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A little story of scientific struggle. I submitted a paper to an Elsevier's journal in October 2018. It took about two months to send the paper to the reviewers, a little longer than average. But that was ok, I wasn't in a hurry at the time. In May, the paper was still "under review". It took much longer than average for "Material Science". I contacted the help desk and I got a reply from a guy in India. No editor of the journal lives in India, it's just less expensive to run a "call center" there. He told me that only one of the two reviewers replied. Usually, when a reviewer is late on his job, the paper is sent to someone else, but, for unknown reasons, not in this case. He told me that he will personally make sure to contact the reviewer and that he will update me in 3 weeks. After 6 weeks, I didn't receive any updates from him. I wrote an angry letter, but he ignored most of the content and just replied that he was sorry, but the editor in charge resigned and the process was probably going to take much longer. He promised to keep me updated. So I contacted directly the editor. She did indeed resign, but in May, BEFORE I contacted Elsevier the first time. The support guy didn't even know. She offered to send a letter to the editorial board to speed things up. One month is passed, the paper is still listed under her (3 months after she left) and I didn't receive any further update. Today I wrote to the Managing Editor.
My precious work is in the hands of people with no respect for the hundreds of hours I spent in my lab for this project. No respect for the PhD students who need a publication to get their degree. No respect for our intellectual property which is currently stalled because of their internal issues. My promotion also depends on my publications, of course.
Just like a sad italian comedy from the '70s.
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Well, research gate offer two chances: ask a question or start a discussion, my point being the latter. It's crucial to point out that we are not the ones making money out of publications, a little more respect (and responsibility) would be more than welcome. I'm not particularly angry, it's just that the system has many flaws and it's incredible that a journal with over 40 editors can't even manage internal issues properly.
A simple withdraw is a solution for my case, but not to the general problem. That's why I called this q "cautionary tale".
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can someone please recommend me coding sheet for content analysis of political comedy programs?
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Just sit down and think about what you want to ask. Then consider your questions or scales. Its not difficult to develop a set of scales once you know what material you want to analyse. I help stage I students create effective coding sheets regularly. Mostly you just need to think what you want to know.
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A while back i came across the comedies Busybody by Jack Popplewell and Out of Order by Ray Cooney. I know they both are british and that they were great successes in the theater. However, i was unable to find out anything more about them, even using google. Is anyone familiar with them?
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Cooney was hugely successful in the popular theatre. His plays were the modern equivalent of Feydeau, the 19th century French playwright. The plays also hark back to the British restoration period of the 17th century, with people like Wycherley (The Country Wife) and John Dryden (Marriage a la Mode). The Restoration plays were also called Plays of Manners, and usually involved sexual antics, affairs, wives been cheated on, and men being cuckolded. Cooney's plays did not get the critical attention that the 17th century playwrights did but many were hugely successful - Run For Your Wife particularly. I think the reason was not artistic snobbery on the part of the critics, but the slightness of Cooney's plays. Perhaps we might compare them to a lot of the Carry On series of films.
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I have a article title. Stand Up Comedy In Preaching: Comedian or Preacher? How do you think about that? Please give your advice?
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How about?
Humour in Preaching: Propagating the Gospel or Stand-up Comedy?
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Generally, to make learning more fun, I use some small comedies or very short stories in correlation with the concept, when the similarity or the analogy permits. It gives a great success to make students happy, focus, love the course, be relaxed from their internal stress, etc.
However, we must be vigilant, we risk to lost control, especially with some students who go far away. We must keep a discreet watch on their reactions or behaviors instantaneously. It’s very hard, it makes me very tired, but very successful.
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Yes, it is a good idea to use them if you can get hold of them. Sometimes I use Dilbert and other comic strips in between the lecture slides to reinforce the concept. Here is an example for product safety comic art.
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Comic art has received differing explanations since Aristotle´s "Poetics." Bergson in his essay "Laughter" conceives of comedy as deshumanization of human beings into things or machines. How do you conceive the mechanism of the funny? Who is your favorite comedian or comedienne and what in your opinion makes him or her laughable? If you can post youtubes of examples, that would clarify.
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For me, dear @Nelson the man in question is Fernand Contadin-Fernandel! :)
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Dark humor comedies with substituted corpses would do. Any repertoire would do (Italian, Spanish, German, Irish, British etc)
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The protagonist Huck Finn attends his own funeral in a humorous scene in Mark Twain's most famous novel _Huckleberry Finn_ (the adventures of).