Science topic

Cross-Cultural Communication - Science topic

Explore the latest questions and answers in Cross-Cultural Communication, and find Cross-Cultural Communication experts.
Questions related to Cross-Cultural Communication
  • asked a question related to Cross-Cultural Communication
Question
29 answers
Each cultural dimension of the Hofstede's culture require to assign a constant value [C(pd) for Power Distance Index, C(ic) for Individualism Index and etc). The manual says the constant values are chosen by the user to shift her/his PDI scores to values between 0 and 100. But how to determine what to assign and how to assign are not explained. Can anyone suggest me a procedure..
Relevant answer
Answer
  • asked a question related to Cross-Cultural Communication
Question
7 answers
Please suggest some variables through which I can easily find the effectiveness of Cross Cultural Training and it impact on work performance of expatriates.
  • asked a question related to Cross-Cultural Communication
Question
14 answers
Hello everyone,
I have a question about analyzing the cross-cultural communication needs of EFL learners. The aim is to create a short syllabus for students whose background knowledge of the target culture is at a basic level while their level of English is assumed to be above average. The aim of the syllabus is to increase students' awareness/knowledge/understanding of intercultural communication. Students were never exposed to cultural content in a direct way (they do not know concepts such as components of culture, culture shock, etc.).
The ultimate goal for students being enrolled in this program is to become teachers of the English language. They have rare contact with native English speakers.
The time allotted for this unit is 42 hours (21 hours = for lectures, 21 hours = for TD sessions where they practice the information gained during the lecture). The time spent for each session is 1h30.
Now, I try to set objectives as well as the content to be taught based on the teachers 'perspectives, the learners' needs, and the scholarly works. An interview is designed to address the teachers. As for the analysis of students' needs, I do not have a clear idea of ​​what sections the questionnaire should include. Sometimes I think of dividing it into (necessities, lacks, wants, and learning needs).
This is my problem. I am unable to specify what and how the elements of the questionnaire should be. (Content elements, assessment and evaluation, learning styles, present situations analysis, target situation analysis ... etc.). Is there any model that addresses cross-cultural communication in the context of English as a foreign language by means of raising students' awareness?
Thank you in advance
Relevant answer
Answer
The school English course for Russians (for example Starkov, Dixon, Rybakov) always included information about England, the British, British literature, etc. The problem is that England is not perceived as the main English-speaking country now ...
By the way, when I was in the United States, one American said: "You speak little, but right, you might think from your pronunciation that you are from New England ..." I recently spoke with my grandson - he is taught right away by Dixie ...
  • asked a question related to Cross-Cultural Communication
Question
14 answers
How far is "Cross-Cultural Communication" important as a subject to be included in curricula? Thanks for your insightful input in advance!
Relevant answer
Answer
very important! especially in countries with new democracy, Post-Soviet countries, etc. it is important to give such competences (international competencies) to students who will be global citizens.
Regards,
Mariam
  • asked a question related to Cross-Cultural Communication
Question
13 answers
Hello!
I am planning cross-cultural study in psychology.
I've read various articles, but I can’t understand what are the requirements for translators? I’m at the stage one - translating the original instrument. Let’s say, my translator 1 is fluent in target language with a good understanding of original language and works in translation agency + has a university degree in some field (not in philology) Translator 2- the same. Translator 3 (for a synthesized translated version) is fluent in target language, with a good understanding of original language + has a higher education in Philology!
My question: is it ok? I mean “translator” doesn’t automatically mean that he/she has a bachelor, master or PhD degree in Philology.
What do you think about it?
Relevant answer
Answer
I'm glad my comments were useful. You will also find that if a question is shaped primarily by analytical concerns, you will likely not be able to translate the question into everyday language that will be easily understood. If we ask a survey question in any language, and we get a puzzled look, then we have failed to do our job. A good survey question is one for which you know in advance more or less what answers people will give; you just don't know how many will give which of the 3-5 likely answers.
  • asked a question related to Cross-Cultural Communication
Question
3 answers
India is a diverse nation and the social, economic and cultural differences in all the regions (North India, South India, East India, and West India) of India implied to miscellaneous cultural differences. Is there any research conducted to study internal cultural differences in India?
P.S I'm also interested to take a glance at how other countries argue the intercultural challenges that they faced while working with India firms based in India.
Relevant answer
Answer
I am not in position to response to your question -1.
However, all companies conduct cultural sensitivity awareness training for their employees when they go to other country to minimize the conduct error due to cultural difference.
  • asked a question related to Cross-Cultural Communication
Question
9 answers
Will growing multiculturalism all over the world increasingly affect cross-cultural communication? What possible forms can this influence take? Will it be mostly positive or negative for different cultures?
Could we possibly foresee any potential drawbacks of this process and try to avoid or prevent them?
Relevant answer
Answer
In the environment of globalization it is most important for persons to be culturally competent in all aspects including communications. This means that the person not only understands the spoken or written word but also the nuances, body language (if applicable) and cultural context behind the conversation.
  • asked a question related to Cross-Cultural Communication
Question
4 answers
In a globalized world where communities are in constant contact with each other in an unprecedented manner, it is important to know how meanings vary across cultures. A lack of this knowledge can sometimes lead to misunderstandings and even animosity. Thus, communicative competence also calls for intercultural awareness.
Relevant answer
Answer
Cummunicators need to be aware of special meanings attached to certain phrases (idioms) that don't have a straightforward compositional meaning in some contexts. Also awareness of "false friends" is important, since there is a tendency to cognitively process similar words in different languages as having the same meaning:
Often loan words undergo some shift in meaning. For example the German word "Limonade" doesn't always refer to lemonade but is sometimes used in a generic sense. So orangeade would be "Orangenlimonade". And to ensure you get the drink specifically made from lemons (or "Zitronen" in German) you might have to ask for "Zitronenlimonade".
  • asked a question related to Cross-Cultural Communication
Question
2 answers
The Cultural Intelligence scale (CQS) is widely used in empirical studies to measure cultural intelligence; I found out that it was used in studies conducted in the United States, Saudi Arabia, Korea, the Netherlands, and Ireland. Do you know of studies using the CQS but conducted in other countries than these?
Relevant answer
Answer
  • asked a question related to Cross-Cultural Communication
Question
9 answers
Beyond common topics taught in cross-cultural management courses, what do you think are the current challenges our field in confronted with?
I am working on the draft course outline of "Advanced Cross-cultural management" and I'd be glad to hear the topics you would suggest to deal with in such session.
Relevant answer
Answer
Topics should include an understanding of culture as a set of shared values, beliefs and practices that change across time based upon a variety of experiences and changes in sociocultural context. There is always as much variation within any particular group as there is between any two groups. Thus, effective communication requires cultural humility - a clear understanding that one's own values, beliefs and practices are not inherently 'right' nor necessarily shared by the person with whom one is communicating. Awareness of one's own cultural values, beliefs and practices is best achieved by honest conversations with a trusted diverse group (management team) about the values one was raised with, one's personal understanding of what constitutes an ideal adult, etc. Cultural humility necessitates approaching communication with an attitude of 'not knowing, but being eager to learn' in conversations with others.
  • asked a question related to Cross-Cultural Communication
Question
3 answers
  1. How does cross-cultural inform international health decisions and policies.
  2. What are the implication of cross-cultural communication to international health strategies.
  3. How does cross-cultural communication influence the effectiveness of international health programs.
Relevant answer
Answer
Any health policies or programs that fail to take into consideration the cultural values, beliefs and practices of the communities involved are extremely unlikely to be effective and may have the paradoxical effect of ultimately worsening the long term health of the people they were intended to benefit. Policies or programs imposed without regard for culture are likely to increase distrust of outsiders, damage relationships with health providers and health systems and make future efforts on behalf of affected communities more difficult. An excellent example of a successful international organization that empowers indigenous communities while providing invaluable health resources is Hesperian Health Guides at hesperian.org.
  • asked a question related to Cross-Cultural Communication
Question
18 answers
It amazes me that this is accepted politically-correct terminology with wide academic usage. It is such a poor construct because it leaves out the necessary core semantics which are about "cross-cultural" interaction. In some ways it's an elitist term -- because it "belongs" to a special discourse community.
Relevant answer
Answer
Cultural competency is an OLD term amongst those beginning to working in cross cultural health care contexts - medicine in particular. As clearly noted by Tervalon and Murray-Garcia. One cannot be competent in all ~ and 1 or 2 is insufficient in a multicultural world. In addition, competence seems to reinforce a one way hierarchy. Other, more process focused and INTERPERSONAL terms are: cultural literacy, intercultural competence or, another I use, is cross-culturally, informed or responsive. BOTH descriptors lend at least an essential two way process - and where one is on the process is determined through listening and the acknowledgement by all parties of the need to learn about each other. I and a team of researchers defined culture for health research ~ a suggested read re: the complexity that is lost in the concept of "cultural competence" ( ). Lawrence Kirmayer wrote an article in 2012 in Transcultural Psychiatry outlining underlying power dynamics of the use of the concept of cultural competency from a social political stance. "Rethinking Cultural Competence"
  • asked a question related to Cross-Cultural Communication
Question
3 answers
Anyone could suggest practical workshop to illustrate the benefits of cultural inclusion within an organization?
I use many workshops about cross-cultural communication in general but here I search something that really illustrate the benefits of inclusion behaviors.
Relevant answer
Answer
Diversity is the chorus. Inclusion is their song. Our cultural diversity training solutions for increasing and leveraging global inclusion. I send some link that connected to workshop
 https://www.pdx.edu › ... › Diversity Advocacy › Diversity Action Council
  • asked a question related to Cross-Cultural Communication
Question
6 answers
In view of advertising of numerous softwares to facilitate writing of scientific publications,  will it be a threat to vanish the scientific vigour?
Relevant answer
Answer
At best, AI may help you find references relating to your research. I say at best because even that can not be guaranteed. What an AI would lack is the ability to interpret the data in context; an achievement which is still exclusive to the scientist who constructs the study. So as far as scientific vigour is concerned, while AI may help with some formalities, the best research will still depend on the general enthusiasm put into it by the researcher.
  • asked a question related to Cross-Cultural Communication
Question
6 answers
we are doing a research on application of Hofstede model on students' career preferences in Croatia and Germany. It seems that the results are different in a few aspects of cultural context in both cases when we compare the results to total population Hofstede results. has anyone run into something similar?
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Mirna, please find the article attached. It contains valuable info on the comparison of the results compiled based on the Hofstede database, contrasted with the results of Varga, a Hungarian researcher. It shows some remarkable differences (distortions of the Hofstede material in my opinion). The author of the article is one of the leading experts of Hofstede studies in Hungary. 
Article's full reference format: Falkné Bánó Klára 2014. Identifying Hungarian cultural characteristics in Europe's cultural diversity in the 21st century: a controversial issue. In: Solt Katalin (szerk.) Alkalmazott tudományok I. fóruma: konferenciakötet. Budapest: Budapesti Gazdasági Főiskola. 195-206.
  • asked a question related to Cross-Cultural Communication
Question
29 answers
Suggest some background literature.
Relevant answer
Answer
Howdy, all,
   No one has mentioned the old Italian pun, "traductore, tradittore" (translator, traitor). I recall a comment by an interpreter at the UN on interpreting a speech by Kruschev. When he told a traditional Russian story to illustrate a point, the interpreter realized that the story would make no sense to English hearers, so he quickly realized this and substituted a completely different story which would be familiar and make the same point. 
  Research has shown that, even at a literal level, different languages "pack" different kinds of information in, for example, verbs. Both English and Spanish have a general verb of motion, "go"/"ir", but Spanish has a verb "salir", which would be translated by the Verb + Particle combination "go out", which separates the motion and direction. Translations of novels from English to Spanish and vice-versa show differences in the amount of information omitted or added. 
  Even in technical translation, people working in a field have standard expressions which a translator unfamiliar with the field would be unfamiliar with. A professional translator hired by an archeology journal to translate article summaries into Spanish produced odd literal translations because she was unfamiliar with the field. Literary translation, of course, is vastly more complex because it includes a great deal of cultural and emotional content, and poetry in particular requires a complete re-casting. I have heard it said that the English translation of the Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam is better than the original. 
  Pedagogically, translation provides an important "boot-strapping" which speeds access into the target language. Learning a second language in a school setting can be likened to gaining familiarity with another country and its culture by looking at pictures in a book, or reading descriptions. Only by gradual steps does one gain greater sociolinguistic and cultural knowledge, but only living in the other country gives one the experiential and existential sensibility for deeper knowledge. (Even then, of course, no one can ever become a complete native of a second culture.) All second language learners necessarily begin with translation, overt or covert, until their linguistic competence reaches the point at which they can use the L2 without conscious awareness, but even then, psycholinguistic research shows that the L1 is being activated, suggesting that translation is still taking place subliminally.
   Rudy Troike
   University of Arizona
   Tucson, Arizona, USA
  • asked a question related to Cross-Cultural Communication
Question
10 answers
Indigenous communities have their own definitions of tastes and flavors. They have a name for a full well cooked meal, or a mature, ripe seed. Is there anyone out there with knowledge of these time-tested community sciences?
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Monica Opole
The scientific community is a diverse network of interacting scientists. It includes many "sub-communities" working on particular scientific fields, and within particular institutions; interdisciplinary and cross-institutional activities are also significant. Objectivity is expected to be achieved by the scientific method. Peer review, through discussion and debate within journals and conferences, assists in this objectivity by maintaining the quality of research methodology and interpretation of results.
History of scientific communities
The eighteenth century had some societies made up of men who studied nature, also known as natural philosophers and natural historians, which included even amateurs. As such these societies were more like local clubs and groups with diverse interests than actual scientific communities, which usually had interests on specialized disciplines.Though there were a few older societies of men who studied nature such as the Royal Society of London, the concept of scientific communities emerged in the second half of the 19th century, not before, because it was in this century that the language of modern science emerged, the professionalization of science occurred, specialized institutions were created, and the specialization of scientific disciplines and fields occurred.For instance, the term scientist was first coined by the naturalist-theologian William Whewell in 1834 and the wider acceptance of the term along with the growth of specialized societies allowed for researchers to see themselves as a part of a wider imagined community, similar to the concept of nationhood.
Membership, status and interactions
Membership of the community is generally, but not exclusively, a function of education, employment status, and institutional affiliation. Status within the community is highly correlated with publication record. Scientists are usually trained in academia through universities. As such, degrees in the relevant scientific sub-disciplines are often considered prerequisites for membership in the relevant community. In particular, the PhD with its research requirements functions as a marker of being an important integrator into the community, though continued membership is dependent on maintaining connections to other researchers through publication, technical contributions, and conferences. After obtaining a PhD an academic scientist may continue through post-doctoral fellowships and onto professorships. Other scientists make contributions to the scientific community in alternate ways such as in industry, education, think tanks, or the government.
Members of the same community do not need to work together.Communication between the members is established by disseminating research work and hypotheses through articles in peer reviewed journals, or by attending conferences where new research is presented and ideas exchanged and discussed. There are also many informal methods of communication of scientific work and results as well. And many in a coherent community may actually not communicate all of their work with one another, for various professional reasons.
Speaking for the scientific community
Unlike in previous centuries when the community of scholars were all members of few learned societies and similar institutions, there are no singular bodies or individuals which can be said today to speak for all science or all scientists. This is partly due to the specialized training most scientists receive in very few fields. As a result, many would lack expertise in all the other fields of the sciences. For instance, due to the increasing complexity of information and specialization of scientists, most of the cutting-edge research today is done by well funded groups of scientists, rather than individuals.However, there are still multiple societies and academies in many countries which help consolidate some opinions and research to help guide public discussions on matters of policy and government-funded research. For example, the United States' National Academy of Science (NAS) and United Kingdom's Royal Society sometimes act as surrogates when the opinions of the scientific community need to be ascertained by policy makers or the national government, but the statements of the National Academy of Science or the Royal Society are not binding on scientists nor do they necessarily reflect the opinions of every scientist in a given community since membership is often exclusive, their commissions are explicitly focused on serving their governments, and they have never "shown systematic interest in what rank-and file scientists think about scientific matters". Exclusivity of membership in these types of organizations can be seen in their election processes in which only existing members can officially nominate others for candidacy of membership. It is very unusual for organizations like the National Academy of Science to engage in external research projects since they normally focus on preparing scientific reports for government agencies.[8] An example of how rarely the NAS engages in external and active research can be seen in its struggle to prepare and overcome hurdles, due to its lack of experience in coordinating research grants and major research programs on the environment and health.
Nevertheless, general scientific consensus is a concept which is often referred to when dealing with questions that can be subject to scientific methodology. While the consensus opinion of the community is not always easy to ascertain or fix due to paradigm shifting, generally the standards and utility of the scientific methodhave tended to ensure, to some degree, that scientists agree on some general corpus of facts explicated by scientific theory while rejecting some ideas which run counter to this realization. The concept of scientific consensus is very important to science pedagogy, the evaluation of new ideas, and research funding. Sometimes it is argued that there is a closed shop bias within the scientific community toward new ideas. Protoscience, fringe science, and pseudoscience have been topics that discuss demarcation problems. In response to this some non-consensus claims skeptical organizations, not research institutions, have devoted considerable amounts of time and money contesting ideas which run counter to general agreement on a particular topic.
Philosophers of science argue over the epistemological limits of such a consensus and some, including Thomas Kuhn, have pointed to the existence of scientific revolutions in the history of science as being an important indication that scientific consensus can, at times, be wrong. Nevertheless, the sheer explanatory power of science in its ability to make accurate and precise predictions and aid in the design and engineering of new technology has ensconced "science" and, by proxy, the opinions of the scientific community as a highly respected form of knowledge both in the academy and in popular culture.
Political controversies
The high regard with which scientific results are held in Western society has caused a number of political controversies over scientific subjects to arise. An allegedconflict thesis proposed in the 19th century between religion and science has been cited by some as representative of a struggle between tradition and substantial change and faith and reason.[citation needed]. A popular example used to support this thesis is when Galileo was tried before the Inquisition concerning the heliocentric model.[9] The persecution began after Pope Urban VIII permitted Galileo to write about the Copernican model. Galileo had used arguments from the Pope and put them in the voice of the simpleton in the work "Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems" which caused great offense to him.Even though many historians of science have discredited the conflict thesis it still remains a popular belief among many including some scientists. In more recent times, thecreation-evolution controversy has resulted in many religious believers in a supernatural creation to challenge some naturalistic assumptions that have been proposed in some of the branches of scientific fields such as evolutionary biology, geology, and astronomy. Although the dichotomy seems to be of a different outlook from a Continental European perspective, it does exist. The Vienna Circle, for instance, had a paramount (i.e. symbolic) influence on the semiotic regimerepresented by the Scientific Community in Europe.
In the decades following World War II, some were convinced that nuclear power would solve the pending energy crisis by providing energy at low cost. This advocacy led to the construction of many nuclear power plants, but was also accompanied by a global political movement opposed to nuclear power due to safety concerns and associations of the technology with nuclear weapons. Mass protests in the United States and Europe during the 1970s and 1980s along with the disasters of Chernobyl and Three Mile Island led to a decline in nuclear power plant construction.
In the last decades or so, both global warming and stem cells have placed the opinions of the scientific community in the forefront of political debate.
  • asked a question related to Cross-Cultural Communication
Question
3 answers
Models/articles about the mediator role of acculturative stress on the relationship between perceived discrimination and psychological distress ?
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Celine,
The following resources may interest you:
Discrimination, Acculturation, Acculturative Stress, and Latino Psychological Distress: A Moderated Mediational Model by Lucas Torres, Mark W. Driscoll, and Maria Voell.
  • asked a question related to Cross-Cultural Communication
Question
4 answers
I need to identify a tool that allows you to measure the impact of culture in international business?
thanks and regards
Relevant answer
Answer
Thanks a lot. I already have the text as a reference for consultation. Best regards
  • asked a question related to Cross-Cultural Communication
Question
5 answers
How could measure the impact of the lack of knowledge of culture in international negotiations?
Relevant answer
Answer
My pleasure John! cheers
  • asked a question related to Cross-Cultural Communication
Question
5 answers
It will be used in the selection process for a Market Research Director - International.  Thanks in advance!
Relevant answer
Answer
I might be able to help. Can you be a bit clearer about what you are looking for when you say "recommend a cross-cultural assessment"?
  • asked a question related to Cross-Cultural Communication
Question
8 answers
Looking for recent publications on Hofstede's Cultural Dimensions model. Anyone doing current research or know of recent publications I can review? Thanks!
Relevant answer
Answer
This might help a little - includes and extends his work
  • asked a question related to Cross-Cultural Communication
Question
13 answers
I am working from a cross-cultural perspective. Thanks in advance!
Relevant answer
Answer
Yes, They can. Cultural factors as contributors are: power distance, individualism, and uncertainty avoidance. You may find this paper useful:
Liao, Meng-Yuan (2015). Safety Culture in commercial aviation: Differences in perspective between Chinese and Western pilots. Safety Science, 79, 193-205
  • asked a question related to Cross-Cultural Communication
Question
9 answers
Are students in language immersion.
Relevant answer
Answer
I think it will depend on Chinese students knowledge of English. If that cohort of students have fluency in English than I will be better to teach them otherwise it is very difficult for Non-Chinese teachers. So, try to use Visual-Aid and Pictographic way of teaching that will be also significant.
  • asked a question related to Cross-Cultural Communication
Question
6 answers
I'm searching for recent studies in the field of international/intercultural communication related to the opinion leadership concept or similar papers (educational policy, gatekeeper etc.)
Relevant answer
Answer
Hi Melanie,
hope you will find helpful, best wishes.
Ghanim.
  • asked a question related to Cross-Cultural Communication
Question
6 answers
I'm interested in Communication Accommodation Theory (CAT) and the Latin American culture.  As I was searching for information, I came across Dimensional Accrual and Dissociation (DAD) Theory studied within the Latin American culture.  I have to do more research on DAD but would like to know in what capacity could these two theories be studied together?  Is anyone working on either theory and the Latin American culture?
  • asked a question related to Cross-Cultural Communication
Question
5 answers
I need a survey tool based on Trompenaars cultural dimensions
  • asked a question related to Cross-Cultural Communication
Question
4 answers
It is envisaged that qualitative interviews will be used in the study. 
Relevant answer
Answer
Thanx a million Michael for the very useful feedback.
  • asked a question related to Cross-Cultural Communication
Question
9 answers
I would like  to know if serious concerts can exist without the benefit of grants.  Many  happenings are organised with subsidies of the city, consequently the tickets are  for free or rather cheap.
 Can financial support not restrict the freedom of expression.
Relevant answer
Answer
Good question. Please allow me to extemporize a bit.
My performing career in classical music spans over three decades. This includes experiences in the academy as a student, in the symphonic world (including ballet and opera) Broadway type musicals, church performances,and casual dance "gigs." If one looks at the historical growth of Western art music (often considered "serious" music) patronage has always played a significant role in the creation and performance of music. 
The early Christian church (a.k.a. Catholic church) played a significant role in the development of notation and the establishment of the modes to allow the singing of chants to have the same intervallic relationships between notes regardless of the starting pitch or the "tonic." Composers began to develop new styles such as organum which introduced polyphony and the rhythmic modes. Not to go into too much theory or medieval history, if  composers were not supported by the church, the development of Western art music would likely have suffered.
Other early patrons include nobility and the merchant class, particularly in the city-states of Italy. F. J. Haydn enjoyed a lengthy tenure as court composer/conductor/performer with the Esterhazy family. His patron so admired Haydn that he was provided an opportunity to travel to London on two occasions and to solicit/receive commissions for several symphonies.
Serious music performances were largely associated with worship or the court until the development of opera which although early on was sustained by the wealthy became one of the first large-scale publicly attended art events. By the 17th and 18th  centuries composers were seeking commissions and were beginning to establish themselves as independent from the patronage system as it had existed previously.
In today's world patronage still exists and the philanthropic endeavors of arts presenting organizations is highly developed. Organizations have developed support groups such as guilds, societies, memberships, etc. to supplement the income brought in through ticket sales and subscriptions as well as selling advertising in the concert program. Corporations, foundations, and individuals are sought to sponsor a season or a particular performance (or series). For corporations and foundations, this serves as a public relations or marketing outlet. Private individuals have a variety of personal motivations to support the arts.
The costs incurred with presenting serious music are considerable. Professional musicians, conductors and soloists demand to be paid unless it is a benefit concert in which the individuals have agreed to perform gratis. Their remuneration covers rehearsals and performances. Rental of the rehearsal space, performance space, and frequently music is an expense that some audience members do not readily consider. The same is true for marketing, advertising, and the publication of printed materials such as tickets, posters, and programs. Additionally the ticket staff, ushers and concessionaires will need to be paid. Some upscale performance also provide valet parking as a perk for the most expensive seats.
The actual percentage of the overall production costs that ticket and advertising revenue generates is roughly 20-35% depending on a host of factors surrounding the production. A single ticket for the New York Philharmonic in March 2015 can cost from close to $150 to over $400. Certainly serious music can demand "serious cash"...and that is with corporate, foundation, and individual contributions as well as selling advertising and other "soft goods."
All of this is just on the cost side of the equation. Other factors to consider include the impact of popular culture in the development of taste. This may be somewhat geographically influenced similar to the argument of "nature versus nurture." However with the widespread availability for the electronic playback of music regardless of the genre or style most listeners are now consumers of music who often choose to listen to anything but serious music. Arts presenting organizations generally have public outreach concerts that are free in public parks and schools to acquaint potential audiences with their artistic product. These are supported through donations, grants, gifts and the general operating budget of the organization. However these are only momentary interactions with the arts and unless the artistic exposure is frequent, sustained, or regularly available, the popular culture seems to win out.
In addition to my performing career, I've been a college professor for 25 years. In teaching courses from music appreciation to more advance music history and literature during this time my music major students more often listen to popular music even if they desire to be a professional performing musician in an orchestra. Peer pressure and culture prevail, it seems.
Thanks for bearing with my rambling, but I did want to share some of my insights.
Regards,
Jim
 
 
  • asked a question related to Cross-Cultural Communication
Question
28 answers
Normally, the factors for engagement of employees is culture-determined. Definitely, the eastern culture is quite different from that in the Western countries. Any thoughts on this issue would be appreciated.
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Debi,
The trouble is though we can distinct geographically, economically and historically Eastern and Western worlds but the people are much more similar to each other and because of the quasi uniform media effects people's commitments are congruent.
  • asked a question related to Cross-Cultural Communication
Question
12 answers
I prefer "intercultural" to "cross-cultural" because it sound more multilateral. Perhaps "transcultural" is better. I suspect that some term codification has been established in someone's research.
Relevant answer
Answer
• Multicultural communication supposes the coexistence of several cultures.
• Intercultural communication suggests interactions between different cultures.
• Intercultural communication necessarily concerns situations of contact.
• Transcultural communication can be defined as communication which are valid across social groups, or which do not take into account cultural differences.
For more, see:
  • asked a question related to Cross-Cultural Communication
Question
2 answers
My field of research is not sociolinguistics. I am working on a project about the multilingual personnel of an elderly care facility (3500 employees) and conflicts based on different languages (and probably cultures) within the team that have been reported to the HR-manager. I'm looking for sociolinguistically/ sociologically relevant literature, especially recent studies with precise hypothesis etc.
Relevant answer
Answer
A PhD student in our department, Tamiryn Jones, recently completed a study on "Linguistic strategies used in the construction of performance assessment discourse in the South African workplace". Sounds relevant to your focus on multilingualism and team conflicts.
And then a PhD project that I was co-supervisor of dealt with multilingualism in Lesotho Health Care centres (focusing on language discordant HIV and AIDS interactions), which is possibly not relevant to your specific question but may point you in the direction of useful sources.
  • asked a question related to Cross-Cultural Communication
Question
8 answers
Intercultural communication is often defined as a skill. Yet, in order to be a successful in communicating - let's say across two cultures - doesn't one need to be culturally adapted to both contexts? Or in other words, instead of developing intercultural communication skilss, should trainers not address acculturation first?
Relevant answer
Answer
I am not a specialist in this field, but having worked 7 years for a Japanese company in Hungary and being very much interested in comparative cultural research I do have a (non-expert) opinon. My impression is that acculturation is a notion used for people living on the territory of another culture for a longer time. Inter-cultural communication skills are needed, however, for a much broader circle of people, e.g. for those working in joint ventures. (Hall has very good examples of cultural misunderstanind even for European-European companies using monochronic and polychronic timescale, let alone Asian-European cooperations). From the practical viewpoint one cannot send each coworker to spend years in another culture, nevertheless (I believe) that certain inter-cultural commincation skills may be taught to them to reduce the cultural shock and misunderstanding. The most important thing is, however, empathy and keen observation. That's why women are better in this respect than proud males ...
  • asked a question related to Cross-Cultural Communication
Question
5 answers
Cross-culture management
Relevant answer
Yes. people in low power distance, indulgence, low uncertainty avoidance, and individualistic societies may easily communicate with the others. Strongly suggest Hofstede and Hofstede publications.