Science topic

Contingency Management - Science topic

Explore the latest questions and answers in Contingency Management, and find Contingency Management experts.
Questions related to Contingency Management
  • asked a question related to Contingency Management
Question
4 answers
A contingency plan is a plan devised for an outcome other than in the usual (expected) plan. According to the quality assurance and accreditation process, it is required from all higher academic institutions to design a contingency plan in case of emergency, so no panic and risk-managed very well.
In a line of coronavirus outbreak and possibilities to close universities are there any contingency plans in a place? if not inorder the mangers to take responsibility and protect their students and staff are they ready to develop one? in your workplace as academicians do you know if there is a contingency plan available and who responds to implement it?is it developed at the level of institutions, colleges or programs?
I would appreciate your thought in this
Relevant answer
Answer
thanks Diana
I t would be useful to know what has been done so others could learn from it
  • asked a question related to Contingency Management
Question
2 answers
I have written a code for load flow analysis. I would like to introduce a fault in one of the line and run the load flow again. How can I do that?
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Yugeswar Reddy,
First it will be possible to write the program in C to introduce the fault or a line outage and make the link with Matlab, because this is possible because C and C ++ are compatible with Matlab.
Second you can use MATPOWER is an open source programming package of Matlab, this package is dedicated to simulate power lines.
For more details and information about this subject, I suggest you to see links and attached files on topic.
Best regards
  • asked a question related to Contingency Management
Question
12 answers
Please share some real world examples of outages or contingencies caused in both system that effected them mutually. Thanks
Relevant answer
Answer
I agree with Dr. Arouna Oloulade
  • asked a question related to Contingency Management
Question
1 answer
My research team and I are designing a contingency management programme- we are thinking about using an approach where participants are able to view how much money they have earned during the study and receive payment at the end. Is this as effective as immediate payment?
  • asked a question related to Contingency Management
Question
3 answers
Dear Colleagues, My name is Aleksei Aleinikov and I am a Master student at Lomonosov Moscow State University. I kindly ask you to take a survey concerned with special aspects of structural design of innovative business. I would like to know your opinions and ideas regarding contigency factors affecting organizationals structures at different life-cycle stages and my own model of designing organizational structure of innovative company.
This survey is placed in Google Forms, following a link:
Have a nice day!
Relevant answer
Answer
An organization passes through various stage of life cycle – birth, youth, midlife and maturity. Thenature of contingency factors changes with the change in the life cycle of the organization. For example, In the birth stage, the organisation created by the entrepreneur is informal, with no rules and regulations. Decision making is centralised with the owner and tasks are not specialised. In the youth stage, the organisation is growing – it expands and hires more employees. It incorporates division of labour and formal rules and policies. Decision making is still with the owner although it is shared by few persons close to the owner. In the midlife stage, the company has become quite large. It now has extensive sets of rules, regulations, policies and systems to guide the employees. Control systems are used, professionals are hired, tasks are decentralised and authority is delegated to functional departments. In the maturity stage, rules, regulations, specialised staffs, budgets, a refined division of labour and control systems are in place. These contingency factors and their importance changes depending upon the farious factors like Strategy, Size of the organisation Age of the organization, and technology .
  • asked a question related to Contingency Management
Question
3 answers
I have thought this question because I taught risk and contingency management already for many years in China, Australia and PNG.
This is also the reason why I have been editing Special Issue on Big Data Driven Risk and Contingency Management (BRCM 2017) with Prof Ken Strang. 
Reading is thinking, writing is critical thinking, publishing is systematic thinking. 
Please tell me what you thinking about it.
  • asked a question related to Contingency Management
Question
4 answers
1. comparative contingency theory with other theories.
2. is the contingency theory adequate for management accounting research.
3.can the management accounting practice improve the performance.
4. models related with this subject. 
Relevant answer
Answer
You will find Management Accounting and Control Systems: An Organizational and Sociological Approach, 2nd Edition. Norman B. Macintosh, Paolo Quattrone and Wickramasinghe, D., and Alawattage, C. (2007) Management Accounting Change: Approaches and Perspectives. Routledge: London, UK very useful. I have attached some papers that you may find useful.
  • asked a question related to Contingency Management
Question
4 answers
Preferably on the following 
- The Hawthorne Studies
- Theory X & Theory Y
- Open Systems View
- Contingency Theory
Relevant answer
Answer
dear Dintle Stephina Mahlatsi
you can see this paper about the history the management school and try ti find anther paper in different  issue  
with best wishes
dr.ssalim
university of baghdad
  • asked a question related to Contingency Management
Question
2 answers
Please let me know if the phi value can be rounded to 0.3 from 0.25 in contingency analysis? Are there hard and fast rule that only 0.3 can be considered a positive association or even 0.25 be considered positive.
Relevant answer
Answer
Thank you Adam..The links above are useful.  You are rightt. I was referring to Pearson phi coefficient.
  • asked a question related to Contingency Management
Question
7 answers
I am working on cost contingency in Construction Project. Any suggestion in relation to BIM adoption and cost risk management will be appreciated 
Relevant answer
Answer
In theory yes. In practice it depends. Do not forget the human capacity for abstraction, the BIM is a slower and more cumbersome approach. The benefits: BIM is good at tedious repetitive tasks that humans don't like. The BIM is a formal process, the frameworks encourages a complete plan, without BIM it is easy to skip something or forget to change all aspects of scope, schedule, and cost. Last, the BIM is a record, you can go back to the BIM and review the record. Also, be certain to define what type of construction. There is heavy construction, building construction, and industrial plants. The BIM is something different to each of these.
  • asked a question related to Contingency Management
Question
7 answers
I am searching for the efficacy of non-pharmacological methods for methamphetamine dependency.
Relevant answer
Answer
There is a dearth of outcome data for all treatment modalities for all substance use disorders.  That said, the general consensus of clinicians IN THE UNITED STATES is against substitution (medication) therapy for stimulants (cocaine, methamphetamine, methylphenidate, d-amphetimine, a-amphetimine, dextroamphetamine, e.g. all DOPAMINE upregulators).  [In response to Dr. Rich's comment, I think the original question was aimed at stopping individuals from using methamphetamine using non-medicinal means.  Yes methamphetamine can induce psychosis, but clinicians can stop this not by treating psychosis directly but by trying to get meth users to stop using it.]  So, for clinicians wanting to take an abstinence-based approach, it seems that "talk therapy" like CBT and support-group therapy like 12-step programs (NA, AA, CA, etc) have shown success - but only anecdotally - we don't really know how effective these modalities are and for which patients they work, and how well they work, in achieving long-term remission from methamphetamine (stimulant) use disorders.  I think that, like with all substance use disorders, the best results will be obtained by keeping patients in long-term outpatient treatment following intensive residential treatment.  As Dr. Buttfield said "support" is the key, whatever the particular structure of a pt's aftercare plan.  Given how little real outcome data we have, the best strategy is probably to apply all available treatment modalities and hope that something helps.  But the *anecdotal* results so far are not terribly encouraging; most pts with stimulant use disorders have great difficulty achieving remission for any meaningful period of time.  In other words, the average Px for a pt presenting with stimulant use disorder is not terribly auspicious.  
For now, it seems that the only two viable non-medicinal treatments are direct therapy (CBT or otherwise) and mutual support therapy (12 step or other group therapy approaches).  I really hope that more treatment modalities will be developed for patients suffering from stimulant use disorder.  Remember also that most SUD patients have high comorbidity with other psychiatric disorders (which contribute to the difficulty of achieving absence/remission) -- it is important to Dx and Tx these as well as SUD itself.  
A final comment on the Karila et al article cited above, which reviews medicinal/pharmacological Tx (Rx) treatments.  There are really three types of strategies in medication, and I think it is important to categorize potential medications as such (1) "blockers" - e.g. medications that stop the stimulant from acting, such as naltrexone.  The problem with naltrexone, which works very well with both opioids and alcohol and has shown promise with stimulants, is PATIENT NON-COMPLIANCE.  Patients may take the medication during a study, but often will stop in conjunction with resuming use.  As such, it is not really a treatment, except in long-acting forms such as the monthly IV injection of naltrexone (Vivitrol in the US, manufactured by Alkermes).  The problem with this, again, is that patients will often decline to take medication that blocks the psychoactive effects of the substance they want to use.  Blocking strategies have had weak results so far EXCEPT in conjunction with rigorous aftercare programs, such as those required of physicians in recovery and pharmacists in recovery.
 (2) "Mitigating medications".  In my opinion, these show the most promise.  Bupropion, for example, is a very WEAK stimulant (and antidepressant and anxiolytic in some patients) - and if it can provide enough dopamine/norepinephrine/adrenaline upregulation that a patient will resist the urge to use a much stronger stimulant, then it is BY FAR a better alternative 
(3) substitution (harm reduction).  As Karila et al note, substitution with d-amphetamine, a STRONG stimulant, logically shows promise.  However, as with any substitution strategy, the patient remains dependent on a substitute stimulant with dangerous morbidity - but which may arguably be substantially less harmful than dependence on methamphetamine.  The Karila review, written in 2010, concludes "Despite the lack of success in most studies to date, increasing efforts are being made to develop medications for the treatment of methamphetamine dependence and several promising agents are targets of further research."  I am unaware of any such compounds emerging as likely candidates for medicinal treatment in the past several years.  
Furthermore, LONG-TERM COMPLIANCE is something that is rarely studied in the RCTs cited by Karila.  Unfortunately, there seems to be an inverse relationship between the effectiveness (measured in terms of pt quality of life) and pt compliance on medication.  With a blocking strategy, you get LOW LONG TERM COMPLIANCE, and with a strong-substitution strategy, you get much higher compliance (naturally) but then you are really just switching the patient from methamphetamine to a stimulant with less deleterious effects, while you try to keep the dose at a steady level (very difficult given rapid tolerance and relatively flat dose-response curves of many stimulant-substitution alternatives).  I am personally (subjectively) much more optimistic about opioid substitution therapy than I am about stimulant substation therapy for that reason -- but I have no data to  back up this conjecture.