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Cognitive Musicology - Science topic

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Do you know any specific tool to assess musicians' divergent thinking and/or creativity?
We are looking for a test specifically used with musicians (possibly, with guitarists, drummers, bassists, organists, and/or pianists).
Thank you in advance
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Just a few examples: How many ways can one (re)interpret/find uses for a voicing? A rhythmic pattern? A pitch series? A form? a group of instruments? Could be done In 1) real time, i.e, improvised 2) pre-composed approach. These are music specific divergent thinking tasks.
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When I look around I see the number of people listening to sad music is much higher than those who listening to cheerful music. I know it varies from one culture to another.
I can imagine the previous experiences of a listener plays a great role in habit of listening but to what extend the sad music relates to past incidents and events of listeners?
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on what basis is the music considered 'sad'? Some music is more inward and thoughtful rather than 'sad' as such. Music can give or appears to give expression to or chime in with a mood that someone is in and so they feel understood or comforted. There is quite a lot of research into 'music in everyday life' and how and why people listen to what.
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The user behaviour while in interaction with an interface designed for measuring the perception of emotion can give us an idea about the cognitive load of the particular interface in different conditions. Parameters like gaze fixation, saccade movements, gaze counts and so on are there, but what are the most used and reliable parameters.
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Percent change in Pupil Dilation  is a good measure for cognitive load. 
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For instance, Sinfonia del Silenzio e della Morte possibily premiered in Vienna in 1911 but can we discover more about where in Vienna, who might have written up the concert and where it took place etc.?
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Most useful; can to same conclusions mysefl thinking hard and logically....many, many thanks...I went to Vienna and found amazing things....
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I'm conducting a research on Frescobaldi's toccatas. Any help or contributions would be very appreciated. The results will be presented in the Milano's Conservatory of Music within next June.
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Yes, of course I can help you. Doctoral dissertation:
- Naomi Joy Barker, "Analytical Issues in the Toccatas of Girolamo Frescobaldi", Ph.D. in Musicology, Royal Holloway College, University of London, 1995;
- Elena Burundukovskaya, "Organno-klavirnye sotchineniya Jirolamo Frescobaldi i voprosy ich ispolneniya na organe" [Girolamo Frescobaldi's Keyboard Works and the Questions of Their Performance on the Organ], Ph.D. in Music, Moscow Academy of Music, 1993;
- Étienne Darbellay, "Primo et secondo libro di toccate de Girolamo Frescobaldi, édition critique. En marge des deux livres de toccate de Girolamo Frescobaldi, étude de style", Ph.D. in Musicology, Fribourg, 1971;
- Michael J. Eisenberg, "Keyboard Secunda Pratica in Transmission: The Copper-Engraved Toccata Publications of Girolamo Frescobaldi", Ph.D. in Musicology, City University of New York, in progress.
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Music affects us emotionally. Language could be unemotional but still the prosody of language sounds emotional. How do language and music interact in cognition? What are the differences and similarities between emotions in music and language?
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In language there are words, but more general are symbols.
A symbol can reference something other. Musical elements
can also be used as symbols: notes, chords, intervals, duration
of notes, courses of notes within a chord. Like in language,
there can be recursion. The difference between music and
language is: symbols defined by music don't have an a priori
meaning. With a few exceptions, that major stands for joy,
minor for sadness, the tritonus for something bad. But in
most cases the symbols in a piece of music are devoid of
a fixed meaning, It might be possible that during a composition
the listener acquires a list of mappings between musical
symbols and a meaning, and that such a meaning is
contained in the composition itself, and that he gets
joy from such discoveries (only my humble opionion).
Literature:
Regards,
Joachim