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is there a cure for SSHL in alternative of complementary medicine?
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I'm currently working on complementary medicine for treating PCOS related infertility and reducing Insulin Resistance. And my Professor wants me to publish a literature review on Complementary Medicine of PCOS.
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Dear Mr. Mulya Ritonga,
You are in luck because there are many magazines that deal with your topic. In my point of view, It is best to see for yourself which one is right for you on this web site
I hope I have been of some help.
Yours sincerely,
Andrija
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Urotherapy is an established practice. Urotherapy has been practiced for treating piles, Atheletics foot, prevention from wetting the bed and skin care. The safety of urotherapy has not been established by scientific studies.
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In a previous question about shunt follow up, a respected researcher referred to the value of craniosacral therapy. At beginning I thought she is talking irrelevant until the following speaker convinced me with a possible correlation:
On the other hand I knew from other reference that scientific committees disagree. Can you kindly share your knowledge and opinion on this specific point.
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Dear Renato,
Thank you too much for your important note. Surely you are following syringomelia by imaging also? How do you see the changes? Any experience in pseudotumor cerebri? Do you advice shunt implantation to be added to craniosacral therapy?
Best regards,
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I prepared a manuscript for the journal but still have issue with cover letter and title page format.
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Thank you very much Umar Suleiman Abubakar for this very topical but simple question. There is a need to clarify to you the issue of a cover letter for whatever purpose.
To simplify this issue for you and some of our sisters or brothers in the academia, a cover a letter is any normal letter that you in a formal correspondence. In this case, a cover letter is meant to have your article attached to it. So it covers the article. It is a level of personal or institutional commitment to the partnership.
This implies that a cover letter contains an attachment because it explains or confirms your commitment to allow the editors or the publishers to legally process your article or manuscript. It is sent as an attachment to the email.
For example, you will write a normal letter with the following parts:
1. If you use a letterhead, it contains the logo and full contact address of your institution or personal address (name, emails, telephones, fax, box number, website, among others).The whole contact information is on top of the lletter.
2. Date is indicated below the letterhead.
3. If you do not use a letterhead, your full contact information will appear on the top right side of the letter or the paper.In this case, the address of the editor will appear on the left hand side of the letter, just below your address which is indicated on the right hand side.
4. Below the address of the editor, you open the letter with a salutation or greeting: Dear Editor. Below it, is the subject. For example, Submission of an article for your publication.
5.Below this is the opening paragraph of your letter informing the editor that as per the above subject, you are submitting the attached to be reviewed for a publication. You may state the title of the article in the letter. Make it brief. I t can be two to three lines only.
6.Conclude the letter with traditional words like, Yours sincerely, Yours faithfully,
7. This is followed by your name and signature above the name after leaving about two spaces. And below your signature, indicate your title or status as the author.
I have not seen a sample of their cover page but they normally show it to the authors as part of the guidelines to the contributors. The normal title page shows the topic on top of the paper, followed by the name of the author/co-authors, email and telephone contacts, name of the affiliated institutions, and perhaps the date, moth, year of submission as well as the city or country of submission.
Best regards
Wilson
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Oligoscan www.oligoscan.net.au is being widely used by Australian and NZ complementary Medicine clinicians as a way to detect heavy metal levels in their patients. The device claims to have been internally validated. It’s customers seem to accept that this is enough. Can someone with experience in spectrophotomeyour comment on the likelihood that holding this device on the hand is capable of detecting heavy metal levels for clinical purposes?
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We are all on the same page. I am in the last throes of developing a hand-held device to measure Vitamin C in blood (finger prick) and there are very clearly defined processes (such as CE marking) that ensure such devices work as they say they do and, subsequently, protect the consumer. In my opinion any device worth it's salt should be CE-marked, or similar, otherwise I would run a mile from it.
External validation in just one of several key components of CE-marking and, sadly, the Oligoscan appears to fall short. I say sadly because I think it would be pretty cool to have such a device that worked. On the issue of sensitivity, I think even very low concentrations could be detected spectrometrically, but it couldn't be based solely on emission; it would require fluorescence techniques etc. And specificity isn't much of an issue at all because (a) there are multiple bands for each element and (b) even though some bands may appear close to each other modern detectors can distinguish them. Accuracy in most all hand-held analytical devices is +/- 10-15% minimum, which is indeed lower than the variability seen in individuals. It's not at all uncommon to see people with orders of magnitude differences in post-provocation urine metal concentrations.
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My papers using lithium in Alzheimer patients and Mice models show a protective action in both mice and human beens.
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Dr Nahata. I work in my office with human being. We did an experiment with Alzheimer´s patients and we did an experiment with mice too. I´m trying to understand the pathway of lithium in this dose . Than I ask in alternative medicine if some one had ever did some research with Lithium in homeopaty or other kind of alternative medicine.
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It would be a small-scale pilot study using myself as the provider and volunteers as clients.  I'm fascinated by reflexology and it's charted indications of active health conditions in clients upon subjective palpation review.  I believe the mechanisms of reflexology are similar to that of acupuncture.  I'd like to research even elementary connections between the two disciplines.  Any constructive advice appreciated.
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The "Gold Standard" is fMRI imaging.  Eg, if you stimulate a point near the 5th toe, areas in the occipital lobe "light up",  or stimulate a point on the ventral wrist between flexor carpi radialis and palmaris longus, near where your wrist watch might sit, and multiple centres in the cerebellum "light up". You need large sums of money, even in a small pilot study. Costs range from a low of AUD$360 per 1/2 hour at University of Melbourne, Australia through USD$621 per hour at University of Michigan to up to USD$800 per 1/2 hour at Indiana University.
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What is the best timing for thymectomy in an ICU myasthenic patient with thymic mass?
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Thymectomy helps with a certain delay of some weeks. So it may be of little use in the critical ill patient. I'd try corticoids + plasmapheresis.
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Does thymoquinone have some therapeutic potential as a complementary medicine? 
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Dear Jose L Mauriz
Many thanks,
I will consider your links that would be so beneficial for me.
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Here at the University of Bristol we are conducting a DH funded scoping study of complementary/alternative medicine (CAM) for multimorbid patients with mental health and musculoskeletal problems in primary care in the UK.  By CAM we mean approaches where a practitioner is involved in providing a treatment complementary to conventional care, for example acupuncture, chiropractic, massage, Pilates, mindfulness etc.
We are looking for services in the UK where an integrated approach - CAM alongside conventional NHS treatment - is currently provided or has recently been provided. These services need to:
·         Be in the UK
·         Target patients with musculoskeletal and/or mental health issues
·         Provide the CAM through primary care e.g. GP referral to CAM, GP practising CAM
·         Offer CAM which is at least partially funded by the NHS or charitable funds etc i.e. the patient pays nothing/very little
We are interested in places where this is currently happening, but also where it has been attempted but been unsuccessful.
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In Maidstone there is the Blackthorn Trust which provides CAM therapies (anthroposophic medicine) and social and work rehabilitation therapy through craft work and work in a bakery and garden. They mainly work with people with chronic pain and mental illness. They have NHS funding. See the website below.
In greenwich there is a project that works along similar lines which is still in the set up stage and has just got or is in the process of getting NHS funding for patients who have failed with secondary care pain management services. They became a charity last year. It was founded by the same GP who founded Blackthorn. They work as part of the Greenwich PCT pain service.
Let me know if you need any further information or help on this.
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Some drugs are recommended for androgenic alopecia but these may carry certain risks. In certain parts of the world bizarre natural remedies are used like camel's urine! Are they a myth?
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Natural Interventions for Alopecia Treatment
Some good potential sources have already been cited above. What I add here is a summary of my findings from a recent internal review I completed on the issue of natural interventions for alopecia. Note that I deliberately confine my attention solely to human clinical studies. What's important to note is that we have several natural agents that have a plausible degree of evidentiary support through based on human clinical data, and my own observation is that these may on their own provide clinically significant relief from alopecia, and they may also provide a synergistic or at least additive benefit to current conventional treatments (note; several other interventions - like millet seeds, among others - have shown some preliminary promise, but I focus on the more robust of the studies, to be updated as new evidence appears].
Essential Oils
A double-blind, placebo-controlled trial1 found efficacy for a treatment oil containing essential oils of thyme, rosemary, lavender, and cedarwood in a grape seed and jojoba oil base. The clinical significant benefit of essential oils in the treatment of alopecia was further confirmed in a randomized placebo-controlled double-blind study of a pulsed electromagnetic field in combination with essential oils2.
Vitamins/Minerals/ Amino Acids
Biotin/Zinc/Silicon: High - and potentially dangerous - dose zinc aspartate and biotin in combination showed preliminary benefit3 for alopecia areata in children, but I note that this was in conjunction with the ultrapotent corticosteroid clobetasol, a problematic deployment in children. In addition, biotin and niacin appear to have some preliminary positive activity4,5. And a proprietary form of silicon (choline-stabilized orthosilicic acid) has shown some promise6,7.
Cysteine: A combination oral supplement of cysteine, histidine, copper and zinc induced a significant mean change in total hair count in male and female patients8.
Melatonin
One double-blind study found that the pineal hormone melatonin, applied topically to the scalp as a 0.1% solution, may be helpful for women with diffuse hair loss9.
Vegetable/Fruit Based Interventions
Topical Onion/Garlic Extracts: Topical crude onion juice in the treatment of patchy alopecia areata was tested single-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study, hair regrowth being observed in 87% of patients treated with onion juice compared to only 13% of the control group10. And topical garlic gel was tested in conjunction with a corticosteroid, a beneficial effect being observed for the garlic gel on the therapeutic efficacy of topical corticosteroid therapy in patients with alopecia areata11.
Preliminary data12 also has found that topical khellin, an extract derived from the fruit of the Mediterranean plant khella ( Ammi visnaga) may promote new hair growth in combination therapy with ultraviolet light for alopecia areata.
Herbals and Phytochemicals
A combination of two herbals, peony-derived glucosides and licorice-dreived glycyrrhizin was tested in pediatric alopecia in a randomized controlled trial13 and found both safe and effective and an earlier RCT also confirmed efficacy in adults14. And the proanthocyanidine flavonoid procyanidine B induced significant mean changes from total hair count in male patients15.
Natural 5-α reductase (5AR) Inhibitors
One of the most extensively researched - and clinical successful - arenas of potential benefit dervies from natural 5-α reductase (5AR) inhibitors, given the fact that he conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (DHT) via the enzyme 5-α reductase (5AR) is a well-documented major contributing factor of alopecia disorders, and the same mechanisms is of course also implicated in the onset and progression of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).
Curcumin: It is known that curcumin behaves as a natural 5-α reductase (5AR) inhibitor, and this activity was exploited in a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study16 which tested the efficacy of 5% hexane extract of Curcuma aeruginosa when added to 5% minoxidil, the combination inducing slowed hair loss and increased hair growth.
Saw Palmetto/Beta-sitosterol: A liposterolic extract of Saw Palmetto (Serenoa repens) and the plant sterol beta-sitosterol (found in Nigella sativa, Serenoa repens, Pygeum africanum, and sea-buckthorn, among other plant sources), both botanically derived 5AR inhibitors, were tested in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial5 and found to induce a highly positive response.
Methodology for this Review
A search of the PUBMED, Cochrane Library / Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED (Allied and Complimentary Medicine Database), CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), PsycINFO, ISI Web of Science (WoS), BIOSIS, LILACS (Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature), ASSIA (Applied Social Sciences Index and Abstracts), and SCEH (NHS Evidence Specialist Collection for Ethnicity and Health) was conducted without language or date restrictions, and updated again current as of date of publication, with systematic reviews and meta-analyses extracted separately. Search was expanded in parallel to include just-in-time (JIT) medical feed sources as returned from Terkko (provided by the National Library of Health Sciences - Terkko at the University of Helsinki). Unpublished studies were located via contextual search, and relevant dissertations were located via NTLTD (Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations) and OpenThesis. Sources in languages foreign to this reviewer were translated by language translation software.
References
  1. Hay IC, Jamieson M, Ormerod AD. Randomized trial of aromatherapy. Successful treatment for alopecia areata. Arch Dermatol. 1998;134:1349-1352.
  2. Bureau JP, Ginouves P, Guilbaud J, Roux ME. Essential oils and low-intensity electromagnetic pulses in the treatment of androgen-dependent alopecia. Adv Ther 2003 Jul-Aug; 20(4):220-9.
  3. Camacho FM, Garcia-Hernandez MJ. Zinc aspartate, biotin, and clobetasol propionate in the treatment of alopecia areata in childhood. Pediatr Dermatol. 1999;16:336-338.
  4. Draelos ZD, Jacobson EL, Kim H, Kim M, Jacobson MK. A pilot study evaluating the efficacy of topically applied niacin derivatives for treatment of female pattern alopecia. J Cosmet Dermatol 2005; 4(4): 258–61.
  5. Prager N, Bickett K, French N, Marcovici G. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to determine the effectiveness of botanically derived inhibitors of 5-alpha-reductase in the treatment of androgenetic alopecia. J Altern Complement Med 2002; 8(2):143-52.
  6. Barel A, Calomme M, Timchenko A, et al. Effect of oral intake of choline-stabilized orthosilicic acid on skin, nails and hair in women with photodamaged skin. Arch Dermatol Res. 2005 Oct 5. [Epub ahead of print].
  7. Wickett RR, Kossmann E, Barel A, et al. Effect of oral intake of choline-stabilized orthosilicic acid on hair tensile strength and morphology in women with fine hair. Arch Dermatol Res. 2007 Oct 25. [Epub ahead of print].
  8. Morganti P, Fabrizi G, James B, Bruno C. Effect of gelatin-cystine and serenoa repens extract on free radicals level and hair growth. J Appl Cosme-tol 1998; 16(3): 57–64.
  9. Fischer TW, Burmeister G, Schmidt HW, Elsner P. Melatonin increases anagen hair rate in women with androgenetic alopecia or diffuse alopecia: results of a pilot randomized controlled trial. Br J Dermatol. 2004;150:341-345.
  10. Sharquie KE, Al-Obaidi HK. Onion juice (Allium cepa L.), a new topical treatment for alopecia areata. J Dermatol 2002 Jun; 29 (6): 343-6.
  11. Hajhydari Z, Jamshidi M, Akbari J, et al. Combination of topical garlic gel and betamethasone valerate cream in the treatment of localized alopecia areata: a double-blind randomized controlled study. Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol 2007 Jan-Feb; 73 (1): 29-32.
  12. Tritrungtasna O, Jerasutus S, Suvanprakorn P. Treatment of alopecia areata with khellin and UVA. Int J Dermatol. 1993;32:690.
  13. Yang D, Zheng J, Zhang Y, Jin Y, Gan C, Bai Y. . Total glucosides of paeony capsule plus compound glycyrrhizin tablets for the treatment of severe alopecia areata in children: a randomized controlled trial. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med 2013; 2013:378219.
  14. Yang DQ, You LP, Song PH, Zhang LX, Bai YP. A randomized controlled trial comparing total glucosides of paeony capsule and compound glycyrrhizin tablet for alopecia areata. Chin J Integr Med 2012; 18(8):621-5.
  15. Kamimura A, Takahashi T, Watanabe Y. Investigation of topical application of procyanidin B-2 from apple to identify its potential use as a hair growing agent. Phytomedicine 2000; 7(6): 529–36.
  16. Pumthong G, Asawanonda P, Varothai S, et al. Curcuma aeruginosa, a novel botanically derived 5α-reductase inhibitor in the treatment of male-pattern baldness: a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. J Dermatolog Treat 2012; 23(5):385-92.
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Practice of yoga improves the physical health. There are a number of studies available that prove the efficacy of yoga as therapy. Can someone practice it during spinal cord injury?
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Any injury can be treated with yoga and CAM effectively. Time and nature of intervention, would depend on the type of injury. Divine association can also make the patient feel comfortable.  Yoga and Asanas may be correctly practiced with concurrent use of other CAM medicines also. Surgery may be an aided requirement. Diseases may be treated with multidisciplinary approach, all that is required is a perfect coordination between them.
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It is common that WSR is suggested as an alternative to classical clinical research methodology in the field of CAM, which does not have many limitations of classic RCT designs? Can anyone explain what the exact difference between these research methodologies is?
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A classical RCT design seeks to determine the cause and effect of one variable only, and traditionally has been applied to drug efficacy studies. This design doesn't suit CAM so well, as there are many known elements to CAM which can influence a health outcome such as the therapeutic relationship, the setting, the patient expectations, on top of the actual complementary therapy being practiced. Furthermore when you assess the effectiveness of a CAM approach to health, you are acknowleding that all aspects of the person are important and affect how they feel. How a person feels is measured often with Health Related Quality of LIfe Questionnaires, however these questionnaires do not always contain all the items that are deemed important to a patient. Thus you can incorporate tools that allow a patient to nominate items that concern them (see MYMOP and MYCaW). When you analyse these types of data you can see that there are many elements that patients consider important in relation to their health. A whole system approach to health research seeks to incorporate the evaluation of the whole person, on the understanding that total quality of life is contributed to by all aspects such as physical, social, functional, emotional, psychological and spiritual health. This means you have more variables to consider when carrying out statistical analysis in comparison to a straightforward analysis that you would carry out in an RCT. For the CAM field specifically thisWSR approach can acknowledge the broader effects of holistic healthcare in a way that RCT designs do not. It can also identify variables that should be incorporated into comparative effectiveness research design
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I am trying to screen ellagic acid, punicalagin and some other purified compounds in animal and in-vitro models. Since I have never ordered these things from company like sigma, I see there are many forms of the same compound available (like from tree bark, technical grade, analytical grade, etc). I wasn't sure what should I order for my assay.
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I think in this case you should order the one which claims its source as a tree bark. This would be possessing the inherent activity required for the pharmacological testing during in vivo and in vitro analysis. The other grades are suitably purified for intended use like LR grade for laboratory work and AR for synthetic purposes. Prize will increase dramatically with purity of the chemical. It depends on the intended use of the chemical at your end and accordingly you should decide.
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I am looking at the bench marks for T-CAM
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Amina,
This is a very interesting, and hotly debated, question. I would say that the short answer is: yes. There are several reasons: 1) ethical practitioners what/need to provide the most effective and cost-effective treatment available for their clients; 2) harmful and non-effective modalities should be exposed; 3) acceptance in the larger medical community requires an evidence-based approach to treatment; 4) private pay is difficult in today’s world and insurance will not cover treatments that are not proven through solid research (and sometimes not even then).
The long answer, however, requires a defining of the term ‘research’. The randomized controlled trial is the gold standard in medical research, as well as in other fields. Yet the RCT is not a suitable approach for TACM. There will likely never be a large body of literature supporting TACM via RCTs as there is with allopathic approaches. This is often the type of research that is required to get a therapy accepted in the medical community and approved by insurance companies, thus this lack of compatibility with the research model presents a challenge to the acceptance of TACM.
Why is the RCT or standard quantitative research not a good fit for TACM? Allopathic medicine treats diseases. The patient is diagnosed and the treatment is prescribed based on that diagnosis with limited consideration given to who the patient is – perhaps only taking into account history of allergies or other medications. TACM treats the individual client rather than the disease so five clients with the exact same diagnosis may receive five very different treatments based on lifestyle factors, energy levels or blockages, and even temperament. It would be impossible to conduct an RCT with an experimental group in which all of the participants received different interventions. At the same time, establishing a TACM experimental condition in which all of the participants receive the same intervention would not be truly representative of the TACM approach. Unfortunately qualitative research is often not considered scientific and is rarely sufficient for establishing broad acceptance of a treatment in the medical community.
That said, there is interesting research going on in mind-body medicine and TACM. Beverly Rubik (http://www.healthy.net/scr/bio.aspx?Id=75) has conducted scientific research on the human biofield, which includes what is referred to as chi, qi, life-force, and energy in many ‘energy-based’ holistic treatments. Jeanne Achterberg (http://www.jeanneachterberg.com/bio.html) studied MRI scans of energy healers and shamans as they performed distance healing. The Center for Mind-Body Medicine (www.cmbm.org) has used standardized scales to measure the impact of Mind-Body Skills Groups on traumatized children in war zones. Research on the impact of mindfulness in almost every area of human health is being published daily. The list goes on. The research is being conducted and it is producing very promising results but the question of acceptance remains.
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i have a patient who had left phrenic nerve damage at c5-c6 from herniated disc probably from minor auto accident followed by weakness in walking with brisk lower extremity reflexes. pt recovered most function with home use of iron lung neg pressure vent, one of the few current indications for this modality. pt spent alot of time leaning on left shoulder looking at tv etc and then developed rsi brachial neuritis with phrenic nerve involvement and is severely limitef because of immediate impact of produced or received speech or sudden loud sounds. during exertion or stress patient has to consciously pace her breathing. recently her home environment is more stressful due to increased ambient sound and stress and sound can lead to left upper extremity fasciculations and i am concerned that this might imply denervation. also she gets apical AF when exposed to too much sound. besides hoping it gets more quiet, i have found gentle stretch of shoulder helps, but household needs demand overuse of shoulders. inhaled glutathione supports cardiac status and i hope improves diaphragm functiion as does inhaled acetylcysteine remarkably. avoiiding increased bp, maintaining circulation and optimal metabolic status being done. idebenone works but isno longer being manufactured. ventilation or oral glycerin or both when pco2 high help but former also causes damage iatrogenicaly by pressing on site of phrenic nerve insertion on chest wall. the pt is on hydrocortisone for addisons. aerobic exercise when tolerated can improve status a bit. i am interested in any ideas, experimental or otherwise. is anyone using calcium channel blockers or anticonvulsants? tens? any new source idebenone? any advances in neuoscience that might suggest ideas? use of alpha ketoglutarate? all comments welcome.
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Thank you for your intelligent response,Gabriel. Let me clarify that the MRI and initial presentation was seven years ago, and there was such significant improvement after implementation of the iron lung for a couple years and given the natural hx of disc absorption, the hx was consistent with this problem being resollved and ongoing and recurring problems due to iatrogenic damage from pressure from the turtle shell cuirass- the only system available or utilizable for several different reasons patient related and system related, and due to the newer onset brachial neuritis. I am not sure therefore that it is the same picture of an acute HNP like your patients present with. The big issue now is the enormous sensitivity to sound and conversation and the unfortunate increase in both in her milieu because of recent death of elder parentleading to the spouse moving in who is unable to control or limit her speech or use sign languate for communication. Also I am going to review the initial MRI to check if it was a hermiation or bulge but what I do recall is that the reading of impingement of the cord at c5-c6 was consistent clinically with exam and presentation. So given this, and given the patient's sensitivity to sound and breathing under duress, influenced by other medical disorders, there is need to miniimze travel and procedures and such interactions, so I am not sure I would recommend a repeat MRI at this time.
I thnk the take home message from your comments might be that the patient needs a firmer mattress or a better bed wedge and to consider sleeping with a good cervical collar and gentle neck stretches.If you have sources that sell good wedges you recommed from an allergen free environment I would apprecuate it as she recently bought a new collar and cant use it because it was scented from the pharmacy counter softeners etc to which she is severely allergic. I will look into TNF and similar biochemical alterations that you comment upon and see if that generates any addtional practical modalities for treatment. I would be interested if you can be more detailed or specific in the cervical-thoracic stabilization exercises, since the a fib is aborted by mechanical expansion of the opposite lung which requires leaning to left which then puts presssure on left shoulder to trigger the same rsi.
Please, in addition, let me know if you have seen this sound sensitivity among patients with phrenic nerve palsies of any degree and where i can get documentation of this to perhaps help her family members understand the need for respecting avoidance of sound as much as possible. I am most grateful for your thoughtful considered assistance and your kind words on a case that can be exhausting re looking for treatments but we have come so far and i wish to provide hope and not to have the injury progress after all these years.