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Hello all,
I have encountered a Finnish doctoral thesis in Education (Ahokallio-Leppälä 2016. Osaaminen keskiössä - ammattikorkeakoulun uusi paradigma [The Competence in the Center: a New Paradigm for Finnish Universities of Applied Sciences (my translation)] in which the Finnish concept "osaaminen" (approaching competence, competency, skills etc.) was repeated 1066 times. It seems that the author's strategy in concept formation approaches to kind of "moulding" or "plastering" instead of "building from parts step by step". As far as I know, this kind of concepts are called "malleable" ones. What do you think about this kind of concepts in terms of concept analysis? It seems to me that the process described here is rather challenging in terms of reliablity but also in terms of trustworthiness.
(It shoud be noted, that in Finnish Universities, doctoral dissertation is kind of a goal in itself - you need not publish any revised version of your argumentation presented in the doctoral thesis, which is usually published in Acta series of your University, be it a monograph or 4-5 refereed articles and an introduction.)
Best Regards,
Juha
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My dear ,
I am totally agree with you about the importance of your topic and I need your help to send papers or references about it .I would like to know more about it
Good luck
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Much has been written about justice. However, to the best of my knowledge, there are hardly any careful analyses of the meaning(s) of 'justice' to date. Do you know of any philosophers that have presented such an analysis?
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Look at section V on Dikaiological terms in Peter Glassen, The classes of moral terms.
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I recently sent my conceptual paper for publication in International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business (Inderscience). I had earlier submitted the same manuscript to the journal of entrepreneurship (JoE) but sadly it was rejected within two days of submission by both for the same reason. Given below are the details of their response:
Thank you for submitting your work to the International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business. We regretfully conclude that we are not good fit. We do thank you for your interest in the International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business.
I would be grateful to know why my paper was rejected by both the publishers without disclosing a tangible reason for the same. I would also like to highlight that I had uploaded the paper on the submission portal. Could this be one of the reasons why my paper was rejected?
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My advice is that conceptual papers are not the kind of papers a beginner should focus on writing. To write a conceptual article, you must have researched and published so much on the topic or subject to provide you with expert opinion. I have the same problem when I tried to write conceptual papers just after defending my PhD in 2013 and received rejections from editors. After 4 years of researching and doing qualitative and quantitative focused research, I have gone back to writing conceptual papers. I have 2 papers accepted since last year, one on International Journal of Organisational Analysis (ABS 1*) and another on Politics and Policy (ABS 3*). Currently, I have 2 more under review. Hence, after 5 years of engaging in the conventional research, I have gained knowledge and expertise to write conceptual papers.
My Advise to young researchers is focus on the conventional research methods (qualitative and quantitative) and learn from the process to graduate to writing conceptual papers. I hope this helps.
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Since I'm interested in Conceptual Analysis, I've been searching for work making use of this "research method". What surprised me is that almost half of the papers I found are from the field/discipline of Nursing Studies/Research. Considering that arguably all scientific fields/disciplines (sociology, psychology, mathematics, engineering, linguistics, law, economics, physics, philosophy, medicine, etc.) could equally employ Conceptual Analysis, can anyone explain to me the special connection there seems to be between Nursing Studies/Research and Conceptual Analysis? Thank you!
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Etienne,
There will be a few reasons for this - such as a high proportion of nursing research that is what I call 'naval-gazing' research i.e. trying to make sense of 'abstract' things and 'what is the nature of things'. There may be multiple terms for these 'issues' and those terms are often used interchangeably/incorrectly. Concept analysis is designed to bring clarity to this prevelant issue in nursing. Of course, it isn't just unique to nursing though - which is why you will see it with other disciplines.
Another reason is that most of the seminal frameworks i.e. Morse, Rodgers, Walker and Avant, Hupcey etc were developed by nurses.
A further reason, and one that some might not like me saying, is that it can be deemed as 'easier' research compared to other methodologies and yet still publishable. The data for concept analysis is narrative data derived from the existing literature. It does not require sampling and setting techniques, the recruitment of participants, ethics approval - nor data collection in the physical clinical field.
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Hi! I'm looking for theories, methods and approaches to study the history/evolution/conception of a given concept/term/label/topic within a given scientific discipline, mainly through the (textual) analysis of the discipline's (pivotal) writings. I'm particularly interested in approaches that would draw from ontology, terminology, conceptual analysis, conceptual history, historiography, etc., but I don't really know where to start. I'm especially interested in what the discipline's most influential writers have to say about a specific object, however they might have labelled it, and how the discipline's various theories and approaches regard that object. The approach would have to work both semasiologically (from a label to its concepts) and onomasiologically (from a concept to its labels), as there is no necessary relation between a given label and a given concept. Any ideas? Thank you very much!
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For the evolution of a mathematical conception you might look at Imre Lakatos, Proofs and Refutations: The Logic of Mathematical Discovery.
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Hello Dears,
Suppose that you're developing a technology acceptance model (TAM) in a case. Could you tell me about the effects and advantages of including "Several Independent Variables" into the TAM?
Bests,
Dashtpeyma
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The TAM model is used to explain and predict user acceptance of computer technologies. Basically, if an information system can help people do their jobs better, it is perceived as useful. Accordingly, the basic TAM model defines two variables: perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use, in order to quantify users' attitudes towards information technology. In this context, you can check as a TAM example on this link: https://commons.erau.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1354&context=publication
It is about TAM of the Information Systems Security that can help you to respond to your question.
Also, to be confident about the problem, you can use the independent decision variables but they should have significative ponderations. To determine the ponderation, I suggest using an experimental method like "Delphi" as a methodology for constructing your final model.
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Can someone please explain what is A-R-A model in short. The Wikipedia information is deficient. It would be great to discuss applications and how one can apply this model in the industry.
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Please read the article available at:
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How to measure different writers mental spaces,image schemata,conceptual metaphor different processing through texts?
Texts are products of multi-cognitive processing .
Writers are hidden shadows in their texts which represent their mental content ,spaces,images and semantic neural networks.
Texts can give analytics of situation of writer to his environment and predict his impacts in mental content of readers.
But How can we compare distinctive features of his/her mental processing quantitatively?
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One way to do this is to construct a corpus with these authors' writing as samples, then annotate the samples with the intented constructs that you desire to study, for example, annotate all cases of conceptual metaphors that you can identify, after you have done the annotation job, use a concordancer to extract all cases of conceptual metaphors, and compare their distributions (frequencies) across authorial differences, statistics, graphs, etc. may be used.
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I'm currently conducting a study whereby I'm hoping to clarify what people mean when they talk about a certain concept. I have interviewed 16 individuals and now wish to conduct a conceptual analysis. However, the only resources I can find for a 'step by step' guide suggest that concept analyses only measure frequency of phrases/terms when participants are talking. I was hoping for a more detailed and narrative-based approach than this, but the study doesn't exactly fit the criteria for an IPA study.
Any thoughts?
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I disagree with Hein. In exploratory, grounded, and/or inductive research it's common to collect data and then explore it. Chapter 15 of my book, 'Basic Research Methods: An Introduction to Social Science Research' (Sage, New Delhi, 2010) has a Describe/Classify/Interpret sequence, including a clunky but effective spreadsheet method for identifying key words and phrases, which should help basic quantitative description and qualitative interpretation.
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Can anyone refer me to some updated studies on the conceptual analysis of the notion of 'belonging'?
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Many very thanks. 
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When communicating a conceptual understanding of the nature of the universe, how is the quality of the communication affected by each of: the clearness of the conceptualization, the expressiveness of the language used or the interpretation of the perceived information?
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I think that from the point of view of communication and specifically science communication the issue is valid and important.
We have been working on 'cultural distance' model of communication, which gives some insight about factors that influence the communication of complex ideas to the lay public.
large scale surveys have shown that the demographic factors do  influence propagation of ideas from one culture (scientific culture) to other cultures (peoples culture). However, the evidence shows that there are four factors, which are intrinsic to idea that is being communicated and these are
Life cycle of the phenomenon (that includes ease of demonstration and repeatability)
Its intensity of likely impact on the life of the target layperson
Level of complexity or mathematical obtuseness involved in explaining the phenomenon
Control over manipulation of reality
We have also worked out empirical method to measure the distance between various scientific explanations and target audience.
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The 'understanding' is a very complicated and sensitive term. It's quite a long time that I have been focusing on logical specification, representation and analysis of [constructivist] understanding. Now, I feel the need to use the knowledge of the appropriate researchers from different fields (e.g., psychology, neuroscience, cognitive science, learning sciences, philosophy, knowledge processing and cybernetics) to make the logical comparisons between the answers. The question may seem to be very general, but I want the researchers in different fields to make it more specific with regard to their own conceptions and relying on their own policies.  
Kind regards,
Farshad Badie 
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Knowledge is all that one can learn by rote. It is the information concerning a process that could be stored in a computer and incorporated in a computer program. It is information and process steps that could be used in a check list or an operating procedure. It is the information and relationships that management by bureaucracy requires.
Understanding is knowledge that includes the how and why. Someone who understands has developed an intuition of the process. One may acquire through practice the how of a process. The how of a process allows proficiency and a level of expertise. The why of the process is necessary to apply the process and innovate. Innovation may be altering of the process as conditions change or applying the process to a new situation. There are many aspects of process why. What is to be accomplished? When or whether it is necessary? Who or what is affected? What are the limits? When or how is it applied? Is the process proper for the situation? When have you done enough? ...
There may be a difference in semantics when you and I use 'conceptual realization.' I mean you must merge the how and why to apply knowledge in a meaningful way. The how and why are necessary to form a concept and make it real. Understanding is the merging of how and why with the comprehension of all the aspects of the process why.
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I am using conceptual map in different stages of research as a tool to organise main concepts and as a research pool to track researched areas. I am looking to publications to support and defend their use. 
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Dear Tulio,
Try to find the following articles that provide solid background and literature review about concepts and conceptual maps:
[1] Martin J Eppler. A comparison between concept maps, mind maps, conceptual diagrams, and visual metaphors as complementary tools for knowledge construction and sharing. Information Visualization, September 21, 2006, vol. 5, no. 3, 202-210. doi: 10.1057/palgrave.ivs.9500131.
[2] Martin Davies. Concept mapping, mind mapping and argument mapping: what are the differences and do they matter? Higher Education, 2011, Volume 62, Issue 3, pp 279-301. doi: 10.1007/s10734-010-9387-6.
I have these articles and some more articles related to concepts in qualitative research, because one of my research interests is related to concept and knowledge development through qualitative research.
Regards,
Zeljko
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Some are more productive than others.
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you have the short bibliography there: http://www.ericdigests.org/1998-1/concept.htm
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Recently I have been researching on how to understand the historical content of the cultural practices of sociability in the second mital of the nineteenth century. I've noticed that the concept of sociality exists before being typified by contemporary sociology as an object of study. I hope you have some points of view dissimilar to enrich the debate
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I think "sociability" can be a useful historical category. Precisely because it allows for interactions and interconnections in society. Its not a rigid and structural term, in my view.
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We are having a challenge at a national and European scale on this issue. Does anybody have work or have conceptual ideas on what should be done and potential challenges and opportunities?
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Heazle M., Tangney P., Burton P., Howes M., Grant-Smith D., Reis K., Bosomworth K., 2013. Mainstreaming climate change adaptation: An incremental approach to disaster risk management in Australia. Environmental Science & Policy 33, 162 – 170
Howes M., Tangney P., Reis K., Grant-Smith D., Heazle M., Bosomworth K., Burton P. 2014 Towards networked governance: improving interagency communication and collaboration for disaster risk management and climate change adaptation in Australia. Journal of Environmental Planning and Management
Howes, Michael, Grant-Smith, Deanna, Reis, Kim, Tangney, Peter, Bosomworth, Karyn, Heazle, Michael, et al. (2013) Rethinking disaster risk management and climate change adaptation. National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility (NCCARF), Gold Coast, QLD.
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Recall another question, posted in RG, entitled "is there a finite definition for every real number?"
If Cantor theorem is assumed, the answer is not. Now, the question is more ambitious. Perhaps there is no possibility of proving the existence of undefinable concepts.
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Dear Juan-Esteban,
You asked me to let you know axioms of any philosophical theory.
Easy.
Pythagoreans: "Everything is a number".
Plato: "Everything is either an Idea or the image of an Idea".
Aristotle: "Everything is an individual thing (first substance), or a species (substance second)."
Spinoza: "Everything is an individual thing and abstractions have no existence in Nature".
And so on... You can check that theses axioms fit well with the respective philosophical theories of Plato, Aristotle and Spinoza.
Note that theses examples have the logical form of laws. Note also that they do not form together a consistent theory and that therefore you have to make a choice.
In mathematics also, we are not forced to believe that classical logic is the Core logic and we are not forced to accept the thesis that ZFC is the right set theory. As mathematician, you have to make a choice, so you take also a risk.
There are nevetheless indeed differences between mathematics and philosophical systems: the ontological system of the latter is of course larger and some philosophers do not accept the point that logic and science in general can be a mean to solve philosophical problems. No mathematician accept the claim of irrationality, some (bad) philosophers do.
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For an article on the concept of ecosystem services (and the multiple diverging interpretations of its meaning) I am looking for studies that have investigated the fluidity of concepts, and (ideally) the discursive effects thereof.
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Thanks Nelson
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I need to provide information about how to develop a conceptual framework. Any suggestions?
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Conceptual framework. Well I think it depends a bit on what science you are coming from (I am a social scientist with some biology background) Conceptual framework is as I see it an explanation of how you see the concepts of issues that you are going to research are interlinked with each other. In natural science it would in several ways be quite close to your hypothesis but may be a bit broader taking into consideration and explaining what the "parameters" of the hypothesis are and how they are interlinked. In social qualitative science it is more an explanation of how you see the concepts you examined are interlinked. A good way to start an analytical framework is to do a brainstorming and put the concepts you want to examine up on a paper and then start to develop their interlinkages (that can be hypothesis).