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The South Asian legal systems are still bearing colonial heritage of the British Indian empire inside its important laws. Basic laws in the field of evidence law, civil procedure, criminal procedure, penal law, contract law, personal law and so many other fields. Larger portion of these legislations are based on either the principles of Roman Law, Common law.
Most of these outdated and socially irrelevant laws are causing severe damage to the judicial systems and the societies. Complex laws are creating case-backlogs, laws with socially irrelevant remedy and lack of deterrance in punishments are creating social disorder.
Moreover, from a jurisprudential perspective, we can not expect a portion of victorian age legal system to be applied into some modern heterogenous societies having high opportunity of socio-economic prosperity.
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Altough my opinion can not be but an external point of view, because I am not immersed in the culture of the South Asian countries, nor have I had experienced their history, I agree what Montserrat Gas-Aixendri wrote: «The changes should depend more on the fact that the laws are not adequate to reality, than on whether they come from a colonial government».
In Latin America, where I live and work, even when some figures (still on force) descends clearely from Roman Law, our legal systems were not precisely inherited from those ruling in the times of european empire's domination, but imported from codes, institutions and political arrangements conceived under the strong influence of liberal ideals, also brought from Europe in the times of French Revolution and intensfied with the example given by the United States' Independence. Probably, we could regard them as colonial inheritance, but they have been well assimilated in our political culture and our legal thinking.
Nowadays, after two centuries, the same basic constructs support our normative frame and, even in the recognizion of the several ammendements operated time by time, globalization is impelling us to equate legal figures and procedures to those existent in developed countries, in order to attract business and investments. So, I think, there is a worldwide phenomenon concerning legislation: its tendency to be homologated.
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I wonder if there are any jurisdictions in the world that do not provide an appellate body for civil disputes (in the sense of a legal and, albeit limited, factual review of the first instance judgment)?
I would greatly appreciate your answers! Thank you so much in advance!
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very good question
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Hello All, i have a comparative law research paper with functionalist method, about the presidents veto power in Afghanistan and Germany. Can anyone please suggest me some useful sources?
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Hello! Maybe this information can help you: https://comparelex.org/2014/03/20/functionalism-in-comparative-law/
Also, there are lot of information about that, but functionalist method in comparative law could be limited because it does not consider other disciplines in their analysis. Althought, I consider is fine to start and take the method that developed. Other work you can review:
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I would like to collaborate with your work on Legal ENglish and Comparative Law.
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Hello! I am an expert in legal linguistics (incl. computer‐assisted legal linguistics (CAL) , experienced in teaching Legal English and preparing law professionals for Cambridge ILEC & Toles exams. You can count on me too.
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The La Porta, Lopez de Silanes et al thesis establishes that investor protection determines levels of firm ownership concentration. Therefore, weak investor protection tend to cause high levels of firm ownership concentration.
However, local business culture could also affect the levels of firm ownership concentration. In one country local businessmen may have preferences for higher concentration.
How can one measure one or the other? How can one determine which one is the real cause?
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Hi,
You may find here some new insights:
Do exogeneous Changes in passive institutional ownership affect corporate governance and firm value?
Journal of Financial Economics Forthcoming, 2017
Cornelius Schmidt, Rudiger Fahlenbrach
Best regards.
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for example, i want to look for some cases about Trust in England, but i don't know how.
I'm a law student in Germany and have great interests in comparative law. 
Thank you in advance.
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Just to add to the last response: Bailii does have (or rather commonli has) the English Reports. Go to http://www.commonlii.org/uk/cases/EngR/
To use the ER you need to know case name or year. They ended in 1873 so maybe you won't need them.
I do agree that the best place to start is with an analysis of the law. This will also give leading cases. You can often check whether a case has been appealed (and perhaps reversed) by searching its name not as "case name" but as phrase. 
Good luck!
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I am interest in a good text about the law protection of this type of rights in comparative law.
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Just because I was studying this case, it might be helpful for the purpose of your question.
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I am writing a thesis abut the right of the child to be heard, in special the participation right in judicial and administrative procedures affecting them. I need information in the fields of human rights, comparative law, legal and sociological studies, etc. all information will be welcome.
My investigation is centered in the participation right of the child and all the rights related: the right to be respected, the right to information, the right to be heard, the right to express their points of views, in special in the judicial and administrative process, in special in what concern children and young people in conflict of law.
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What should we consider? Number of times cited by those peers? in the high court judgments?
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Karine, There are a number of tools you can review that show you how impact can be measured in journals. Are you familiar with the Journal Citation Reports from the database Web of Science? Or, SciMago which is a similar tool from the UK. To use the JCR your institution needs to have a subscription to the Web of Science database or I believe you can have just  a subscription just to the JCR. JCR shows rankings for science and social science journals and I think you are able to go back and see 5 years or more of reports. SciMago is free. Google Scholar also has a tool that measures impact. These tools will give you rankings according to subject, for example looking at all the journals in a particular subject and ranking according their impact in their respective fields as well as the impact factor. They also provide a lot of other information that may be useful but too numerous to include in this posting. One thing to note with the JCR and Google is that the list of journals that they rank is not exhaustive so, it's possible that a particular journal you're interested in looking at may not show up in the rankings. SciMago may show titles that are not listed in the JCR or Google Scholar. If you have additional question feel free to contact me at grant@ohio.edu
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I mean: in a state of exception all legal categories collapse, and at the end of day the same act can deserve a medal or be deemed high treason. In this way it represents, according to me, a pure political world, where the law is suspended. 
From my viewpoint the law is to a large extent an ontology, a weaponed ontology, establishing the things composing the stuff of the world : goods, persons, properties, absolute rights, agreements, deeds, covenants, contracts, and so on.
Then it seems to me that a pure political state has no ontology, and as such is completely shapeless, and it works only through decision and mobilisation. 
This would also be practically important in the US constitutional law, since the Supreme Court maintains that a "political question" can not be justiciable.
As such the nature of the political seems to lie outside the law in a realm of pure ontological ambiguity where all things get confused, precisely at the opposite of a world governed by the rule of law, which needs, first of all, a fixed social ontology to establish its own domain.
Is such a sharp opposition between the legal and the political, in ontological terms, sustainable or not ? And where it can bring us to?
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Dear Pier Giuseppe
Let me share with you just some general approaches.
1) I am not very fond to think in terms of "ontologies", just because it usually means immutable essences, and therefore also liable to absolute truths. Beyond that, I can understand the approach that seeks a deeper understanding of this problem.
2) the problem you pose is about the relationship between politics and law. Generally, it is assumed that politics and law are independent and excluding experiences. Under this assumption, of course, states of emergency mean a collapse of rule of law.
3) however, in my view, it should be seen from another perspective: in any case public power corresponds to the policy. The policy can be exerted in a wide range of possibilities: through brutal ways (war) or through more rational ways (under rule of law), including intermediate or mixed forms.
4) keeping this in mind, it allows us to remember that : (a) even under the rule of law, politics is present everywhere, it's only a matter of degree; this includes the case where a judge decides when it should make an exception to the general rule for reasons of inapplicability or reasons of equity (b) is always risked falling into less civilized ways of exercising power (c) even when politic power exerted by violent means (uncivilized), the expectations of legitimation of power -in today's world- compels rulers to respect -as much as possible- legal forms, or at least, to promise to do so. Therefore, I think that the states of exception are instances in which the holders of power whereas interpret that must resign certain legal forms for the benefit of desirable outcomes, including to satisfy public opinion, hoping to legitimize power. Naturally, the less intense the withdrawal of legal forms and the more credible its exceptionality , the greater chance of being accepted. In those terms, states of exception (emergency) can be interpreted even as been part of the experience of a (legal) civilized politics, perhaps to the least extent, or perhaps on the way to stop being so.
Otherwise, I agree with the theoretical references that mention our colleagues.
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The legal pluralism accept the idea that coexist more than one juridical system, in the case of indigenous people the have their own juridical system. Extractives industries most of the time relate with this particular juridical system. Which is the role of the state in this relationship? 
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De conformidad con el Convenio 69 de la OIT, los pueblos indígenas tienen derecho a participar en la toma de decisiones relacionadas con su entorno y con cualquier cuestión que pudiere afectar su forma de vida tradicional y sus territorios ancestrales.
El reconocimiento de la multiculturalidad y el consecuente derecho a la preservación de la cultura que tienen todos los grupos humanos,  me parece que es un derecho humano de máxima prioridad, sobre todo si se le confronta con derechos relacionados con la posibilidad de hacer negocio de una empresa, de manera que en caso de conflicto debe prevalecer el derecho a la preservación de la propia cultura que tiene el grupo indígena, contra el derecho a la explotación económica de un yacimiento minero. 
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I got some feedback on a paper I'm writing on "Analysis of Legal Pluralism in Family Laws in Nigeria and Malaysia" where the commentators were asking if I could use normative approach or participant observation as the methodologies to be adopted.
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Participant observation is the process enabling researchers to learn about the activities of the people under study in the natural setting through observing and participating in those activities
Most challenging and must need qualityfor a researcher while using this method: Maintaining objectivity through distance
This method involves field work which it self is mix of many tools as follows :
1. Gaining entry into the community and rapport with the target group you want to study
2. Selecting key informants/ sample
3. Participating in as many different activities as are allowed by the community
4. Observation of activities and understanding non verbal communications
5. Triangulation with members
6. Formal and informal interviews and Focus Group Discussions
7. Structured field notes to facilitate the development of a narrative that explains various cultural aspects to the reader.
The theory you know about a phenomenon ( Normative) will be tested using participtory method. Thus the normative and participatory methods are complimentary to each other
Hope it is clear - Vilas