Science topic

Developmental Disabilities - Science topic

Disorders in which there is a delay in development based on that expected for a given age level or stage of development. These impairments or disabilities originate before age 18, may be expected to continue indefinitely, and constitute a substantial impairment. Biological and nonbiological factors are involved in these disorders. (From American Psychiatric Glossary, 6th ed)
Questions related to Developmental Disabilities
  • asked a question related to Developmental Disabilities
Question
3 answers
The Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) was developed to teach children with
autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and related developmental disabilities a functional communication system (Bondy and Frost, 1998), requiring the user to approach a communicative partner and initiate interaction prior to performing a referential communicative act (Bondy, 2001; Charlop- Christy, Carpenter, Le, LeBlanc, and Kellet, 2002). The PECS was only formally introduced to South Africa in 2004, and the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of PECS within this specific context, and its effect on the requesting and commenting behaviours and length of verbal utterances of children with ASD.
Relevant answer
Answer
As you mentioned, Autism is a spectrum and that is key here. Some people autism are verbal, some are not. Autism is not correlated with decreased intelligence quotient though behaviors can reveal developmental milestones that have not been mastered. PECS boards are absolutely necessary for nonverbal autism, starting at a young age. It provides these children and adults a way to mand “ask for” what they need out of a list of necessary daily activities and preferred activities. It negates problem behavior that results from that person’s inability to communicate on their own behalf. Providing a PECS board will not of itself instill development of verbal communication, that is a different behavior protocol, in the case you are asking if a PECS board will present you an individual with autism who communicates and acts more like the status quo. PECS are tailored to the the individual, as are all therapeutic efforts. if implemented correctly (successfully non-aversive) it WILL enhance preexisting/enable new communication skills that will decrease problem behaviors that result from unmet needs and I infer, frustration and stress. I have seen pediatric clients show a significant decrease in SIB and aggression once PECS boards are added to their treatment plan. Parents must be on board with the protocol and have a full understanding of the full access a student needs to the PECS board at all times. My data shows increases in SIB and physical aggression when PECS boards are misplaced or left at home.
  • asked a question related to Developmental Disabilities
Question
3 answers
Experiences of sleep hygiene education as an intervention for sleep problems in children with developmental disabilities : findings from an exploratory study
Relevant answer
Answer
Hi Thanks for this- I managed to contact ersearch gate and they resolved it. Have a good day
  • asked a question related to Developmental Disabilities
Question
9 answers
Any viewpoint is highly accepted! You can send any research papers or links which focus on this topic.
Thank you all,
C. Mantzikos
Relevant answer
Yes, Applied Behavior Analysis is an appropriate way to educate individuals with developmental disabilities, and I offer you this useful link:
  • asked a question related to Developmental Disabilities
Question
11 answers
Dear colleagues,
Hope you are well and healthy and the work is going fine despite COVID-19.
I need any research which focuses on COVID-19 and developmental disabilities. Especially I need some of the following topics, if there are:
(1) Statistics on COVID-19 and Developmental Disabilities (i.e. how many individuals with disabilities affected by this virus, the type and severity of the disability, case fatality rate, etc).
(2) The impact of COVID-19 in their quality of lives
(3) The impact of hydroxychloroquine as a treatment for COVID-19 in these individuals
(4) The impact of quarantine in the lives of these persons
(5) COVID-19 and Disability Rights
etc (any other research on this subject is accepted)
Additionally, I need these investigations from
(1) medical/ objective side
(2) the personal experience of individuals with disabilities/ subjective side
because I want to understand more this condition from both sides.
Thank you very much!! Keep up the good work!!
Constantinos Mantzikos
  • asked a question related to Developmental Disabilities
Question
8 answers
Hi everyone,
I am interested to find articles that talk about negative effect that support might have on a parent with developmentally chalenged child (e.g. giving advice when not asked for, criticism, innapropriate comments). I am mostly interested in this construct, but also search for papers that link consequential stress to well-being.
This topic is obviously not as appealing as positive side of social support and I have trouble finding reasearch that explored it among these parents. I would kindly ask for help in form of a reasearch paper, tip, hint, thought or direction in which I could turn my searches to. Of course, more recent papers that deal with this group specifically would be best, but I gratefully accept any recommendation that might help me improve my understanding of the topic (like classical work by KS Rook (1984) The negative side of social interaction: impact on psychological well-being or Shumaker, & Brownell, (1984). Toward a theory of social support: Closing conceptual gaps )
Thank you all very much in advance...
Lana
Relevant answer
Answer
Lana, this is an interesting research topic area. The work of Lincoln (2000) on the link between social support, psychological wellbeing and the negative aspects of the interactions is worth having a look at. Likewise, you may also find it beneficial to examine the other side of the topic, which is the extent to which positive social support may trigger negative social, interactive behaviour (see for example, Hirsch, 2011). Interesting work.
  • asked a question related to Developmental Disabilities
Question
8 answers
What is the global prevalence of autism spectrum disorders? Is there any statistics about ASD in developing and developed countries?
  • asked a question related to Developmental Disabilities
Question
3 answers
In the field of intellectual disability, data are often hierarchical. As in the case of the classic example of schools (school, class, student), data in our field are often hierarchical ( residential setting, life unit, individuals).
In this context, I am looking for studies that have analyzed the impact of this hierarchy in the field of intellectual disability or empirical studies that have at least controlled for this using multilevel models.
is anyone aware of the existence of such studies?
Relevant answer
Answer
Just to say that there is now no need fro a strict hierarchy with random effcets multilevel models. You can cross classifiactions and multiple memebership wich can take account of individuals being nested in more than one setting and spending different amonts of time in them
  • asked a question related to Developmental Disabilities
Question
1 answer
We are also interested on families adaptation to Fragile X Syndrome
Relevant answer
Answer
I am currently seeing a boy diagnosed with Autism and Fragile X. We have found Applied Behavior Analysis to be very effective. In terms of family adjustment, this has been a challenge and dealing with the challenging behaviors has been difficult as well.
  • asked a question related to Developmental Disabilities
Question
8 answers
We used structural equation modelling with latent variables using items indicators for our analyses. Given the sample size and the complexity of the model, the use of structural equation modeling using parcels/packets as indicators might be a good alternative. Although I have read some disadvantages about parceling, I would like to give it a try. However, I cannot find a tutorial or something similar that explains step by step how to use parceling in mplus. Does anyone have a suggestions?
Thank you very much and kind regards,
Noud Frielink
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Noud,
You can use the DEFINE command to create parcels within MPlus. 
For example with three items:
DEFINE:
parcel1 = (item1 + item2 + item3)/3
Than add this new variable in the USEVARIABLES ARE line behind all wihtim data set variables u use in your model and it should work.
Best
  • asked a question related to Developmental Disabilities
Question
4 answers
HI i am doing a cross cultural research with parents of children diagnosed with developmental disability, i am doing this as part of my honors project, it is between Pakistani parents living in Pakistan and lining in Australia. Any suggesions and tips are welcome
Relevant answer
Answer
The Caregiver Strain Questionnaire paper is available on ResearchGate 
  • asked a question related to Developmental Disabilities
Question
1 answer
Hello, everyone! 
Down syndrome is a genetic health problem. If an unborn baby has a risk to be born with down syndrome, parents can decide to receive an information with the test such as amniocentesis which is risky for the pregnancy. The other day, I have read an article that some researchers developed a less risky test to clarify the situation. "The new down syndrome test" can get results with the maternal blood. 
Though that we are not certain what caused autism, brain scans have differences among the neurotypical people and genetic vulnerability increases the risk. Autism and down syndrome have similarities. There is a research on autism that can be understood by brain waves. This research has studied the people between 6 and 17 years old. 
I don't know if it's hard to measure an unborn baby's brainwaves in a womb but whether this or maybe the pregnant woman's brain activity might be a clue to receive this information. There would be difficulties but I wonder if it is possible or there are some proof against it? It's a different question but is there a kind of correlation between an unborn baby and the pregnant woman?
Thanks for your time and the answer!
Zehra
These are the news and the research I have mentioned above:
Relevant answer
The presence of Mu waves on the EEG for Autism has been researched, but most kids are older kids; not early diagnose (less than 2 years) , and for Down syndrome you would have to found an specific pattern asides from the slowing of the EEG pattern, you would need a different wave on the Down syndrome patients, and that would need to be observed in all patients regarding of age; so first you would need to look for something on the living ones and then try to find out if there would be a way to do it on the unborn; but that would also be an invasive procedure to the mother until now.
  • asked a question related to Developmental Disabilities
Question
6 answers
I would be interested in any studies that have looked at agreement between parent/caregiver rating and self report ratings of social or physical competence for participants with Intellectual Disability. Anything you know of with child or adult participants would be very helpful.
Thanks, Rosie
Relevant answer
Answer
Hi Rosie
This might be slightly off topic, but we recently conducted a study examining client, carer, and clinical psychologists' perceptions of barriers and facilitators to therapeutic change within an intellectual disability setting. Although our study did not look at quantitative consensus in relation to social competency, etc., the paper may be useful background reading for highlighting aspects of convergence and divergence between individuals with an ID, their carers, and the professionals involved with them.
  • asked a question related to Developmental Disabilities
Question
6 answers
Hey there, I'm currently writing my graduation paper and I have a chapter where I have to compare the normal development with the development of a child with DCD.
Relevant answer
Answer
Look for attributions of Moto Miyahara  Otago University Dunedin NZ
  • asked a question related to Developmental Disabilities
Question
17 answers
I have a case that has puzzled me - a boy who is turning 6 this month. He was diagnosed with ASD at around age 4. According to his parents & the diagnostic report, he developed speech at very early stage and showed regression at around 2~3 years. Now he cannot produce any speech at all, except mimicking the shape of the mouth for simple words upon prompting. He has been placed on behavioural intervention for almost 2.5 years, but the progress has been real slow. His verbal and non-verbal imitation is limited, he does not really show restricted/repetitive interests or behaviour. Started recently, according to his father, he "becomes too engrossed in play that he just passes urine in his pants" (he has been fully toilet trained since age 4+); he also showed quite some mood turbulence, and likes to jump around and make a lot of noise (cry, whine, laugh, shout) recently, although his sitting tolerance has been prolonged significantly in the past year and it is actually one of his strengths. His motor skill is also really poor and so far he is still stuck in doing pre-writing activities in terms of IEP. I just find the diagnosis doubtful and I suspect the child has other conditions that actually require medical intervention. Anyone can please advise?
Relevant answer
Answer
Concerning those symptoms, I agree about the epilepsy hypothesis. Actually I would suggest considering the possibility of a Landau-Kleffner syndrome.
There is some research regarding this topic. You can find it easily at Google Scholar. You can even have access to many of these publications:
Deonna, T. & Roulet-Perez, E. (2010). Early-onset acquired epileptic aphasia (Landau–Kleffner syndrome, LKS) and regressive autistic disorders with epileptic EEG abnormalities: The continuing debate. Brain and Development, 32(9), 746–752.
  • asked a question related to Developmental Disabilities
Question
8 answers
The Bayley Scale of infant and toddler Development- III is one of the best tests for screening in infants and toddlers for clinical and research purposes. Is this validated in other cultural environments?
Relevant answer
Answer
It is also available in Dutch: http://www.pearsonclinical.nl/bayley-3
  • asked a question related to Developmental Disabilities
Question
53 answers
Signs and symptoms of depression in mothers of children with autism are frequently reported. However, based on extensive clinical observations and self reported data, I constantly observed that these mothers report specific depressive symptoms more than others. I did not observe this phenomenon in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorders. Is there any evidence supports this??? or it is a merely chance?  
Relevant answer
Answer
I'd like to join others in saying "Yes" to your question, Ahmad.
Indeed depression is a universal phenomenon and there are subtypes of depression. However, from the perspective of multicultural psychotherapy and international/global psychology, there are differences in one’s symptom manifestations, cultural explanations, and impact of depression on oneself and one’s intimates, depending on one’s cultural identification, acculturation to the Western cultural worldviews, and diverse backgrounds (Falicov, 2014; McGoldrick et al., 2005; Sue & Sue, 2013).
In terms of treatment, there are also differences in one's expectations of the treatment goals, processes and relationship with the healer (Cheung, 2009; Hong & Ham, 2001).
DSM-5 has provided an excellent outline for cultural formulation (OCF) and Cultural Formulation Interview (CFI).
  • asked a question related to Developmental Disabilities
Question
52 answers
Parents of children with ASD are frequently asking me about Nutrition Therapy for their children. I need some evidences about the topic. Do you agree using Nutrition Therapy for autism? is there any evidence about it?
Relevant answer
Answer
Yes, autistic children tested either had poor sulphate production, or poor sulphate transport. Sulphate deals with amines produced by the nervous system. Dietary amines and phenols are sulphated, and autistic children should not have too much amine or phenol in their diets. Relevant supplements are molybdenum, omega 3 fatty acids, and vitamins B2, B5 and B6. Poor sulphation in the gut may make it too permeable, in which case avoiding casein and gluten makes sense. Boron is excreted with vitamin B2, and so foods high in boron are best avoided. Often there have been many courses of antibiotics, and replenishing beneficial bacteria is relevant. Chlorella and vitamin C may help remove harmful minerals like mercury and aluminium.  Butter and coconut provide fatty acids to reduce gut permeability.
If possible, test plasma elements, red cell magnesium and functional B vitamins.
Relevant articles include:
Murch SH, MacDonald TT, Walker-Smith JA, Levin M, Lionetti P, Klein NJ. Disruption of sulphated  glycosaminoglycans in intestinal inflammation. Lancet 1993; 341: 711-4.
Waring RH, Klovrza LV. Sulphur metabolism in autism. J Nutritional & Environmental Medicine 2000; 10: 25-32.
Whiteley P, Shattock P. Biochemical aspects in autism spectrum disorders: updating the opioid-excess theory and presenting new opportunities for biomedical intervention. Expert Opin Ther Targets 2002; 6(2):175-183.
Harris RM, Waring RH. Dietary modulation of human platelet phenolsulphotransferase activity. Xenobiotica 1996; 26: 1241-7.
Moss M. Effects of Molybdenum on Pain and General Health: A Pilot Study. J Nutr Env Med 1995; 5: 55-61.
Moss M. Purines, Alcohol and Boron in the Diets of People with Chronic Digestive Problems. J Nutr Env Med 2001; 11: 23-32.
Moss M, Waring RH. The Plasma Cysteine/Sulphate Ratio: a Possible Clinical Biomarker. J Nutr Env Med 2003; 13(4): 215-229.
  • asked a question related to Developmental Disabilities
Question
28 answers
Parents of children with ASD are frequently asking me about oxygen therapy for their children. I need some evidences about the topic. Do you agree using Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for autism? is there any evidence about it?
Relevant answer
Answer
No. There is no scientific evidence that it can. This is yet another pseudoscientific "cure" for autism that gives false hope to vulnerable, desperate parents.
  • asked a question related to Developmental Disabilities
Question
59 answers
After extensive literature review of articles that include the terms ‘autism’ and ‘severity’, thousands of articles were found, but their definition of severity as well as the methods used to measure it varied extensively. Measures focused in general on language ability, intellectual functioning or behavioral problems.
Examples of tools used to measure the severity level of ASD: The Childhood Autism Rating Scale, the Gilliam Autism Rating Scale and the Autism Behavior Checklist; Autism Spectrum Quotient, the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS), the Pervasive Developmental Disorder Behavior Inventory, the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) and Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS); and measures of cognitive level, adaptive ability, and language ability, or a combination thereof.
Away from research, I have visited different clinicians who are certified in diagnosis of ASD, and they told me that they use the Stanford Binet Scale (IQ) as an indicative of severity level for ASD in all over the country (developing country) because it is highly correlated with most of other measures.
Is it appropriate to depend on the Stanford Binet Scale as an indication for severity level of ASD?
Relevant answer
Answer
You can ask actual clinicians in the field, but based on my knowledge, the most commonly used measures in the US are ADOS and ADI. The Stanford Binet only measures IQ and thus doesn't really capture the whole ASD spectrum (as many people with ASD do not have an intellectual disability). It may be appropriate to test Intellectual disability in ASD but not as a measure of ASD severity since it does not tap into behavioral and social issues. 
  • asked a question related to Developmental Disabilities
Question
10 answers
i would like to conduct the research regarding inclusive education for students with disabilities in the primary school. i am interested to look at the barriers and facilitating factors to participate into inclusive education from the eyes of parents, teachers and students with disabilities.
What kind of research questions is relevant to the ethnographic research?
May i ask:
What are the barriers to engage children with disabilities in inclusive education?
What are the facilitating factors to engage children with disabilities in inclusive education?
or i should ask questions sound in more sociological? i have no idea how all about the ethnographic research.. Much appreciate to get your guidelines.
Relevant answer
Answer
Hello Vimal
I have no expertise relating to researching children's needs, but in your quest for appropriate research methods, I wondered if it might help to read articles that offer comparison between the different options:
Goulding, C. (2005). Grounded theory, ethnography and phenomenology. European Journal of Marketing, 39(3/4), 294-308 - a ResearchGate member - downloadable from her publications page:
The paper below is also available from the publications section of a ResearchGate member, Professor Michael David Myers:
Myers, M. D., & Avison, D. (1997). Qualitative research in information systems. Management Information Systems Quarterly, 21, 241-242.
Fossey, E., Harvey, C., McDermott, F., & Davidson, L. (2002). Understanding and evaluating qualitative research. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 36, 717-732 - also available from ResearchGate:
Creswell, J. W. (2013). Research design: Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods approaches. Sage publications - below is chapter one:
Thorne, S. (2000). Data analysis in qualitative research. Evidence Based Nursing, 3(3), 68-70.
Merriam, S. B. (2002). Introduction to qualitative research. Qualitative research in practice: Examples for discussion and analysis, 1, 1-17.
Best wishes
Mary
  • asked a question related to Developmental Disabilities
Question
8 answers
There several questionnaires that measure attitudes toward persons with disabilities, but I need one to be more specific for persons with developmental disabilities.
Relevant answer
Answer
Indeed, that may be the way to go.  If you do not find a specific measure, you may used another one that comes close, just make sure the Chronbach Alpha is good and it has good reliability measures.
  • asked a question related to Developmental Disabilities
Question
2 answers
Any insight, experience, and recommendations, are welcome.
Relevant answer
Answer
You may also want to contact various ABA associations for posters and oral presentations and other library sources
  • asked a question related to Developmental Disabilities
Question
13 answers
Normalization principle as classic concept was developed fully by B. Nirje in late 60's and in Poland was introduced in early 90's. I do not mention now later SRV concept by Wolf Wolfensberger, perceiving B. Nirje's work also important.
What are your opinions about the theoretical assumptions and implementation the concept of normalization of life of people with disabilities in your country?
Where there are gaps in the capabilities of the implementation?
What controversies triggered this concept in your country ?
What discussions in academic environment were raised ?
Your knowledge, opinions, experiences will be appreciated.
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Bata
 Thank you very much. I shall see to getting it translated when possible. Yes N. E. Bank-Mikkelsen was marginalized. I understand it was because he only stated the normalization principle in terms of mere a mere right for people with handicap. Professionals apparently misunderstood the intentions. Therefor he had to explain what his original idea with the principle was. So he published this around 1971 - short after Nirje formulated his view on the matter. And I know they knew each other well.    
Thank you very much. Likewise to you. Happy New Year as well
Kind regards
Frederik
  • asked a question related to Developmental Disabilities
Question
6 answers
Are there specific apps that you have found to be more successful than others in teaching your developmentally delayed kinder and first graders basic academic skills?
Relevant answer
Answer
We just published our study about the use of apps in primary school: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/270280736_EXPERIENCES_WITH_IPADS_IN_PRIMARY_SCHOOL
maybe it helps
  • asked a question related to Developmental Disabilities
Question
7 answers
I am currently planning a study looking into nutritional supplement effects on ADHD children (aged 7-10yo).
I want to empirically measure the attention of ADHD and healthy control children at baseline, midline (2wks) and end (4wks) of intervention. I found that the Conner's Continuous Performance Test would be perfect for this... however, not so perfect at £760! I came across a free software download which has a large testing battery included in it called PEBL - has anybody used this, and in particular the Continuous Performance Test within it? I am slightly worried there is no normative data for the PEBL software, unlike Conner's which there is, but if I am comparing to my own control group this is not a major problem.
Any alternative suggestions would be great and any input to my research is always welcome, thanks!
Relevant answer
Answer
I have a new CPT program, a new one.  It is not so expensive as it is not commercial yet.  You can ask me for detail or read one of my paper describe the construction of the test.  The second paper describes a research when the test was used.
Lufi, D., & Fichman, N. (2012). The Development and Use of a Computerized Test, MATH-CPT, to Assess Attention. Perceptual and Motor Skills, 114, 59-74.
Lufi, D., Tzchishinky, O., & Hadar, S. (2011). Delaying school starting times by one hour: effects on attention level in adolescents. Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine, 7, 138-143.
I am looking forward to hearing from you.
Dubi Lufi
  • asked a question related to Developmental Disabilities
Question
3 answers
This publication (uploaded) from 3rd world says the average age of repair of a myelomeningocele is about 30 days.
In most instances, myelodysplasia should be treated surgically as soon after birth as possible, irrespective of whether the meningocele has ruptured.
Relevant answer
Answer
Very important are the preoperative and postoperative neurorehabilitation program which started in intensive care unit.
  • asked a question related to Developmental Disabilities
Question
2 answers
And how can I get it ? Thank you 
Relevant answer
I can refer you to a general quality of life scale, perhaps it could be useful for you.
  • asked a question related to Developmental Disabilities
Question
9 answers
In most cases, Angelman syndrome is associated with a chromosme 15q problem but studies have reported that some individuals with an Angelman syndrome phenotype actually have defects in the MECP2 gene on the X chromosome. So should these cases be considered a variant of Angelman syndrome or simple cases of Rett syndrome that were misdiagnosed as Angelman syndrome that has a similar phenotype.
Relevant answer
Answer
Patients with Angelman syndrome (AS) symptoms harboring MECP2 mutations are classified as AS patients in the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man /OMIM database of the U.S. National Center for Biotechnology Information (Phenotype MIM number 105830)
  • asked a question related to Developmental Disabilities
Question
3 answers
I'm working with individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities.
Relevant answer
Answer
A couple of scales you could perhaps consider are the Glasgow Anxiety Scale for people with ID and the Anxiety, Depression and Mood Scale.  Links to validation papers below.
  • asked a question related to Developmental Disabilities
Question
3 answers
I am looking for guidance regarding protection of youth with Developmental Disabilities who are unable to provide assent to participate in research. To clarify, getting consent from schools and parents is not the problem.
Relevant answer
Answer
I believe that the Person Centered Planning literature may have some potential answers for you.  Whereas this process is focused on implementation of intervention programs for people with DD (rather than research), it emphasizes inclusion of the individual with the disability in the decision making process.  Although this is a much more stringent standard than that applied to research studies (especially non-invasive studies), there may be specific methods from that approach that you can use in developing your research protocol - if indeed your goal is to maximize the possibility of true assent in your research study. For example, in PCP one might consult in advance, with a caregiver about techniques that may help maximize attention during a meeting with the individual with DD.  Hope that helps!
  • asked a question related to Developmental Disabilities
Question
224 answers
Throughout the centuries and history of mankind, different cultures created the artifacts (in architecture, fine art, applied art, literature, poetry, language [sayings], music)  illustrating the concepts of approaches to disability. 
Do you know in your own or other cultures historical or current artifacts illustrating the direct or symbolic issues of following categories as social inclusion orsocial exclusion of persons with disabilities?
To bring this thread inspired me my dear colleague from RG Ans Schapendonk. 
Please share your comments and optionally photos. 
Relevant answer
Answer
Thought you might be interested in this blog
Downs syndrome represented in art;
.
And this fascinating journal article;
.
Regards,
Paul.
  • asked a question related to Developmental Disabilities
Question
6 answers
An assessment/inquiry that would provide information to me, the researcher, on parent satisfaction or dissatisfaction with their high school transition program for their child with developmental disabilities.  Does anyone know of one that is reliable and valid?
Relevant answer
Answer
It occurs to me that you might find the material available on Beach Center website to be helpful in your work. http://www.beachcenter.org/families/family_research_toolkit.aspx
I'm thinking that any one of the assessment tools that Beach Center colleagues have developed and field tested might support you in your study.
Good luck! Parental satisfaction and/or client (i.e., student) satisfaction remains an 'under-studied' phenomenon.
 
 Washington DC school system has published a comprehensive document on the transition process: http://specialneedsplanning.net/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/Transition-Assessment-Toolkit.pdf
 
  • asked a question related to Developmental Disabilities
Question
7 answers
Is there a specific model that helps develop these children's learning process? I am trying to find the most suitable model that incorporates learning as well as welfare aspects for these children.
An interesting fact about the Malaysian education system is that not every child is eligible to go to school. Those who cannot take care of themselves will be referred to the Welfare Department to be placed at Community Rehabilitation Centres owned and managed by private individuals. There is no integration between the two systems.
I feel that there is a need for both the Education Ministry and Welfare Ministry to collaborate and join their efforts in introducing a new and more suitable policy and model that emphasizes the learning as well as self-development of the children with disabilities. Can anyone share how children with disabilities are developed in your country?
Relevant answer
Answer
In Germany, most children with severe SEN are sent to special schools. We have recently investigated how these differences between the UK's (integrative) and Germany's (segregative) educational systems affect children's attainment chances and indeed early inlcusion in normal schools combined with special support seem to make a huge difference (paper under review). Both the UN and the EU are currently enforcing more inclusive schooling Germany.
  • asked a question related to Developmental Disabilities
Question
73 answers
Cultural knowledge of the countries concerning various disabilities is also built on the basis of oral or written stories.
In the Middle Ages, in Europe (500 A.D -1500 A.D.), there existed in the cultures the concepts of the "changeling", which to some extent has dominated thinking about the origins of human disabilities. Medieval and later time peoples, believed that a "changeling" was a baby swapped by trolls, devils or elves.
The "Changeling" was perceived as a swapped child. He/she was described as visually and physically different, gluttonous, and weird.
Traces of disability understood as changeling can be found in the German fairy tales of the famous Brothers Grimm. Below I share a picture by Martino di Bartolomeo from the 15th century, which shows the origins of the swapping process. The image is titled "Devil swaps a baby". In medieval and later time Poland, there was the concept of a changeling called "bebok", "babok" or "boginiak" born by a goddess, a nymph (forest nymphs). "Boginiak" frequented in accordance with the beliefs tossed in place of a newborn.
Would you share your opinions please:
What representations of changelings exist in your culture and country?
What are folk tales and fairy tales that speak of changelings or the process of the process of change concerned somehow disabilities?
Who, then, in the folk cultural transmission was a changeling and what was his/her
appearance and role ?
What folk stories and fairy tales in your cultures tell about any symbolic depiction of a changeling and symbolic personality changes ?
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Beata,
While reflecting on many of these folk figures, especially mermaids and good-hearted giants and dwarfs, I am struck by the fact that small children are blind to what we adults call disabilities or deformities. Such children would break into tears if they were aware that their favorite story figures were somehow "deformed." Children think in terms of archetypes. Paul Bunyan is a "good guy." Therefore there can be nothing wrong with him.
  • asked a question related to Developmental Disabilities
Question
44 answers
What do the students with various disabilities (physical, sensory-neurological, emotional, psychiatric disorders etc,) need from the universities?
Are these met? What if not?
Is this enough to have active working staff in the office or unit for disability affairs, at the university ?
What issues are also important taking in account students' lives 24h a day?
Have you any experiences with students with disabilities when you discovered some new and individually suited solution for teaching ?
Relevant answer
Answer
Each year we have students with some disabilities. We have students using crutches, with leg amputated for various reasons; and students using wheel chairs. Classes with these students are purposely put on the ground floor. In the hostels, they are also placed in rooms on the ground floor. Their friends will make it a point to help them, so they manage quite well with the support of family and peers. Being quite a new college, the design is meant to facilitate disabled students.
  • asked a question related to Developmental Disabilities
Question
13 answers
From the time of preparations of my PhD. I'm leading qualitative research within adults (both sexes) with developmental disabilities. I carried out researches with adults as participants and informants, being in their early and middle stages of their adulthood.
In recent larger research (2007-2010) I observed, as (a tacit knowledge) some phenomena which was characterized by some valorised roles, given to adult with intellectual disability(ID) in a few families. In those families, women with ID, degrees mild (IQ 55-70 ) to moderate ( IQ 35-54 ) had important, responsible and accepted generative family duty, as the caregiver - babysitter for little children, of own studying or working siblings (cousins)​.This pattern and skills were not further transferred to other areas of independent living , such as into work opportunities. The roles and skills stayed in the circle of family roles. Maybe anyone has completed a similar research, has similar findings ? Maybe there are in your countries similar patterns of family life with adult women with intellectual disabilities? Please indicate and share the studies, authors or review publications on this topic. Thank you.
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Beata, yes I observed same thing in my home country, But in my opinion nowadays for full intellectual peoples are difficult to take care on children and then what about those with disabilities. My suggestion is that we have to be very careful, calm, quiet, respectful, soft and smooth with those that have Intellectual disabilities, and never give them or command them to do such responsibilities. TQ
  • asked a question related to Developmental Disabilities
Question
20 answers
I am looking for current primary research that involves the use of ABA to teach reading skills.
Relevant answer
Answer
Off the top of my head, I would recommend Chapter 16, TEACHING READING, in the second volume of the American Psychological Association Handbook for ABA (Daly & Kupzyk, 2012). This chapter provides a great overview of a behavior analytic approach to reading. There are many references within the chapter that will provide a useful foundation for further searching specific to implementation with individuals with autism.
Lastly, you might benefit from searching more specific terms other than ABA. I would recommend you search within the Direct Instruction and Precision Teaching literature.
I hope this helps as a starting point since it doesn't really give you specifics to application of autism.
  • asked a question related to Developmental Disabilities
Question
15 answers
Requirements for the test: (a) it should yield age equivalent scores, (b) it should cover the (developmental) age range of 3 years to about 16 years.
I am familiar with the Movement ABC 2, but unfortunately this test does not provide age equivalents.
Relevant answer
Answer
Another optional solution might be rescaling the results of different tests (done at different age ranges) into one scale, so that you can compare between them and look at the results longitudinally. I have done that with the Bayley and the Bruininks in my paper: Shafir et al., (2006) Effects of iron deficiency in infancy on patterns of motor development over time. Human Movement Science, 25(6), 821-838. (PMC1993818)
  • asked a question related to Developmental Disabilities
Question
1 answer
I am researching with parents with ID most of whom say their assessments were inadequate
Relevant answer
Answer
parents with an intellectual disability show that most parents can improve in one or more skills. Some mothers with intellectual disabilities have been taught to increase their demonstrations of affection, descriptive and reflective statements, stimulating conversations and behavior management skills. The subsequent increase in a parent's skills will lead to an overall improvement in their child's development and behavior.
  • asked a question related to Developmental Disabilities
Question
20 answers
This is currently a serious question being considered by APA and insurance companies in the United States.
Relevant answer
Answer
Skinner was my great grand mentor (my doctoral advisor's advisor's colleague and mentor), and he was a psychologist who used almost his last breath to speak to the APA convention. I was there. Behavior analysis has always been an important thread in psychology, but represents only one approach to asking questions of and controlling nature. Behavior Analysis seems to have always - and still does - marginalize itself by asserting it has a unique (only) way to find the truth and disparaging other methodologies that may be much better suited to answering certain kinds of important questions. We know that inductive methods can show real functional relations in individuals, but what if we want to establish population level safety guidelines?
  • asked a question related to Developmental Disabilities
Question
1 answer
Budget considerations
Relevant answer
Answer
I would be very interested in this project - I work with adult with developmental disabilities (in NYC area), many of whom have been abused. There is very little to guide my work with these clients, espeically the ones who have more severe to profound disabilties. Traditional therapies do not work.
  • asked a question related to Developmental Disabilities
Question
6 answers
Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS), also known as Treacher Collins–Franceschetti syndrome, or mandibulofacial dysostosis is a rare autosomal dominant congenital disorder characterized by craniofacial deformities, such as absent cheekbones. Treacher Collins syndrome is found in about 1 in 50,000 births. The typical physical features include downward slanting eyes, micrognathia (a small lower jaw), conductive hearing loss, underdeveloped zygoma, drooping part of the lateral lower eyelids, and malformed or absent ears.
Relevant answer
Answer
Not at all, u r welcome.