Science topic

Dietetics - Science topic

Dietetics are the application of nutritional principles to regulation of the diet and feeding persons or groups of persons.
Questions related to Dietetics
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Dietitians all over the world strive to help fight obesity and other food related diseases. I am sure that most hospitals turn a sharp eye on healthy food according to contemporary knowledge. There are databases covering this topic, e.g. USDA. On the other hand, different patients have different needs relating their diets.
Which software and applications can you recommend for use in a hospital food planning system that takes into account nutritional data for creating healthy diets?
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Nutritionist Pro is so good
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I have a policy statement from the British Dietetic Association, and both a policy statement and practice guidance from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (USA). I can't find any other countries. Anyone know of others? with link to document if possible. Thanks.
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Guideline: protecting, promoting and supporting breastfeeding in facilities providing maternity and newborn services.
ISBN 978-92-4-155008-6
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Dear colleagues,
From novel dietary indexes and biomarkers to more contemporary nutritional issues including sustainability, health literacy, and food security, nutrition research is constantly evolving. Grounded on the pillars of nutrition epidemiology, nutritional science is updated while moving towards a more evidence-based approach.
To address this we had started a special issue in Nutrients journal entitled ""Contemporary Issues in Nutrition Research". This special issue aims to embrace updated multidisciplinary research on all challenges and important aspects of nutrition today, including principles of hydration, new supplementation delivery methods, evidence on personalized nutrition and health, as well as epidemiological and methodological issues related to the science of nutrition and dietetics. The authors of original articles, opinion papers, as well as narrative and systematic reviews are welcome to submit and showcase their research.
Thank you for your interest,
with regards,
Dr. Maria G. Grammatikopoulou Dr. Markos Klonizakis Guest Editors
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Vitamin K2 (MK 7) as a strong inhibitor of coronary artery calcification (CAC), I believe, is a contemporary issue. Heart disease is the #1 case of death in the US.
Please see:
*Main dietary sources of vitamin K2 are: fermented soybeans called natto, grass fed butter, eggs, organ meats and cheese.
*BMC Nephrology, Mabel Aoun, et al., “High Dephosphorylated-Uncarboxylated MGP in Hemodialysis patients: risk factors and response to vitamin K2, A pre-post intervention clinical trial”, BMC series – open, inclusive and trusted, 2017, 18:191 DOI: 10.1186/s12882-017-0609-3
* Studies have shown populations with higher vitamin K2 intake (>32 mcg) have a 50% reduction in death risk from CVD compared to those with low intake (J Nutr., 134(11), 2004, Integr Med {Encinitas}, 14(1), 2015)
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In a study among People living with HIV, a food diary was used in documenting dietary intake of the participants. No information was collected on the quantity of food consumed, the price of food was collected but the data were collected in different communities of a large city. Also, the price of food has increased substantially in the last six months and current pricing may not provide a good estimate of quantity of food consumed during the data collection period.
A qualitative approach is being considered, we have not seen any study where food diary was used to deduce the dietary diversity. We want to know the possibility and likely modality for such attempt.
Thank you.
Seun 
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There is a growing debate over the validity and value of data derived from memory-based dietary assessment methods (M-BMs) such as FFQs, food diaries, and 24HRs. My empirically supported position is that all forms of M-BMs are pseudo-scientific, produce non-falsifiable and physiologically implausible data, and should not be used in nutrition research. Please see the recent 'Controversy & Debate' Series in the Journal of Clinical Epidemiology for details: Archer E, Marlow ML, Lavie CJ. The Fatal Flaws of Food Frequency Questionnaires and Other Memory-Based Dietary Assessment Methods. Journal of Clinical Epidemiology. 2018.
Link: Archer E, Marlow ML, Lavie CJ. Controversy and Debate: Memory-Based Dietary Assessment Methods Paper #3. Journal of Clinical Epidemiology. 2018. Link:
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Avg daily intake anthocyanin intake in UK? 
Avg daily intake total polyphenol intake worldwide? 
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Hi Catherine
Thanks for the links. Some very good papers there.
Terun
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Seeking articles on pharmacists in mental health.  Other beneficial services include physical and occupational therapy, ministry, dietitian, dentist, physician, and counselor.
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 Thank you for all the information, Matej. I appreciate your concern for this. Network for Excellence in Health Innovation seems very important.  Research companies also share that MH facilities mostly do not survey for consumer satisfaction and effectiveness. This is all a terrible shame, and we should continue advocating for these causes.
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Scientific data or legal  data concerning the safe level of rutin for children.
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Many Thanks
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If any, which combination of nutrients can provoke rapid weight gain? Which kind of nutrient supplementation can be combined to achieve this?
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Callisthenics is a good form of exercises that helps to stimulate lean muscle growth, results can be moderately rapid if put in combination with a healthy diet and sufficient sleep, as it allows the body to recover.
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Unhealthy diets that contain bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) promote amyloid beta aggregation and healthy diets in the developing world are encouraged to reduce the toxic amyloid beta speices by release of a number of proteins to prevent amyloid beta aggregation.
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The answer appears to be yes.  Researchers found Candida yeast in the brains of 11 AD who diet but not in the brains of those who died of other causes. (Pisa D et al. Scientific Reports, 5, 2015). 
AB proteins thought to cause AD but now found to block the growth of C. albicans & other brain infections.  Therefore, AB is a symptom--not the cause of AD.
Dr. Mark Stengler (Health Revelations 2016) recommends a low glycemic diet, protein, vegetables, pre/probiotic food & multi-strain PBs, S. Boulardii  (and antifungal drugs when needed) to help eradicate and keep low C. albicans--therefore preventing the buildup of AB.
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I'm trying to look for articles looking for possible relationships between diet and reduction of psychological stress among survivors of natural disasters. Most of the articles I had searched used micronutrient supplementation but I'm more concerned with food-based interventions or dietary managements. 
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Hello Mike, I read recently one study may be it is of use to you.
Health after disaster
MK Lala, KR Lala - Indian J Community Med, 2006
 One more study done by Gokhle but have not gone through it. kindly check
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My older daughter (aged 5) had an ependymoma removed (recidivism) last December. Neurosurgery went perfectly well and then a whole heavy radiotherapy treatment was done (cranio-spinal). Are there any evidence for advices regarding preventive food restrictions/preconisations/avoidance ?
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Salut Thierry,
Je suis vraiment désolé d'apprendre cette nouvelle. Il y a deux livres phares sur ce sujet: Le Vrai Régime anticancer, par Prof David Khayat, et Anticancer, de David Servan Schreiber.  Je pense que celui de Khayat est le plus "scientifique", mais l'autre est considéré comme remarquable aussi.  Bonne chance à ta fille (et à vous). D'après ce que je sais, les cancers du cerveau de l'enfant ont un bon pronostic.  Si je peux être d'une quelconque utilité n'hésite pas!
Amicalement
Dan
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I am interested in whether a relationship can be identified between an individuals perception of the quality of their diet and their BMI and WLOC. 
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Yes, there could be multiple relationships. I have more clinical experience on this than direct personal research knowledge, however. Consider the research on how belief in the efficacy (or lack thereof) of a psychotropic medication, e.g. antidepressant, will predict ultimate therapeutic response.  People may believe that specific foods or dietary 'recipes' are therapeutic (or harmful).  Weight Locus of Control will be affected by these beliefs. So if a person thinks that high fructose corn syrup or 'bad bacteria' will take over their metabolism and redirect their adiposity (ie make them gain weight), they may feel helpless and become avoidant, perhaps phobic about 'dangerous' foods. The opposite or inverted concept may also operate:  If a person's Weight Locus of Control resides 'within' them and they perceive a sense of mastery over their environment, the have a high internal control, ie realization that they have the income and access capacities to acquire quality foods.  Alternatively, a person may have a external locus of control: 'i am poor, living in a rural or 'urban desert' where quality food is inaccessible. People living 60+ miles from grocery stores with fresh food, who do not have the means to grow their own food, may rationalize a high BMI and have a low WLOC.
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How much calorie is produced by burning a mole of fat (palmitate)? Results do not appear consistent in the internet? Any helps?
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Fat produces ~9kcal/gm through complete oxidation (CO2 + H2O).
Palmitic acid is a 16C fatty acid:
CH3-(CH2)14-COOH; Chemical Formula: C16H32O2
Mol. Wt. = 12x16 + 1x32 + 16x2 = 256
Calories/mole = 9x256 = 2,304 kcal  (approximately)
I imagine you were taught all this during your undergraduate studies.   ;) 
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In daily practice sometimes we can not weigh patients directly because the patient's condition is not allowed. Is there a way or a formula that can be used to estimate patient's body weight based on, for example, the circumference of the upper arm or wrist circumference?
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Dear Awarm
As you can see bu the previous responses, there are different algorythms in the literature for the estimation of body weight. I would look at different options and try the ones that would be more suited for my population, and then look at the ones with the highest R2 and lowest standard errors  (SRMSE) of the predictive regression equations.. I think the patients preception of their own weight, as mentioned above is also a very good idea.
As you might be intersted in prediction of standing height as well, I include a recent publication from our group on the estimation of height based on knee length
Hope this is useful
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I have given a good web-link that details what are the best and worst food for type-2 diabetes patients.
These food are listed under the following categories:
  1. Protein
  2. Grains
  3. Dairy
  4. Vegetables
  5. Fruit
  6. Fats
Your views on these or other categories are welcome!
Best wishes, Sundar
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A balance diet is definitely the key. Usually for diabetes, you would want to also include low glycemic index food, such as fiber, to prevent postprandial glucose spike. 
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We are being told that we should eat dairy products regularly. But the China study Shows the opposite. The more animal products we eat the more chronic deseases we develop, no matter of our genetic Disposition.
Do you have/know any new papers on this subject, wich are not sponsored directly or indirectly by members of this industry sector?
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I'm a supporter of plant-based diets, but Campbell's "China Study" is full of methodological errors and therfore of low scientific value. Take a look at this: http://rawfoodsos.com/the-china-study/
However, there are some evidences that link dairy products with breast and prostata cancer:
1) Qin LQ, Xu JY, Wang PY, Kaneko T, Hoshi K, Sato A. Milk consumption is a risk factor for prostate cancer: meta-analysis of case-control studies. Nutr Cancer. 2009;48(1):22–27
2) Dong JY, Zhang L, He K, Qin LQ. Dairy consumption and risk of breast cancer: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2011;127(1):23–31
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Could rapid active weight loss increase serum triglycerides and cholestrol?
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I think  it may happen under conditions when the animal is mobilizing all its reserves to  keep its metabolic processes go on.
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Is there a pure line demarcation between vegetarian and non-vegetarian ?
If somebody talks of purely vegetarian, is he not eating yeast, bacteria, molds?
Need only scientific input.
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According to me, to be a vegetarian is rather than a living attitude than a scientific way. You are a vegetarian if you does not eat meat and meat products from breeding animals. Protozoans are not slaughtered and they don't eat corn or wheat, as competitors from vegetal sources for human nutrition. Good luck. JB
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Recently, JP Richie Jr. published an article where oral glutathione ingestion was shown to be successful in raising body stores of glutathione (PMID 24791752) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=24791752
It has been my understanding that oral glutathione has been demonstrated to be relatively inneffective in human subjects. This paper claims a 30-35% increase in glutathione levels were found in healthy adults. This flies in the face of decades of previous research. Comments would be appreciated.
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In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial in 2011, conducted at Bastyr University Research Institute, Kenmore, WA and the Bastyr Center for Natural Health, Seattle, WA, reported that  short-term, oral intake (500 mg twice daily administered  to  volunteers for 4 weeks) GSH does not improve glutathione status or reduce markers of oxidative stress in healthy adults.  The authors indicated that routine supplementation might not offer health benefits in the absence of disease or oxidative challenge.
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I'm trying to refine public health thesis ideas concerning nutrition education and dietary choices. I'm not sure where to focus. Maybe on the FDA changing the label? I'm also thinking about comparing groups of diabetic patients that receive nutritional counseling upon diagnosis without external referrals. I need help with ideas, but I'm looking for valid surveys in hopes that they might help guide me, so I can see what I may actually be able to measure.
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Thank you Michael. I am still interested in working on projects regarding food labeling and consumer behavior/attitudes. 
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Where I work we have allied health discipline advisors for physiotherapy, occupational therapy, dietetics, speech pathology and social work- these are strategic leadership and support roles. These roles are all newly established, and we are planning to take advantage of this by researching the impact of the advisor roles at 1 and 2 years post commencement.
I have looked at the literature and am unable to identify any research on advisor roles in any of the allied health disciplines. Is anyone aware of literature in this area?
Any suggestions would be a great help.
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Hi Dave then I guess you research question is very valid then, now i see its application a little better. I think if you lack ALH's then adaptation is the only way forward, you can only work with whom you have or what you've got. Good luck in your research David nice talking with you by the way.
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Specially when not only the country of origin has a very different culture and diet pattern, but also, different groups of immigrants from various countries coexist. 
How can these matters be overcome?
 
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Emely -
By "foreigners', do you mean immigrants?  The years of residence in the "new" country would be a major issue because dietary habits change over time. Lifestyle factors and overnutrition warrant attention. (Specially when not only the country of origin has a very different culture and diet pattern, but also, different groups of immigrants from various countries coexist.> So it is a heterogeneous group, and therefore ethnic actors are not an issue. How can you study the issue when individuals are not from  a single group?
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I just pretended to evaluate the amount of food ingested by a group of athletes after the exercise until the next meal. i don't think a food frequency questionnaire should be appropriate so I would like to know what you guys think.
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One of the problems I find is that when you conceptualize the "behavior" of eating a meal - it can be thought of as a series of responses such as any task - each step acts as a discriminative stimulus for the next step as well as reinforcing consequence for the previous step - inserting a "novel" step - such as taking a picture of your food is adding a step to a pretty practiced behavior (ie I take my food from the refrigerator - put on a plate - bring it to the table ...) typically I am not thinking about the process since it is so "rote" and often I find when I attempt to consistently photo post my meals - I will find myself already eating my meal before I remember to photo-post it first! In order not to forget - I would need a prompt - be a "alert" on my phone (assuming I always eat the same time. In terms of photo-posting to the investigator directly - that behavior may be reinforcing to some (a way of recruiting praise for making "good" food choices) and it also could be aversive (such as feeling bad if you not making an "optimal" choice - like eating a candy bar) and sometimes the extra response effort makes this level of self-monitoring less preferred to the alternative behavior of "doing nothing" (ie the status quo) - in other words - my informal research among those who have and continue to be members of my various FB groups is that there is huge surge of momentum at the beginning but as time goes on - the motivation to post wanes and so does access to social praise - so it is good to have other schedules of both reinforcement or maybe even a potential punisher (such as a response cost - like the website stickK.com)
Also in terms of running a baseline - I found that simply telling people the premise of the intervention - such as - investigating whether photo posting to a private FB group - has a sequencing effect in terms of introducing a confounding variable - "pure" baseline would be to literally have the investigator observe (without telling the participants) what they are eating - but not sure how that would adhere to "informed consent" - any level of self-awareness tends to alter people's behavior.
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Proton-pump inhibitors like omeprazole appear to reduce calcium absorption from calcium carbonate more than from calcium citrate, but how do they affect the absorption from dietary intake from foods like milk, cheese, spinach, etc?
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Dear Dick,
A class of drugs called proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have become the most common medication used to suppress stomach acid production in people with reflux.
PPIs are believed to affect calcium metabolism by promoting accelerated loss of calcium from the bones in addition to impairing absorption of calcium from the diet. They have also been shown to impair absorption of magnesium, another mineral important to bone mineralization. PPIs can promote "hypermotility" of the gut , you may say that they can cause diarrhea in some users. Sometimes, this diarrhea can be misdiagnosed as IBS.they can cause food intolerances.
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In November, I will defend my doctoral thesis entitled "nutritional analysis and its relation with psycho-physical stress and muscle damage in professional players of volleyball throughout a season". Besides I finished in 2011 the master degree in nutrition and health at Basque County University (Spain) and I'm also finished a Master in Kinanthropometry and Sports Nutrition at the University of Valencia (Spain).
I would like to know a research group in nutrition and/or sport physiology for a post-doctorate in this area.
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In july 2014 a national confernce about kinanthropometry and nutrition be held in murcia of spain
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Type-1 diabetics, mainly those with severe diabetic complications, suffer from chronic malnutrition. The ideal is to improve their nutritional status prior to major elective surgery.
However, it is important to know their baseline nutritional profile to target their specific needs before and after surgery. We started with nutritional assessment prior to pancreas transplantation in combination with Early Enteral Nutrition. But we found it difficult to assess this specific group of the patients.
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Thanks, very helpful
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I would like to know opinions of medical doctors, nutritionists, gastroenterologists and physiologists about models (rodents or in vitro experiments) to tryout the effects of dietary bioactive compounds isolated from foods on different markers of human diseases or health. My question is not the way drugs are tested but dietary compounds which later will be eaten as part of a complex diet. For instance, bioactive peptides from cow milk on arterial pressure.
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Thank you very much!. It sounds very interesting, I will look for the last studies on resveratrol.
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I need the questions, not only the article of validation
I'm specially interested in questions about nutrients related to immune system and muscle healing after an injury
Thanks
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Hi Dolors,
I'm using the Martin Moreno´s for Spanish female population. Look this page: http://www.juntadeandalucia.es/servicioandaluzdesalud/contenidos/gestioncalidad/DRECA2/E9.pdf
Regards
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I am interested in knowing if anyone has worked on iron rich probiotic. I came across one article sometime ago. I am looking for a probiotic which can be administered for treatment of anemia in an easy and comfortable way rather than through medicines.
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Oh, that is very interesting and from Anand. Just today being Dr.Kurien's Birth anniversary and a reply from you really delights me. Thank you very much Mr.Jashbhai. Kindly do inform us for any field trials as well, since it is a nutritious product and there should be no objection from the subjects. Please do plan such a work. With regards, Saileela.