments and suggestions.
I am involved in a project studying country/region level catastrophe response systems.
To be clear, I need to clarify my use of the term catastrophe.
Insurance companies define disaster and catastrophe differently. There are 2 main contextual differences.
Disasters are predicable and local.
Catastrophes are widespread (regions, country wide) and not predictable.
Disaster Example: Tornadoes in Oklahoma
Catastrophe Example: The 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami
Our research is trying to codify differences in the context of (for example) widespread floods, fires, hurricanes, cyclones, wind events, chemical spills, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, etc. impacting a large geographic area.
Catastrophe Response:
Here is our Main Area of Inquiry (let's call this Q1):
In your country, when there is a large scale catastrophe, what international, country or regional Institutions are in control and what is the scope of their control (to what level are they responsible for the response)? Please clarify if they are governmental or public/private organizations. Also, are they local, regional or national? What does it take to elevate a regional catastrophe to receive country level (national) response? To what degree is the response elevated to international response?
Here is our Secondary Area of Inquiry (let's call this Q2):
To what degree are independent, non-governmental or local response organizations involved? (UN, Red Cross, local NGOs). If they are involved, how responsible are they (in a percentage compared to a government agency or military role)? In a catastrophe, to what extent (% response) is left up to local businesses, regional governments, local citizens?
We welcome ALL answers, comments and questions.
Thank you.
MT
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I had hoped to run a workshop to understand how militaries and humanitarians should share clinical best practice (or indeed IF they should). It was intended to be a workshop over a day or two - a couple of thought provoking presentations with our data so far - that people feel we should share, but that there have to be clear limits on what is shared and when, and that no-one yet has expressed ideas about what those limits are or how best to do the sharing.
Clearly COVID 19 means that large university based workshops are a thing of the past, for the moment at least. The problem is that platforms such as zoom often favour the loudest/most assertive participants, and shut out the quieter/less confident ones. Equally a Delphi probably won't provide the richness of data that I'd need.
Does anyone have experience of running workshop style qualitative data collection in the 'new normal'? What works? Are there mechanisms for making an on-line event work in this way?
Thank you!
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Sir
I don't have any experience in qualitative data collection in this format but I was very impressed with the recent Global Emergency Care Collaborative UK webinar in July. I felt they managed to get a reasonable discussion/interaction going. I think their key was to keep numbers of delegates within the "breakout rooms" low - we had approx 7/8 which made it easier to facilitate and direct the flow of conversation. They also used a jamboard to collate views:
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Do you use any structured questionary to evaluate your disaster drill?
Or do you know any tool that is used?
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Check list and structured questionnaire both are usually used. Mixed method approach could be better to assess the reality from the particular ground.
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As everyone knows, the evaluation of performance of proposed MANET routing protocol related to Disaster Response Applications is very difficult to implement in real-environment. So, can you suggest any Environment (Govt/Private), where the proposed MANET routing protocol performance be tested for Disaster Response Applications?
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Reza Fotohi Thanks Sir for your valuable response
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I realize that Structural Equation Modelling is currently used in many fields of SCM and Logistics, such as Supply Chain (SC) agility , Sustaintable SC, Disaster Response logistics, and some others.
Why is the use of SEM becoming popular among Logistics and Supply Chain researchers?
What can be wrong when using SEM in logistics and SC?
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SEM is used in many contexts in SCM, but many studies lack validity and reliability, often relating to the genaralizability of the sample, the nature of data collected (cross-sectional vs. longitudinal data), or single response biases (only one respondent per firm vs. multiple respondents), among other possible biases or limitations. Therefore, SEM studies must be well designed, it is a method that requires almost more time in study design than in the evaluation of the results. Please see, for instance:
Flynn, B., Pagell, M., & Fugate, B. (2018). Survey research design in supply chain management: the need for evolution in our expectations. Journal of Supply Chain Management, 54(1), 1-15.
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I am working related to disaster management in IT field. How artificial intelligence used in disaster response related to information technology .
Suggest some topics or works related to disaster management
thanks
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Artificial intelligence can be effectively used disaster management by efficient data analyzation for detecting the disaster early.
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We are living in urban world. Cities are housing more than 50% of world population. The size or urban land and population are increasing. Urbanization is inevitable . Urbanization bringing both opportunities and challenges for future.
What will be the biggest challenge in future urban disaster response and management?
1. Climate change
2. Population growth
3. Resource scarcity
4. Infrastructures and services
5. Terrorism
6. Complex technological hazards
7. Social justice
8. Or, something else
Why you think it as the biggest challenge?
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I expect the future society or individuals would be more independent in future due to IT and other technological comforts alone without being physically social. So, in times of disasters, social bond 'Kizuuna' may be a challenge. Also, until we come up with flying cars or drones for urban mobility, transportation to safety and evacuation centers presents challenges in the present or immediate future. As Shahab Uddin pointed out already, urban population is increasing, so density of people and cars would mean heavy pressure on transport infrastructure like roads. There could be many more pertinent issues.
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I'm very intersted in this research. I've conducted a study that document bleak results for nurses perceived knowledge of disaster response. We are in the process of developing education modules to distribute. I believe we need to have educational options that range from univsersity coursework to 1 hour modules for nurses in the work environment.
Thank you,
Julie Bulson DNP, MPA, RN, NE-BC
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Thanks Anne, as SADN has included in the strategic plan accessibility and affordability of disaster nursing education is a priority if we want to change the landscape of nursing preparedness. Currently I'm engaged in a project with ASPR-TRACIE to develop emergency preparedness modules focused on the nursing response that will allow nurses in a short period of time to receive a basic understanding of what they need in a crisis and then outlining the ROI for the organization. Much of it comes down to critically thinking and using the nursing process as I've outlined in one of my articles.
Glad someone is leading the cause...
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I'm looking into doing a qualitative research on disaster response, either from the perspective of the rescuers or from disaster victims. Any ideas for a topic to study?
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I recommend to look into aspects of social capital for disaster response and recovery. Here many gaps in knowledge still exist and every empirical study brings another piece to the puzzle.
Here a paper on the topic
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When accounting for uncertainty in demand for humanitarian logistics planning, one of the most common ways is to use stochastic optimization approach in which the demand is generally assumed to follow a certain distribution (usually normal or uniform).
My question here is, how to identify these distributions when there is no historical data (as is the case in most disasters)?
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Thank you very much for all your replies, this is exactly the dilemma, while some suggest estimating these distributions, others question its possibility. But like Christopher Paulus Imanto suggested, normal distribution would not harm when there is absolutely no other ways to estimate the nature of distribution.
Thanks again, this helps.
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I am searching for anyone with interest on nurses' experience during disaster response or perhaps already conducted any study on the topics for collaboration in writing up articles.
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Hi,
I am working on a project and I would like to have some recommendations on the following issues:
- How can the smart devices and applications be used for disaster response?
- How these technologies can be used for indoor and outdoor navigation for mass crowd evacuation and rescue?
- How can navigation methods or system that utilize geographic information or building information modeling (BIM) help for mass crowd evacuation and rescue?
- What are the dependability and safety issues of disaster response systems?
Any recommendation (your views, research papers, books etc.) would be highly appreciated.
Thank you very much.
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I am currently looking into the use of unmanned air vehicles (drones) for viewing inaccessible areas following a disaster. Depending on the cameras and other equipment that is loaded, it is possible to make a 3D make of a disaster area, showing access roads, secondary hazards, location of survivors, etc. There is even a group - Robotocists without Borders - who are available for disaster response.
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I hoping to study the influence of culturally relevant disaster response. Does it improve the response efficiency and efficacy?
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Disaster professionals, security analyst, emergency management expert
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I believe you have asked two separate questions. I would recommend you look at Haddon's Matrix.
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I am interested if any colleges or universities might have contracts in place with other institutions to accept their students during the period of recovery from a major disaster.
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Dear friend ,
I really appreciate your idea and thinking .I have not come across any such agreements but it made me to think in what way it can be done,,will it be resources sharing  or only academic support .,whether affected students to be migrated,,,please share your ideas, I am also thinking on it
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Recently I have visited a rural area of Nepal where frequency of Thunder and Lightning is very high and thus there is a high number of human casualty and property loss for many years. I would like to know any research work about localized effect of Thunder and Lightning in a very small area and any mitigation measures?
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If you are interested in science then use a fast speed video camera or use a fast Antenna ( A circular plate - VLF/LF) sensor network as 3D monetering . You can also setup a high voltage laboratory to check the stepped leader physics and may be a cloud chamber for lightning initiation. Overall it depend on fundding from your colabration because each of the experiment is costly.
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Disaster Risk Reduction has become a central agenda in many parts of the world. This is due to increases in intensity and frequency of extreme events like cyclone/typhoon, heavy rainfall, earthquake, tsunami etc. Ecosystems are the close entities of causes to consequences of these events. However, a system approach that relates ecology and ecosystem services of a particular region are not significantly addressed. Do you think so, and why? How to address these?
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Risk management often refers to situational response and tactical thinking. And the ecological approach assumes continuous monitoring and strategic thinking. They should be used in combination, as in reality is done in most countries (although this is not obvious from official documents). But they can not be interchangeable, each is needed in its own way.
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I am a BTech student, doing a research on the effectiveness of Performance Management in local government.
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Thanks
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How can I find open source model of landslides related disasters. I want learn something about the process of  developing such kind of model including statistical or physical based models.
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I need to find some studies done related to extramarital issues among the military personnel. 
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Hello,
Here are a few...
Booth, A., & Dabbs, J. M. (1993). Testosterone and men's marriages. Social Forces, 72(2), 463-477.
Essien, E. J., Monjok, E., Chen, H., Abughosh, S., Ekong, E., Peters, R. J., ... & Mgbere, O. (2010). Correlates of HIV knowledge and sexual risk behaviors among female military personnel. AIDS and Behavior, 14(6), 1401-1414.
London, A. S., Allen, E., & Wilmoth, J. M. (2013). Veteran Status, Extramarital Sex, and Divorce Findings From the 1992 National Health and Social Life Survey. Journal of Family Issues, 34(11), 1452-1473.
Dissertation:
Brinson, J. S. (2008). Factors leading to adultery in the military population (Doctoral dissertation, Tennessee State University).
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The method of data collection will be an appraisal and evaluation of different disastrous situations. While the objectives is to;
1.      Identify possible causes of some disasters
2.      Investigate the effects of disasters on conditions, and essential lifeline services
3.      Analyze the effect of disasters on public services and Environmental Health Services
4.      Identify ways of Planning for effective management of environmental health services and resources in the event of a sudden natural disaster.
5.      The management of disaster-created environmental health conditions
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okay thanks, can you help me with some literature material
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Creating a link between tourism and disaster risk reduction and management is particularly important in places that rely heavily on tourism and, at the same time, are prone to natural hazards.  Many tourists don't talk the local dialect and can't without much of a stretch find directions of how to carry on in a calamity setting. Nobody can assure earthquake safety unless if anyone is aware of earthquake consequences and gets prepared. Man tourist destinations are lacking the sufficient notice boards and emergency contact numbers, thus the conduct of visitors is harder to control in case of a fiasco. This makes a more grounded need to effective disaster management in the tourism industry and tourist destination. Away from home, in unfamiliar surroundings when an earthquake/disaster hits a tourist area, the priority of voyagers is to go home first and this powerful urge to exit facilitate many other gigantic difficulties that are hard to manage.
So I am currently looking for article /report and similar items on awareness level amongst International tourists regarding measures to be taken at earthquake prone destination.
 if you know any information on this, could you please share with me?
Thank you
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@Deon Canyon thank you for suggestions. 
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does anybody know where i can collect infrastructure systems (power systems) recovery data (after extreme disaster)? such as power systems recovery process after cascading blackout
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 Thank you so much. All the best for you.
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Am a student pursuing Masters in disaster management and i want to know details regarding how effctivel social media data can be used in context of disasters..
Thanks
Hareesh
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Hello, I think that it requires qualitative research to sanwer such questions. People exposed to natural hazards are th ebest to report in how far social media was useful in their individual cases. In Fiji where we asked such questions with regards to urban flooding relevance was rather wide-spread and at times very different than initially expected. So people's experiences provide a crucial starting point and from here one could systematically categorize potential benefits of social media in disaster issues.
Hope this helps. Maybe also look at the importance of SMS / mobile phones to communicate during disaster events. This might be even more important than social media as in the Fiji context many did not have easy access to social media, but almost all had mobile phones and used them to gather and spread information.
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Use of MCA analysis for smallholder communities
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Thank you so much Eefe. It has helped me a lot. Please send me your email address.
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Dear friends,
I am working on a project for comparing the communication systems before and during flood events and I would like to know what are the flood communication/warning systems are being used nowadays and how we can improve it.
Please provide the detail information or any link to such information if possible.
Thank you.
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Before flood comm system and during flood comm systems are in different ways.. if its a during flood you may see large floods or flash floods? in a urban area its different than a rural area. community based comm systems are there.. if you need extended info lets discuss later... better check in ADPC web.. I have practice many disaster comm systems and some are introduced by me.. 
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Terminal equipment should be capable of video/voice/data communications, preferably if it can act as GIS terminal too.
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Nowadays, SatCom On-The-Move (SOTM) is coming into operation. Applications for SatCom On-The-Move (SOTM) are intended to provide mobile users with communication services especially at places without any terrestrial communication infrastructure, or at disaster scenarios.
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I am searching for literature about the process of monitoring by leaders of a rapid response team during emergency situation (i.e. medical/ military of firefighting). What does a supervisor do when he/she monitor a subordinate? What are do or don’t for leaders in the monitoring process to ensure that his subordinates are fulfilling their expected task conform the roles?
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It may be helpful to search for firefighter accountability systems and processes. Firefighter accountability relates to keeping track of firefighters at a fire scene, in a structure, out, etc. 
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Research Professionals, disaster professionals, disaster research centre.
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Dear Sanjay - Attached is a document that might help you
Best
Isaac 
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I am conducting thesis work on hospital disaster preparedness in Addis Ababa city Ethiopia. 
Does anyone have evaluation tools/checklists for it?
Also anyone have articles regarding it in east Africa?
your kindness is really appreciated. 
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simple   suggestion . emergency preperdness is situation and context based. what  will apply in one area may not feet for other, start Reading national gudeline and then buid knowledge on that.
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Managing information in emergencies is critical to effective disaster response. Without effective information management, the ability to plan and organize a response to the emergency is greatly limited. The starting point in the design of any information management system is the identification of the eventual users of the system and their particular needs. The users of information in most disaster situations are numerous. Each is likely to have specific information needs that the designer of the disaster information management system should consider in advance.
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A MIS is critical in normal management issues and can be proved useful  in catastrophes if designed accordingly. The issue relies mostly on the analysis of the system concerned it subsystems and so on.
The information science field has historically focused on the “document” as the primary unit of information. Documents have traditionally been paper-based,  and consisted primarily of published books and articles. Their contents are individually meaningful, at least at a literal, surface level. Deeper meanings however do require interpretation in relation to connected documents and cultural contexts.These connections are relatively sparse (e.g., a few dozen references in an academic article) and have little built-in semantics (e.g., a reference simply leads you to another document, much like the  links that  predominate on today’s “World Wide Web”). Documents are fairly stable, and new ones take considerable time and effort to create. Document content is primarily read, interpreted and acted
on by humans.
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I am looking for information regarding encountered issues and a communications overview in mass casualty incidents and disasters responses. This should be addressed by doctors, nurses, paramedics and any other participants. Are there radio communication problems on route and at the scene? If so, what does that encompass and can this be quantified? What about the general overview of the intervention, like amplitude, knowing the incident and route beforehand, patient information transmission to the hospital or on arrival, debriefing.
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You have raised an important question.  One approach is to capture and align all the coordinating nodes necessary to respond effectively to a mass casualty event--care should be taken to distinguish a plane crash from a complex HAZMAT event and in turn recognize the complexities of pandemic response.  They are not the same although their metrics are similar.  Talk with experts and validate the nodes looking for evidence of basic communication requirements, typical requirements, crucial requirements and lapses which experts regard as contrary to, and often disruptively injected, into ongoing crisis communications.  Look at time-sensitive issues, information sharing, and tracking of injured, DOA and juveniles.  Getting the injured from the disaster site to the primary care facility is key--how that is done and under what priority procedures is also crucial.
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Hello,
I guess we have all heard about the ongoing tragic and worsening situation in Greece since 2008 for a large fraction of the population there and for refugees from Europe and elsewhere who ended up in Greece.
I am no socio-economic or political  expert but I gather that the number of people living in  precarity has soared there. I have certainly met benevolent social workers  who shared stories of despair that are hard to forget.
Greece is afflicted by a range of natural hazards and risks of disasters. It has a recurrent and documented history of such disasters.
I am wondering to what extent it is still possible for Greek scientists and/or the international community to suitably anticipate and monitor for those potential disasters and to suitably prepare for a disaster response, considering the ongoing and arguably worsening (?) situation in Greece ?
I am thinking about large forest fires (and eg. resulting biodiversity loss and atmospheric pollution), severe thunderstorms, land erosion, flash floods and mud flows on the one hand, and of tectonic earthquake and volcanic eruption hazards that may also lead to a tsunami risk in the Mediterranean on the other hand.
With the situation in Greece, aren't the vulnerabilities and the risks of impacts from such potential disasters much greater in Greece, and for some of these hazards for the European-Mediterranean regions ?
Has anyone studied how vulnerability of the Greece population to such eventualities may have increased since 2008 ?
Has anyone studied how the risks themselves for a given disaster scenario may have increased considering increased vulnerabilities and other changes in the structure of the Greece socio-politico-economic systems ?
Tectonic earthquakes from the Aegean arc submarine faults in Greece could trigger a tsunami affecting the Mediterranean region.
Can the adequate monitoring and disaster preparedness efforts still be pursued at the present time ?
And if not, what may be the wide-ranging impacts ?
The unmonitored active shallow-marine Kolumbos Bank Volcano (6km to NE of Santorini volcano) erupted explosively in 1650 AD. If it erupts again in a similar way, what may be the risk of an impact for international air traffic similar to that which related to the Eyjafjallajokull 2010 eruptions ?
What may be the tsunami risks in the Mediterranean  if the Kolumbos Bank volcano erupted explosively again ?
So to sum up, I am wondering if socio-economic-political changes in Greece since 2008 have affected vulnerability, resilience and risks for a diversity of disaster scenarios ? And also who may have studied aspects of this ?
I am also wondering to what extent scientists in Greece and elsewhere can continue to adequately monitor for, anticipate, research, sensitize for, , and generally prepare for such disasters occurring in Greece ?
And if it is the case that  the Greek scientists have difficulties continuing their work (?), to what extent the European Commission and international negociators on debt alleviation in Greece may have taken such considerations into account ?
Is this not the sort of situation making the ground much more fertile for much-enhanced impacts of geo-disasters ? Including for some that may affect much of Europe or the  Mediterranean Countries ?
Anyhow, a whole series of inter-related questions there.
I am wondering what colleagues think of all this and if some of you may have elements of answer to some of these questions ?
Many thanks in advance for any insights.
With best wishes and kindest regards,
Gerald
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Hello Gerard,
 In your extensive analysis you did not include the fact that the Greek population is well educated and aware of the natural dangers that hit all too common for millennia. Although the country is short of money, many research projects are funded from EE and elsewhere, so there is not a big increase of risks since 2008.  You see some of the projects mentioned above.
For example, the Greek people were well aware of tsunamis before Dec. 2004, unlike most of the rest of the world. I think Greek people are better prepared than those in Canada by comparison. In the last 10 years or so the federal funding for anything to do with the environment including research at universities in Canada has been severely CUT to avoid people get the facts on weather, natural disasters, etc. The reason is the government has been extremely pro-fossil fuel with a “forget the environment” attitude (also was the only country to officially return its signature from the Kyoto Protocol).  The result is a big problem for preparedness in a developed country and a worry for those trying to educate the public/schools, etc
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I started working on Twitter responses related to the Nepal earthquake 2015. I'm new to the field of disaster responses on social media. I wonder what sort of main readings I should refer to? 
And also, I would like to discuss further if anyone likes to collaborate on this project.
Thanks,
Chamil 
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Hi Drs. Ungerer and Abrams. Thanks very much for the replies. I'm more on the side of online political action. So this field is totally new to me, and the links are helpful. Dr. Zanker, it's a great suggestion that I should not ignore the role played by old media. I was in Sri Lanka when 2004 Tsunami hit. The mobile lines were totally overloaded, the radios did a pretty good service. Thanks again. Chamil. 
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I am new in research and I want to focus on the factors affecting the number of ambulances required in an earthquake disaster relief operation. Type of construction, Population of effected area, Percentage of earthquake damage and Energy of an earthquake are some factors based on LR which has discussed one by one. Therefore I designed my hypothesis model and based on that, I want to go to the second step of my research. The Problem is that I don’t know with which technique I can come up with this model: if by questionnaire and using Structural equation modeling then I cannot assign proper scale, Since the answer of each questions is just yes or no… do you think I should go through interview or … if yes then with which technique I can prove my model … Thanks for your help (hypothesis model is also attached)  
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Several here have covered many of the important points. Just from my perspective, our greatest vulnerability (in our area) is associated with a Hurricane. We have traditionally used a ratio of ambulances per population impacted. We also use ambulance buses. We use a model we created with Monte Carlo Simulation relying on @Risk by Palisade software. (Monte Carlo simulation is a good way to test a number of multiple variables) Since we typically have sufficient advanced notice, our use of ambulances includes a pre-landfall evacuation. While we've never built a model for earthquakes, we have built and published how we would use ambulances for a Burn Disaster. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/244481012_Disaster_Planning_Transportation_Resources_and_Considerations_for_Managing_a_Burn_Disaster I don't have the paper listed here (just the abstract, proprietary issues with the publisher but I'll see what I can publish if you have an interest.)
Other things I'd consider; transportation resources in general, travel time, how much can assist with your disaster versus how many need to stay behind to continue the daily services? Build into your assumptions to include how many may self evacuate/transport, good Samaritan assistance, other transportation resources, city/school buses, trains, etc. Also, how much transportation resource will you need to respond and push forward equipment into the disaster zone (creating a temporary hospital) to manage a surge of patients on site to reduce the number of ambulances needed to transport away from the disaster? As someone else also noted and I'm sure you've already considered, you'll have an infrastructure problem that further limits access and place more emphasis on air transportation resources.   
With catastrophic events, what we did was find the point of failure in our own capability and then look for framework (instead of plan) opportunities to continue to support the disaster response efforts. Every disaster (and thus your disaster plan) has a point of failure where the demand will exceed the capabilities/capacity. Keeping systems operating when this occurs can be a critical component of the disaster response.  We have a fairly extensive guide published regarding disaster planning for a burn disaster that may help you. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/251234706_Disaster_Planning_The_Basics_of_Creating_a_Burn_Mass_Casualty_Disaster_Plan_for_a_Burn_Center
Again, the paper is burn disaster focused but includes lots of generic information that can cross over to any disaster. Good luck with the research!   
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I've been working for more than three years on natural disaster management, and one of the major gaps I could identify is the lack of comprehensive and powerful software. Sahana Eden is an open source that claims to support disaster management activities. However, the interface is not so friendly and the software itself is essentially oriented for inventory managing. The messaging features are useful but could be highly improved.
In this scope, I've been seeking for a good software without success. It should be a good messenger and should be focused on process management. Does anyone know something that could match my necessities?
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Daniel
There are a lot of different platforms out there which support activity across the spectrum of  PPRR.    Some focus on particular disasters whereas others are more general in nature.     some are open source platforms and a lot are commercial applications.   I guess it depends on the type of organisation you are working for and your particular needs.   You might be interested in exploring the attached links.
Regards
Ged
Incident Maps
UK Environment Agency Life Flood Warning Map http://apps.environment-agency.gov.uk/flood/142151.aspx
MIT’s Next-Generation Incident Command System https://public.nics.ll.mit.edu/nicshelp/articles/frontpage.php
The Virginia Interoperability Picture for Emergency Response https://cop.vdem.virginia.gov/
Crowd sourced incident maps
Open Street Map Humanitarian Team http://hot.openstreetmap.org/about
Climate CoLab Crowd Sourced Crisis Management Platform http://climatecolab.org:18081/plans/-/plans/contestId/1300402/planId/1307506
Planning
Australia-Indonesia Facility for Disaster Reduction InaSAFE planning and simulation tool http://inasafe.org/en
University of Melbourne/IBM Australian Disaster Management Platform http://admp.org.au/
University of Melbourne Intelligent Disaster Decision Support System http://www.csdila.unimelb.edu.au/projects/IDDSS/About.html
Situational Awareness
Pacific Disaster Centre Global Hazards Map http://atlas.pdc.org/atlas/
Pacific Disaster Centre EMOPS http://emops.pdc.org/emops
Pacific Disaster Centre Disaster Aware http://www.pdc.org/solutions/products/disasteraware/
Global disaster Alert and Coordination System http://www.gdacs.org/default.aspx
IRIS Earthquake Browser http://ds.iris.edu/sm2//
Educational
Emergency Management Australia disaster mapper https://disastermapper.ema.edu.au/#/intro
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I am trying to get a picture on existing programs (voluntary or obligatory) in DM education on medical schools.
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Disaster medicine education in British Columbia, (and the situation is similar across Canada per chats with my colleagues) is thin.
There are a number of very interested individuals across the country, from a variety of professional backgrounds, who are active in promoting improved disaster prep, education, training, etc. However, like all things that don't occur daily.... out of site = out of mind, and the funding isn't there to do this work more than off the side of one's desk. 
What is interesting to me is that we have a divide between Emergency Management and Emergency Medicine. With such similar names, you'd think they work very closely together. The Emergency Management community is very involved in professional preparation for disasters regionally affecting people, property and infrastructure, but there is very little funded collaboration time between them and the Emergency Medicine Community.
There is an assumption that "the hospitals will know what to do", but the time, funding and effort to get disaster drills and "code orange" training off the ground precludes it in working professionals... the result, very little systematic teaching in disaster medicine. As such, the medical schools have no formal curriculum in disaster medicine and/or emergency management. They may get a lecture on it during an emergency medicine rotation, but this is not consistent.
Locally, our Mass Gathering Medicine research team (http://mgm.med.ubc.ca) involves students and residents in participating in aspects of the planning for mass gathering and mass participation events. We very deliberately get them thinking about the logistics, power, water, sanitation, personnel, communication, transportation, equipment, resupply lines, and many other issues that mass gathering medical response shares with disaster medicine. Developing a more organized curriculum, and using mass gatherings as a "live fire" or "field" exercise is our future goal. I've attached an article that explores this further for those interested. 
Canada is a very geographically large country with a very distributed population. Face to face training for specialized topics is prohibitive in this environment. An eLearning solution to Disaster Medicine Education is a topic that our team has explored in the past. During my residency, when 2 colleagues and I were working on our Masters, we piloted an online program to provide case-based disaster education for medical students and emergency medicine residents. We got great feedback on the National pilot, but the lack of sustainable funding to develop more modules eventually relegated it to the back-burner. 
Back to your question, Luc... Canada does not have a robust model of education for disaster medicine in its Medical Schools. 
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Sidoarjo mud flow have been destroyed resettlements in Porong. People have to move away from that area, and there are many options but many of them prefer to resettle in Tanggulangin which is near that disaster area. What do you think the reason is?
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We found in our risk perception studies a correlation with age: the older the disaster survivors the more likely that they remained / or returned early in the disaster area. In addition, farmers are more likely to stay, compared to other societal groups, as they feel responsible for their farm and, particularly for their farm animals.
In other studies (Hungary) we found that several people stood in the disaster area as they were afraid of robbery.
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I want to implement Hybrid MANET Routing protocol for emergency Group communication as a social innovative project. please share your ideas.
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What Kind of idea (for simulation in NS-2) (better try reactive + geographic/load aware routing it will improves your performance when compared with hybrid and proactive, hybrid and proactive consumes more  energy compared with reactive + geographic/load aware routing)
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In disasters, often it is the responsible local agencies which appear unprepared to assist; for example, the news media showed rising waters in nursing homes with no means of egress, since boats would be needed for patients in beds. [Newsmedia, Katrina Disaster in New Orleans, onsite footage]
The basic question of where does one turn for assistance, too, has sometimes been passed by where one might expect a central place with water and food storage, and pharmacy linkages in place. The International Red Cross and its chapters has come through, and federal plans (FEMA) seem much better in 2014 (with toolkits available).
Regions of the country (when people move) vary for disasters, and tornado planning and hurricane planning is sometimes warranted. Earthquakes are common in places like California, with my visits already yielding a minor one in Los Angeles and a major one in San Francisco. [Racino, 1991, 1993, first independent living center in the US]
The physicians below have indicated that "their nursing homes" are operated by physicians (often not the case) with early reviews indicating that only a consulting physician might be onsite and mainly a nursing aide level. The new Direct Support Professional (Larson et al, 2014) in my new 2014 book are also in nursing facilities per the University of Minnesota.
Julie Ann Racino, July 2015, amended
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Hi Julie.
It greatly depends when where you are (I mean what part of the world/country). At USA NFPA 101 or the NFPA 1600 are the most obvious answers for buildings. FEMA has some publications as well.
In my country (Portugal) emergency planning is mandatory and all buildings (except residencial ones and just inside the dwells) must have their own emergency and maintenance plans. A Fire Manager is the person in charge (typically the owner, landlord or CEO for organizations) that must provide the emergency plans and verify their implementation. Training is also required and fire drills should be performed regularly (intervals depend on the risk). Risk is categorized in four levels; lower level has almost no requirements (just fire extinguisher maintenance, and emergency lights/signs), e.g. small shops, restaurants, offices (few occupants < 100 and at road level). Higher risk implies more and more requirements such as minimum safety staff, regular fire drills and training, adequate preventive maintenance plans and emergency plans.
Hope this helps.
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See how the South Pacific is doing and learn lessons that can be applied or used to assess disaster response systems in similar contexts.
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Hi Golam, sorry for the very delayed response. The focus of the study was more on the humanitarian aspect but there were some broader findings. You can read the full study report here http://www.pacificdisaster.net/pdnadmin/data/original/NCCARF_UTS_2013_response_cc_pacific.pdf. You may email the lead author with your questions as well. Hope this helps.
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I'm looking for software that can assist me in analyzing the course of action during an emergency response exercise by investigating communication between those who participated in the exercise.
I have a log (in a spreadsheet table) of 6-700 messages between 20 emergency response agencies during an emergency response exercise. For each of the 6-700 messages, I have information about time that the message was sent, who the sender was, the message content, and the receiver of the message. I have furthermore categorized the messages according to which event the message is about (several hazard events during the exercise) and according to several other criteria (e.g. if a question/request or information is communicated, if the message contains information about location or place names, if the message is about allocation of resources, if it is a situation report etc.).
I picture information visualized in a matrix with time on one axis and different emergency response agencies on the other, and messages containing requests and information moving between the agencies plotted in the matrix in a way that enable identification of different threads and different types of content. An aim is to identify threads that have a satisfactory outcome (e.g. question resolved, decision made, action taken) or unsatisfactory outcome (messages getting lost on the way).
A further aim is to find new ways to evaluate an exercise just after it has been taking place.
All suggestions are welcome.
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you could try Robert Walker
"Walker, Robert" <RWalker@jibc.ca>
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We are undertaking an update of our assessment tool for public alerting technologies and New Zealand does not have any agencies employing geolocatable mobile broadcast technology (to mobile telephones) for public alerting. Any examples of use and assessment of efficiency and effectiveness of this technology would be most helpful.
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Have a look at Australia and the mobile phone network for bushfire alerts. I think/believe that a system is now working where each mobile provider can transmit an alert to its users who are in a bushfire alert zone. This was seen as a necessary action after the 2009 Bushfires (Black Saturday) where 159 people died in the Kinglake/Whittlesea/Marysville Area (total deaths exceeded 170). It has to be remembered that the conditions were near impossible to fight fires for the 3-4week period. I seem to remember the story went something along the lines Telstra was initially able to setup an alert system that could notify its users who were recorded by billing address. It then progressed to Telstra mobile/phones in an area the other carriers took some time to come on line http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/bushfire-and-emergency-mobile-phone-alerts-for-telstra-customers-only/story-e6frf7jo-1226450645200 See here for another story on the progress http://www.theherald.com.au/story/1844221/new-bushfire-alerts-to-follow-mobile-owners/ Another source of info is http://exchange.telstra.com.au/2009/12/16/bushfire-readiness-update/
As for assessment of effectiveness/efficiency absolutely no idea...............
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Response to an emergency is restricted by one factor or the other, heavy traffic, lack of vehicles (which in developing countries may not be the case), lack of personnel, etc.
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One of the issues in urban areas is the ability for firefighters to set up at the incident and access on-site firefighting equiment, For example, the on-site equipment might be not maintained, not visible, blocked or not appropriately designed for the fire at hand.
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see above
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It would be easier to answer, if you can further specify on what kind of shelters you are talking about: relief shelters, temporary/interim shelters (during recovery) or permanent shelters (reconstruction).
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For quality improvement and outcome as evaluated by unit head, peer, and client served.
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I would look to the Military protocols to formulate an assessment tool. There are dedicated professionals who have formulated plans for all types of scenarios and I believe you will find valuable information on their site for your sector.
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I would like to get involved with a disaster response agency after my graduation from GCU.
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Hi Stephen! I know when it was the katrina hurrican in New Orleans there were several articles in The New England Journal about ethics in cathostrophic situations. Mainly analizing decision making in that kind of situations, specially when doctors at hospital decided to leave behind some patients as they couldn't save them all. And then, you have the "triage" a system designed to help you in decision making in disasters. Hope this is of help. Susie.