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Digital Humanities and Archiving - Science topic

Digital Humanities and Archiving are this topic focuses on Digital Humanities through discussions on Humanities and History combined with interests in computing, information science (archiving, digital librarianship), and geospatial technology. I hope to include the role of archives in Digital History and Digital Humanities.
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Besides V&A, I'm interested to know what other four international photo collection that contains K. A. C. Creswell ( 1879 - 1974 )? I need to find his photos of Egypt in Particular.
Photo of the northwest iwan of the funerary complex of the Mamluk Sultan al-Ashraf Qaytbay, Cairo
Photo Credit: V&A's collections
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Thank you Dr. Eman Gomaa for your answer! I found a very interesting photograph in his collection for my work. However, the photograph belongs to Lekegian not Creswell! http://digitalcollections.aucegypt.edu/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15795coll14/id/1112/rec/2
Ramadan Kareem.
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18th century Habsburg reforms, particularly in Austria under the reign of Maria Theresa. 
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Hi Sophie
Maybe this will be useful:
C. T. Atkinson 1908, A history of Germany 1715-1815, London
O. Katsiardi-Hering, I. Madouvalos 2014; The tolerant policy of the Habsburg Authorities towards the Orthodox people from South-Eastern Europe and the formation of national identities (18th - early 19th century), "Balkan Studies", 49: 5-34
Best Regards
Maciej Wawrzczak
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What are examples of texts describing spatial situations which either have been studied in the digital humanities or where doing so would be interesting?
Especially cases where the spatial information is too vague or uncertain to plot on a conventional map. Or maybe where the spatial relations are especially interesting in themselves rather than being seen as a defective means of giving more detailed information. Maybe psychogeographical writings or narratives of journeys, walks or wanderings where plotting on a map might sometimes be feasible but where the specificity of mapping detracts from the text itself?
Spatial relations might include "between", "next to", "near to",  "to the right of", "crossing", "following alongside", "underneath" and so on. They could relate paths taken, tracts of territory, geographical features such as ponds, and so on.
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The Literature Atlas may be an interesting project in this regard. See http://www.literaturatlas.eu/en/
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from which file/log file i can able to get page modificaiton information (Dirty Page information)
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Stelios Sir,
thanks for your quick reply. I have seen Paper and code  but at this stage it would be difficult for me to extract information. May i request to give i) if log files of such output because i don't know whether NUMA architecture would work on my platform (any linux) and/or x86 architecture ii) if any standard log details of process migration available, so i am able to  extract page info from those logs....
- what are the parameters to migrate process and what is the role of kernel at the same time? can we generate a tiny OS program given in Figure 4. (https://www.academia.edu/760613/Survey_of_Virtual_Machine_Migration_Techniques)
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Topic Maps (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Topic_Maps) have three main elements: Occurrences, Associations and Topic). Its tree like structure connecting nodes with its related sub nodes.. 
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During my research study, i worked on application of concept maps and information visualization to enhance user experience over DSpace by using comparing many tools such as VUI, SpaceTree, etc. A prototype model also build on this.
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I need recent data.
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Hi Anelia,
at our University (Regensburg, Germany) there is a large archive of digitized, historic radio ads. Maybe you can find some relevant information on their website:
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For automatically building a corpus of literary text with metadata.
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This should help you get the texts and metadata (but no annotations though).
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Many projects use metadata. They are backbone to many data warehouse systems. There is a major drawback with metadata, though. The notion of metadata quality is neither agreed on nor even clearly laid out.
Bruce and Hillmann said 10 years ago 'Like pornography, metadata quality is difficult to define. We know it when we see it, but conveying the full bundle of assumptions and experience that allow us to identify it is a different matter. For this reason, among others, few outside the library community have written about defining metadata quality. Still less has been said about enforcing quality in ways that do not require unacceptable levels of human effort.'
What can we do about it? And if we could not agree on a definition of metadata quality, would it not be a failed concept?
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Michael, I'll answer your question from a different perspective to Arjun & would like to separate the issues that arise in your provocative title "Is metadata a failed concept?" from the commentary around "metadata quality".
I have participated for many years in international standards development efforts relating to metadata schemas (in organisations like IEEE LTSC, IMS Global, DCMI & SC36). All these organisations have responded -- & are still responding -- to the consequences of the digital revolution in terms of information management & discovery. Successful standards are usually judged as being "fit for purpose" & rarely can add value beyond that. There's plenty of debate out there as to the usefulness of metadata standards or profiles of them but there's also plenty of success stories too. But another point I'd like to make is that "metadata" is not just a term that describes metadata schemas. There's an enormous amount of metadata that gets used in virtually every web service you can think of -- whether it is in the form of XML, RDF, RSS, etc; "date posted" information; or whether it's just a tag cloud or all the other data that gets collected as "analytics". Any content or data that can somewhow be expressed in terms of "who, what, when, & where" while also relating to some other content or data is essentially metadata. So, i don't think "metadata" is a failed concept -- to the contrary, it is as you indicate the "backbone of many warehouse systems" as well as what enables so much systems interoperability on the web.
The issue of metadata quality is of a totally different order for me. If you're managing systems or curating content that requires high quality metadata then it's best to make sure you're drawing on expert input. In many other situations the metadata quality may be of questionable quality or value -- but it's a consequence of how social media works. in time, I'd expect it to improve.
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Starting a new R&D project in this domain in January 2014, I would be eager to know of ongoing projects, best practices, etc. Many thanks in advance for your answers.
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Hello Matt; Many thanks for these four really very interesting links. I already know the impressive activities of the King's College in DH; but I didn't know the three other initiatives, all of them are very, very valuable.
I like very much the very practical and pedagogical approach of JISC for explaining the work with digital video resources. This question we also deal with, here in Paris with our "Audiovisual Research Archives"project (http://www.archivesaudiovisuelles.fr/EN/).
We have started the development of a working environment for people in DH who wants to create and manage their own audiovisual archives (unfortunately, for the moment all the stuff is still in French, but however here is the link to our experimental platform which will yet be stabilised in the coming months: http://www.semiosphere.fr/).
Many thanks again for your so informative message. With all my best wishes Peter
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Gutenberg's press probably influenced fundamental shifts in general literacy, social structures and the loci of political power as well as subsequently influencing other major changes in society.
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Many interesting parallels between the 'printing revolution' and the 'digital revolution', not least the increasing availability of portable 'cultural technologies' such as iPads, iPods, iPhones, etc., as parallel in their impacts to the 16th/17th century increasing availability of the earlier cultural technology of the portable (codex) printed book in the form of the bible, prayer books, almanacs, Luther's 95 theses, etc., which were, for the first time, available in vernacular languages rather than just Latin. It was this 'material culture' and its diverse uses rather than simply the 'spread of ideas' which lead to the European Reformation, the formation of early modern nation-states, the development of national languages, canons of literature, dictionaries for standardising the language, etc. I would recommend on this Benedict Anderson 'Imagined Communities: Reflections of the Origins and Spread of Nationalism', London, Verso, 1985 and Elizabeth Eisenstein 'The Printing Revolution in Early Modern Europe', Cambridge, Cambridge University Press. I am also attaching a recent short discussion paper by me for the European Commission which touches on some of these themes.