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Cultural Ecology - Science topic

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Thanks a million for having my back. That's so kind of you. I will go through this brilliant research work. I would like to take a chance to extend my congrats on their success as well. A/Professor Montserrat Delpino-Chamy
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Hi, we aim to "quantify" cultural ecosystem services from urban forests of our study area (Karlsruhe, Germany). We know that cultural ecosystem services are difficult to quantify as they are often qualitative and have intangible significance. Our approach is to first do a detail survey on public and stakeholders' perception and preferences on selected cultural ecosystem services using questionnaire survey and Likert's scale of response. Then, we want to use our data from the questionnaire survey to develop a scoring systems. Do you know any method which can be helpful to us? Or, do you know how to valuate cultural ecosystem services? In addition to questionnaire survey, we also have data from urban forest plots on forest structure and composition. We followed the guidelines from i-tree-eco software's handbook and UFORE model developed by the US Forest Service (David Nowak). We will really appreciate if you can provide us some literature or provide some suggestions on methods to quantify cultural ecosystem services.
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First of all, there are two different questions to look at. The first is the value and status of the eco-system and the second is the value and the quantity of the service. By focussing on eco-system services and not the capital we tend to miss important aspects. The first is the value of the natural capital. Capital is something which is used in production but not used up. Built capital (like houses) are valued at "market value" that is what someone is prepared to pay for them, rather than their replacement cost, which must form some baseline. The next value and quantity is that of "roof over head" or apartments. Again, unless you have controlled rents (Germany) you have the valuation of what people are prepared to pay. So the quantification is the number of apartments and with number of bedrooms, total potential housing people/year.
Value is tricky. If I have a home I will not want to respond to a "flats to rent" sign. But if homeless and with money I might. Homeless without money I won't.
Now. let us assume that we want our population to have a service. What natural capital is needed to provide that service? Now you have a dimension. What natural capital do we have? Now you have a gap to work with. Do we have the capital and are still not providing the service? Now you have a production gap.
But of course, the difficult thing is what service?
There IS one measure though of ecosystems - maturity. See Odum et al. Easy to measure, mature eco-systems represent capital that can be used to provide services. Mature eco-systems have high mass, absorb sunlight, control rain, provide biodiversity etc etc.
So that brings me to answer that 1) measure the ecological maturity. 2) Dimension the natural capital needed by the geographical region the capital shall serve. 3) identify the services remembering that you need to extract the services without degrading maturity. Clever people(indigenous) increase maturity AND extract services at the same time. Read Odum if you haven't already.
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What are the sights, landscapes and places of interest in your country?
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in my coundry many sighding and inderesding places exisd such as capadocia andalia bodrum izmir focha bolu sald lake....
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In 1983, geographer Michael Watts published an influential essay entitled “On the Poverty of Theory: Natural Hazards Research in Context,” where he launched a powerful critique of cultural ecology and traditional hazards research which had tended to look at natural disasters in isolation from broader political economy systems embedded on [local] human-environment interactions. At that time, climate change could be considered a minor controversial topic discussed mostly by physical scientists. More than 30 years later, climate change is now considered one of the greatest challenges of our time and calls for adaptation are everywhere. Adaptation to climate change has become an imperative, many would argue. In the developing world, governments, international organizations and NGO are implementing adaptation projects to support what is being called more resilient communities, here understood as communities that are capable of bouncing back from adverse situations and to adapt to change through self-organization and learning. Although often acknowledged, development deficits remain outside the scope of many of these projects that tend to focus on the symptoms of the problem and less on its causes.
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It is indeed surprising that PE is not a stronger field in climate change adaptation work, given that cultural ecology was all about human adaptability, and political ecology pointed out that the processes of human adaptability are deeply imbued with power relations and struggles.
There have been several conceptual nods to the relevance of political ecology in the field of climate adaptation (see especially several works by Adger), but not a lot of published case studies thus far that explicitly analyze climate change adaptation processes/projects from a PE lens. These are starting to emerge, however.
Much of the PE literature on environmental change and development is quite relevant, but not necessarily integrated into the CCA field, which often (but not always) tends to have more technical or instrumental bents. That being said, CCA is a still a relatively young field, both in academia and policy, so I see this as a significant growth niche for PE research.