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Dear scholars,
I have a feeling that the discussion of traditional performing arts within Cultural Evolution is almost non-existent. Maybe because the nature of traditional dance is too complex? It seems that performing arts research falls mainly either within cultural and anthropology but never within Cultural Evolution. Is it because it is impossible to discuss? What are your thoughts?
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Traditional performing arts within cultural evolution was a big topic historically for the German schools of "comparative musicology" (including dance studies). You can find many of their books and articles in English, mostly from the 1890s-1950s. In recent years, there is a bit of a revival of the topic.
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Dear fellow researchers,
I am planning to conduct a research related to Ethnic Diversity composition in schools (e.g. ethnic diversity composition per classroom). Could you please share with me a questionnaire or instrument or the formula for measuring Ethnic Diversity Composition? So I can categorize the Ethnic Diversity Composition into high Ethnic Diversity and low Ethnic Diversity (e.g. 1 for high and 0 for low).
Best,
Edita
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Hi,
It is always better to follow known ways of measuring from the literature. High and low Ethnicity would not yield much but frequency, proportions or percentages are better. Here are a few references that can aid you:
Connelly R, Gayle V, Lambert PS. Ethnicity and ethnic group measures in social survey research. Methodological Innovations. 2016;9. doi:10.1177/2059799116642885
Saha S, Guiton G, Wimmers PF, Wilkerson L. Student body racial and ethnic composition and diversity-related outcomes in US medical schools. JAMA. 2008;300(10):1135-1145. doi:10.1001/jama.300.10.1135
Vervoort MH, Scholte RH, Overbeek G. Bullying and victimization among adolescents: the role of ethnicity and ethnic composition of school class. J Youth Adolesc. 2010;39(1):1-11. doi:10.1007/s10964-008-9355-y
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And how exactly does it do cultural analysis differently? and also, what exactly does a Reckwitz's PT analysis make us focus on methodologically?
I think this is hard to understand, but once we get clear it will very useful for us to do some empirical research about the consumption or other topics.\
Hope you guys can give me some wonderful inspirations! :)
thanks!
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It is distinctive due to Rectwitz concept that all of the social forms of that theory originally beginned from the traditional Action Theory. For this someone can behave in a certain way similar to an agent. This means an agents desires and beliefs influence their actions.
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What does the text reveal about the problematics of post-colonial identity, including the relationship between personal and cultural identity and such issues as double consciousness and hybridity?
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Try to read "Can the Subaltern Speak?" Spivak discusses the lack of an account of the Sati practice, leading her to reflect on whether the subaltern can even speak. Spivak writes about the process, the focus on the Eurocentric Subject as they disavow the problem of representation; and by invoking the Subject of Europe, these intellectuals constitute the subaltern Other of Europe as anonymous and mute. Reading Edward Said should help critics like you understanding this topic. All the best!
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I'm conducting research on the development and underdevelopment of third world countries.
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Hi Olu,
The above responses definitely provide some good avenues! And it is certainly a "depends who you ask" kind of question, as Nathan points out.
A few people have mentioned the Human Development Index (HDI), which is a composite including economic, health and educational measures. Artur is correct that the measure has issues, and therefore I'd recommend using the newer Inequality Adjusted HDI (http://www.hdr.undp.org/en/content/inequality-adjusted-human-development-index-ihdi)
You could also use an even broader composite indicator, such as the Social Progress Index (SPI), which takes into account a much wider array of categories and variables (https://www.socialprogress.org)
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I am looking to assess the Schwartz's cultural value orientations for a country with high cultural diversity. Based on what I learned, I have to use the Schwartz's Value Survey (SVS) which contain 57 items and key in these items to get the results for Cultural Values Orientation.
But for my Master research, I believe that a 57 items questionnaire may be time consuming and would affect the response rate especially that this only one section of the research.
I was able to find a Short Schwartz's Survey for Basic Human Values, but i was not able to find any shorter version for Schwartz's Cultural Value Orientation
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“may be time consuming and would affect the response rate” - what supporting evidence do you have?
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Hi all,
For my research, I would like to group my participants according to the culture they belong to, which brings about the question of what is culture, and whether you can actually create cultural groups.
So far, I have looked into Hofstede's work as well as the more recent GLOBE project (House et al. 2004, Chokkar et al. 2007). Do you know of any other model which would be worth considering?
Thank you!
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Dear Tobias, Many thanks for your reaction. This is indeed a very puzzling aspect which I am not sure how to treat. Originating from Belgium (the north of the country is monolingual Dutch, hence more influenced by the Dutch culture, while the south of the country is monolingual French, hence more influenced by the French culture), I am myself convinced that country boundaries might not always offer the best delineation for cultural groups. I guess that we need to start with some sort of clustering, hence some sort of "(over)generalisation" to be able to unveil broad, ''gross'' patterns (with a quantitative approach), which can then be refined in future research (probably with a more qualitative approach or by looking quantitatively at smaller geographical areas). If you know of any names of researchers which might help further my reflection on this, I would be glad to hear it. Thank you for sharing your thoughts on this, Pernelle
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These include:
  • IPads-per-student, Smartboards, and digital devices
  • Independent learning MOOC's like Khan Academy or Coursera
  • In-class online tasks in educational programs used to assist teaching
Preferably from the perspective of teachers based in rural areas
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The main resistance that has come about against the implementation of these educational technological platforms in Mexico has been led by teachers‘ syndicate. For example, the Coordinadora Nacional de Trabajadores de la Educación (CNTE) has argued that these technologies are not only unsuited butcurrently unnecessary in the context of rural communities, which to a great extent lack the infrastructure to support them (electricity, network connectivity, phone lines, etc). It is paradoxical to support the use of these technologies because they have implied the weakening of teachers’ labor rights. Take the case of the major education reform passed by President Enrique Peña Nieto in 2013, which requires rural teachers to train themselves and be regularly evaluated on their application of these technologies in rural schools. We are talking here about schools who lack basic infrastructure.
In short, resistance from the CNTE has foregrounded the historical gap between the bourgeois and the proletarian-rural worlds within Mexico.
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I am looking for references to current projects that involve collaboration between the arts and sciences as part of my Future Fellowship research. If you are working in this area, or know of any relevant ongoing projects, I'd love to hear about them.
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Dear Elizabeth,
These resources will be helpful. Best regards
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I used the World Values Survey longitudinal data file merged with the European Values Survey file as instructed. From this data, I tried to recreate the cultural dimensions, and plotted the cultural map but I got different coordinates in my recreated cultural map from the one in their website. I used SPSS and followed the instructions to the letter in their website http://www.worldvaluessurvey.org/WVSContents.jsp. How can I resolve this problem? Thank you!
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See also this other book. I quote something from it as a possible point of departure for your question:
"This problem of “spatial mismatch” can be addressed with GIS tools, but this approach introduces an inevitable level of uncertainty. These problems of spatial mismatch and uncertainty could be reduced for NASS Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. Improving Crop Estimates by Integrating Multiple Data Sources A VISION OF NASS IN 2025 43 if a basic spatial unit could be adopted, and all data could be expressed as attributes of one or more basic spatial units."
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What are the sights, landscapes and places of interest in your country?
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in my coundry many sighding and inderesding places exisd such as capadocia andalia bodrum izmir focha bolu sald lake....
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I am proposing a cross cultural project for people on the Autistic Spectrum that looks at :
-how the experience of Autism may be different depending on religious or political community affiliation and associated values
-provides opportunity for people on the Autistic Spectrum to explore community identity and participate in cross-cultural experiences
Are there any studies that may support an assumption that limited social network, social anxiety and other factors such as lack of tailored initiatives, may mean that a person on the Autistic Spectrum may have less opportunity to challenge received opinion associated with the religious/ political affiliations of their immediate community?
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Thanks Laura
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Anthropology of Communication is intended as a method of social and cultural analysis and is insofar linked with theories of structure and systems.
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Anthropology of communication  can be used to analysed the socio-cultural phenomenon of the society. Therefore, it is more a research method to examine cultural situations/ issues/ problems. Although, this can be used as a tool for education, I think it is secondary when consider about the education science which has emerged in the modern world whereas the other was emerged long before the existence of so called modern science.
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I've read the original paper by Axelrod, and other related papers where some parameters are varied. I want to know if there are empirical evidences proving Axelrod's model. 
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Indigenous communities have their own definitions of tastes and flavors. They have a name for a full well cooked meal, or a mature, ripe seed. Is there anyone out there with knowledge of these time-tested community sciences?
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Dear Monica Opole
The scientific community is a diverse network of interacting scientists. It includes many "sub-communities" working on particular scientific fields, and within particular institutions; interdisciplinary and cross-institutional activities are also significant. Objectivity is expected to be achieved by the scientific method. Peer review, through discussion and debate within journals and conferences, assists in this objectivity by maintaining the quality of research methodology and interpretation of results.
History of scientific communities
The eighteenth century had some societies made up of men who studied nature, also known as natural philosophers and natural historians, which included even amateurs. As such these societies were more like local clubs and groups with diverse interests than actual scientific communities, which usually had interests on specialized disciplines.Though there were a few older societies of men who studied nature such as the Royal Society of London, the concept of scientific communities emerged in the second half of the 19th century, not before, because it was in this century that the language of modern science emerged, the professionalization of science occurred, specialized institutions were created, and the specialization of scientific disciplines and fields occurred.For instance, the term scientist was first coined by the naturalist-theologian William Whewell in 1834 and the wider acceptance of the term along with the growth of specialized societies allowed for researchers to see themselves as a part of a wider imagined community, similar to the concept of nationhood.
Membership, status and interactions
Membership of the community is generally, but not exclusively, a function of education, employment status, and institutional affiliation. Status within the community is highly correlated with publication record. Scientists are usually trained in academia through universities. As such, degrees in the relevant scientific sub-disciplines are often considered prerequisites for membership in the relevant community. In particular, the PhD with its research requirements functions as a marker of being an important integrator into the community, though continued membership is dependent on maintaining connections to other researchers through publication, technical contributions, and conferences. After obtaining a PhD an academic scientist may continue through post-doctoral fellowships and onto professorships. Other scientists make contributions to the scientific community in alternate ways such as in industry, education, think tanks, or the government.
Members of the same community do not need to work together.Communication between the members is established by disseminating research work and hypotheses through articles in peer reviewed journals, or by attending conferences where new research is presented and ideas exchanged and discussed. There are also many informal methods of communication of scientific work and results as well. And many in a coherent community may actually not communicate all of their work with one another, for various professional reasons.
Speaking for the scientific community
Unlike in previous centuries when the community of scholars were all members of few learned societies and similar institutions, there are no singular bodies or individuals which can be said today to speak for all science or all scientists. This is partly due to the specialized training most scientists receive in very few fields. As a result, many would lack expertise in all the other fields of the sciences. For instance, due to the increasing complexity of information and specialization of scientists, most of the cutting-edge research today is done by well funded groups of scientists, rather than individuals.However, there are still multiple societies and academies in many countries which help consolidate some opinions and research to help guide public discussions on matters of policy and government-funded research. For example, the United States' National Academy of Science (NAS) and United Kingdom's Royal Society sometimes act as surrogates when the opinions of the scientific community need to be ascertained by policy makers or the national government, but the statements of the National Academy of Science or the Royal Society are not binding on scientists nor do they necessarily reflect the opinions of every scientist in a given community since membership is often exclusive, their commissions are explicitly focused on serving their governments, and they have never "shown systematic interest in what rank-and file scientists think about scientific matters". Exclusivity of membership in these types of organizations can be seen in their election processes in which only existing members can officially nominate others for candidacy of membership. It is very unusual for organizations like the National Academy of Science to engage in external research projects since they normally focus on preparing scientific reports for government agencies.[8] An example of how rarely the NAS engages in external and active research can be seen in its struggle to prepare and overcome hurdles, due to its lack of experience in coordinating research grants and major research programs on the environment and health.
Nevertheless, general scientific consensus is a concept which is often referred to when dealing with questions that can be subject to scientific methodology. While the consensus opinion of the community is not always easy to ascertain or fix due to paradigm shifting, generally the standards and utility of the scientific methodhave tended to ensure, to some degree, that scientists agree on some general corpus of facts explicated by scientific theory while rejecting some ideas which run counter to this realization. The concept of scientific consensus is very important to science pedagogy, the evaluation of new ideas, and research funding. Sometimes it is argued that there is a closed shop bias within the scientific community toward new ideas. Protoscience, fringe science, and pseudoscience have been topics that discuss demarcation problems. In response to this some non-consensus claims skeptical organizations, not research institutions, have devoted considerable amounts of time and money contesting ideas which run counter to general agreement on a particular topic.
Philosophers of science argue over the epistemological limits of such a consensus and some, including Thomas Kuhn, have pointed to the existence of scientific revolutions in the history of science as being an important indication that scientific consensus can, at times, be wrong. Nevertheless, the sheer explanatory power of science in its ability to make accurate and precise predictions and aid in the design and engineering of new technology has ensconced "science" and, by proxy, the opinions of the scientific community as a highly respected form of knowledge both in the academy and in popular culture.
Political controversies
The high regard with which scientific results are held in Western society has caused a number of political controversies over scientific subjects to arise. An allegedconflict thesis proposed in the 19th century between religion and science has been cited by some as representative of a struggle between tradition and substantial change and faith and reason.[citation needed]. A popular example used to support this thesis is when Galileo was tried before the Inquisition concerning the heliocentric model.[9] The persecution began after Pope Urban VIII permitted Galileo to write about the Copernican model. Galileo had used arguments from the Pope and put them in the voice of the simpleton in the work "Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems" which caused great offense to him.Even though many historians of science have discredited the conflict thesis it still remains a popular belief among many including some scientists. In more recent times, thecreation-evolution controversy has resulted in many religious believers in a supernatural creation to challenge some naturalistic assumptions that have been proposed in some of the branches of scientific fields such as evolutionary biology, geology, and astronomy. Although the dichotomy seems to be of a different outlook from a Continental European perspective, it does exist. The Vienna Circle, for instance, had a paramount (i.e. symbolic) influence on the semiotic regimerepresented by the Scientific Community in Europe.
In the decades following World War II, some were convinced that nuclear power would solve the pending energy crisis by providing energy at low cost. This advocacy led to the construction of many nuclear power plants, but was also accompanied by a global political movement opposed to nuclear power due to safety concerns and associations of the technology with nuclear weapons. Mass protests in the United States and Europe during the 1970s and 1980s along with the disasters of Chernobyl and Three Mile Island led to a decline in nuclear power plant construction.
In the last decades or so, both global warming and stem cells have placed the opinions of the scientific community in the forefront of political debate.
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I need to identify a tool that allows you to measure the impact of culture in international business?
thanks and regards
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Thanks a lot. I already have the text as a reference for consultation. Best regards
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I need to conduct a study on cultural literacy of secondary school students. do you know any reliable survey about it? or should I do it solely qualitative? if so, what should be asked in semi-structured interviews?
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Cultural literacy is a term coined by E. D. Hirsch , referring to the ability to understand and participate fluently in a given culture. Cultural literacy is an analogy to literacy proper (the ability to read and write letters). A literate reader knows the object-language's alphabet, grammar, and a sufficient set of vocabulary; a culturally literate person knows a given culture's signs and symbols, including its language, particular dialectic, stories,[1] entertainment, idioms, idiosyncrasies, and so on. The culturally literate person is able to talk to and understand others of that culture with fluency, while the culturally illiterate person fails to understand culturally-conditioned allusions, references to past events, idiomatic expressions, jokes, names, places, etc.
There has been a recent renaissance in civics and moral education in the Asia-Pacific region. The need to incorporate the notion of emotional literacy into such programmes is discussed and results from the analysis of the influence that emotional literacy has on problem behaviours in Malaysian secondary school students are presented. Results indicated that emotional literacy, measured in terms of emotional intelligence, was linked to internalising and externalising problem behaviours. Emotional literacy also served as a moderating factor between parental monitoring and externalising problem behaviours. The need for developing emotional literacy programmes utilising the pedagogy of multiliteracies is discussed.
In addition, find the attached publications:
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I am currently working on my field study (and will eventually use this scholarship to shape my prospectus/dissertation). My study is divided into colonial, partition, and post-colonial era. However, my own contribution will be the current trends in popular culture that have surged as a result of the rape cases in India that have been identified by the national and international media (e.g. Delhi Rape Case 2012). Should I divide my study of the representation into colonial, Partition, and post-colonial (or add another category for the contemporary/present time period)? 
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Historians feel that the rise of the global economy marks the end of the post-colonial era. It has been labeled the era of neo-liberalism. Business historians say it started in the 1980's and accelerated after 9/11. Other names for it are the "American Empire."
Banwell, S. (2015). Globalisation masculinities, empire building and forced prostitution: A critical analysis of the gendered impact of the neoliberal economic agenda in post-invasion/occupation Iraq. Third World Quarterly, 36(4), 705-722.
Chandra, S. (2015). “India Will Change You Forever”: Hinduism, Islam, and Whiteness in the American Empire. Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society, 40(2), 487-512.
Das, R. (2015). Critical Observations on Neo-liberalism and India’s New Economic Policy. Journal of Contemporary Asia, 45(4), 715-726.
Defining, Constructing and Policing a 'New India': Relationship between Neoliberalism and Hindutva. (2006). Economic and Political Weekly, 41(26), 2803-2813.
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Apart from mere linguistic eloquence, the literature (prose, poetry, fiction and even tabloid serials and story lines of movies) reflects the persona and more importantly, the 'psyche' of a country. The dance, drama and music of the country reflect the beauty of its soul.
This is what we have always believed. But today, the world is multi-cultural. Except for 'national efforts' to preserve the original art and literature of our individual countries, we have adopted certain art forms and literary styles from other countries as our own.
So, do the literature and arts of a country continue to reflect its persona and inherent beauty the way they did in earlier times or have they lost their originality?
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hi srinivasan
demarcation and pigeonholing them is far from justifiable , they tend to merge r, even harmonize and enhance one another, there are no ways to separate beauty of and persona, psyche and persona , these are only hackneyed expression made to make abstract intangible concepts more understandable , aside from this function, they don't seem to be licensed in the postmoderm world of relativist and antifoundationalism .
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Journals, papers, Phd thesis
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to detect the culture on a territory o economic region you must apply the methodology of radar chart. In this accounting methodology there are financial slacks, they show how companies made its management and you can detect the economic culture of region too. The publication add below present how you can obtain the several kind of financial slacks and the manuscript refered you can obtain how measure the risk of managementa by positive, independent, normalized and objetive variables. 
You can get the last publication on this review.
THE ANALYSIS OF BEHAVIOR OF SWITZERLAND COMPANY BY METHODOLOGY OF RADAR CHART.
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Some scholar debates are around whether or not can we define culture as a trait present in many non-human animals, or if it´s just an exclusive human trait.
The importance of this particular barrier comes not only from the obvious issue of culture as the basic frame for developing and explaining humanity as unique, wich is not my main interest.
I suggest that by establishing the presence of culture in other species, and performing cultural analysis method  of the later, we can open new ways of inference and knowledge in our own.
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Rafael,
I revisited all the posts.  On page 1, the conversation focused on what could be an appropriate animal culture concept then on page 2 you moved the discussion on the topic of consciousness and from there the discussion diverged from the topic of the thread.   I personally believe that the study of animal cultures , an animal anthropology is potentially conducive to a lot of insights about what it is it to be humans.  Like all anthropological study, it has to involve a degree of participation into the culture.  One area where this is possible for humans to participate into an animal culture is music.  A few researcher musicians have began to engage into animal music.  Music is a very important form of culture given that it is probably at the root of the primate human cultural transition.  Humans are probably the results of a long cultural journey that began with the leadership of a musical Eve.  A new form of dancing singing for emotional tribe control was probably the first form of religion , the first language and the road that has allowed the control conscious access to the mammalian self-enactment narrative capacities.  All mammals have these self-enactment capacities but they are used for sensory-motor learning and integration without any direct access to it.  The dancing singing social leadership hypothesis could be investigated through trying to engage bonobos through some forms of dancing singing practices.
 In Descent of Man Charles Darwin  wrote:
"When we treat of sexual selection we shall see that primeval man, or rather some early progenitor of man, probably first used his voice in producing true musical cadences, that is in singing, as do some of the gibbon-apes at the present day; and we may conclude from a widely-spread analogy, that this power would have been especially exerted during the courtship of the sexes,--would have expressed various emotions, such as love, jealousy, triumph,--and would have served as a challenge to rivals. It is, therefore, probable that the imitation of musical cries by articulate sounds may have given rise to words expressive of various complex emotions."
Also in Descent of Man, Darwin  suggested that modern music is a “fossil”
of a former adaptation: an earlier hominid communication
system or “musical protolanguage.” This is an
idea of considerable merit that has been rediscovered by
many subsequent authors (e.g., Brown, 2000; Jespersen,
1922; Livingstone, 1973; Mithen, 2005; Richman, 1993)
A review of The Singing Neanderthals: The Origins of Music, Language, Mind and Body by Steven Mithen.
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I'm looking for the methodological grounds, assumptions, steps, rules and criteria of cultural knowledge building/designing after field research in cultural anthropology (social anthropology as well). 
Any ideas of classic key or gifted authors / researchers ?
Please share with me your ideas. 
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Dear Beata, you can take a look at three different sources on the subject: a French anthropologist (Marc Augé), has carried out very interesting research on our contemporary culture. There is, of course, the classical book by Marvin Harris - The Development of Anthropology Theory-, and, on a different but very suggestive take, there is also Gregory Bateson's book on Three Steps...
To begin with…
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I am writing my thesis on friendly societies in nineteenth-century Victoria, Australia.
F S are recognised in the fields of mutuality, respectability, thrift, etc. but their role in civil society requires exploration and in particular answering the question concerning their value/contribution to the social capital of the day.
Any references or comments?
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Coleman should provide some general theoretical points of departure, but you probably know this. I also find Raymond Boudon's work surprisingly relevant when it comes to studies of social capital.
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Dear colleagues: I am presently executing an organizational culture analysis within a community hospital setting. I have covered the major topics regarding the views, values, goals and expectations of medical and nursing personnel. Now I would like to explore the patient views of quality, timing and effectiveness of their medical services - but using a quantitative survey tool.
May you suggest a powerful survey that would provide a factor grouping of questions, pointing to different quality areas of medical services from a patient standpoint? 
Your proposals will be highly appreciated.
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The U.S. agency AHRQ developed HCAHPS. It is a blend of experience of care, satisfaction, and quality of care indicators. The instrument is in the public domain and it has been in use long enough to have comparative information also available. 
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Has anybody tried to operationalize Bourdieu's concepts of economic, social and cultural capital? Such as that it can be parts of experiments. I seem to only find sociological accounts of that, but no measures.
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I know that one of our graduate students applied the theory in his thesis last Spring to investigate media consumption as a form of cultural capital in regards to educational outcomes.  I wasn't on his committee but the link to his thesis is:  http://soar.wichita.edu/handle/10057/10975
He was doing secondary data analysis so his operationalization would have been limited by the available data but thought I'd pass it along in case you find it useful.
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I am currently working on my thesis topic on how the culture influence on the architectural imagery of skyscrapers. Do you have any recommended sources I could use and what is your opinion on the topic and area I have chosen?
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no worries. For what it s worth, Louis Sullivan also attended the Ecole  des Beaux Arts in Paris, and did build an office building (without a tower) in the Bowery in New York. Whether he had any contact with Flagg or not i cannot say.
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I haven't used postcolonial theory before and all recommendations, suggestions and advice is very welcomed.
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If you go with Dussel or Mignolo, the Western civilization as such only starts with the moment of colonization (at that moment, the "us" is constructed on a global level). So, the colonizer is hybridizised in the process of colonization just as the colonized is (but not in the same ways, obviously). I am quite sure that with only a little of imagination, you can built an abstract theoretic model that fits for other types of colonization and not just that of Latin America...
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How do you mitigate differences in language when it comes to making the delivery of your lessons effective?  
In what way can you reconcile opposing views in religion and beliefs among students?  What would be a good alternative solution to a conflict of opinions and highly-prejudiced cultural preferences?
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If you are teaching mathematics or physics, perhaps the problem will be only related to the simplicity with which the teacher must deliver his sessions. More problems will be there in teaching social sciences and management. The teacher needs to develop extreme tolerance to diversity of views. His  job should be to thrash out and help articulate the issues, rather than being judgmental in such cases so that everyone has the courage to speak up. this will help contribute to better learning. That is what I do when I teach HRM in Denmark, where students are from about 8 to 10 different cultures. .
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What other instrument(s) can we use to measure "multicultural attitude" other than MASQUE, TMAS, and "Multicultural Attitude Scale"? 
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Multicultural attitude is not measurable with quantitative means (it is appealing to do so, however, it is impossible). All tools you mention measure only a single group of features and can be harshly criticized (and will be criticized) for putting the agents under a joint abstract condition that does not exist in reality. For being able to evaluate with qualitative tools, you need a broad personal understanding of multiple cultures. This way seems to be too long for a short span of 3 years. Nevertheless, I would strive for mixed methods that allow for a better balanced interpretation of outcomes. Follow Praveen Hoogar's discussion! That looks promising!
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Three cultural competence tools follow:
1. Rew, et al. Measuring cultural competence in nursing
2.Schim, Development of a cultural assessment instrument, and
3. Campinha-Bacote, The process of cultural competence.
All of these are easy to find on the web.
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Is it necessary to assess both essentiality (necessity) and relevancy of the items of a valid instrument, which is translated into another language for cultural adaptation? Don't they mean the same thing?
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Dear Forough,
You answered your question. You should pre-test your  questionnaire with experts and also potential participants. Pre-testing is considered to be critical and essential part of the questionnaire design in order to provide valid, reliable and unbiased results and to detect any potential problems in the questionnaire such as difficulty, time, wording and also see how it works and whether changes are necessary before the start of the actual survey. This procedure is very critical in order to overcome the different cultural terminologies and avoid collecting useless data. While i was doing my phd, i went through some easy questions but still i found some who denied answering this questions. For example, since i was collecting my data from Lebanon, some female participants mentioned that they have problems  answering thier age in years and suggested that it is better to present age in different interval groups, another respondent highlighted some potential problem with wording one of the questions. This is in terms of questionnaire design (i.e face validity). Then after collecting the data from the potential participants (pilot study), you can analysis the data and check for content validity and eliminate any item that is below 0.6.
N.B: keep in mind that what may be applicable in one country, may not be applicable in another one. thats why, you noticed already that most of the theories/ models are always tested in different countries and cultures (e.g developing vs developed countries etc...)
Good luck
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I'm trying to determine if any studies have been done that have employed songs to defuse conflict between children from different ethno-cultural backgrounds.
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Earliest memories from childhood, no matter blurred tottler- hood, or short and sharp memories of preschool periods, is the structural frame of our norm, personality and joy of childhood. When the school- ages starts, the structure is strongly there to accept transparency of schooling. 
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Many years of working with Alaska Natives have convinced me that most of what we call suicide prevention is in fact intervention. I am interested in reinforcing & inventing appropriate cultural components to assist in the formation of secure identity at early ages, and changing our definition of prevention.
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Well, Paul, your response makes your intention clearer.  
I, too, have had similar experiences---altho I haven't ever been so depressed---other than the passing thots the typical teenager goes thru to "get even" with what we then consider an "uncaring and unfeeling parent".  Two of my brothers were suicides (in their teens).  A dear adult friend gave warning, but I didn't take her seriously---and she did the deed.  
My best understanding---mainly from studying spiritual literature---is that the body-mind functions here in this Earth realm as an opportunity (the supreme opportunity) to transcend oneself and everything else in Divine Awakening.  This process is accomplished via Divine Grace while turning attention to the true Adept Spiritual Master (whoever it is for the individual).  Further, when one---usually in ignorance of this bodily purpose in life---literally "throws away" the body in suicide, one is wasting the greatest opportunity in life.  Sadly, our culture (as is so with virtually all other world cultures) only says, in effect, "You mustn't do that."  But no one really comes right out and says exactly why suicide is definitely not a good thing.
Another quality of this practice called suicide is that "we" (the deeper personality) get "recycled" back to where we were when we left---which may or not be this Earth plane, just something similar.  After 73 years of life, 43 of it in clinical practice as a physician and lots of study, this is my best understanding of how suicide works. 
So, people need to be educated to all this.  They need to be brought up in real Wisdom and Love---as described in the amazing book, The First Three Stages of Life.  Meanwhile, here we are in this "crazy random" culture, the (for me) USA.  It doesn't take a genius to see that it is just very difficult to live here.  Everything and everyone we love here dies.  We can, still, be happy here, but not (certainly) because of that fact.  We can be happy because of the fact that real Happiness (capital "H:) is always already (albeit hidden) in our hearts.  It is what every heart longs for.  It just takes "The Awakener" to do his / her Work!  The book, The Knee of Listening describes this process perfectly.  (Does this help in some way?)
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We are dealing with culturable analysis of microbial community found in hot springs. Which procedures should I apply for studying cultivable microbial diversity and how can we start our work in the laboratory? Provide some basic idea for these work like media, parameters etc.
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Wow! This is a very broad based question.
However, the first thing you would want to ascertain is the temperature of the hot springs from which you wish to study the microflora.
It may be as low as 70C or as high as 90C or even higher.
To start off take perhaps five samples (1 ml each) in Eppedorf tubes and microfuge them to get a pellet of the organisms in your sample.
Resuspend each pellet in about 0,2 ml of phoasphate buffered saline, make a smear on a slide of each and do a Gram's staining. This will give you an idea of the morphology of the kinds of organisms present in your sample.
Combine the remaining pellets and add 5 ml of a nutrient medium such as Trypticase Soy Broth or Nutrient broth. Incubate the tube at the temperature closes to that of the hot spring from which the original sample was obtained.  
Check every 24 hours for turbidity (growth) and do a Gram's stain of any growth seen.
The above should give you a good starting point. We can discuss further via email if you wish.
Good luck. God bless.
 
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Problems and dilemmas, manifested during past projects, as well as in planned current qualitative research, inspired me to bring up this question.
Could you please, highlight the key problems, during secondary data analysis, from any perspective ?
Could you give the names of researchers from the areas of health sciences, sociology or anthropology who methodologically refined the issue of secondary data analysis?
Share your opinions, knowledge and experiences.
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Here are links to two "special issues" of the journal Forum: Qualitative Social Research that were devoted to the topic of secondary analysis of qualitative data:
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I need something like in the link below (in German but understandable for non-German speakers). Do you think this one is plausible?
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For the index on cultural similarity see the English website with an explanation of the index construction:
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After decades of cultural orientation research in marketing is this concept still relevant?
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Nowadays it all bout individualism and this pressure of being perfect is related with top class buying selections
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Hofstede (1980) in his seminal work on culture described a set of features that influences how group of people reacts to its environment and thus differentiates group membership. In his definition of national culture, five independent dimensions were proposed in relation to national culture. They are namely; power distance, uncertainty avoidance, individualism – Collectivism and Masculinity.
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The initial model was extended to include:
5. Short Term - Long-Term Orientation (Hofstede & Bond, 1988)
6. Indulgence - Restraint (Hofstede & Minkov, 2010).
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I wish to understand social capital in the cultural festival context.
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Thats quite a bog question but I take these principles as important - language is the primary medium of cultural production - but take language as any form of meaning making - eg music, dance etc... pay attention to both structure and agency... attend to dualisms and identify the ways which dualisms are deployed to generate authenticity - as opposed to the social/historical production of the capital in the festival - identify attempts to create stable, whole, and full ideas/entities... seek to understand these as they are exchanged within an economy of meaning... just a few ideas