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There are many energy based modes of therapies that exist globally and cater to many illness. It would be great to know about them in order to explore avenues where they can be used for treating medical ailmnts. .
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Complementary and Alternative Medicine is itself typically based on energy medicine and includes many various energy-based modes of therapies. See attached link. Well-known modes include HeartMath, yoga, chi-gong, Johrei, Reiki, Acapuncture,
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How do you feel about prescribing standardised Chinese herbal medicine to patients with polycystic ovary syndrome, especially for irregular or no period?
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Ayurveda has many medicines for PCOD. Among them, Pushpadhanwa Rasa is a very effective Ayurveda medicine for PCOD. Kindly find the research paper on PCOD.
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Urotherapy is an established practice. Urotherapy has been practiced for treating piles, Atheletics foot, prevention from wetting the bed and skin care. The safety of urotherapy has not been established by scientific studies.
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Market chain from raw materials to manufacturing of consumer products to consumption of those products
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Nice answer by Taifa....
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Hi,I have done some post doc research on an instrument I developed for my PhD. The research has not been published and is now really old as it was done in 2006. I had submitted it to Psychology and Health, Patient Education and Counselling, BMC Health Services Research and Complementary and Alternative Medicine, but it's been always rejected so far. The feedback made it stronger though - I still believe the data works out rather well (i.e. in line with the model) and the conclusions are ok, but probably more of interest to a particular niche group of people in my field.
Would you recommend I give up on the idea of publishing it in a peer reviewed journal or just keep going?  I put the article on my page for public review - let me know if you think it is worthwhile to keep pushing. If you think there is value, which journal do you think would take it and not charge me any money for processing it? Thank you for your time!
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OR
If you want to find an alternative, you can use Journal Finder (https://journalfinder.elsevier.com/) to search for other journals that could be better suited for publishing your manuscript.
Elsevier B.V. | Privacy Policy Elsevier B.V., Radarweg 29, 1043 NX Amsterdam, The Netherlands, Reg. No. 33156677.
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It would be a small-scale pilot study using myself as the provider and volunteers as clients.  I'm fascinated by reflexology and it's charted indications of active health conditions in clients upon subjective palpation review.  I believe the mechanisms of reflexology are similar to that of acupuncture.  I'd like to research even elementary connections between the two disciplines.  Any constructive advice appreciated.
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The "Gold Standard" is fMRI imaging.  Eg, if you stimulate a point near the 5th toe, areas in the occipital lobe "light up",  or stimulate a point on the ventral wrist between flexor carpi radialis and palmaris longus, near where your wrist watch might sit, and multiple centres in the cerebellum "light up". You need large sums of money, even in a small pilot study. Costs range from a low of AUD$360 per 1/2 hour at University of Melbourne, Australia through USD$621 per hour at University of Michigan to up to USD$800 per 1/2 hour at Indiana University.
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There have been controlled studies on yoga for adolescents, but I am not aware of comparable studies for younger children.
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Thank you both for your replies.
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I am looking for freely available research tools to measure burnout among health care workers and teachers
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Phytoconstituents and herbal extracts are known to act through multiple complex pathways, there may be some phytoconstituents which can act through HPA axis leading to down-regulation of corresponding gene/protein.
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HPA (Hypothalamo-pituitary adernal cortex) axis in the body is some thing like akash ganga in the universe of human body. As the name suggests , It starts from bottom of the body means adernal cortex controlling corticosteroids, mineralocorticoids, etc through cortisone-cortisol interconversion system and return back from top hypothalamus-pituitary glands in a negative-positive feedback system..... anyways let me tell you one important thing about herbals....... select polyphenolic compounds with similarity to cortisol and cortisone...they will 100% have the interactions through hydrogen bondings at any receptor or ion channel level in tha HPA axis...... this is the key to HPA system...... Read Bhagyashree's PhD. Thesis for HPA and its inhibitors/activators... all the best!!!!
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Ayurveda has concept of Rasa, Vipaka, & Virya which may be correlated with Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. And here I want to know how can we correlate the AVASTHHA -PAK, NISTHAA-PAK (A stages of Ayurvedic pharmacokinetics) with phases of metabolism.
Phase -I & II are the stages of metabolism in which body try to make the xenobiotic more polar so that it can get eliminated as soon as possible. Since the product of these phases of metabolism may also acts a active pharmaceutical moiety (e.g. in case of prodrug).
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I don't know much about the ayurvedic AVASTHHA -PAK and NISTHAA-PAK as much in detail but to my limited knowledge Avastha-pak is some thing like a passage of drugs or eatables after eating, churning from mouth to large intestine during which absorption takes place... this is not Phase I metabolism as Phases of metabolism starts in liver only and avastha-pak has nothing to do with liver... now coming to nishtha-pak which seems final metabolism of the absorbed juices after which the drug action or nutrition starts... This seems to me like the real metabolic phases in liver classified under single name nishtha-pak. Correct me if am wrong. !!!!
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What is your experience with the ketogenic diet (or other dietary treatments), VNS, DBS or "other" treatments (complementary/alternative treatments that your patients might have used) ?
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If you consider the 5 major progressive myoclonic epilpesies including: Unverricht-Lundborg disease, myoclonic epilepsy with ragged red fibers (MERRF), Lafora disease, the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses, and sialidoses, then I would say that neither KD nor VNS were efficient in significantly controlling the seizures apart from some amelioration which is variable in duration of  response.
Other syndromes including myoclonic seizures e.g. Dravet or Doose: the ketogenic diet is superior to VNS . Sometimes the combination of the 2 is beneficial.
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Does anyone would like to contribute a chapter on treatments used in CAM for the 38th ed of SEDA?
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Dear Dr Posadzki
I sent this email to your email address but failure delivery.
Sara sent me the chapter of version of 36 and 37 which I must thank her.
I had a look at them very briefly. I have an new idea for new version. In fact I think that this time is the turn of Traditional Persian-Iranian Medicine (TPIM) to be presented. In two previous version the TCM has been presented very good and this is good idea to present another school of Asian Medicine (TPIM).
In this manuscript I can present and introduce about the :
Ghamz Therapy In TPIM or reflexology
Phelebotomy or blood letting
Hijamat in TPIM
Aromatherapy
Cupping
Surgery in TPIM
Food =C2=A0in TPIM
Herbal and plants of TPIM
Animal materia and medica
Acupuncture
Embedding and complication
Moxibustion and side effects
Now I would like to know in details what should I do and what is your expec=
tation?
Thank you
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In Traditional Persian Medicine, venesection, enema, nasal application of aroma and some herbal medicines such as Zataria multiflora are recommended by Avicenna in Canon of medicine.
Related article:
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There is some evidence for Ginkgo biloba extract. Refer to 2005 Cochrane review CD003691 by Zeng, Liu, Yang et al. 
Also some early trials found benefit in recent stroke victims. References can be found in Principles and Practice of Phytotherapy, 2013 by Bone and Mills p605
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Could anyone share if you have heard of articles on my question:
Is there any alternative therapy that inhibits Phosphodiesterase-4?
Thank you
Amnah
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Thank you. 
I will check now...
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Here at the University of Bristol we are conducting a DH funded scoping study of complementary/alternative medicine (CAM) for multimorbid patients with mental health and musculoskeletal problems in primary care in the UK.  By CAM we mean approaches where a practitioner is involved in providing a treatment complementary to conventional care, for example acupuncture, chiropractic, massage, Pilates, mindfulness etc.
We are looking for services in the UK where an integrated approach - CAM alongside conventional NHS treatment - is currently provided or has recently been provided. These services need to:
·         Be in the UK
·         Target patients with musculoskeletal and/or mental health issues
·         Provide the CAM through primary care e.g. GP referral to CAM, GP practising CAM
·         Offer CAM which is at least partially funded by the NHS or charitable funds etc i.e. the patient pays nothing/very little
We are interested in places where this is currently happening, but also where it has been attempted but been unsuccessful.
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In Maidstone there is the Blackthorn Trust which provides CAM therapies (anthroposophic medicine) and social and work rehabilitation therapy through craft work and work in a bakery and garden. They mainly work with people with chronic pain and mental illness. They have NHS funding. See the website below.
In greenwich there is a project that works along similar lines which is still in the set up stage and has just got or is in the process of getting NHS funding for patients who have failed with secondary care pain management services. They became a charity last year. It was founded by the same GP who founded Blackthorn. They work as part of the Greenwich PCT pain service.
Let me know if you need any further information or help on this.
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Considering that drug's odor has therapeutic effects in aromatherapy, how is possible to blind the patients on the odor of the study drugs. 
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Make 'two (double) standards' evaluation system.  Try two sets of standards (base element) comparable say C1 and C2. experiment with a set using C1+Aromatic 1,  C2 + Aromatic 1.  C1 + Aromatic 2 and C2 + Aromatic 2. Compare.
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I am interested in CAM in painful diabetic neuropathy. Can anyone help me on CAM options for painful diabetic neuroapthy?
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Treatment options from CAM (depending on the severeritiy grade of the neuropathy): 1. intravenous ascorbic acid according to our published protocol (see my references) 2. high dose boswellia acid ( up to 2400 mg bosewllia serrata/ 24 h) 3. alternate thigh affusions according to Kneipps`hydrotherapy has special influence especially on the combined nociceptive and neuropathic pain (see my literature) 4. tong accupuncture might improve the symptoms 4. herbal/phytotherapy: all externas with a combination of menthol and capsaicin. Kind regards- Martin Schencking, University o Witten/Herdecke, Germany.
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Hello,
I am looking for data sets generated by pulse measuring devices that are suitable for TCM diagnosis. Does anyone know of any such data available online or of any hospital / practitioner that could provide such data?
Thank you.
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Yes, it will be my pleasure.
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Is infrared rays can be used after oil massage? If used what precautions should be taken?
what will be the duration and course?
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IRR for 45 mins will be too long as it can cause burns. Usually it is given for 10 mins, to the max 15 mins and it is very good combination after massage espicially in palliative care
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Water holding ability of basil seeds has been used by the Akamba community of Kenya for removing foreign objects from eyes. The process involves introducing a small amount of dry basil seeds into the affected eye and then removing a 'ball' that forms. The ball comprises the foreign bodies and basil seeds and is formed when the seeds attract water in the eye the stream of which carries the foreign bodies.
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Dear Spencer Muthoka
The use of certain types of basils to adsorb water to form mucilages has been explored by several local communities. In India, seeds of Ocimum basilicum chemotype rich in methylcinnamate (the essential oil recovered from the herb is rich in this compound and not the seeds) are traditionally added to water and after the seeds swell, the water is consumed. This seed-water is believed to cool the body during hot summer months (when temperatures cross 40oC). I have not come across any reference where this property of basil seeds has been explored to make available the water adsorbed by them to plants. There are synthetic chemical water adsorbents that have been used as soil conditioners for supplying water to plants under water-stress conditions. CSIR-National Chemical Laboratory, Pune, India has done research on such chemical compounds. You may check with the Institute by contacting the concerned authorities.
Best wishes
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Yoga, or what passes off as Yoga in the western world, is a $30 billion industry in the United States.. People of all ages contort themselves into positions like 'downward dog' and believe that they are doing Yoga. Due to the limitations and failures of modern allopathic health systems, increasingly people are turning to alternative and complementary eastern health systems in the hope of a cure for their mental and physical ailments. Capitalist tendencies are quick to capitalize on this ignorance/demand and quick to offer a number of services and goods(gadgets) to fool the consumer even further.
All the Yoga texts state that Yoga is a mental process to achieve equanimity, mental poise, stillness of the mind, 'Chitta vriddhi nirodaha'. 'Asana' is mental balance and stability in whatever you do in life, not a physical pose to hold for a convenient time, or at a convenient place(studio). How come its so far away from the truth when it comes to western understanding & practice of Yoga? What has been "Lost in Translation"? If individuals continue to choose the 'juicier' parts of Yoga philosophy(for example the health benefits) and twist it to suit their own convenience in the name of 'freedom' (due to the munificence of the original seers who sought no exclusive rights and patents) and ignore the ethical, spiritual, human, environmental and disciplinary parts, is there a danger of Yoga losing its meaning? By only taking the parts we want, isn't the very purpose of Yoga lost? Why bother calling it Yoga at all and add to the deepening confusion everywhere? Should the charade of the emperor's new clothes continue or an attempt made to define the science for what it actually is?
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David:
1. Yoga is not ancient Indian philosophy. It does not belong to anyone, or to Hinduism. It is the heritage of all mankind who have arose from a single source. The geographical, cultural, political and demographical entity known as India now, received it & practiced it to preserve the science of Yoga faithfully. Other inheritors lost it, while India preserved it as a sacred science, recognizing its essentiality. But all mankind are the inheritors. You have the same right as anyone from India has over Yoga. This is probably difficult for Americans to comprehend in the times of cutthroat copyrights, intellectual property rights and patents. The ancient seers of Yoga never claimed patents(not even signing their names, preferring to remain anonymous)and gave the science to all the children of mankind, saying that they themselves received it, proclaiming 'Loka Samastha Sukhinoh Bhavanthu"! May All Worlds be Happy! This is long before any religion even came into the picture.
Yoga is 'open source', but please don't misinterpret and use it to misguide humanity to make your own living. Using wisely, responsibly, remaining true to its actual content is a way of showing respect to the 'original' giver.
2. It is not based on the Patanjali Yoga Sutras. Patanjali is a seer who organised & codified the science into sutras, terse aphorsims, in the recent past, recognising that in the age of Kali, man's limited intelligence is liable to lose the science altogether. It is not even known if he is a human being as he is usually depicted with the lower half of his body coiled like a snake(pic). The snake is a representation of Time in Yoga. He is also known as the Lord of Time. In the Bhagavad Gita(circa 3200 BC), Krishna states that the ancient science was lost many times in the hoary past and every time He descends to deliver the same science to Man to subjugate evil. The science of Yoga is the original 'Operations manual' of man. It is the 'Science of Man'. We descended from a source and the way back to the source is Yoga. The path and the goal is Yoga. 
Hatha Yoga Pradipika is a recent (15th century )abridged work that lays emphasis on the physical posture part so that the main goal of Yoga is achieved without bodily interference.
3. I would rather not comment on the level of absurdity Yoga has been misinterpreted by commercial interests in America. Cherry-picking is both harmful and counterproductive. What would happen if the government let people cherry pick the American constitution and interpret it according to their own comfort zone?
4. There's no mud slinging going on here, only concern that the 'adulterated ' version may become 'mainstream' and the truth lost forever. Blowback effect ?
5.On the contrary, this is an attempt to prevent people from getting hurt by clearing the air. Are you stating that the "Ignorance is Bliss" mode, status quo, is Ok? Am I throwing a spanner in the well oiled sham?
Regards
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Some drugs are recommended for androgenic alopecia but these may carry certain risks. In certain parts of the world bizarre natural remedies are used like camel's urine! Are they a myth?
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Natural Interventions for Alopecia Treatment
Some good potential sources have already been cited above. What I add here is a summary of my findings from a recent internal review I completed on the issue of natural interventions for alopecia. Note that I deliberately confine my attention solely to human clinical studies. What's important to note is that we have several natural agents that have a plausible degree of evidentiary support through based on human clinical data, and my own observation is that these may on their own provide clinically significant relief from alopecia, and they may also provide a synergistic or at least additive benefit to current conventional treatments (note; several other interventions - like millet seeds, among others - have shown some preliminary promise, but I focus on the more robust of the studies, to be updated as new evidence appears].
Essential Oils
A double-blind, placebo-controlled trial1 found efficacy for a treatment oil containing essential oils of thyme, rosemary, lavender, and cedarwood in a grape seed and jojoba oil base. The clinical significant benefit of essential oils in the treatment of alopecia was further confirmed in a randomized placebo-controlled double-blind study of a pulsed electromagnetic field in combination with essential oils2.
Vitamins/Minerals/ Amino Acids
Biotin/Zinc/Silicon: High - and potentially dangerous - dose zinc aspartate and biotin in combination showed preliminary benefit3 for alopecia areata in children, but I note that this was in conjunction with the ultrapotent corticosteroid clobetasol, a problematic deployment in children. In addition, biotin and niacin appear to have some preliminary positive activity4,5. And a proprietary form of silicon (choline-stabilized orthosilicic acid) has shown some promise6,7.
Cysteine: A combination oral supplement of cysteine, histidine, copper and zinc induced a significant mean change in total hair count in male and female patients8.
Melatonin
One double-blind study found that the pineal hormone melatonin, applied topically to the scalp as a 0.1% solution, may be helpful for women with diffuse hair loss9.
Vegetable/Fruit Based Interventions
Topical Onion/Garlic Extracts: Topical crude onion juice in the treatment of patchy alopecia areata was tested single-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study, hair regrowth being observed in 87% of patients treated with onion juice compared to only 13% of the control group10. And topical garlic gel was tested in conjunction with a corticosteroid, a beneficial effect being observed for the garlic gel on the therapeutic efficacy of topical corticosteroid therapy in patients with alopecia areata11.
Preliminary data12 also has found that topical khellin, an extract derived from the fruit of the Mediterranean plant khella ( Ammi visnaga) may promote new hair growth in combination therapy with ultraviolet light for alopecia areata.
Herbals and Phytochemicals
A combination of two herbals, peony-derived glucosides and licorice-dreived glycyrrhizin was tested in pediatric alopecia in a randomized controlled trial13 and found both safe and effective and an earlier RCT also confirmed efficacy in adults14. And the proanthocyanidine flavonoid procyanidine B induced significant mean changes from total hair count in male patients15.
Natural 5-α reductase (5AR) Inhibitors
One of the most extensively researched - and clinical successful - arenas of potential benefit dervies from natural 5-α reductase (5AR) inhibitors, given the fact that he conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (DHT) via the enzyme 5-α reductase (5AR) is a well-documented major contributing factor of alopecia disorders, and the same mechanisms is of course also implicated in the onset and progression of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).
Curcumin: It is known that curcumin behaves as a natural 5-α reductase (5AR) inhibitor, and this activity was exploited in a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study16 which tested the efficacy of 5% hexane extract of Curcuma aeruginosa when added to 5% minoxidil, the combination inducing slowed hair loss and increased hair growth.
Saw Palmetto/Beta-sitosterol: A liposterolic extract of Saw Palmetto (Serenoa repens) and the plant sterol beta-sitosterol (found in Nigella sativa, Serenoa repens, Pygeum africanum, and sea-buckthorn, among other plant sources), both botanically derived 5AR inhibitors, were tested in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial5 and found to induce a highly positive response.
Methodology for this Review
A search of the PUBMED, Cochrane Library / Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED (Allied and Complimentary Medicine Database), CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), PsycINFO, ISI Web of Science (WoS), BIOSIS, LILACS (Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature), ASSIA (Applied Social Sciences Index and Abstracts), and SCEH (NHS Evidence Specialist Collection for Ethnicity and Health) was conducted without language or date restrictions, and updated again current as of date of publication, with systematic reviews and meta-analyses extracted separately. Search was expanded in parallel to include just-in-time (JIT) medical feed sources as returned from Terkko (provided by the National Library of Health Sciences - Terkko at the University of Helsinki). Unpublished studies were located via contextual search, and relevant dissertations were located via NTLTD (Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations) and OpenThesis. Sources in languages foreign to this reviewer were translated by language translation software.
References
  1. Hay IC, Jamieson M, Ormerod AD. Randomized trial of aromatherapy. Successful treatment for alopecia areata. Arch Dermatol. 1998;134:1349-1352.
  2. Bureau JP, Ginouves P, Guilbaud J, Roux ME. Essential oils and low-intensity electromagnetic pulses in the treatment of androgen-dependent alopecia. Adv Ther 2003 Jul-Aug; 20(4):220-9.
  3. Camacho FM, Garcia-Hernandez MJ. Zinc aspartate, biotin, and clobetasol propionate in the treatment of alopecia areata in childhood. Pediatr Dermatol. 1999;16:336-338.
  4. Draelos ZD, Jacobson EL, Kim H, Kim M, Jacobson MK. A pilot study evaluating the efficacy of topically applied niacin derivatives for treatment of female pattern alopecia. J Cosmet Dermatol 2005; 4(4): 258–61.
  5. Prager N, Bickett K, French N, Marcovici G. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to determine the effectiveness of botanically derived inhibitors of 5-alpha-reductase in the treatment of androgenetic alopecia. J Altern Complement Med 2002; 8(2):143-52.
  6. Barel A, Calomme M, Timchenko A, et al. Effect of oral intake of choline-stabilized orthosilicic acid on skin, nails and hair in women with photodamaged skin. Arch Dermatol Res. 2005 Oct 5. [Epub ahead of print].
  7. Wickett RR, Kossmann E, Barel A, et al. Effect of oral intake of choline-stabilized orthosilicic acid on hair tensile strength and morphology in women with fine hair. Arch Dermatol Res. 2007 Oct 25. [Epub ahead of print].
  8. Morganti P, Fabrizi G, James B, Bruno C. Effect of gelatin-cystine and serenoa repens extract on free radicals level and hair growth. J Appl Cosme-tol 1998; 16(3): 57–64.
  9. Fischer TW, Burmeister G, Schmidt HW, Elsner P. Melatonin increases anagen hair rate in women with androgenetic alopecia or diffuse alopecia: results of a pilot randomized controlled trial. Br J Dermatol. 2004;150:341-345.
  10. Sharquie KE, Al-Obaidi HK. Onion juice (Allium cepa L.), a new topical treatment for alopecia areata. J Dermatol 2002 Jun; 29 (6): 343-6.
  11. Hajhydari Z, Jamshidi M, Akbari J, et al. Combination of topical garlic gel and betamethasone valerate cream in the treatment of localized alopecia areata: a double-blind randomized controlled study. Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol 2007 Jan-Feb; 73 (1): 29-32.
  12. Tritrungtasna O, Jerasutus S, Suvanprakorn P. Treatment of alopecia areata with khellin and UVA. Int J Dermatol. 1993;32:690.
  13. Yang D, Zheng J, Zhang Y, Jin Y, Gan C, Bai Y. . Total glucosides of paeony capsule plus compound glycyrrhizin tablets for the treatment of severe alopecia areata in children: a randomized controlled trial. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med 2013; 2013:378219.
  14. Yang DQ, You LP, Song PH, Zhang LX, Bai YP. A randomized controlled trial comparing total glucosides of paeony capsule and compound glycyrrhizin tablet for alopecia areata. Chin J Integr Med 2012; 18(8):621-5.
  15. Kamimura A, Takahashi T, Watanabe Y. Investigation of topical application of procyanidin B-2 from apple to identify its potential use as a hair growing agent. Phytomedicine 2000; 7(6): 529–36.
  16. Pumthong G, Asawanonda P, Varothai S, et al. Curcuma aeruginosa, a novel botanically derived 5α-reductase inhibitor in the treatment of male-pattern baldness: a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. J Dermatolog Treat 2012; 23(5):385-92.
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Yang, Yin, and Qi concepts are simple yet profound explanations of fundamental polarity concepts (+/-)  and the resulting magnetic fields that are created when these opposing forces are brought together.
Traditional medical systems had many diverse ways to talk and discuss these phenomena, but had no way to measure the subtle and diverse changes.
Is the lack of research and general inquiry into establishing a dataset on the human bio-field mostly due to poor technological means?  Lack of interest?
Are there any researchers currently engaged in these types of measurements?
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This is such an interesting and important question. I believe that it is a combination of both – lack of appropriate technology/method and interest (or more precisely financial interest). On the other hand, there is more research out there than you probably realize due to a lack of common language. This research can sometimes fall under non-local healing, prayer effects, shamanism, energy healing, healing touch, qi gong, Traditional Chinese Medicine, Reiki, etc. These studies may or may not specifically address measured frequencies but they certainly do address the existence, use and effects of the human bio-field. There are also studies that attempt to understand the bio-field through triangulation using physiological bio-markers.
As for prominent researchers, I would definitely recommend checking out Beverly Rubik. There is a profile on her and discussion of research in this area here: http://www.faim.org/energymedicine/measurement-human-biofield.html
Here are links to a couple articles as well:
You might do a search for dissertations on the subject as this would, ideally, provide some current research and a thorough literature review.
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Using specific qualitative research methods
 
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I think that the problem of different methodological considerations with conventional medicine is not unique for Iranian Traditional Medicine. All traditional medical systems such as TCM, Homeopathy, Ayurveda and others have faced this problem and tried to make solutions for it. The concept of Whole System Research (WSR) has multiple dimensions that can solve some methodological issues in CAM and traditional medicine researchers. However there are many non solved methodological problems that should be worked on in future.
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I am looking to investigate the effects of an intervention (alternative medicine) on lactic acid clearance in a healthy (non-athlete) population . Any suggestions as to the best method af analysis?
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Recent work presented at the European College of Sports Science conference in Amsterdam evaluated the reliability of the new Lactate Pro handheld device. The newer module uses 1/5 of the sample size of the older model. Test re-test reliability was good but there was a lack oa agreement between models at higher lactate concentrations. This is an argument that has been presented in the literature (Int J Sport Med). So the question to consider for you is are you looking for good internal reliability and limited variability or good external reliability? If the later you should perhaps consider devices such as the Analox system.
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I want to set up a holistic health clinic for low-income or fixed income individuals. Setting up the clinic as a non-profit has many shortcomings and limitations, therefore I am looking for a financial model to subsidize discounted services.
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The concept of community acupuncture clinics seems to be gaining in popularity. These operate with a sliding scale, dependent on income. Patients are treated in one large room, rather than individual treatment rooms. I assume the consultation is done privately, but the larger treatment room allows the practitioner to treat several people at once and keeps overhead low. This type of set up could work for other therapies that don't require patients to disrobe such as shiatsu or acupressure, the difference being that one therapist could only work on one patient at a time. But the overhead of the clinic would still be lower and the sliding scale would allow access by fixed income individuals.
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What is your opinion of hypnosis and meditation in medicine/ treatment?
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These are 2 very different questions:
Hypnosis: there is a large individual variability in the "propension" to be hynotized. Most of this variability is inter-individual variability (some individuals can be hypnotized very easily others never)  but there is probably also some degree of intra-individual variability on this propension, based on "context' and other unknown factors. Albeit we all know intuitively what hyposis is, we also lack an operational definition for hpnosis and to a similar point, there are different degrees or "depths" of hypnosis which is an important facotr if one wants to use hyposis as a substitution or an adjuvant for deep sedation.  With all these caveats and unsolved issues, hyposis may be a safe and effective tool  in the hands of a qualified health professional for selected subset subjects.
Meditation: there are several studies (of varying quality) showing beneficial effects of meditation in subjects with hypertension, migraine and many other medical conditions. It is not as easy as swallowing a pill, it requires training, predisposition, and the right environment ( a quiet room and undisturbed time). Those who need meditation the most sadly are also those less likely to be able to practice it on a regular basis (think of the type A, goal-driven mid-age executive suffering from blood pressure, or the anxious mother of 3 children suffering of recurring migraine).
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Practice of yoga improves the physical health. There are a number of studies available that prove the efficacy of yoga as therapy. Can someone practice it during spinal cord injury?
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Any injury can be treated with yoga and CAM effectively. Time and nature of intervention, would depend on the type of injury. Divine association can also make the patient feel comfortable.  Yoga and Asanas may be correctly practiced with concurrent use of other CAM medicines also. Surgery may be an aided requirement. Diseases may be treated with multidisciplinary approach, all that is required is a perfect coordination between them.
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Glucosamine is a chitin-derived mucopolysaccharide and putative disease modifying agent; anti-rheumatic agent.
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yes, the NSAID effect of Glucosamine sulfate is there, but it is of other class/chondroprotective  when we see it as a NUETRACEUTICAL promotion....But i would like to ask why plain glucosamine sulfate with 1500 mg is not acceptable by the doctors in Grade I osteoarthritis.. 
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African Sleeping Sickness (Western) is caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and is transmitted by the tsetse fly (genus Glossina). It constitutes 98% of all cases (WHO). African Sleeping Sickness (Eastern) is caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense. I am looking for traditional plant based therapies for this disease.
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I'm working on a book about ozone therapy and would like to hear any opinions on this topic.
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Thank you very much for your replies. If "prevailing scientific evidence does not support claims" but practitioners of alternative medicine believe ozone has therapeutic benefits, should more extensive research be funded?
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It is common that WSR is suggested as an alternative to classical clinical research methodology in the field of CAM, which does not have many limitations of classic RCT designs? Can anyone explain what the exact difference between these research methodologies is?
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A classical RCT design seeks to determine the cause and effect of one variable only, and traditionally has been applied to drug efficacy studies. This design doesn't suit CAM so well, as there are many known elements to CAM which can influence a health outcome such as the therapeutic relationship, the setting, the patient expectations, on top of the actual complementary therapy being practiced. Furthermore when you assess the effectiveness of a CAM approach to health, you are acknowleding that all aspects of the person are important and affect how they feel. How a person feels is measured often with Health Related Quality of LIfe Questionnaires, however these questionnaires do not always contain all the items that are deemed important to a patient. Thus you can incorporate tools that allow a patient to nominate items that concern them (see MYMOP and MYCaW). When you analyse these types of data you can see that there are many elements that patients consider important in relation to their health. A whole system approach to health research seeks to incorporate the evaluation of the whole person, on the understanding that total quality of life is contributed to by all aspects such as physical, social, functional, emotional, psychological and spiritual health. This means you have more variables to consider when carrying out statistical analysis in comparison to a straightforward analysis that you would carry out in an RCT. For the CAM field specifically thisWSR approach can acknowledge the broader effects of holistic healthcare in a way that RCT designs do not. It can also identify variables that should be incorporated into comparative effectiveness research design
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Conventional medicine prides itself on being science-based, and shuns alternative medicine for being "unproven," however, many of the non-communicable diseases have been taken care of successfully by alternative medicine. Conventional medicine is still behind and it will send your health into a downward spiral.
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If people think that alternative medicine is rubbish because it has not undergone bench mark trials than I say, stop eating because true 'alternative medicine' has been around for centuries, is mostly food based and many of our pharmacueticals are based on 'alternative medicines' eg lipator.
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Need names of authors...
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Dear Maureen
It was a pleasure
Regards
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Several medicines as well as complementary therapies promises that their use can improve the bowel movement. How can anyone understand whether the medicine is working or not?
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Meant to add that the letter we published can be found at:
Constipation: patient perceptions compared to diagnostic tools.
Liz Brown, Iain Lawrie, Viv Barros D'Sa, Sarah Wilcox, Mike Bennett
Palliative Medicine 11/2006; 20(7):717-8.
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I am an undergraduate and writing my first research paper using BMC format,
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It is depends on the journal you are submitting your paper and is described in "instructions for author" however most journals receive the figures in separate files and they themselves embed it in result part in publication format.
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Being a Physician Scientist, I have always observed a significant improvement in the patients with relation to their overall metabolism, signs and symptoms and disease severity if done in a scientific way. The sad thing about this is no strong comprehensive trial is observed to my knowledge. What do you people from varied expertise think about all these procedures from your personal and scientific experience. Can you suggest a probable study which would justify and validate their use?
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I think your clinical experience is valid source. Of course it is better to be more validated with different designs of clinical researches. However the Ayurveda and other traditional medical recommendations can be used in clinical settings if there were no side effect or interaction in current literature against their use.
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(Comment on an article - see below link).
Pistacia is a genus of the family Anacardiaceae. The plant has played an important role in traditional medicine and has been used in treatment of several diseases. In some countries the resin of Pistacia is used as wound dressing. As herbal medicine is usually safe and not expensive and also according to voluble traditional experiences, researchers have tried to assess the real effect of this part of medicine [1].
In our previous study [1] we have cited an article done by Djerrou et al that is a survey on the effect of Pistacia lentiscus virgin fatty oil on the burning wound healing. They have reported that the oil promotes wound contraction and reduces epithelization period in rabbit model [2]. They have created burn wounds on the back of rabbits (four burn wound for each animal) and divided them into four groups. The groups were treated by Pistacia lentiscus virgin fatty oil (PLVFO), Madecassol (MAD), Vaseline (VAS) and nothing (CRL) as a control group and finally wound contraction and epithelization were assessed. They have reported that “both PLVFO and Madecassol significantly accelerated wound healing activity compared to wounds dressed with Vaseline and the untreated wounds. Also the level of wound contraction was significantly higher and the healing time was faster in PLVFO group than those of the MAD group, VAS group and CRL group”. In our article [1] we have reported that “Djerrou et al. revealed that Pistacia lentiscus virgin fatty oil significantly promotes wound contraction and reduces epithelialization period in rabbit model”. According to their results mean±SD of wound contraction (%) in the final day of the study were 96.93±4.95, 93.78±10.98, 87.49±13.76 and 83.40±12.85 for PLVFO, MAD, VAS and CRL groups respectively (P‹0.05) and they have reported that PLVFO has higher wound contraction so it has better effect of burn wound healing.
According to table 1 and also figure 1 of the mentioned paper [2], from the 4th day of the study PLVFO had a better wound contraction. From the beginning of the study there was a significant difference between groups and the difference is remained till the end of the study. Interestingly there is a pattern for wound contraction in all four groups and they all have the same shape. I think for better analysis, the wound size in the first day and analysis of the differences is important. If wound size of PLVFO be significantly smaller in the first day than other groups, with the same decreasing in the wound size in the four groups, wound contraction of PLVFO will be higher than the others. In addition when we calculate the increasing of wound contraction within the study (28th day-4th day), the results will be 60.44 (96.93-36.49), 61.42 (93.78-32.36), 75.20 (87.49-12.29) and 54.03 (83.4-29.37) for PLVFO, MAD, VAS and CRL groups respectively. According to this analysis, VAS group has a better improvement of wound contraction and CRL is the worst.
In conclusion I recommend the authors to re-analyze the data and report them for better conclusion.
References
1. Haghdoost F, Baradaran Mahdavi MM, Zandifar A, Sanei MH, Zolfaghari B, Javanmard SH. “Pistacia atlantica Resin Has a Dose-Dependent Effect on Angiogenesis and Skin Burn Wound Healing in Rat,” Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, vol. 2013, Article ID 893425, 8 pages, 2013. doi:10.1155/2013/893425.
2. Djerrou Z, Maameri Z, Hamdi-Pacha Y, Serakta M, Riachi F, Djaalab H, et al. Effect of virgin fatty oil of Pistacia lentiscus on experimental burn wound's healing in rabbits. Afr J Tradit Complement Altern Med. 2010;7:258-263.
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Hello Faraidoon Haghdoost
Really, it is difficult to get similar wounds , particularly in the case of excisional wounds. But some research teams use an electric ablation system (discoid) to obtain identical wounds. For our case (burns), we usually use more animals and after experimental procedure, we choose animals that have the most similar wounds (no significant differences) to implicate them in the study.
Best regards!
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It is difficult for me to find a topical preparation with really no effect in PDN.
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I suggest Vaseline, or olive oil
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Overt hostility sometimes arises between physicians and non-allopathic health providers, with caustic diatribes emanating from both sides of the divide – particularly relating to the scientific credibility of various interventions. In an era of evidence-based medicine, should modern clinical care be based on credible untainted research and favorable outcomes for patients and populations rather than what is considered conventional or alternative?
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Anything that is rigid doesn't last too long generally. Acceptance, modifications and adaptations are the pillars of innovation and success. Lots of time tested remedies for various conditions are present in alternate systems. Also there are certain theories beyond known in conventional medicine. They can form basis of further research for basis and validity. These will nothing but enrich the conventional healthcare and no wrongs with it.
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The reproductive function in female (represented by Artava and stanya ) are special functions in female. Apart from these certain Stri kara bhavas are mentioned in Ayurveda such as Klaibya, Bhirutvam, Avaisharadyam, Moha, Anavasthana, Shaithilya, Mardavam which are seen especially in female.
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It is shown that some techniques (yoga, meditation, tai-chi, relaxation, conscious breathing, etc.) improve immune system, cardiovascular performance, pain management, quality of life, and other aspects of well-being. It is reasonable that these changes would have positive outcome on cancer supression. Does anyone have experience, considerations or explanations on the mechanisms and efficiency of such interactions?
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I am not sure why I was sent this question. There are many who have far more experience than I in this area. One person that comes to mind is Prof. Patricia Carpenter of the Psychology Department at CMU in Pittsburgh..
That being said, my own 'intuitions' in this area are as follows:
I believe that the fundamental cause of many types of cancer is stress - both metabolic and psychological.. Techniques are now being developed by which we may quantify the health of a single cell. Quantities derived from our new understanding of dynamical systems (living systems are dynamical systems), are being applied such that we may now have an objective measure as to what it means to be healthy or diseased (see reference below).
One may argue that such approaches are limited to the metabolic domain and are not relevant to the psychological. However, recent theoretical work (and I include my own contribution) suggests the possibility that function and metabolism may actually be the same thing in ALL biological processes - including the brain. Such unified theories offer a means by which the psychological and the physiological may be more closely aligned. Although, perhaps, counter intuitive, such approaches greatly simplify the relationship between the emotional and the biological.
Within such a theoretical context, there is a necessary relationship between the metabolic state of the body and the metabolic state of the brain that equates to a 'logical sympathy'. The mind/body relationship becomes less of a dualistic problem and more of a complimentary dichotomy.
If these advances prove to be useful and relevant then it comes as no surprise that the stress relieving techniques that you have mentioned in your question would have a positive effect with respect to oncogenesis.
Davia, C.J (June 2006), "Life, Catalysis and Excitable Media: A Dynamic Systems Approach to Metabolism and Cognition", in Tuszynski, J.A, The Emerging Physics of Consciousness (The Frontiers Collection), Springer, pp. 255–292, ISBN 978-3540238904
Villorba, F; Van Piaggio, V.E (2010). "The role of mitochondria and mit-DNA in Oncogenesis". Quantum Biosystems 2 (1): 250–281.
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I mean based on which criteria we can find out a given herbal thing is appropriate for a pharmacology research. Can you introduce some references?
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A wide spectrum of phyto-chemicals belonging to a number of chemical classes or taxonomic affiliations (genus/species/family/class) have so far been attributed with medicinal properties. This thread is almost one year old. I feel that some one having access to CAS/SciFinder, can search chemical abstract database for "plant derived chemicals" OR 'natural products" and then analyse the search results employing their data-mining tools. One can create a matrix of compounds on one axis and medicinal property on the other. SciFinder is a very good but a paid tool available with Chemical Abstract people. Any one who knows to use a computer can accomplish the job and publish areview paper to help the entire research community.