Science topic

Dementia - Science topic

An acquired organic mental disorder with loss of intellectual abilities of sufficient severity to interfere with social or occupational functioning. The dysfunction is multifaceted and involves memory, behavior, personality, judgment, attention, spatial relations, language, abstract thought, and other executive functions. The intellectual decline is usually progressive, and initially spares the level of consciousness.
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Any citation, current one, to check how I could separate the age groups to yound adults, middle-age adults and older adults?
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Golgi Cenci Foundation [see director Antonio Guaita in ResearchGate, and www.golgicenci.it for results and methodology] focussed on 70 to 74 years old people to follow longitudinally a cohort, since a turnpoint age; we are running the 5th wave
regards, Mauro Colombo
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I'm doing a project to detect signs of Alzheimer's related macular degeneration, for which I would require a dataset of healthy and AD retinal images (ideally also in different stages of the disease), any suggestions of pre-existing datasets or how I might go about cobbling one together? Size and quality of the dataset aren't super high priority as it's a small POC.
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Hi did you find the dataset of retinal imaging for the detection of Alzheimer's?
Could you help me to find some database for this subject to?
Thank you in advance
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I would like to ask one crucial question.
When I monitor Amyloid Beta (AB-42) concentration in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), I get some values in lower and higher concentraitons. AB-42 concentration range in CSF varies between 200 - 1000 pg/mL according to the literature.
My question is following.
Do higher concentrations or lower concentrations of AB-42 in CSF indicate dementia ?
Thank you all for your answers or comments.
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Lower concentrations of amyloid beta 42 are associated with dementia
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I am planning to conduct an interventional research on nurse's knowledge on dementia which includes pre test, post test and educational intervention.
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It depends on research design, questions, hypotheses, methodology.etc
A selected focus group of say 5 to 10 nurses, with experience of dementia, could provide sufficient initial data. Alternatively/additionally, a small representative sample could be randomly chosen from the nurse population. Quantitative and qualitative approaches could be integrated.
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Mixed dementia is common in the elderly, how useful are these perfusion technqiues in unselected populations with cognitive problems?
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There is a lot of heterogeneity, I think - wide differences from one institution to another. In Australia, for example, it is available at only a few centres so this is rarely done, only referred by relatively select clinicians (eg a few geriatricians).
I would not be surprised if there are very few cases in some countries and more in others.
That, then, leads to the question if only a certain few can afford it (obviously in some countries you can only get it if you pay for it) then does that mean a lot of people who need this cannot get it?
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Dear Colleagues, please fill thiscquestionnaire, it takes only 5 minutes. It os anonymous. For health professionels e.g. nurses and medical doctors. All specialties. Thank you. In advanced for ypur collaboration. Deatails in the first page. Of the link.
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Done
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My friend is looking for coauthors in Psychology & Cognitive Neuroscience field. Basically you will be responsible for paraphrazing, creating figures, and collecting references for a variety of publications. Please leave your email address if you are interested. 10 hours a week is required as there is a lot of projects to be done!
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Paraphrasing and collecting reference, editing work in other word, cannot result in coautorship ! The authors of papers must have been involved in the creative process of the paper, no ? To be honest, I do not think that this kind of request is deontological or even ethical.
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Hello everyone,
My research will interview people living with dementia outside of NHS settings. In the University ethics application I outlined the use of a consultee to ensure people living with dementia who lack capacity have the opportunity to participate. However, what the NHS HRA defines as ‘intrusive research’ involving adults lacking mental capacity cannot be approved under the University's ethics processes, as University ethics committees are not recognised as Appropriate Bodies under the Mental Capacity Act . This is regardless of whether the research is taking place within or outside of the NHS.
The only option I can see to avoid HRA application, is not including people who lack capacity to consent. I do not want to take this route as it seems inequitable. This doesn't sit well with me and I wonder if anyone has confronted this issue in the past?
Any advice and information welcomed!
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In order for adults lacking capacity to participate in non-clinical trial research it must be connected with an impairing condition in the functioning of the mind or brain affecting the person (or its treatment), which causes or contributes to the impairment. a person must be assumed to have capacity unless established otherwise. Individuals should be helped to make their own decisions as far as practicable. A person is not to be treated as unable to make a decision merely because he makes an unwise decision. All decisions and actions must be in the best interests of the person lacking capacity. All decisions and actions must be the least restrictive of the person’s rights and freedom of action. Capacity refers to the everyday ability that individuals possess to make decisions or to take actions that affect them, from simple decisions such as what to have for breakfast to far-reaching decisions about serious medical treatment or financial affairs.
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If there is Immunological Memory, there is also possibility of;
Immunological Dyslexia.
Immunological Dementia.
Immunological Amnesia.
Is it not ?
And such effects might occur as a result of adaptations in epigenetic system of individuals accompanied by ageing, co-morbidities, polypharmacy etc ?
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All over the world, rates of dementia are expected to rise dramatically over the coming decades. And research continues to suggest that actions that have been taken early can reduce the risk of this disease. There are about 10 million new cases, each year, of dementia, which is a general term for groups of symptoms associated with deterioration of the brain. We know that what we eat can affect our physical health. But it could affect the brain too.
So, it is possible that there is a link between our diet and the risk of the development of dementia? Is there any effective food that can reduce the risk of the development of this disease? How can we reduce the risk of dementia through diet?
All comments and contributions are welcome.
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Thanks a lot, Dr. Martin Hofmeister Yes, a number of studies are pooled on the benefits of sticking to a Mediterranean-style diet to stave off brain decline. Most of the studies focused on the overall benefits of the diet, but one study delved into the specific ingredients that help. Harvard Health cited a study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health that evaluated the lifestyles of more than 7,750 participants and followed them for five to 10 years. They used this data to identify the dietary factors that were most important in reducing the risk of cognitive impairment, as well as the dietary factors that were most important in reducing the risk of cognitive decline. Harvard Health reported that fish was the “most important dietary factor” in reducing the risk of cognitive impairment. https://middleeast.in-24.com/News/162859.html
We are so grateful for sharing these valuable and informative links about this thread...My sincere gratitude, Doctor.
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Research publications and datasets for diagnosis of dementia patients.
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Hello Mr Pise.
I hope you’re doing good. I’m currently working on validating observer-rated only scales to assess presence of depressive symptoms in moderately severe dementia (in the nursing field).
Throughout hundreds of articles I’ve read, I saw a lack of consensus on how to diagnose depression in dementia (e.g.: ICD-10 criteria, DSM, PDC-dAD, etc.). For the Alzheimer’s type dementia, some studies suggest the use of the Provisional Diagnostic Criteria for Depression of Alzheimer's Disease (PDC-dAD). A lot of studies use this criteria measure (PDC-dAD) as the reference standard for depression diagnosis in other types of dementia (ex: vascular, fronto-temporal, ect.), however the same limit always come back to surface: the PDC-dAD was developed for Alzheimer’s disease and never validated for any other types of dementia. This being said, there seems to be a need in developing a consensus for depression diagnosis in diverse dementia types/severity. It would be very interesting to either validate the PDC-dAD in different dementia types/severity or construct a new universal criteria measure for depression in all dementia types (or one who incorporates criteria for the different types). All studies I’ve seen on the assessment of depression in dementia discusses how the main difficulty for healthcare providers (physicians and nurses) is the bidirectional relationship between the two problems and how symptoms of depression in this clientele could actually be behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia or vice versa, leading to over or under detection/diagnosis of depression.
I hope my answer is the type you are looking for and hope this helps! Have a nice day!
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Dear Sirs and Madams, Doctors and Nurses
please fill this anonymous questionnaire about Dementia and palliative care. You needonly 5 minutes. Thank you to help this research study.
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Done
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We would like to start using a program to build pedigrees for our genetic CJD and dementia cohorts. The program should allow to incorporate and search for clinical data.
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FamGenix is a family health history platform that allows you to build pedigrees yourself or auto-generate them by gathering family history data from patients/family members via the app/web portal. It also includes custom surveys that can be sent to participants. On the provider portal you can enter/search clinical data and review/edit pedigrees. https://famgenix.com
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Does anyone have "good" Journal suggestions for publications in China or India? Topic related to dementia or neurodegeneration. (searches give thousands and it is difficult to know).
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Chinese Medical Journal may be a good choice. It is an authoritative medical journal with a long history in China, and its status is similar to that of BMJ.
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Dear Colleagues
We kindly ask you to fulfill this anonymous questionnaire about knowledge and attitudes for the care of people with advanced dementias (severe neurocogntive disorders in DMS-V terminology). Thanks in advance to contribute to the research progresses in this important field.
The questionnaire is for Nurses and Medical doctors.
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👌🏾
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I am working on the effect of music therapy on persons with Alzheimer's Disease. I require EEG signals of healthy individuals and people with Alzheimer's Disease/Dementia that have undergone music therapy. Due to the on-going pandemic, I am unable to collect signals in real-time. It would be helpful if I could be directed to a database that I can get EEG signals from.
Thank You.
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I have enclosed a music therapy and Alzheimer's review of literature article for your perusal. Chris
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Hello.
I am looking for research/papers about using food to decrease behavioral and psychological symptoms in dementia (BPSD). The focus is on behavioral disturbances such as eg. wandering, aggression and insomnia. I am interested of effects of both food deprivation and/or postprandial somnolence but even other suggestions and inputs are welcomed.
Sending my best regards - Sabina Dalsborn
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There are quite a few, just explore it Sabina
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Omega 3 fatty acids have a different wide beneficial effect on many tissues. Does it show any protection against dementia?  
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Also, see the following RG link.
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Hi everyone. I am working on HT22 cell line in-vitro experiment to study dememtia.
I have mostly seen that they usually induce this cell death with H2O2 or glutamate.
BUT why very few people use SCOPOLAMINE?
Because in mouse or rat model, people usually use SCOPOLAMINE to make a dementia model.
Take this paper for example:
Animal experiment: use scopolamine indced modle.
Cell experiment: use glutamate and H2O2.
(Why didn't the author use scopolamine-induced HT22 cell death?)
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you need to ask ourself, first, what are you going to study. Are you studying cell death per se? Do you want to study dementia, and if so, is this the right model and is cell death the most important factor to be studied? Cell lines are great to study biochemistry, sort of great for cell biology, much less great to study neuroscience, even less great to study neurodegeneration.
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I am currently working with predict dementia with a machine learning project. Mainly I am focusing to develop a mobile-based application that consists series of questions designed to test a range of everyday mental skills.
This mobile-based application depends on effective feature attributes that impact the diagnosis of dementia from the already diagnosed clinical patients.
With this covid-19 situation, I have found it difficult to find a dataset for my project. Can anyone suggest/ideas about publicly available datasets for my project ?
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Applying Deep Learning to Predicting Dementia and Mild Cognitive Impairment
Guest Editor (s): Ilias Maglogiannis, Lazaros Iliadis, and Elias Pimenidis
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I have been doing immunohistochemistry of Beta Amyloid on adult healthy cynomolgus monkey brains with the 4G8 and 6E10 antibodies, which were from the Covance company. I found there was 4G8 immunostained intracellular Aβ in a granular pattern in the monkey brains. However, no reaction stained with 6E10 antibody was found. I checked the datesheet of these two antibodies and found that the 6E10 is reactive to amino acid residue 1-16 of beta amyloid while the 4G8 recognizes amino acid residues 17-24 of beta amyloid. I am confused about the result. Consequently, I wonder if there were some differences of structure/function or processing of APP between Aβ1-16 and Aβ17-24.
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This paper might help you out:
Hunter and Brayne Journal of Negative Results in BioMedicine (2017) 16:1 DOI 10.1186/s12952-017-0066-3
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Hi,
I am interested to carry out a thesis on early prediction of Dementia using csv/excel type data. Can someone please assist?
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Regarding variable will you use in your thesis, I have some suggestions for you:
1. For y (dependent) variable, that is dementia, type of the variable is binary (i.e. 1 and 0,where 1 represents dementia and 0 is not dementia)
2. For x (independent) variable, you have to specify it before hand. I mean you have to ensure these variables affect and can be used to predict dementia. Do Exploratory data analysis before doing prediction.
Have you done with all of these?
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I found the Cohen-Mansfield scale, but it is for weekly use. I'm looking for the same type of rating scale or grid that can be used evey day by home caregivers, so it has to be easy to fill. Thank you for your help!
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Rating Scale for Aggressive Behaviour in the Elderly (RAGE)
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Hola
I'm working on a project that deals with clinical named entity recognition, relation extraction etc. I'm currently using Scispacy library for NER work. However, I'm searching for a open source package for relation extraction from clinical notes (Eg. In the following sentence "Dementia due to Alzheimer disease." I except a model that should recognize the relationship that its not just dementia and its is dementia due to Alzheimer.)
Spending sometime on reading articles and surfing google
I found the following packages:
1. SemRep
2. BioBERT
3. Clincal BioBERT
etc.
from the articles, I also got to know that clincal BioBERT to be the suitable model. However, when I tried running the model from transformer library I just found the following output
Code
from transformers import AutoModelForTokenClassification, AutoTokenizer, pipeline
model =  AutoModelForTokenClassification.from_pretrained("emilyalsentzer/Bio_Discharge_Summary_BERT")
tokenizer = AutoTokenizer.from_pretrained("emilyalsentzer/Bio_Discharge_Summary_BERT")
nlp = pipeline('ner', model=model, tokenizer=tokenizer)
text = "Dementia due to Alzheimers disease. Kidney failure due to liver disease."
nlp(text)
Out put:
[{'entity': 'LABEL_1', 'index': 1, 'score': 0.562394917011261, 'word': 'dementia'}, {'entity': 'LABEL_0', 'index': 2, 'score': 0.5325632691383362, 'word': 'due'}, {'entity': 'LABEL_1', 'index': 3, 'score': 0.5473843812942505, 'word': 'to'}, {'entity': 'LABEL_1', 'index': 4, 'score': 0.5070908069610596, 'word': 'alzheimer'}, {'entity': 'LABEL_0', 'index': 5, 'score': 0.5742462873458862, 'word': '##s'}, {'entity': 'LABEL_1', 'index': 6, 'score': 0.5498184561729431, 'word': 'disease'}, {'entity': 'LABEL_1', 'index': 7, 'score': 0.5163406133651733, 'word': '.'}, {'entity': 'LABEL_1', 'index': 8, 'score': 0.5038259625434875, 'word': 'kidney'}, {'entity': 'LABEL_1', 'index': 9, 'score': 0.5872519612312317, 'word': 'failure'}, {'entity': 'LABEL_0', 'index': 10, 'score': 0.523786723613739, 'word': 'due'}, {'entity': 'LABEL_1', 'index': 11, 'score': 0.5193214416503906, 'word': 'to'}, {'entity': 'LABEL_1', 'index': 12, 'score': 0.5457456707954407, 'word': 'liver'}, {'entity': 'LABEL_1', 'index': 13, 'score': 0.5755748748779297, 'word': 'disease'}, {'entity': 'LABEL_1', 'index': 14, 'score': 0.5418881177902222, 'word': '.'}]
From the above output, I except labels such as disease, organ etc. However, the model labeled the entity as 'LABEL_1' or 'LABEL_0'.
How do I use the clinical BioBERT to extract relations. Please advice.
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Hi all
I'm starting to research rating scales to assess symptoms of agitation or anxiety in patients with dementia. If you know any papers or resources Id be very grateful for suggestions
Kind regards
P.J.
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Many thanks for this. This is really useful!
P.J.
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Hi All, I am looking at compiling a wide list of papers or resources on reminiscence therapy for dementia for older people. The positive and negative results, Creative approaches, ICT interventions, standard procedures, etc. I'm interested in perspectives from differing disciplines. All resources/ papers/ leads welcome Thank you!
P.J.
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It feels great to share it. Hope you find it useful P.J. White
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The link between type 2 diabetes and dementia: from biomarkers to treatment
  • Michal Schnaider Beeri
  • Barbara B Bendlin
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I am looking to apply supervised machine analytics on a dataset that shows the location-based movement of patients in a house. The database needs to show the indoor movements of patients. The dataset may have both numerical or categorical values.
An example of this is the demonstration of the time the person woke up, any chores/activities the patient did, the time the patient went to sleep, etc. I would prefer the dataset to be labeled defining the abnormal and normal occasions.
Ideally, I will be applying supervised machine learning algorithms to the patient's movements. For future work unsupervised machine learning analytics can be applied.
Should you know of any of the specific types of datasets, please let me know.
Thanks
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Hi Donna, thanks for this. However, I have been looking for the data collected from these types of sensors. There are usually motion detection sensors applied to patients' houses to collect information based on when there is motion detected in each room.
This type of data is usually found on Kaggle or UCI machine learning websites, but there is not anything similar available.
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I have just registered on PROSPERO the protocol for a systematic literature review and started wondering to witch journals could I submit it. The review is on the use of therapeutic music-based interventions, in the acute hospital setting, with patients with dementia.
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Dear Dr.Lidia,
There are many online journals, such as American Journal of Infectious Diseases and Microbiology, American Journal of Public Health Research, Biomedical Research International, Journal of One Health etc, in which review articles can be published.I have published reviews in all these journals.
Stay safe and healthy.
With kind regards,
Prof.Dr.Mahendra Pal
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Lancet followed by JAMA and others published today announced "new" recommendations to help prevent '40%' of dementia. The thing is, none of this is new. It is all what I learned as 'common sense' sixty years ago, as a child. From the title I was expecting some earth-shattering new discovery, but no it was the same old doctrine. After trying all of these recommendations for the past 60 years, I can tell you that in average lifetime, many are not obtainable even with vigorous effort based upon knowledge. I would also say that this 40% reduction is already built into society, and the 40% just cannot or will not follow the guidelines. Also, some of the risk factors are built into the aging process, diabetes, hypertension, decreased mobility, chance of head trauma, etc. Although not stated, this "new" set of guidelines may be promoting the greater use of medicinal control. The authors, I don't believe, laid any blame on genetics, which I think is also important. I, as an example, have risk factors, despite trying to control them for 60 plus years, and don't have dementia that i am aware of, but also have none in my family who commonly live over a century. Genetics, family history, is also important I believe. There is also no mention of limiting exposure to neurotoxins, which (as a Medical Toxicologist) I think is a major contributor to dementia. This also foregoes the effect of viruses on neural function, including the possible effects of the novel coronavirus and others on dementia. Now, identifying these additional factors may have been "new" and revolutionary. Thank you and stay safe. Gary Ordog, MD September 24, 2020.
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We encourage all patients, especially those with early dementia and those with risk factors for dementia, to maintain or increase physical activity and exercise as long as there are no contraindications.
●Mediterranean-style diets that are high in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, beans, nuts, and seeds and include olive oil as an important source of fat have been associated with a variety of health benefits, including reduced cardiovascular risk, which may directly or indirectly reduce dementia risk.
●Prospective studies and randomized controlled trials have not shown an overall benefit from vitamins, statins, cholinesterase inhibitors, estrogen replacement, or nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for the prevention of dementia.
●While vitamin E is not recommended in healthy adults for the purposes of preventing dementia,
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People with Dementia (PwD) have difficulty living their daily lives. And to help PwD, the caregiver is one of several solutions. However, caregivers also have many challenges in helping PwD. Because the memory and thinking decreased dramatically, PwD usually has many symptoms such as Agitation and Anxiety, repetitive questions, depression, hallucinations, sleep disturbances, etc. which make PwD refuse to be helped by caregivers. Therefore, approaches or methods that can help caregivers are needed so that their efforts to support PwD are successful. I have read "humanitude" which is one of the most successful methods. But are there other methods you might know about? Please share. Thank you.
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See: Johnson, C and Johnson, R. (2000) Alzheimer's disease as a trip back in time. American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease April or the short British Alzheimer's Society one page article. for an explanation of the time Travel model of AD. The updated version with more positive language in in the 2017 Behavioral Science journal article.
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Substance-P is an example of peptide neurotransmitter present in hippocampus, neocortex region of brain which involved in perception of pain. I want to know is any link between this neurotransmitter to Alzheimer's or other type of dementia?
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There most likely are many causes of AD.
One prominent theory is loss of autophagy. This dysfunction
allows deposition of tau protein. Rapamycin inhibition of the
mTOR pathway allows improvement in autophagy and repair
of damaged proteins etc.and suggests therapeutic effects.
Mitochondrial dysfunction is also involved. The loss of normal
cell function due to severe mitochondrial damage from various insults
ie ischemia, toxins, hyperglycemia, direct physical damage etc.
Cells die at an advance rate via apoptosis.
I love this topic....so much to learn
Lester Mandelker DVM
Fellow AAVPT
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The Novel Object Recognition Test (NORT) is now among the most commonly used behavioral tests for rodents, It is used to evaluate cognition, particularly recognition memory in rodent models of CNS disorders (Ennaceur and delacour, 1988), relies on the innate preference and the natural tendency of rodents to spend more time exploring novel objects than familiar ones (Cohen and Stackman, 2015).
Our studies are about testing the enhancer potential of phytochemicals on memory impairment in Aged rats, and other models of impair cognition (e.g NMDA antagonists (MK-801) and muscarinic antagonists (scopolamine), for the purpose we would be so grateful
I would like to know :
How many times can we use this test during a treatment period of 14 days ? And will there be any effect of this repetition on the effectiveness and the results of this test?
Thank you in advance.
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Our study is based on two behavioral tests the Y-Maze test, which in it the spatial working memory was evaluated based on the percentage of correct alteration between the three arms (A, B and C), and the NOR test to analyze the nonspatial working memory in Scopolamine-induced memory impairment model. And other biochemical parameters such as dosing antioxidants enzymes, lipid peroxidation in both brain and serum ....
Is that enough !!! To confirm the anti-amnesic potential of a plant ?
Ansab Akhtar Thanks Sir for your valuable help. 🌹
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Dear colleagues and other scholars,
I'm a psychiatry resident currently working on a review about BPSD management. However, one thing I haven't understood is: "Why is it that researcher and clinicians group BPSD as if it was a single entity?"
Given the varied symptoms of BPSD, is it logical to group it as a single syndrome just because it's happening along with dementia? Or does it have a well-established psychopathology to justify the grouping?
Does anyone have a good reference regarding this issue?
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I just saw your question from quite a while ago, so I'm not sure if it's still relevant but others might find the information useful as well...
There is good evidence the BPSDs co-occur. In the paper attached, we showed a high degree of BPSD comorbidity in a representative sample of PwD living in residential care (in Australia).
While all BPSDs do not occur in all forms of dementia, some form of BPSD is common in most forms of dementia. BPSD are grouped together because they are associated with damage to the brain (and deficits associated with this) and they can often be treated in similar ways, which often differ from the way the condition would be treated in a person without dementia.
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The Greater Cincinnati Well-being Observation Tool developed by Clarissa Rentz (2005).
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I am looking for interesting, pure research (not s.reviews) into recommenations for effective communication in patients with dementia.
Thank you.
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Thank you so much, Kathryn.
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Hi,
I'm searching for journals that have an interest in case studies that incorporate neurological, neuropsychological, and neuropath (autopsy) data. I have an interesting case of dementia that was unclear at the first two levels and presented somewhat of a surprise at autopsy.
Any journal recommendations?
Greatly appreciated,
Bryant
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Depending on the questions you're addressing with the case, the nature and quality of data and analysis, you could try a look at the following: 'Neurocase', 'Cortex' or The Clinical Neuropsychologist.
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I work in the aged care system, mainly with people who have a diagnosis of dementia, and am currently doing a bachelor of dementia care with UTAS
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Several strategies could be put in place depending on unique presenting scenarios,but focus should be on patient safety,nutrition,adherence to medication and self care.
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I find very interesting the idea that intestinal microbiota might influence brain development and behaviour. There are research groups or studies that explore a link between the gut miocrobioma and dementia? 
Thanks
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I have done half of the analysis and have reached the fifth step where we do a fraction of the total score. so after that i am clueless on what the next step is, also a syntax of the scale is also asked and i couldn't find it. Can anyone of you help me out if you know.
Thank you.
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Hello Alisha,
I'm unclear from your query as to what the source or purpose of the "steps" you're trying to implement might be. For that reason, this might not be as direct an answer as you seek.
1. Here's a link to the authors' attempt to run a CFA on the DKAS, which pretty clearly indicates which items are purported to associate with the proposed four-factor solution:
2. Not sure what you mean by syntax of the scale, except that the factor structure shown in the link above explicitly indicates item to factor associations.
Good luck with your work!
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As a health researcher I have been long concerned at the lack of proper diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease in older adults that pervades the mental health field. Up to 92% of those suffering from memory disorders have been found to also suffer from hearing impairment, almost all of them un-/under-corrected. This renders any diagnosis of AD in an older adult inconclusive or over-diagnosed. My symptomatic charts comparing the behaviors arising from late onset AD and moderate hearing impairment in older adults have been published by NIH entities, yet the practice of disregarding the auditory component persists throughout the mental health field. How may be best to remedy this pervasive oversight?
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My feeling is that genetic influence is not as strong as some tend to believe. For instance, in cases where we find "the deaf gene", we find almost no offspring that are deaf. In combining my clinical (empirical observations in a case history frame) and objective research experience I find genetics influence but do not determine outcome. Environment added to generic influence is a much stronger and more reliable predictor. In fact, as we begin understanding the plasticity of genes, even within individuals, we see a huge range of generic expression over time---from genetic repair to genetic breakdown. The Methuselah Mouse studies bear this out quite well.
But getting back to the core question of hearing loss---no matter what underlying genetic influence we can today conclude that uncorrected hearing does indeed influence both identifiable cognitive behaviors and the underlying physical cascade that brings it on. It is so pervasive that in one (University of Pittsburgh, 1999) meta-study of 32 studies on Alzheimer's and hearing loss, that older adults that were diagnosed with dementia (Alzheimer's), 92% were found to have uncorrected hearing loss.
The research trail before that (Chartrand, 1990; UT-Austin, 1992; University of South Florida, 1996) was better explained and framed in subsequent studies, such as Brandeis University (2006, 2008, 2012) and John Hopkins (2011, 2012, 2014, 2017)--to name but a smattering of the evidence that dementia and uncorrected hearing loss are, for sure, bosom buddies of the first order. But who's paying attention? The entire clinical community of mental health remains, in my opinion, in blissful denial.
For that reason, I started this project to try to 1) alert my colleagues of this massive and critical oversight, and 2) invite more evidence--pro or con--from anyone wishing to shed more light on the subject. To-date, no one has introduced hard data proving the central theme of this project is in error. I appreciate all of your comments--and hope we do the bold thing by getting the word out, thusly: No mental health assessment of an older adult is valid or conclusive until their hearing acuity has been evaluated and any hearing deficiency corrected. Once that has happened, one may have confidence that the diagnosis is reasonably valid, all other factors being equal. But to treat for dementia without first treating the hearing loss represents, at best, professional and clinical negligence.
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Carbon is one of the common air pollutants. Burning of fossil fuel generates carbon pollution. Carbon pollution in turn triggers bouts of asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, lung cancer, type II diabetes, dementia etc. To reduce the burden of these said ailments we need to reduce the use of fossil fuels. What could be the fuel sources alternative to fossil fuels? What measures could be taken to reduce air pollution from burning fossil fuels?
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The main alternatives energy sources to the use of fossil fuels for electricity generation are:
a) Renewables;
b) Nuclear energy.
However, not all countries are ready to replace the use of fossil fuels for electricity generation with the use of renewables and nuclear energy altogether. Renewable energy sources are unstable, such as solar and wind power; both types of renewables depend on climate conditions. Some others are not available in the country such as geothermal or their presence is not strong enough to represent a real alternative to the use of fossil fuels for electricity generation such as hydropower.
The use of nuclear energy for electricity generation is not a cheap option, and many countries have not adequate infrastructure and the qualified workforce to use this type of energy source for electricity generation.
For this reason, a country should study all types of energy sources available in the country very carefully and select the most economical and clean combination of energy sources to build its energy matrix.
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Hello,
I'm looking for a communication measure that assesses both verbal and non-verbal aspects of communication, to be administered in people with dementia. Do you have any suggestions? Thank you!
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Hello Mauro Colombo, thanks for the suggestion!
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Hello,
I am looking for data and citations on how long it takes to analyse an MRI scan of MS lesions and of cortical atrophy (dementia) manually. In most papers it is written it is time-consuming, but I would like to know precisely how long it takes.
Thanks for you help!
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I'm very sorry, Jerome Maller, I never learned of any software package evaluating MS lesions for their specific, truly diagnostic and causally revealing features. It was quite a relief if you might tell us of such achievements in light of the issues raised in my @addendum.
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My dataset consists of EEG electrode power features in all power bands(alpha, beta, delta..both relative and absolute) and source power features (obtained after sLoreta analysis) in addition to connectivity strengths between the different sources (brain regions). There are as many as 20k features in all.
If i have to predict disease (dementia) based on all above features, what approach will yield best accuracy on test sets? I initially thought that maybe i must fit seperate classifiers for each type of feature set (after dimension reduction) and then use the output probabilities obtained to write a meta classifier on top to predict the final disease state.
However, i think that may perhaps not be so great as all features are correlated (as source estimates and connectivity measures are obtained from the electrodes themselves). Is this correct?
I used KernelPCA to select a few components from the entire dataset and then run a classifier on top of the transformed dataset with cross validation. I get an accuracy of around 75% only on test sets. I have to improve accuracy atleast by another 15%. I used extremely randomized trees but the accuracy was not that much.
What other approaches can i use?
I am looking for a good discussion on possible approaches and/or a sample solution. Thank you.
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Yes, try these two out. With keras you can build deep learning models very fast.
In addition you can try to find even better features.
A hyperparameter optimization could improve your classifier. However, I would try this last. First find good features and a suitable model.
All the best for you.
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Other than differences caused by stroke, would cognitive function (and other symptoms) differ in a group that includes all types of VCI compared to those that have a very specific type subcortical ischaemic vascular cognitive impairment
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Jordi Serra-Mestres Thank you for putting this in a clear way that helps me understand this. You have been very helpful, thank you.
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I would appreciate assistance in discovering peer reviewed articles concerning dementia among homeless....
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please check te pdf
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Autopsies show that there are two abnormal structures in the brain with AD called plaques and tangles. Plaques are made from a protein known as Beta-amyloid and tangles are made of Tau protein. These proteins also exist in a healthy brain. What make them to lose their normal function and cause the cell death?
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more: to me, the question is "what makes some brain more resilient than others, bearing the same amount of toxic [misfolded] proteins ?"
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Studies and calculations concerning benefits, return on Investment out off implementation of dementia prevention and investigation
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i may suggest to follow the Alzheimer's Federation
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What is the difference between amnesia and dementia?
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Dr Alois Alzheimer never described the s.c. " Alzheimer's disease"! He described only once patient Augusta D. with atypical (symptomatic) psychosis. She was Dr Alzheimer's patient!
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Special training of supporting staff is needed to handle these types of situations
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Need a valid and easily accessible psychometric tools for measuring the psychological well being with respect to general health condition and quality of life of the informal carers of people living with Alzheimer. Those informal caregivers includes family members, spouse and other family relative who are not from the health background.
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This may not be the best tool but you can measure the caregiver's satisfaction with life as well as moral distress or attitudes towards Alzheimer patients:
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Can anyone suggest any research where errors were not corrected on the trail making test? thank you
Are there any advantages and disadvantages of not correcting participants?
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Depending on the version of the TMT you are using (and the associated norms), you are supposed to correct errors as the examinee progresses during the task. For example, if you are using the HRB version of TMT and Heaton's or MOANS norms to correct scores, there is a standardized proceedure for correcting errosr that should be followed; the time that correcting the errors adds to the task contributes to the degree of impairment detected by the measur. The same holds true for Color Trails as well. If you are not correcting the examinee as you go, this confounds their ability to complete the task as they progress. See Reitan and Wolfson (1993) for the proceedures.
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I would like to research on the experiences of people with dementia. I know I would like to use interviews, tape recording however I am struggling on finding a methodology. I had thought of IPA however as a novice I have been advised to read around and hopefully find another one without a lot of new terminology that I will be expected to identify and differentiate.
i am a part time prof doc student.
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Wouldnt the methodology be informed by your research question/ aim? You also need to consider the broad range of capabilities of people suffering this disorder- are you looking at early, middle or late stage presentations?
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Limbic-predominant age-related TDP-43 encephalopathy (LATE) is a quite hot topic these days among those who are concerned with dementia, memory deficits and neurodegenerative diseases.
It has been suggested that LATE is distinguished from frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) with TDP-43 pathology based on its epidemiology.
What do you think about this newly recognized disease?
Any idea about the potential or promising diagnostic approaches?
Possible future biomarkers and mechanisms...
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There is a nice article in Nature Neuroscience 2019;22:65-77.... "TDP-43 extracted from FTD brains displays distinct aggregate assemblies and neurotoxic effects."
They showed that FTD-TDP type A patients were more likely to manifest signs of behavioral variant FTD, and that FTD-TDP type B patients were more likely to manifest signs of the motor neuron variant of FTD, while the FTD-TDP type C patients showed signs of semantic dementia.
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Any research that shows decreasing risk of dementia in persons who perform daily "mental exercise", or brain training games, like Sudoku Lumosity , Elevate or Skillz Apps?
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Dear Abdul,
This is a question I am asked a lot by my older age psychiatry patients.
Thank you Linda for your expert guidance.
Did your thinking about video games and serial AB get any further, Abdul?
Nick Clarke
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Is artificial intelligence combined with machine learning a useful tool to cope with dementia patients?
The management of dementia can include,
+ How to increase the accuracy of diagnosis for dementia
+ How to early detect potential dementia victims
+ How to prevent the victim from further deterioration
+ How to give clear prescription to the victims with the system
+ What sort of online tools for artificial intelligence (ANN or deep learning) would you recommend for.
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Using artificial intelligence combined with machine learning have potential to be clinically relevant for dementia clients. However, before we can use such techniques/algorithms we must have to validate and calibrate the algorithms in a broader and more diverse patients.
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I would like to report the frailty scores of family caregivers of persons with dementia using a mail questionnaire. I am considering multiple questionnaires but wondering if the CFS has ever been used for self-report?
Thanks!
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I will be using CFS to offer former care givers the opportunity to have a frailty assessment but not as a self-report-this will be piloted within a Community Hospital setting(Intermediate Care)
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As previous research indicates that the bilingual people are more resilient to dementia, developing several years after the monolingual, so is it a proportional correlation?
Is more languages practice associated with further reduction in dementia future risk?
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Dear Anton
Exclude other metabolic issues like hypothyroidism or encephalopathy due to metabolic errors also mild concussion may cause some psychiatric manifestations including depression which may then mask her cognitive abilities and reserve and appear as if declining cognitively while the fact that she is depressed so is not communicating or refusing to.
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What are you doing to reduce your risk of dementia?
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I usually avoid stress in daily life, because stress affects the immune system, which is known to play an important role in the development of dementia.
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In our team we are searching different databases for intervention studies on humans suffering from dementia. Unfortunately, Web of Science (former Web of Knowledge) does not use "MeSh" or other qualified terms, thus there are a lot of results including animal models, for instance.
Do you know about a proper search string for automatically excluding these?
Example: NOT TS=(animal* AND model* OR mouse OR mice).
What are your experience with this problem?
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Categories
Research Areas:Veterinary Sciences
Web of Science Categories:Veterinary Sciences
Advance Search
## SU=Veterinary Sciences
## than filter.
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kind Zeinab Khajavi, the abstract of your paper is intriguing; unfortunately, i miss the whole text, being unable to read it. Hence, what are your conclusions about your questions ? My feeling is persons with dementia may retain somehow their emotional experiences - also basing on neural structure
best regards, Mauro Colombo
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Being myself a neurodegenerative patient, I can say fear of being ridiculous, more even, pushes me to retain emotional experiences. You already feel weak and are afraid to scare more even normal people with things that may be just not real. And if you loose control on one leg, what could happen with love or whatever other feeling? What is the reality of human feelings when you cannot do a simple thing any human babies naturally do?
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What is digital dementia? Will the next term be considered mental illness?
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Digital dementia is a term coined by German neuroscientist Dr. Manfred Spritzer in 2015 based on his research proving the breakdown of cognitive function related to the overuse of technology.
See:
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What are the problems and the extent of variations if we use both male and female rats for dementia models?
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This is a very important question, which fortunately nowadays is taken more seriously, after decade of working only with male animals (with the reasoning of hormonal effects that cannot be monitored). See these specific reviews on Alzhiemer’s disease ( ) , but actually this issue on sex effects and difference in various psychiatric and neurological disorders should be studied. That’s why, it is important to have both sexes in your study.
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Apart from the trails test can anyone suggest tests that are done to check someone’s processing speed in dementia patients please.
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I hope you find it useful
Digit Cancellation Test:
Zazzo R. Test des deux barrages. Actualités pédagogiques et psychologiques . Neuchâtel, Switzerland: Delachaux et Nestlé; 1974.
Pattern Comparison Test:
Salthouse TA Babcock RL. Decomposing adult age differences in working memory. Development Psychol . 1991;27:763–776.
Regards
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I am thinking Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) or Physical Self-Maintenance Scale (PSMS) but is there a scale that I should have in mind for the prospective arm of the intervention trial?
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Thank you very much
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I can't find any interesting study showing such dependence reliably. Maybe someone know a interesting paper?
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Several studies have identified metals such Pb, Fe, Al, Cu and Zn in AD pathogen sis. Metal ions are known to catalyze the production of free radicals and induce mental retardation or dementia, Since several dietary polyphenols are known to chelate metals, their routine use may also be protective against the onset of AD. For details consult J Alzheimers Dis. 2010 Jan: 19 ( 4 ) : 1123 - 1139
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On their medical assessments page (for a lay audience), the Alzheimer's Association states that an MMSE score between 20 and 24 suggests mild dementia, a score between 13 and 20 suggests moderate dementia, and a score of 12 or below suggests severe dementia. (https://www.alz.org/alzheimers-dementia/diagnosis/medical_tests)
I'm wondering where these numbers are coming from as cutoffs seem to shift over time with evolving conceptualizations of mild, moderate, and severe dementia. The original Folstein, Folstein, & McHugh (1975) article didn't specify cutoffs but noted that scores for cognitively normal ranged from 24-30 while scores for dementia patients ranged from 0-22. Tombaugh & McIntyre (1992) recommended scores of 24-30 as cognitively normal, 18-23 as mild impairment, and 0-17 as severe impairment in their comprehensive review. I skimmed the 2018 NIA-AA Research Framework for Alzheimer's disease but didn't see anything regarding the MMSE.
Really, I've been struggling to find a recent, modern article or committee report to cite that justifies my decision to include cognitively normal participants in an analysis if MMSE scores are above 25.
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Rafael Franco & Linda A Hershey pointed at seminal bibliography: both references are open access [a further merit of their quotations].
In my experience as a would-be clinical gerontologist, in case MMSE is >= 24/30 but I still have a suspicion of sound abnormality, in the rehabilitative ward I usually combine MMSE with clock-test [Mendes scoring]: the latter test is somewhat complementary to MMSE, with regards to executive [dis-]abilities.
Finally, cut-off "movings" are not infrequent, especially in clinical gerontology, a discipline devoted to the research of new, sometimes unconventional equilibria.
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Hello,
The problem is that cogntivie and functional instruements used for detecting congitive or functional improvement or decrement in patients with mild cognitive impairment or early dementia are often insensitive to change. Your comments are very much appreciated.
Thanks,
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Dear Saeid,
You might be interested in this paper. Please, take a look at it at
The regression-based Reliable Change Index can be a good aproximation to interpret change across assessment waves. The problem here is that you need to have a sample to build the regression, and are limited to the test-retest interval analyzed in that sample. Besides that, you can analyze change using a univariate or a multivariate model including covariates for each individua with MCI.
H/ope this helps. Please let me know your thoughts.
Regards,
Javi
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Hi everyone. i would like to know if using IPA which mixed method may add to a more comphrehensive analysis of this question
'how does having dementia impact personal relationships?'
thanks..
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Can anyone recommend a neuropsychological test to assess problem solving, preferably with easy application for dementia? It can be a sub-test of a large battery. Thanks very much in advance.
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Hi,
Maybe this article will interest you:
Article The Mindstreams MCI score: a practical clinical tool for ear...
Best regards,
Ya'akov
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good monring
i'm questionning about the expression of the behavior in chronic dementia and its relations with the society where the people grow up.
are there a difference in the expression of the behavior between an occidental society and an oriental one?
i need a collaborate working in a geriatric or neurologic services in asia ( china, korea, india, japon ) we take care of patient with chronic dementia; to design and execute this study.
best regards
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It depends which behaviors we are talking about. Socially inappropriate behaviors, physically aggressive behaviors and psychiatric behaviors are commonly seen in different stages of dementia however I believe the single most important determinant of their expression may well be modified or made worse by caregiver approach. I believe it is the difference in the caregiver education/understanding of the disease process between occidental and oriental societies besides the living arrangements (socially cohesive arrangements in oriental cultures) that largely determine the dementia behavior expressions.
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Does anyone use the Mini-Mental State Examination Short Form and what is the cut-off score used for Dementia patients?
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Hi Elene,
Our hospital has moved away from the MMSE as it has been copyrighted and you need to pay per use. We are using the ACE-iii (Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination) and the MOCA (Montreal Cognitive Assessment)
We did a small study to validate these in our settings
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Great to learn that you have been supported to pilot a National Dementia Registry. Please can you share your protocol for this project?
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nice to hear Ireland funded its Dementia National Project
Italy unfortunat€ly plann€d a national action at "0 co$t" ... Mauro
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Hi all,
I want to develop a model to forecast the prevalent cases of dementia in the UK in 2030.
I did a literature search to identify some of the age- and sex- specific prevalence of dementia from the population based studies from historical data. I got the age and sex specific population of UK. How do i forecast for 2020, 2025 and 2030 using this information. Any illustration will be very helpful.
Thanks and regards,
Thiru
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Thanks Mr. Ette Etuk, i have data of Can you please suggest a reading for time series model and extrapolation for forecast.
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I've been asked to design a study investigating the risk of dementia in military veterans that have been exposed to mental ill-health during service. The study I'm designing is will adopt a case-control design, comparing elderly veterans with & without dementia and using their military and medical records to look at mental health during service. However my superiors want me to include an interview component, asking elderly veterans to comment retrospectively on their mental well-being during military service. I'm a little uneasy about using a qualitative component in a quantitative design (case-control)...and I'm also worried about the potential for significant selection/recall/researcher bias - I'd greatly appreciate any advice about this! Many thanks, Chris.
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I hope you'll share your findings as soon as they are published.
Thanks!
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I'm involved in a research project about intimacy and sexuality in residential aged care and we are interested in how this term might be used/overused to 'diagnose' behaviour in people living with dementia.
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