Science topic

Descriptive Studies - Science topic

Explore the latest questions and answers in Descriptive Studies, and find Descriptive Studies experts.
Questions related to Descriptive Studies
  • asked a question related to Descriptive Studies
Question
4 answers
Dear all,
Can data of a single variable used in a descriptive study alone be used in another study with another variable using the same data of the variable used in the previous descriptive study? For example, if I publish the data of social networking sites (psychology) in a study alone, and later I use this data in a correlational study with new data of another variable, psychological well-being variable, for example?
I thank you in advance for your contributing comments.
With regards,
Karwan
Relevant answer
Answer
Thank you for your comment. I was not saying publish the same variable twice. What I was saying was I publish the data of one variable (variable A) alone as a descriptive study, and the add new data (a new variable with new data as well) with variable A together as a new study together. Does this make sense to you anyway?
Also, I found your explanation confusing. In your comment, you are saying you have published the same data set in several studies. Please correct me if I am wrong or have misunderstood you. Many thanks!
Regards
  • asked a question related to Descriptive Studies
Question
4 answers
I am working on my dissertation methodology chapter. Much I am learning and some I am not sure I understand.
Relevant answer
Answer
I will look at that source. Thanks for the direction
  • asked a question related to Descriptive Studies
Question
1 answer
I'm looking to connect with one or more Chinese scholars, ideally at PhD or postdoctoral level, to undertake a contrastive, descriptive study of the forms and focal areas of written feedback provided by several automated writing evaluation platforms (including Pigai) on texts written by developing second language learners. The study is at the conceptual stage and I hope to finalise the design/commence data collection from September. Do message me via Research Gate or email me at wsp202 'at' exeter.ac.uk if you're interested in getting involved. The project is not in receipt of any funding.
  • asked a question related to Descriptive Studies
Question
3 answers
Can a qualitative critical analysis tool be used when critically analysing a qualitative descriptive study?
Relevant answer
Answer
Definitely can.
  • asked a question related to Descriptive Studies
Question
3 answers
I will conduct a mixed-methods qualitative study (semi-structured interview). The second quantitative study will be a survey (descriptive study) to determine whether the intervention is acceptable.
I would like to know how I can use (TFA) in my research.
I have difficulty distinguishing between (The Likert scale) and the Theoretical Framework of Acceptability (TFA). Where is the difference, when should I use it, and which one can help me in the quantitative study?
Relevant answer
Answer
Likert scored items are form of quantitative measure that use a response format such as Strongly Disagree to Strongly Agree. For a scale you need to test whether those items all measure the same thing (i.e., high reliability), and if so you can add the items together.
All of this requires that you have a set of survey questions that correspond to your Theoretical Framework of Acceptance.
  • asked a question related to Descriptive Studies
Question
3 answers
what is the size of sample that considered to be acceptable in descriptive study
i came through a descriptive study in which the sample was 10
is this justified?
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Nabiha, thanks for sharing your question.
It seems from your description that it was a “case series” in which the authors could describe their experience of a group of patients with similar diagnosis.
That usually happens with rare conditions.
  • asked a question related to Descriptive Studies
Question
2 answers
I am currently working on the process of a cross-cultural adaptation for a survey in English and want to translate it into another language. However, the original survey hasn't gone through a content validation process. It has been used for a descriptive study. So, I am wondering if I can start the process of cultural adaptation even the original one is not valid!
Relevant answer
Answer
Yes, it does. A survey tool has to be linguistically, culturally, and statistically valid for cross-cultural adaptation. Besides, it should meet construct validity if it has not been administered in a similar contextual setting. Therefore, its psychometric properties should be tested to ascertain its sound cross-cultural use. You could refer to the following articles for detailed inputs.
Costa, F. A., Duggan, C., & Bates, I. (2007). A systematic approach to cross-cultural adaptation of survey tools. Pharmacy Practice (Internet), 5(3). https://doi.org/10.4321/S1886-36552007000300004
Gjersing, L., Caplehorn, J. R., & Clausen, T. (2010). Cross-cultural adaptation of research instruments: Language, setting, time and statistical considerations. BMC Medical Research Methodology, 10(1), 13. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2288-10-13
Good luck,
  • asked a question related to Descriptive Studies
Question
2 answers
I am a clerkship-level medical student myself and I am interested in the following:
  • Perhaps a cross-sectional descriptive study conducted via online survey on the mental health status (anxiety; burnout for volunteers) of both pre-clerkship and clerkship-level medical students? It's been a month into Extended Community Quarantine in my locality and this might be a good opportunity to conduct such study.
  • This might provide a basis for future studies and might influence policy-makers into integrating mental health programs during times of crises.
Relevant answer
Answer
Yes it is the right time to conduct such a survey, but a lot of mental health surveys have already been conducted on medical students and interns.
  • asked a question related to Descriptive Studies
Question
4 answers
I have done with Meta-analysis and now want to continue it as mixed/multi method by integrating its finding with a qualitative descriptive study. will it be explanatory sequential design?
any article on Mixed/multi method with Meta-analysis and Qualitative Descriptive?
Relevant answer
Answer
Meta-analysis is a numbers game, on the other hand, descriptive study is more of a theme thing. If you ask my personal opinion, I would separate them and publish them in different articles in specific journals. However, If you are working on a Thesis or Research project focusing on an issue holistically, you can carry both of them in the same basket.
  • asked a question related to Descriptive Studies
Question
3 answers
I had 13 case histories of a disease, I am wondering whether to present them as a case series or as a small descriptive study of cases? Please can someone answer my question as early as possible?
Relevant answer
Answer
Describing 11 cases will be too long for most journal. A review eleven case series: A descriptive study appears appropriate
  • asked a question related to Descriptive Studies
Question
15 answers
I am going to conduct a quantitative(descriptive) studies on high school students.
Relevant answer
Answer
Descriptive research is not necessarily hypothesis-driven. It is often used to generate hypotheses. It renders in-depth analysis of particular characteristics/behaviors for better understanding. Its focus is on answering the what question, and not the why/how/when question. Therefore, it is unnecessary to have a hypothesis in descriptive research, adopting a quantitative approach to data collection, as long as no inference(s) are being made out of data.
You might find the following source helpful.
  • asked a question related to Descriptive Studies
Question
6 answers
A study basically entails the following process:
First, comprehensively analysing the literature review, identifying relationships, developing a conceptual model, and proposing hypotheses;
Second, empirically testing those hypotheses to test the proposed relationships.
What basically such types of studies called as? Exploratory or descriptive study or a combination of both.
Please elucidate.
Relevant answer
Answer
There are two things to ask first:
If you have a model already designed and you want to find functions/characteristics of some group/object in the literature to map to the model then your study is descriptive. In other words, if you have a defined question/structure to collect data from the literature and describe according to the structure then it is descriptive. For instance, if you want to describe the traits of specific groups according to a pre-planned structure.
Else if your model is not yet conceptualized rather when you will be exploring the literature and find something to convert to a thought or idea then your study is explorative. It means that you have no pre-planned analysis and design structure or model rather you are starting as unplanned. During this exploration you may reach to a new thought and discovered new ideas. In this way, you are clarifying the research further and making a road to descriptive analysis.
  • asked a question related to Descriptive Studies
Question
7 answers
I have chosen to conduct a descriptive (cross-sectional) study in my master thesis (Public Health programme). The aim is to determine anxiety and depression, among women diagnosed with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome. I would like to requite my participants through Facebook in PCOS Facebook support groups (more than 5000 members in total) and through Facebook Advertising tool to reach out to those not members of groups.
My questions: Is it possible to find the prevalence (of anxiety and depression among Danish women with PCOS), when the requited women on Facebook are not representative of the general population? Furthermore, is it possible to randomize the sample? If not, should I just use the word “proportion” instead?
Therefore it takes me to the last question about sample size; would I be able to calculate a representative sample size? I used Kish Leslie method and I got a number of 196. Is this a minimum number, and can I exceed that number of participants and therefore make the study stronger?
Relevant answer
Answer
Since this is a masters-level thesis work, I strongly suggest that you include considerations in capturing patients with PCOS who are not in Facebook. Furthermore, you can also delimit your coverage to include only patients with PCOS in a particular country (such as Denmark) or in that Facebook group (which I perceive will be an issue to your adviser and in your desire to get a statistically-sound estimate).
"Is it possible to find the prevalence (of anxiety and depression among Danish women with PCOS), when the requited women on Facebook are not representative of the general population?" - Answer: Technically speaking, it is possible to get an estimate of the prevalence even in this scenario, but it will be challenging to convince the reader or yourself or your adviser that this estimate is close to the parameter given the issue of representativeness. You have to contend with issues such as whether there is expected or real differences between patients with PCOS who are in and not in that group.
"Furthermore, is it possible to randomize the sample?" - Answer: Randomization is possible, but it will still not address the fact the Facebook group where you'll do it is likely not representative of the population you want to study in conceptual terms. In this regard, assuming that you'll stick to the plan that you mentioned, I suggest that you aim for law of large numbers and strive to invite as many members from that group as possible, rather than randomizing in a sample that is "flawed" to begin with, given the relative convenience.
"If not, should I just use the word “proportion” instead?" - Answer: Proportion may be a safer word compared to prevalence, but there is no doubt that you are aiming to estimate prevalence anyway.
Regarding your final paragraph, remember that, in more cases than not, standard sample size equations assume that the population ("N") you are working on is appropriate, and you will obtain the sample ("n") through means that will lead to a representative group. The number you will get from any equation is usually the minimum number that will be sound given the conditions/scenarios/values you plugged in from the equation that you used (hence, that minimum sample size estimate is only as good as the values you plugged in the equation), so you can theoretically exceed the number (with approval of course from your ethical board).
  • asked a question related to Descriptive Studies
Question
2 answers
I am doing a systematic review on the prevalence of pathological teeth migration. All of the studies I included are descriptive in nature, which means there are no comparison groups. I am looking for any guidelines/ tools on how GRADE should be done in this case, since all the material I can find is on using reporting GRADE for results from comparative data, not descriptive ones. Is it possible to do GRADE assessment for an estimate of the prevalence of a phenomenon?
Relevant answer
Answer
I am in the same predicament, did you get a solution to this issue?, if so please share with me.
Or if anyone on here can answer that would be great.
Many thanks in advance
  • asked a question related to Descriptive Studies
Question
5 answers
Hello,
I would like to ask you please about literature review for qualitative study, What should I include in the literature review if my question about physicians Prception about a topic and no previous study have the same question?
Also, could you please help me with a resource for qualitative descriptive study?
Best wishes,
Relevant answer
Answer
You need to do a literature review on "physicians perceptions" in the domain of your research, and broader how one defines and studies "physician perceptions". It is your research question and data recollection data would finally decide the methodology to use. The methodology is not prior to the research question or problematic but only a technical aftermath. Nonetheless, one decided the methodology, you need to review as well the methodological literature available in your research domain.
  • asked a question related to Descriptive Studies
Question
14 answers
I am designing my dissertation research. I am exploring nursing leadership education. I am planning on using a qualitative questionnaire, but am having trouble finding an instrument, and the one's that I have fond I have not been able to obtain permission from the authors. I am reaching out to see if anyone has a questionnaire instrument that I could use for my qualitative descriptive study. Thanks for any help.
Relevant answer
Answer
First,what is your research objective?You should have a main question then with that you can do probing.There is no exact research instrument for qualitative because if you prepared a set of questions to follow for your participants then it might become bias.Of course what is your philosophical underpinning?Read Creswell or Polit book on this study,that is my piece of advise.
  • asked a question related to Descriptive Studies
Question
7 answers
I'm looking to publish a descriptive study of a protein and I'm having trouble finding the right journal for it. Need help!
Relevant answer
Answer
Please use Elesvier find journal and enter title and abstract of your paper to easily find journals that could be best suited for publishing.
  • asked a question related to Descriptive Studies
Question
13 answers
If we survey patients for a descriptive study, how do we calculate for the sample size?
Relevant answer
Answer
For sample size estimation calculating the effect size is the most important. The larger the effect size the smaller sample you need, and vice versa. However, in your case as you have only one patient group in a descriptive study, where you are not running compassion or correlation analyses, estimating the effect size might not be applicable. Some studies recommend sample by item role of thump for surveys, the recommendations ranged from 10 patients per survey item to 1 patient per survey item but the last is the lest recommended which will end with very small sample size. 10 patient per item is highly recommended but it depends on how rare is your target condition, where you can reduce the number if you face recruitment issues and justify in your paper.
Best wishes
  • asked a question related to Descriptive Studies
Question
4 answers
Few researchers are just showing sample taken without giving any reference to population does such studies are valid.
Relevant answer
Answer
No this is not possible professionally.
  • asked a question related to Descriptive Studies
Question
33 answers
Due to high number of cancer in the world ,researchers seek investigation to cancer, The proposals that cancer might be preventable, and that food, nutrition, physical activity, and body composition might affect the risk of cancer, were first made before science emerged in its modern form in the 19th and 20th centuries. Throughout recorded history, wise choices of food and drink, and of habitual behaviour, have been recommended to protect against cancer, as well as other diseases, and to improve well-being. Reports such as this, which incorporate systematic examination of all relevant types of research, differ from ancient, historical, and even relatively recent accounts, and descriptive studies of the type detailed of cancer , not only in the quantity and quality of evidence, but also in the reliability of the evidence given to cancer promotion.so can we reach to cancer apperance in early stage?
Relevant answer
Answer
Several studies reports that eating more garlic could lower the risks of stomach, prostate and colorectal cancers.
  • asked a question related to Descriptive Studies
Question
8 answers
Descriptive studies are usually not meant for drawing inferences. But we usually see studies at least suggesting some inferences based on the results of a descriptive study. Therefore, is it important (or correct) to calculate p-values or confidence intervals in a descriptive cross-sectional study? If so, how should we calculate them right and what precautions need to be taken?
Relevant answer
Answer
Saud - A descriptive study can be used among many to: (a) define respondents/study participant characteristics (b) Measure trends in the data collected (c) conduct comparison (d) validate existing conditions etc. To answer your first question, yes- using descriptive research studies we can test a hypotheses/make an inference. The one thing which we can not do with descriptive studies is a conclusion about a CAUSAL relationship. Cross-sectional studies are observational in nature and are often known as descriptive studies. How to calculate the p-value and/or confidence interval depends on the statistical method you use. Each statistical method has its own set of assumptions/procedures that we have to follow so that the p-value or/confidence interval outputted can be interpreted with certain degree of confidence. In case your are looking at particular study and have some specific questions, feel free to let me know.
  • asked a question related to Descriptive Studies
Question
4 answers
I am doing a paper on Plastic Waste Management in Dehradun,so can I use the descriptive study design for it?
Relevant answer
Answer
Surely you can use it however bear in mind that different approaches are meant to answer different research questions.
  • asked a question related to Descriptive Studies
Question
9 answers
I’ve come across several articles explaining Qualitative Descriptive Approach in Health Sciences specifically where the reseacher is not bound to choose GT, phenomenology, Ethnography etc.
now what I’m curious to know is that can I use QD in social sciences where I could ask participants about their views using semi-structured interviews and thematic analysis as data analysis method.
Many thanks
Relevant answer
Answer
This paper might be useful for you! Mehra, B. (2002). Bias in qualitative research: Voices from an online classroom. The Qualitative Report, 7(1), 1-19.
  • asked a question related to Descriptive Studies
Question
1 answer
Hi everybody,
What is the best inhibitor of in vivo systemic endoplasmic reticulum stress in human, 4-Phenylbutyrate or Tauroursodeoxycholic acid ?There are description and studies of both chaperonnes to treat ERS in humans but what is the best one to ihnibit ERS during systemic inflammation ?
Thank you for your help !
Relevant answer
Answer
Stress cousin ROS. And the best natural antioxidants are vitamins especially vitamin C.
  • asked a question related to Descriptive Studies
Question
5 answers
Can you use the same questions for interview, questionnaire, and focus group in a qualitative descriptive study?
Relevant answer
Answer
On the one hand, yes. However, on the other, why would you want to?
  • asked a question related to Descriptive Studies
Question
2 answers
I have a list of 19 questions that I can provide. I am conducting a qualitative descriptive study - and have incorporated the Hoover-Dempsey & Sandler Parental Model (2005)
My research questions are as follows:
R1. How do Latino parents of elementary students describe their experiences with the IEP collaborations and process?
R2. How do Latino parents of elementary students describe their role during the development of the IEP collaborations and process?
R3. How do Latino parents describe the factors necessary for active, meaningful, parent participation during the IEP collaborations and process?
R4. How do Latino parents describe obstacles to meaningful, active, parent participation during the IEP collaborations and process?
Relevant answer
Answer
Mark D Soucy - Thank you very much, I have sent you the questions via email.
I appreciate any feedback you may have.
  • asked a question related to Descriptive Studies
Question
16 answers
How to calculate sample size for unknown population and as well as for known population in epidemiological studies (i.e. descriptive study, cross sectional study etc) ?
Relevant answer
Answer
As everybody has said, there are different formula to calculate the sample size for different types of studies. I have attached one book very useful for sample size calculation. Thanks and Regards
  • asked a question related to Descriptive Studies
Question
10 answers
Cases stored in directories by patient, all in DICOM format, contain plain radiography, CT scans, MRIs, nuclear medicine studies and angiography studies.
Need to to add tags for image findings, diagnosis and sort of report to include patient history and management.
DICOM viewers do a good job "viewing" the files, but creating a data base of the findings is not possible for me so far.
So far all the files are stored in a local directory.
I can not afford commercial software, these are usually directed to radiology or hospital business, the prices are beyond the reach of single user mostly for educational purposes, so please advice regarding open source free software if possible.
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Ayman, i understand your question, and believe there are little or no free products to do this. Are you talking educational resources?
We as a company i work for, Hermes Medical solutions have created several regional or international setups on a commercial product TeleHERMES that do allow using databases up to Terabytes and investigate all (even several native fields), and perform a lot of postprocessing. The TeleHERMES account will work as a local Hermes workstation. Depending on your needs, place you work and interests we can have a offline discussion. We have already installed multiple educational cloud accounts (some hundreds) for teaching institutions worldwide. This also for Inholland Hogeschool the Netherlands with 26 students and teachers simultaneous users on a Amsterdam server, Contact me when interested.
  • asked a question related to Descriptive Studies
Question
4 answers
Hospitals are required to comply with various laws and bylaws. Investigator want to study whether a particular hospital is complying with green building laws, he will check the dimensions of the patient and other areas in the hospital and compare them with green building standards. What would be this study design? Will it be a case study ? or Observational descriptive study? or any other type of study design? Please help
Relevant answer
Answer
There is no hypothesis here. It will be a simple descriptive epidemiological study. Data collection will involve obtaining information on the availability as against the pre-decided norms. Descriptive statistics will be used to describe the proportional achievement (as %) against the pre-decided norms by the regulatory authority. Don't calculate the 95% CI since you will be studying the "total population" and not a sample (here the concerned hospital will comprise the "total population" and the study will be like a total populatiomn census).
  • asked a question related to Descriptive Studies
Question
5 answers
I am interested to know whether we have tools providing the number of research articles published on a given subject and related statistics?
Relevant answer
Answer
I found this tool, which is supposed to mine Google Scholar for specific terms.  The default query was working, but then it wasn't working.
You might be able to do something similar manually, using perhaps, Google Scholar, Google Trends, or Google Ngrams.
  • asked a question related to Descriptive Studies
Question
10 answers
I need a step-by-step procedure for systematic literature review
Relevant answer
Answer
'To answer your question, I am not sure a systematic literature review exists. There are three completely separate methodological reviews: (1) literature review; (2) Scoping review; (3) and a systematic review. 
Reading the title of your question, it will be assumed that you are looking for a systematic review methodology to suit the aim and objectives of your study. A systematic review is a systematic and rigorous method of amalgamating and synthesizing recent research to form a body of empirical knowledge from which decisions may be made. 
There are three kinds of systematic reviews: PRISMA (qualitative, quantitative and mixed method studies); (2) REAIM (a systematic review of interventions); (3) and AMSTAR (a systematic review of reviews). Each one of these designs will offer you a step-by-step guide on how to conduct a SR. Based on the nature, aim and objectives of your study you would have to select a particular systematic review methodology. A nice reading is the Cochrane handbook of systematic reviews which are mainly for interventions/ RCT, however, this would give you a great idea of what a systematic review entails. 
I hope this has helped you, if i can assist with anymore questions inbox me, ill be glad to assist if i can. best of luck
  • asked a question related to Descriptive Studies
Question
16 answers
Some  clinicians believe that it is only a descriptive study.Why it could`n be analytic?
Relevant answer
Answer
You can develop a cross-sectional study only for descrIptive purposes (obtaining prevalences). However, most of times these studies also allow to evaluate associations estimating prevalence ratios and performing hypotheses tests. In that case, you can consider them as analytic studies.
  • asked a question related to Descriptive Studies
Question
11 answers
If you please,
I want to know how to calculate the sample size in my study : 
My study is descriptive one
I choose the purposive sampling to select the companies  ( l picked 16 firms from 3 sectors - Telecom , IT services  and financial  sectors) 
Participants supposed to be : project managers, business mangers,  IT managers,  IT technicians and technology end users.
How  can I determine the sample size ?
Relevant answer
Answer
Note that the formula given by Amir is only useful in a very special case, that has nothing to do with "descriptive" statistics but with hypothesis testing (in this case, comparing two probabilities with some additional assumptions). It may well be completly useless for your practical application.
  • asked a question related to Descriptive Studies
Question
5 answers
Hello all. My strength is not really in statistics, but I am wondering, for a simple descriptive study, what are some of the tests I can run? especially if I want to test some kinds of association? Thank you
Relevant answer
Answer
I think am getting the bigger picture now, and in my case then Spearman's rank correlation may be applicable. Thank you for taking the time to share your insights
  • asked a question related to Descriptive Studies
Question
89 answers
I am currently writing a systematic review and the majority if not all my studies are descriptive. I looked for quality assessment tools and found out that the
QAT is widely used: http://www.nccmt.ca/registry/view/eng/14.html but it is somehow applicable to intervention rather than descriptive studies.
I also came across circum which seems appropriate but I haven't seen any review that used circum before http://circum.com/index.cgi?en:appr
Do you think I should be using QAT? what other tools would you suggest?
Thank you
Mohamad
Relevant answer
Answer
Below are tools that I have previously used, are easy to use, and some of them are recommended by Cochrane:
For cross-sectional/survey studies: the NIH Quality Assessment Tool for Observational Cohort and Cross-Sectional Studies: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health-pro/guidelines/in-develop/cardiovascular-risk-reduction/tools/cohort
For intervention studies: the EPHPP tool http://www.ephpp.ca/tools.html (first two files)
For risk of bias assessment for interventions: the EPOC criteria https://www.biomedcentral.com/content/supplementary/2046-4053-3-103-S2.pdf
  • asked a question related to Descriptive Studies
Question
2 answers
Can anyone share with me a JBI descriptive studies appraisal tool? I can not download it from JBI Web.
Relevant answer
Answer
jbi critical appraisal checklist descriptive studies 
  • asked a question related to Descriptive Studies
Question
9 answers
What checklists can I use to assess my cross-sectional and descriptive study for quantitative data except CASP checklist for quantitative study?
Relevant answer
Answer
Publishers like BMC, PLOS require authors to follow and mention STROBE guidelines in reporting cross-sectional studies. I recommend the same.
  • asked a question related to Descriptive Studies
Question
4 answers
A lot of studies are seen where researchers declares study design as descriptive cross sectional but also finds out p values with various factors in the study. Whether any evidence supports this practice as theoretically p values means testing of hypothesis which cannot be done on descriptive study.
Relevant answer
Answer
Thanks Professor Muayyad Ahmad. so a person who is doing only description of a group and then tries to fine out association of various factors with variable of interest, should either call his study as mix design of cross sectional descriptive and analytical, is any such design  be made
or
he should report association found but not to mention p values and say significance cannot be reported due to being descriptive and further research is req to explore.