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Cultural Geography - Science topic

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I am interested in seeing whether the focus of GIScience studies have shifted over the last few decades from being more local or regional in scale towards global. My assumption is that due to the availability and accessibility of global datasets (e.g. user generated data) and technical advancements that make it possible to analyse these datasets triggered a shift in geographic focus.
In a recent review of OpenStreetMap related publications, we found that 6.5% of analyzed publications had a global focus [1] . I was wondering if there are similar review papers that are broader in scope.
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You may find answers from this paper: “What Were GIScience Scholars Interested in During the Past Decades?”
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I have attached the OSM map of Pannipitiya, Sri Lanka. So looking at the map, what kind of geographical questions you can ask?
To me, the following came to my mind
1. What are the places where house dwellers can walk and reach within 1 minute (600 m ?) ?
2. What is the calmest and quiet place to meditation?
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Describe the geographical features and locations of the places and roads on the map, in relation to one another
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Hello All my Senior person , where can i get Rajasthan State Gram Panchayat or Village Boundary Data ??
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Check Bhuvan
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How does culture influence food choices? I am interested in studying the mutual influence of countries in food traditions, and if geographical context can influence the consumers attitude.
Can traditional foods be common / close to peoples of common ethnic origin? How food patterns develop
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In Bangladesh: Rice, fish and pulse are major representative food.
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A graduate student has written me, "I have been tasked with ascertaining the validity of a certain 'geographer's urban legend" and I was told through some investigation that you might be the person to ask. I am trying to figure out the real story of Dr. Bill Bunge, or more specifically, did he throw an unruly student from a window"? This provocative question is both a can of worms and a minefield, and so I want to cast a wide net here is search of validation of the alleged event, if any. I also provide some additional context, recently come to light, that may or may not be relevant to the alleged event.
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Switching gears for a minute. I now verified that the controversial and "anonymous" illustration that appears in Peter Gould's The Geographer at Work(RKP 1985) titled "the Abduction of Geographia by Quantifactus" (figure 3.5, on page 34) was indeed originally published as authored as "Geo-political Cartoon: The Rape Geographia" on page 15 in Vol, 1(march 1964), of the mimeographed underground journal Geography. The artist is therein identified as T. Untermeer. I know this because I have finally acquired my own copy of this rogue journal(apparently edited by quantitative geographer Forrest R. "woody Pitts), and that it includes the salacious cartoon. my investigations inside the Bungean labyrinth cuntinue--in EARNEST. Anonymous Author
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I am exploring via case study data, manifestations of belonging in a place-based setting. I am aware of varying conceptualisations of belonging (elective, embedded, trans-locational) but want to explore more deeply embedded notions of belonging in particular and more generally how best to make the case that the manifestations of belonging in play in a location need to be understood in order to develop meaningful public policy that improve people's lives.
I welcome views, references and key points as linked to both elements of the above statement.
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Hi,
You may check the following references.
- Owens, Susan. "‘Engaging the public’: Information and deliberation in environmental policy." Environment and planning A 32, no. 7 (2000): 1141-1148.
- Acton, Jan Paul. "Evaluating public programs to save lives." (1973).
- Dreier, Peter, John H. Mollenkopf, and Todd Swanstrom. Place matters: Metropolitics for the twenty-first century. University Press of Kansas, 2004.
Best,
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Hi! I am looking for articles related to the cultural geography field and its relationship with tourism. Do you know if there is some research about it? Thank you very much :)
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Wherever your chosen reading locale - beach, park bench, airplane, air-conditioned living room - make sure you’re curling up with the best books of summer 2018. From novels to short story collections, historical yarns to nonfiction titles drawn from the headlines, there’s something new for readers of all stripes to dig into this summer. Debut authors with buzzy fiction, teen activists marking a movement and historical experts populate this summer reading list for 2018.
My suggestions are (for now):
1. Female Persuasion by Meg Wolitzer
2. The High Season by Judy Blundell
3. Look Alive Out There by Sloane Crosley
4. Nedoumice by Dzevad Karahasan
5. Alfir by Irfan Horozovic
6. The Missing by Agatha Christy
Do yoh have suggestions?
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Gore Vidal's essays, without fail. Beautiful style, analytical and knowledgeable.
Gore Vidal's 'Creation', a novel about a point in time when great thinkers emerged and the world changed, as they say in all the good blurbs. Brilliant novel and brilliant history!
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The relationship between territory and the culture concept.
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Dear Florencia:
I strongly recommend the "Journal of Cultural Geography". Please, find attached these articles:
Best,
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Puede alguien recomendar estudios desde la psicología sobre la conservación de bosques nativos por las comunidades? Muchas gracias.
Traditionally, studies have been carried out on the conservation of native forests of other disciplines, other than psychology. I have found related studies in community and environmental psychology, but not about the subject that I investigate.
Thank you very much.
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Muchas gracias estimads César y Dolores!
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How do / can we appropriate technical information and know-how in construction by visual methods?
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Not sure I can help, but if I understand your question correctly, you are asking how to get input on traditional techniques of building? If you are trying to work with local people and are requesting their expertise and knowledge of construction, one way to start is to elicit their feedback by asking help with a drawing you've made of a building. Starting with a hand-drawn image you've created may open the door for them to help you correct your elevation or plan and may also help them perceive you as genuinely interested in their work.
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I am studying these enterprises as an attempt to understand how theoretically, these enterprises, conceptualised as occuring in developing society, differ from those occuring in western/developed ones. First, I want to contribute to the growing immigrant entrepreneural literature, and also interrogate it. On the flip side of it, the study is also a contribution to south-south migration which is often difficult to find in the migration literature.
One key objective is to examine Nigerian migrants' propensity to self employment, but also I want to explore how their activities serve as continuity, or discontinuity/break to those pursued by thei forebearers in Accra. Of course issues about operational strategies and profiling will also be explored.
I will be interested in suggestions that point to appropriate methodological strategies including sampling, data collection instruments and analyses.
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 Your objectives; 1) to examine Nigerian migrants' propensity to self employment, 2) to explore how their activities serve as continuity, or discontinuity/break to those pursued by thei forebearers in Accra. 3) issues about operational strategies and profiling will also be explored. 
Objective 1 can be met through a phenomelogical approach-hear it from them. objective 2 may require a comparative approach which can also be addressed using a qualitative approach. The third objective i believe can also  be achieved using the same approaches.
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The ancient port of Myos Hormos was established by the Ptolemies on the western coast of the Red Sea in Egypt. It witnessed great interaction between the Ptolemaic kingdom and later the Roman Empire and Eastern nations like India and China. However I found two sets of evidence regarding two different presumed locations of the port: one just north to the Egyptian city of Hurghada and the other north of the Egyptian city of Alqussair. Those locations are around 170 kilometers apart. Any further information on Red Sea ports will be very much appreciated 
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for what ?
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Research papers related to cultural geography to study impact of festivals on market and environment.
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Thematic festivals, political events, cultural activities, sport events, religious meetings, etc., and can be held at an national& international level. festivals are organized in order to answer the specific needs of a community. Many of the buildings built for different important events i.e. world Expo. Festivals help promoting the areas in which they take place, attract numerous tourists, and can be regarded as a new type of tourism & positioning the festival on newer market segments.I send some links about your query-
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There are number of issue can be discussed, if you categorized in number of section –
a)      Flora & fauna
b)      Climate Change
c)       Energy
d)      Pharmaceutical
e)      Geological
f)       Climate change
g)      Geological development
h)      etc.
You need to focus on your expertise field and availability of resources.
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Although a person may belong to a specific nationality and culture, because of different factors,  he /she might be exposed to a culture which is different from his/her own.  However, after being exposed to the new culture, he/she may  acquire a new cultural identity and somehow may feel a sense of belonging to that specific culture.
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Stuart Hall's work would be my go-to source. In the Modernity reader he edited with David held and others, there is a chapter The Question of Cultural Identity (http://faculty.georgetown.edu/irvinem/theory/Hall-Identity-Modernity-1.pdf).
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As we accumulate more and more ecological data on such conflicts, it seems that what we really lack is an understanding of the cultural contexts of many such conflicts. I'm aware of recent work by Steve Redpath and others, and am very keen to find more key sources from a variety of disciplines. My own work on croc attacks suggests that the best scientifically-informed advice based on our knowledge of croc ecology and behaviour often fails because of local beliefs about crocodiles ('were-crocodiles', fate, magical protections or curses). I'm very interested in examples of this in relation to crocodiles, particularly in Africa.
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Hello, got your request through Ana Isabel Queiroz
From a different disciplinary perspective I would recommend this reference:
KNIGHT, J Natural enemies people wildlife conflict from anthropological perspective
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I am researching the distinct visual aesthetic qualities recognisable in paintings made in far northern Queensland, Australia. The tropical region yields sensory reactions to the wet tropic environment as texture, colour and complex patterns and forms. The motifs and symbolism embedded in the work reflects on a western understanding or misunderstanding of the special features of the tropical world, understood by Aristotle as the torrid zone; a space that he thought was dangerous for human occupation. Naturalists and explorers like Humboldt, Darwin, Wallace, Bates and Banks altered this view, which was then imaged by painters like Matisse, Rousseau and Gauguin. Northern Queensland has emerged as a site for painters to look again at the tropical aesthetic.
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In the peruvian amazon reainforest, especialy in Iquitos exists an own kind of tropical painting, inspired by local myth, often painted under the hallucinogenic influence of Ayahuasca (Banisteriopsis caapi) and therfore extremly colorfull (eg attachment). You can find more here:
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My project is examining the art of the Big Dams and Big Dam regionalism in New Deal America. Richard Guy Wilson wrote,"A photograph by Margaret Bourke-White of spillway gate construction at the Fort Peck Dam in Montana graced the first cover Life Magazine in 1936. Dams caught the American imagination because they represented work for a depression-affected economy and the benevolent aspects of governmental planning. The dams suggested that man could alter and control his environment; they also signified the coming of age of a new source of power-hydroelectricity. Yet the dams were more than functional structures. They were symbols that observers struggled to understand." I am looking for opinion, sources, and references on the perceptions of big dams and an insight to the "struggle to understand."
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This is just opinion Katherine, so my apologies ahead of time....Following on from Philipp's comment, dams, or the impounding of water, have been symbols of national development and progress since the Sumerians.  Indicating that our interrelationship with this wonderful and devestating element has been a key player in shaping who we are on this planet.  After the first WWI and the depression, when America was pleading for an answer to this question. The Big Dams seem to have been a part of the answer. Perhaps even the dot on the exlamation mark at the end?  Again, this is just my opinion, but I think one way to look at this question is in terms of its opposites. Form versus force; Man versus nature; water versus concrete; freedom versus containment; natural progress versus technological progress; etc.  If dams are an enigma that we "struggle to understand" then could this juxtaposition have something to do with it? Words like "benevolent" create confusion if we suspect other motives.  Adding to the dilmena is the fact that so many men, desperate for income and therefore willing to do anything, died in the making of these dams (around a hundred workplace deaths in the Hoover Dam, but still more through pneumonia and illnesses directly associated with worker's conditions).  Do we struggle to understand them, either as functional structures or as aethetic expressions, because they represent both temples and tombs?   Just a thought.
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I am interested in insights from studies that have looked at how local culture can be understood and built upon to enable appropriate development. My research is in the field of climate change adaptation, but I am interested in insights drawn from other disciplinary literature. I believe that understanding, and respectfully and appropriately engaging with local cultural forms is an imperative in developing effective, sustainable and culturally appropriate adaptation strategies. If planning does not take into account local cultural forms then the resultant strategies are likely to be ineffective, maladaptive and oppressive, and can lead to further disdain and distrust from local community towards the 'development sector'.
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There are works on local culture and local knowledge in development since the 1990s -in some cases earlier. Here a short introduction: http://www.fao.org/docrep/007/y5610e/y5610e01.htm
, here a longer publication by the World Bank: http://www.worldbank.org/afr/ik/ikcomplete.pdf
I think, the main problem in conceptualizing local knowledge and culture is precisely the "local" - there are as many forms as there are experiences. And while it is relatively easy to work out mechanisms of integration, it is hard to go beyond that and into what local culture really is.
I attached a text of mine on a concept born out of the discussion on local culture and development - Good Life.
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Trying to investigate this question.
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That's a good question. Ideally, it should be defined through the spiritual space, but many people don't see it that way. In countries such as Holland and Belgium this is a very controversial issue as too many people put too much importance and value on the traditional architectural characteristics, whether in a positive or negative way. The "autochthonal" (as used in Holland and Belgium), Christian part of the population generally doesn't like to see these architectural characteristics in their living environment as it reminds them of the presence of a growing Islamic part of the population, mostly made up of immigrants and their descendents from Turkey and Marocco. The latter are often very conservative and generally consider the ability to apply traditional architectural characteristics to their spiritual spaces as a strong affirmation of their identity. Designs for new mosques that lack these architectural characteristics are usually not very much appreciated and as a result, few such examples are realized.
Of course, from the point of view of an architectural style, strong architectural characteristics simplify the specification of the style, as exemplified by the application of shape grammars to define the typology of classical period Ottoman mosques (e.g., Şener and Görgül, 2008). The concept of a spiritual space is much more difficult to capture formally.
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In particular, referring to indigenous groups in Ecuador. The concepts among the peoples have changed according to historical moments and their political demands. Consequently, every concept has a very close relation with its context. Their demands have suffered some modifications, and they are different between ethnic groups as well. How do they now understand the concepts of “land” and “territory”? What are the dimensions of each one? Is it possible to talk about “land” within “territory”?
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On a general (and theoretic) level, I would recommend the texts by Arturo Escobar, Aníbal Quijano, Walter Mignolo and the "Grupo modernidad/colonialidad" in general. Will Kymlicka and his work on multiculturalism also refers to the topic of territory.
Concerning the indigenous perspective, I can recommend the publications of the Institute ILDIS, above all, the journal La Tendencia with a heavy participation of indigenous leaders and intellectuals (here: http://www.fes-ecuador.org/pages/inicio.php). And of course the different indigenous organizations: CONAIE, FENOCIN and FEINE and their institutions such as the Universidad Intercultural Amawtay Wasi or the Instituto Científico de Culturas Indígenas.
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For my first year seminar, I have been teaching out of Joel Spring's Deculturalization text, one chapter of which gives a summary of the educational methods used by White Americans to pacify and "deculturalize" the various indigenous peoples. One of my lectures attempted to match each of the phases of these educational "crusades" with the overall geography of the time, namely, where the Native American tribes were currently located at the time of each educational movement. There is a fairly clear correlation, e.g., the Indian Boarding School Movement began precisely when the Eastern tribes have been effectively eliminated or exiled to Oklahoma and the only barrier to easy transport to the West Coast were the Lakota and Sioux et al.
Unfortunately, I had to piece together the actual geographical location of many of the Native American tribes during the different eras from many different sources, since there does not seem to exist an atlas that simply shows the year-by-year geographic domains -- at least, during the years between the various Indian Wars.
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There are a number of "encyclopedic" publications that may have addressed the issue somewhere in the volume. The Handbook of North American Indians has a volume dedicated to Indian-white relations that may be along the lines of what you are looking for.
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Considering architecture and urban fabric as a tangible product of culture, it is expected to explore the social and cultural factors of immigrant groups in which lead to urban regeneration. I believe Chinese quarters may have the potential, are there any other examples(before or after Industrial Revolution)?
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Kolkata city is an ideal example of an urban centre where the subculture of the immigrant group is nurtured and preserved with proper care. As a result the metropolis is the homeland of different culture group accommodating themselves through community regeneration reaming under the banner of a cosmopolitan culture under the umbrella of on one of the oldest metropolis of the east .
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For instance in Iran during the Safavid dynasty some of the Armenian of Jolfa had been made to settle in Isfahan (the capital city of the time), furthermore a certain district had been built for them. I wonder if there are such examples before or after industrial revolution.
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In Iran: Armenians of the Transcaucasus were forced to migrate to Central Iran. They remained Christians.
Georgians of the Caucasus were forced to migrate to Central Iran. They became SHiite Muslims.
Shiite Kurdish tribes of Eastern Anatolia fled to Iran and Shah Abbas located them in Khorasan.
Stalin deported the Chechens, Ingush, Karachay/Balkars, Meskhetian georgian Muslims from the Caucasus, and Crimean Tatars from Ukraine, and Volga Germans to move in Central Asia.