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I am looking for free to publish communication theory journals that are peer reviewed with fast publication and peer review process. Please help! Thank you!
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Hello,
I am a needy student who is searching for resources for my dissertation about Theory of Communication. I am interested in works/articles/books about: communication models, human values, interpersonal communication. Is there anyone who's a specialist in the field and is able to help? I can explain in more detail what I'm writing about if necessary. Thank you!
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There are many resources for communication theories. From my point of view the theory of speaking winners and silent loosers is the most interesting, as it points to the striking inequalities and inefficiencies in society. As myself having relation to public administration, the theory of "garbage boxes" is also very interesting, which means the lack of communication and the fatalist way of taking decisions in public administration.
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Due to the development of information and communication technologies, the features of the communication parties have changed, and the Lasswell model is no longer representative of the communication process, especially with the emergence of social media and the multiplicity and diversity of uses. So I think it is worth asking about the theories that would be more qualified to serve communication research. That's why II posed the question:
What are the communication theories that you rely on in your research recently?
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thank you Dr. Aijaz for your valuable contribution
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I have been pondering about the relationship between these two important topics of our data-driven world for a while. I have bits and pieces, but I have been looking forward to find a neat and systematic set of connections that would somehow (surprisingly) bind them and fill the empty spots I have drawn in my mind for the last few years.
In the past, while I was dealing with multi-class classification problem (not so long ago), I have come to realize that multiple binary classifications is a viable option to address this problem through using error correction output coding (ECOC) - a well known coding technique used in the literature whose construction requirements are a bit different than classical block or convolutional codes. I would like to remind you that grouping multiple classes in two superclasses (a.k.a. class binarization) can be addressed in various ways. You can group them totally randomly which does not dependent on the problem at hand or based on a set of problem-dependent constraints that can be derived from the training data. One way I like the most stays at the intersection point of information theory and machine learning. To be more precise, class groupings can be done based on the resultant mutual information to be able to maximise the class separation. In fact, the main objective with this method is to maximise class separation so that your binary classifiers expose less noisy data and hopefully result in better performance. On the other hand, ECOC framework calls for coding theory and efficient encoder/decoder architectures that can be used to efficiently handle the classification problem. The nature of the problem is not something we usually come across in communication theory and classical coding applications though. Binarization of classes implies different noise and defect structures to be inserted into the so called "channel model" which is not common in classical communication scenarios. In other words, the solution itself changes the nature of the problem at hand. Also the way we choose the classifiers (such as margin-based, etc) will affect the characterization of the noise that impacts the detection (classification) performance. I do not know if possible, but what is the capacity of such a channel? What is the best code structure that addresses these requirements? Even more interestingly, can the recurrent issues of classification (such as overfitting) be solved with coding? Maybe we can maintain a trade-off between training and generalization errors with an appropriate coding strategy?
Similar trends can be observed in the estimation theory realm. Parameter estimations or in the same way "regression" (including model fitting, linear programming, density estimation etc) can be thought as the problems of finding "best parameters" or "best fit", which are ultimate targets to be reached. The errors due to the methods used, collected data, etc. are problem specific and usually dependent. For instance, density estimation is a hard problem in itself and kernel density estimation is one of its kind to estimate probability density functions. Various kernels and data transformation techniques (such as Box-Cox) are used to normalize data and propose new estimation methods to meet today's performance requirements. To measure how well we do, or how different distributions are we again resort to information theory tools (such as Kullback–Leibler (KL) divergence and Jensen-Shannon function) and use the concepts/techniques (including entropy etc.) therein from a machine learning perspective. Such an observation separates the typical problems posed in the communication theory arena from the machine learning arena requiring a distinct and careful treatment.
Last but not the least, I think that there is deep rooted relationship between deep learning methods (and many machine learning methods per se) and basic core concepts of information and coding theory. Since the hype for deep learning has appeared, I have observed that many studies applying deep learning methods (autoencoders etc) for decoding specific codes (polar, turbo, LDPC, etc) claiming efficiency, robustness, etc thanks to parallel implementation and model deficit nature of neural networks. However, I am wondering the other way around. I wonder if, say, back-propagation can be replaced with more reasonable and efficient techniques very well known in information theory world to date.Perhaps, distortion theory has something to say about the optimal number of layers we ought to use in deep neural networks. Belief propagation, turbo equalization, list decoding, and many other known algorithms and models may have quite well applicability to known machine learning problems and will perhaps promise better and efficient results in some cases. I know few folks have already began searching for neural-network based encoder and decoder designs for feedback channels. There are many open problems in my oppinion about the explicit design of encoders and use of the network without the feedback. Few recent works have considered various areas of applications such as molecular communications and coded computations as means to which deep learning background can be applied and henceforth secure performances which otherwise cannot be achieved using classical methods.
In the end, I just wanted to toss few short notes here to instigate further discussions and thoughts. This interface will attract more attention as we see the connections clearly and bring out new applications down the road...
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I've been having similar random thoughts over the two topics. As a matter of fact, I'd like to think about learning in the more genernal sense, not limited to machines. But when I put keywords like 'coding theory', 'learning' etc. in google, most results are just about applying some information theoretical techniques in machine learning, while I'm looking for a deeper connection help me understand learning better. And your post is seemingly the closest thing to what I want.
To briefly summarise my idea, I think we can treat learning as encoding, similar to the last point brought up in your post. I have to admit my ignorance but I haven't found any works studying learning using the framework of coding theory, rather than just borrowing some convenient tools. You may have dug into the literature more since your post, please direct me to the right works/authors if you have found relevant materials.
I don't have a background in information theory, but I guess I know some naive basics of it. Many artificial neural networks can perform a denoising or pattern completion task -- Isn't that impossible from a information theoretical point of view? Why an output can ever be the 'denoised' version of any noisier input? Of course this is a stupid question, but it led me to realise that learning/training is like encoding and testing/responding is like decoding. Then I had to accept that a learning system with all its training data forms this information pathway that has a long (even permanent) lifespan, which should be shorter than the changing rate of the regularities underlying the data. Specifically, learning is a process for the system to compress the aggregated noise in the training data (coding types other than compression would be more fun, but I'm not discussing it here), it considers this as information and incorporates it into its learnable parameters (these things live longer than individual datum), and as a successful outcome the system becomes capable of denoising a test sample, which is in some sense similar to decoding an encrypted message with the correct codebook. In other words, I can think of learning as a procedure of the system minimising its lifetime entropy by data fitting. This idea is evidently hinted by the common use of error minimisation in terms of mimising loglikelihoods in machine learning, but was clearly spelt out in Smolensky's Harmonium, which is slightly different from Hinton's restricted Boltzmann machine in the goal of optimisation (involving entropy). Unfortunately I'm not experienced enough to explain the technical details.
From my perspective, I consider this research direction extremely important and relevant when it comes to continual learning. In a more classical, static data fitting or machine learning scenario, in theory the learning system could be embracing all the training data at the same time. Minimising lifetime system entropy is equivalent to reduce system uncertainty with respect to the training data at the exact moment it encounters data. However, this is clearly a non-realistic assumption for humans and for many AI applications. A more realistic data stream is more dynamic, and at each moment the system could only observe partially the data. Evidently if an artificial neural network tries only to optimise itself with respect to this imperfect information, it suffers from catastrophic forgetting. So people start to tweak the learning rules or the regularisers, etc. in order to fix the problem. I do similar things, too, but I feel a lack of theoretical guidance, as I consider there should be some information theoretical quantification of the difficulty of continual learning tasks (there are some primary but arbitrary classification now), at least for artificial tasks.
In summary, I believe an updated version for coding theory is needed for studying continual learning, because in this scenario the channel capacity of a learning system has to be affected by more than its instantaneous parameter (including structure) configuration, but additionally an integral over time of these parameters.
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Dear Colleagues,
I put up this question at RG in order to find out what is being studied about the effects on people of social media memes as they attempt to find reliable information regarding social media memes.
In my original data set about the addictive power of memes to shape memory storage and alter personality, I was mainly looking at political memes.
It may be also important to study the effects of memes upon people's ability to find verifiable information. So please post any studies that you are aware of so that we can compile these in one place. I hope this inspires some study because I already know the power of memes from my past work on rhetoric, communication theory, and meme addictive behavior.
Here are an initial couple of links to studies which I have not read as yet, but which may be of interest. Check the bibliographies or Works Citeds, as well.
Social Media Reigned by Information or Misinformation About COVID-19: A Phenomenological Study
Social Sciences & Humanities Open Online journal:
MIT Psychologists study:
Fighting COVID-19 misinformation on social media: Experimental evidence for a scalable accuracy nudge intervention
Peer-edited Polish Journal
SOMEBODY TO BLAME: ON THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE OTHER IN THE CONTEXT OF THE COVID-19 OUTBREAK
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Dear Colleagues,
This week on Public Broadcasting in the US, there was a documentary about InfoWars, one of the persistent purveyors of disinformation in the media. It is well to learn how this rhetoric works. First--going back to Aristotle--you assign a good ETHOS to a speaker, then you will follow any path in this person's arguments.
To take a "base audience" farther into believing more and worse sketchy logic, tie your outrageous claim to some other "outrage" the audience already believes. "It's just like the time that...happened...and did the mainstream media tell the truth then?"
A good example was that the InfoWars host claimed on many shows that the Sandy Hook massacre of school children was "fake" news. He even had a court battle with one of the grieving parents.
These same outrageous techniques of misinformation and lying are being applied daily to the problem of the corona virus. Memes are primary vectors of this spread of misinformation. They have no traceable source and are generated by data mining concerns tasked with "meme flooding' a huge audience. This audience, once addicted to sharing memes, will become more and more trapped in a misinformation bubble reinforced daily.
See this documentary if you have time.
LINK:
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CfP: Communication Association of Eurasian Researchers Conference 'Building Bridges: Internationalizing Communication Theory, Practice, and Education', LCC International University 🇱🇹, June 27-29, 2020
Deadline: January 31, 2020
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The holding of such conferences is very important to develop the skills of university professors, especially in such an important specialization and contribute to creating an atmosphere of familiarity and joint scientific cooperation
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A colleague and I are working on developing a communication theory. This of course synthesizes prior literature, but we also have survey data we gathered to help us "make the case" for how the theory works and how it is applicable. Does anyone have a good example of how this is done? In particular, we're looking for how to do a "method section" when in theory development there typically isn't a formal section.
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A potential place to look would be how Milgram experimented with the "Small World" theory of social networks, or that people are networked in such a way that there exist some very short paths between two random individuals. The experiment was used as empirical evidence to bolster the theory (though had its limitations). It gave rise to the concept of "six degrees of separation".
The nice feature of this study is that being extremely old and well known it is widely available on the net. It outlines the theory and then goes through the experiment and how the experiment helps "make the case" for the small world hypothesis.
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If you are familiar with the Lucky Me: HapagUsapan commercial series, I would like to study these ads from a speech communication perspective and how it is perceived by either nuclear families or single parent families.
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I think uses and gratifications theory most related to your speech
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Hi! I am currently in the process of creating a thesis topic and I'm kind of lost as to what theories I can use. I am majoring communication
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Also, there is the area of Visual Communication which could help your study—-how do we perceive Color in various cultures? What about headwear in various climes & cultures? Doesn’t Fashion also relate to Body Types? And the political aspects of how by whom clothes are constructed?
Lots of areas to explore here. The politics of clothing are considered an Ethics issue by some, & Ethics is an area of Comm. Studies too.
Robin Levenson
ACTING CHEKHOV in TRANSLATION: 4 Plays, 100 Ways
published by Peter Lang, Inc.
January 2019
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So there is this 'two communities' theory / metaphor arguing that academics and policy makers are from separate communities, with distinct languages, values, and reward system, and that leads to limited knowledge use (Caplan 1979, Dunn 1980).
Although criticized by many (e.g. Bogenschneider and Corbett 2010, Jacobson 2007) it still in my opinion is a good story / starting point for analyzing determinants / context of knowledge use in public administration.
I wonder if you could point me to some other examples of alternative theories / metaphors that could serve the same purpose. Let me specify that I'm not asking for sources enlisting factors / determinants of knowledge / evaluation use or models consisting - again - of factors, but something more like a story / perspective (sth like two communities:)
Regards, TK
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Good Day, Thomasz. The below paper ' Effectuating Tacit and Explicit Knowledge via Personal Knowledge Management Frameworks and Devices' utilizes and references sources which differentiate (e.g. Wierzbicki A.P. and Nakamori Y. (2007a) Creative environments: Issues of creativity support for the knowledge civilization age, Springer Publishing Company) between the academic and business world but also point to cumulative synthesis as a common ground methodology (e.g. Usher, A.P. (2013) A history of mechanical inventions (Revised ed.), Courier Corporation). see: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/326877071
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I'm looking at news values and gate-keeping communication theories
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I agree with Roland Schatz that you need to be clear what you are investigating and that you do not distort the answer by failing to include papers known to have views about 'student protest'. A further point that is less obvious: always remember you are analysing (creating a picture of the coverage) and not arguing with those providing the coverage. So you record, categorise, summarise, etc even if what you are reading is distasteful, ludicrous, or simply out of this world. Do not allow yourself the luxury of contending with it.
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Which communication theories are analysed most by the communication researchers theses days?
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That's a broad question. You'll get may different answers. Here are some of the ones that seem to be cutting edge/well-researched across various communication subdisciplines. I'll get yelled at for leaving someone's favorite theory out, but here goes:
Organizational Com: sensemaking, LMX, communicative constitution of organization (CCO), leadership theories, organizational knowledge, organizational change, organizational socialization
Interpersonal Com: relational dialectics, uncertainty management, isocial penetration, communication privacy
Intercultural Com: identity negotiation, intercultural competence
Mediated Com: transmedia, cultivation theory, elaboration likelihood, polymedia, media effects, uses and gratifications
BIG Theories: narrative, social construction, structuration, adaptive structuration, symbolic interaction, symbolic convergence
Hope this helps.
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Dear researchers,
I am doing a research on information communication technologies influence in family communication and behaviour. Any idea what theory can be applied for it?
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Family Communication Patterns Theory by Mcleod and Chaffee
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I wonder if the communication model mentioned above is used outside Germany. In Germany, it is both well known and in widespread everyday use.
In wikipedia, one may find this reference:
I am asking because I want to connect our own model as presented at ESPCH conferences with the Four Sides model and up to now wonder, how to do....
Kind regards, and thanks in advance, should anyone be able to give me a hint,
Thomas
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Dear Dan,
you have been busy in quite some different contexts and countries, as I see :-)
And I think you developed useful tools to improve communication - also the 4 distance model, that I checked on your web site with interest, (http://www.danieletrevisani.com/emotions/Daniele_Trevisani_4_Distances_Model.htm)
Communication training in German health care providers would need improvement, such as with the tools you provide. At least, employees in primary care private practices are sometimes trained with aid of the 4 ears model - but I doubt if this is also the case for medical doctors.
Now I will continue to write a paper issuing practical consequences from our biopsychosocial model that we developed - hope I succeed...
Thank you for the offer to contact you in case I need more information about your potential and distances model, I will keep it in mind,
beste regards, 
Thomas
PS: I add a paper just publlsihed by colleagues in Netherland (that I do not know), it may relate to your communication topics?
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Any suggestions with what communication theories to use on a reception analysis study of flood risk messages by a government council? I am also looking at the messages receivers' Knowledge, Attitude and Practice (with regards to their socio-demographics), on their motivations on acting upon the flood risk messages (i.e. preparation, evacuation). Thanks!
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Hi Randolph
The theory of planned behaviour may be useful to you. It is a well used theory and information inputs to the model should be well studied as well. 
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I'm not looking to code messages categorically (e.g., Brown & Levinson's typology of politeness strategies), but rather to have participants rate their own degree of politeness utilized in a given relationship over time. So far, I've not been able to track down any multi-item measures of self-reported global politeness. Any help or references would be appreciated!
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Timothy, my colleagues and I (Renee Edwards and others) have successfully made use of a number of items derived in part from the work of Trees and Manusov (1998, in Human Communication Research) to measure perceptions of another's politeness.  However, these items could be easily adapted to measure perceptions of one's own politeness in a relationship.  The number of items we have used has varied from five to eight, but perhaps the best version for combining succinctness and internally reliability was in an article published in Communication Quarterly (Bello, Brandau-Brown, & Ragsdale, 2008--see my list of publications for the full-text of this article).  This version consisted of six items.  In the CQ article, I believe that only one is given as an example, but I would be happy to email all of them to you.  Just let me know...
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My field is that of communication, so when I talk about reliability and credibility I talk about both concepts in light of a message, of a source or as an outcome of either.
Of course there is a clear distinction in theory. Do people (while participating in an experiment or filling out a survey) really make that theoretical distinction? And do they still in daily life? And is that distinction measurable, or are they simply two sides of the same coin, meaning that they are perhaps two parts of a multidimensional construct?
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Requires some communication theories to be applied to study of English and Indian Literature
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Try to use the 'Conversational Floor' model that can be used to analyse 'conversations' in a literary work.
Here is a useful link:
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Dear Pallavi,
here's the publication :
good luck with your study
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Hi all,
Good morning.
I am going to conduct Analog Communication theory Lab next semester for Btech students. In this lab we are designing Analog Communication Transmitter and receivers.
For Eg.
1. Amplitude Modulation TX / RX
2. Frequency Modulation TX / RX
and other such circuits.
As far as I have refered I could not find any good book/material which gives detailed design steps/derivations for these circuits.
Kindly let me know a good book/material for this.
I am planning to design simple circuits with transistors.
Regards,
Balaji Dhyabaran
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Hi Ahmed Benaya,
I am not able to download your attachment.
Regards,
Balaji Dhayabaran
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Let's use an example. We have a function y = f(x), in which x is the input (the probability) and y is the output (the entropy).  If we change y in y', can we find an x' such that f(x') = y'?
In other words, I know that when p changes, H changes; is it possible the opposite, such that if H changes, p changes?
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Considering the Gibbs-Shannon entropy S, we know that
dS=-∑(lnpi)dpi
We will consider i=1,2,...,n with n>2. Then there are n-1 independent variations dpi.
You cannot uniquely determine n-1>1 independent quantities dpi from a single quantity dS.
I am not sure if this is what you were asking?
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I am studying “AL JAZEERA AND THE ARAB SPRING - Framing of the Uprisings in Egypt and Bahrain on the Al Jazeera English and Arabic websites”.
I need a good academic book which has done a similar study on, let’s say CNN covering a conflict in the Middle East so that I can imitate it.
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Thank you Mohamed, yes I have contacted them but they did not answer yet, however, if you know any good academic books/studies which have investigated how Western media outlets (CNN, BBC etc.) have covered any of the Middle East conflicts or Western conflict, please let me know.
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Theories must be relevant to business context.
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Thank you very Sadhana for the useful information. I will consult the recommended reading.
Kind regards
Maureen
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Transdisiciplinarity requires elements such as collective thinking, integration, collaboration, cooperation and participation of actors or scientists for knowledge generation and management that can solve real life and complex problems. What will be the ideal theory that this can be based on? Social capital theory? sociology of scientific knowledge? Actor network theory? Communication theory?
It might all be relevant to the study, but which can be the best fit.
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There are various approaches of social capital in sociology (Bourdieu, Coleman) or Political Science (Putnam): depending on its structure, Social Capital is not always a positive factor for collective action.Quantitative  Network analysis is a good tool to approach this as it is shared by various disciplines.
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All possible options please, as well existing research and sources for review.
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My research is to investigate the best ways of dealing with sexual harassment at workplace and the sample universe is female journalists in electronic media. Which theory best suits the topic?
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Thankyou for your guidance it is really helpful...
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Could anyone explain the acapulco typology?
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The comparison of the media agenda with the public agenda has been operationalized in four different categories. The researchers of the agenda-setting theory call these kinds of designs as the Acapulco typology (McCombs, 1981).
This typology was first presented at the International Communication Association convention in Acapulco , Mexico . So this is the reason why this typology is called as Acapulco typology.
• The first type of this typology compares the news coverage for a set of major issues to the aggregate public agenda. The original Chapel Hill study is the best example of Type I design in the agenda-setting literature.
• The second type also examines the media agenda (defined in terms of a set of issues), but shifts the units of analysis for the public agenda from the aggregate population to the individual. In such situations, the rank-order of an agenda of issues is determined for each person on individual basis.
• The third type determines the relationship between the media coverage of a single issue and the public opinion about this issue over a period of time. The study of Winter and Eyal (1981) is an example of this type of Design.
• Type four investigates the relationship between the media coverage of a single issue and the salience of that issue on an individual agenda. The research design of the laboratory experiment is also used in this type and it complements the field research. For example, Iyengar and Kinder (1987) conducted their research on agenda-setting effects repeatedly in a series of laboratory experiments. During the laboratory experiments, the participants watched actual television programs to enhance the salience of certain issues. The result was according to the expectations of the researchers and an increased level of concern was found for the desired issues.