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Cognition Disorders - Science topic

Cognition Disorders are disturbances in the mental process related to thinking, reasoning, and judgment.
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Intruction-based learning refers to the ability to learn from the instruction rapidly. Many recent studies have investigated the neural mechanisms of this fundemental processes. Currently, we are interested in doing a systmatic review on this topic. Please leave your email address if you are interested.
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Please have look on our(Eminent Biosciences (EMBS)) collaborations.. and let me know if interested to associate with us
Our recent publications In collaborations with industries and academia in India and world wide.
EMBS publication In association with Universidad Tecnológica Metropolitana, Santiago, Chile. Publication Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33397265/
EMBS publication In association with Moscow State University , Russia. Publication Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32967475/
EMBS publication In association with Icahn Institute of Genomics and Multiscale Biology,, Mount Sinai Health System, Manhattan, NY, USA. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29199918
EMBS publication In association with University of Missouri, St. Louis, MO, USA. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30457050
EMBS publication In association with Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, USA. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27852211
EMBS publication In association with ICMR- NIN(National Institute of Nutrition), Hyderabad Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23030611
EMBS publication In association with University of Minnesota Duluth, Duluth MN 55811 USA. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27852211
EMBS publication In association with University of Yaounde I, PO Box 812, Yaoundé, Cameroon. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30950335
EMBS publication In association with Federal University of Paraíba, João Pessoa, PB, Brazil. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30693065
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and University of Yaoundé I, Yaoundé, Cameroon. Publication Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31210847/
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, 48080, Leioa, Spain. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27852204
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Publication Link: http://www.eurekaselect.com/135585
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and NIPER , Hyderabad, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29053759
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Alagappa University, Tamil Nadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30950335
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Hyderabad , India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28472910
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and C.S.I.R – CRISAT, Karaikudi, Tamil Nadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30237676
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Karpagam academy of higher education, Eachinary, Coimbatore , Tamil Nadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30237672
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Ballets Olaeta Kalea, 4, 48014 Bilbao, Bizkaia, Spain. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29199918
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Hospital for Genetic Diseases, Osmania University, Hyderabad - 500 016, Telangana, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28472910
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and School of Ocean Science and Technology, Kerala University of Fisheries and Ocean Studies, Panangad-682 506, Cochin, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27964704
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and CODEWEL Nireekshana-ACET, Hyderabad, Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26770024
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Bharathiyar University, Coimbatore-641046, Tamilnadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27919211
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and LPU University, Phagwara, Punjab, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31030499
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Department of Bioinformatics, Kerala University, Kerala. Publication Link: http://www.eurekaselect.com/135585
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Gandhi Medical College and Osmania Medical College, Hyderabad 500 038, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27450915
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and National College (Affiliated to Bharathidasan University), Tiruchirapalli, 620 001 Tamil Nadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27266485
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and University of Calicut - 673635, Kerala, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23030611
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and NIPER, Hyderabad, India. ) Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29053759
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and King George's Medical University, (Erstwhile C.S.M. Medical University), Lucknow-226 003, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25579575
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and School of Chemical & Biotechnology, SASTRA University, Thanjavur, India Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25579569
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Safi center for scientific research, Malappuram, Kerala, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30237672
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Dept of Genetics, Osmania University, Hyderabad Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25248957
EMBS publication In association with Institute of Genetics and Hospital for Genetic Diseases, Osmania University, Hyderabad Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26229292
Sincerely,
Dr. Anuraj Nayarisseri
Principal Scientist & Director,
Eminent Biosciences.
Mob :+91 97522 95342
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I think most scholars would agree that effectuation theory formulated by sarasvathy (2001) is still not a mature theory but when do you think it will reach its maturity? How would you compare the development of effectuation theory vs the development of bricolage?
I have co-authored a few articles into the subject: See below.
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firms’ decision-making logics & entrepreneurial resourcing behaviors combine to create value. We have to conduct a qualitative comparative analysis investigating configurations of effectuation, causation, & bricolage that are associated with firm performance. We have to consider firm size & development stage as contextual factors that differentiate the effectiveness of ways in which firms combine effectuation, causation, and bricolage.
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The big five personality trait model ( McCrae & Costa) describes 5 bipolar dimensions of personality. The model received some criticism but is still generally accepted and perhaps it is the only descriptive model of personality that is "widely" accepted. What do you think are the strengths and weaknesses of this model? Is it complete or not? If not, what is missing?
Best wishes Henrik
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Dear Dr.Samah Zahran,
Please, add money to your greatest assessment for personality perspective..
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I have encountered people who, when confronted with a counterexample to a general claim, will respond with another example that is consistent with the general claim, as if this somehow refutes the counterexample. Is there a name for this fallacy?
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Denis Korneev Well, there's "modus morons" 🤔, but that's just another name for affirming the consequent.
Cheers. 🤡
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How can neuroscience/neuroimaging data help to add advantage/disadvantage over behavioural data in decision making/cognitive science?
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Dear Researchers,
I'm looking for neuroscience article on different type of emotion and how they influence our daily routines behaviours. I'm looking for type of emotion, feeling/affect and causes
Any sugegstion would be much appreciated
Thanks
Angok
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Dear Angok.
Neuroscintist Antonio Damasio has written a lot about emotions and fellings and their influence on one's behavior. You can proffit a lot from reading him.
As I see it, emotions are, say, the energizer of one's behavior.
Best regards,
Olando
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We are intended to plan a project on POCD in cardiac surgical patients. Do you know any groups or are you involved in similar projects? Our center is a cardiac hospital with around 4000 patients annually most of which are coronary artery surgeries.
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My program is experiencing an influx of re-referrals. Our assessments are showing that their cognitive levels have dropped to levels seen prior to beginning the first round of treatment. Has anyone else experienced this? 
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Thank you for your input. That was a very thoughtful and well articulated response. I am actually specifically asking about cognitive remediation therapy, not cognitive restructuring or cognitive behavioral therapy.
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Hi all,
I am seeking for a good rat model to asset memory deficit by using an other compound or drug.  
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also if the aim is to use this model to look for memory enhancing drugs as an alternative you could use natural forgetting. I did this by varying the time delay in a memory task to identify memory-enhancing compounds. Ask me if you want a copy of my paper.
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Cognition of memory is impaired as a result of a stroke but cognition of attention is not impaired.
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What is twisted in the patient situation is the fact the Broca area seems to be impaired by the stroke but he is able to understand his situation and the words are in his mind but he cannot pronounce them. Further interviews with the patient after 4 weeks work unveil he knew the words but he could not say them and he forgets about how to pronounce while he could read. He completely recovers the speech ability but he could not distinguish which language  he is talking mixing up Russian, Turkish, and English as he speaks. He becomes also aggressive while speaking since he cannot express as before what he means.  Why?
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Is there any other questionnaire than self-rating of memory function (ADCS) to capture the subjective memory decline?
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Thanks for your ideas!
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We are going to do improvement of cancer chemotherapy drugs-induced cognitive impairment and peripheral neuropathy via inhibition of neuroinflammation and oxidative stress by using natural compound. We will use paclitaxel as a chemo drug. We are searching for doses of paclitaxel in rat which is related to human.Thank you.
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আমার পক্ষে এক্কেবারেই অসম্ভব ব্যাপার...দুঃখিত ভাই...!!
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I am particularly interested in the psychological aspects of reorganization of language-cognitive functions in acquired aphasia, and studying this in the Vygotskian (L.S. Vygotsky) and Lurian (A.R. Luria) frame of reference. In aphasiology very few relate their work and understanding of learning to L.S. Vygotsky's psychological theories and interpretation of learning.
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Thank you dr. Kulchinsky, very much for your kind contribution. The speed of the development of neuropsysiological/neuropsychological understanding of recovery in aphasia is absolutely fascinating.  These references certainly add aspects to the scope of my stydy, which is the application of Vygotskian (L.S. Vygotsky) and Lurian (A.R. Luria) psychological interpretation of learning (also A.N. Leontjev & P. Galperin) and relearning as reorganization of  the psychological functional systems (and functional systems of the brain) in what I call developmental and systemic (language-cognitive) rehabilitation (DSR) of aphasia.  To my understanding the references you gave actually support my ideas.  
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I am planning to conduct a research study using different devices or toys in order to decrease agitation in hospitalized patients with Alzheimer's disease in order to prevent delirium.
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Encourage family members to stay with patient 24/7 while in hospital.to provide comfort, prevent falls, and to avoid unnecessary/harmful pharmacologic restraints (sedatives/hypnotics to control behavior and "agitation").
Get patient out of hospital as quickly as feasible.
Avoid hospitalization in the first place if possible.
NICHE (Nurses Improving Care for Healthsystem Elders) program
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"Socio-demographic factors" may in fact be genetic for two reasons. 1) Social status is largely transmitted within a family, and familial transmission is in part an environnemental sensu lato, in part genetic. 2) Geographical origin, particularly in Southern Italy, is noted as a "socio-demographic factor"; it may, in fact, act  through a genetic founder effect, and the origin in Calabria of the largest documented Alzheimer kindred not be a coincidence (BRUNI A.C, MONTESI M.P., SALMON D., GEI G., PERRE J., EL HACHIMI K.H., FONCIN J.-F. : Alzheimer's disease: a model from the quantitative study of a large kindred. J. Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology 1992 5 126-131).
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Migration is a particularly interesting example where dissection of the genetic and environmental contributions should be possible. In my field, rates of schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders are known to be raised amongst certain migrant groups and their descendants living in Western Europe (and elsewhere). In the UK, the largest relative risks are found amongst people of black Caribbean and black African origin, beginning in first generation migrants, largely from the Caribbean and sub-Saharan Africa in the 1960s. Elevated risk persists amongst UK-born children and grandchildren. We know this is not explained entirely by socio-economic status [1]. Further, rates of these psychotic disorder are not elevated amongst the Caribbean population in the Caribbean (they are in fact similar to the background incidence rate in the UK) [2-4] and rates do not appear to be elevated in these groups as a result of selection issues [5] (i.e. a tendency for people with genetic vulnerability to schizophrenia to be more likely to migrate). Therefore the experiences of migration and minority status suggest a particularly social origin to elevated risk, which might co-participate with genetic vulnerability. The findings on ethnic density (where neighbhourhood ethnic composition modify individual risk of schizophrenia amongst different ethnic groups i.e. [6] cannot readily be explained by genetic selection effects either. 
Hope this helps. 
References (B J Psych heavy - sorry! - just a coincidence)
1. Kirkbride et al. 2008. Br J Psych. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18700213
2. Mahy et al. 1999. Br J Psych. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=10621765
3. Bhugra et al. 1996. Br J Psych. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8932887
4. Hickling et al. 1995. Br J Psych. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7582668
5. Selten et al. 2002. Am J Psychiatry. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11925311
6. Kirkbride et al. Schiz Bull. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23236081
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I am interested in good questionnaire or rating scale of EF, which we could use for parents of children with special needs. Do you have any suggestions?
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Thanks a lot for your suggestions, Gal! I am considering now to include some other measures (beside parent report) - using teachers' reports would be a good solution to. The paper is really helpful.
Best,
Karin
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early detection of dementia
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I guess it depends the type of test you are after and the type of dementia you want to detect:
1) If you want a biomarker, a PiB scan will tell you whether there is Abeta protein deposition in the brain. Another useful scan is FDG-PET which will provide you a map of brain regions that are metabolically hypoactive. Another biomarker (but not as reliable) is CSF and looking at ratios of different proteins (e.g. tau/phospho tau; Abeta42/Abeta40).
2) If you are after a clinical/bedsite test, MoCA is good. An alternative is the ACE (Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination). It is a broad screening instrument that can be administered in ~15 min and cover the main cognitive domains (attention, memory, language, visuoperceptual, executive). It is scored out of 100, with normal scores being 88 and above. It is sensitive to presence of cognitive deficits and has also good specificity in differentiating Alzheimer's disease from frontotemporal dementia.  
Details on the ACE, which is in its third iteration, can be found at http://www.neura.edu.au/frontier/research/test-downloads/. There is also now an app available for the ACE, which is freely available (http://www.acemobile.org)
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How maternal stressful condition affects offspring's cognitive ability and behavior alteration? and what is the molecular mechanism involving this cognitive impairment?
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There is quite a bit of literature out regarding the methylation processes of epigenetic changes. Offspring from stressed parental conditions (not necessarily maternal), are more likely to express negative heritable traits than offspring in normative conditions. The proteins gained or lost via methylation causes the expression or non-expression of heritable traits. Identifying whether you are inquiring about offspring in utero may lead to different conclusions.
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To my knowledge the mini-mental state examination (MMSE) is most commonly administered within memory clinics. Could anyone tell me who also administers this measure (or similar general measures) in their area please? For instance, I am interested in knowing if anyone is aware of other professionals who ‘screen’ patients in primary care prior to referral to a memory team.
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Hi Amy
Our GP practice is using their own version of the MMSE and screening people over the age of 60 years. They are using a Phlebotomist who has received specific training to record the test and then the GP will review the results particularly if their is evidence of memory problems. They have chosen to do this because of the copyright issue. I am not aware of other GP practices that have done this. Good luck in your research.
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As part of an ongoing project with ICHOM to develop a global set of outcomes for people with dementia we are interested in hearing about disease specific registries and the outcomes that are used by these projects.
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There are registries for AD and related disorders. Some of them are as follows:
1. Alzheimer's Disease Registry from The Office for the Study of Aging (OSA) http://www.sph.sc.edu/osa/alzheimers_registry.html
2. The Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer’s Disease (CERAD) http://cerad.mc.duke.edu/
3. Alzheimer Prevention Registry (http://www.endalznow.org/)
4. St. Louis Alzheimer’s Association Research Registry (http://www.alz.org/stl/in_my_community_14848.asp)
5. Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer's Prevention (WRAP) (http://www.wai.wisc.edu/research/wrap.html)
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Need some helps with answering this question regarding Human Cognition. Thanks in advance!
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I do not understand the claims above that, concerning neurological disorders or medical (cognitive) injury, one has to have experimental evidence. On the contrary, the bulk of knowledge coming from neuropsychology in particular is *not* gathered through experimentation. Neuropsychologists and neurologists only occasionally performed randomized controlled trials. Perhaps today they do so more than in the early days - everybody wants to use the fancy scanner - but the major insights in that field have already been found in those early days, through careful observation and theoretical reflection by the neurologists-psychologists in question. For example, consider Broca's founding work on the neurological basis of the cortical system for language production. Read Oliver Sack's great books. It's all case studies, and particularly the paradigm of the double dissociation, that grounds neuropsychology, not experiments.
Experimentation, that is, randomly assigning subjects to a series of conditions (together the independent variable), the comparison of which on the behavior of the subjects (the dependent variable) should allow us to say something about the relation between the independent and dependent variable, is mostly used in cognitive psychology in the academic research tradition, with its rise starting in the 70's out of behaviorism. It is the part of psychology that has explicitly dedicated itself to being a 'science' in the fundamental, proper sense and in that sense it has always been somehow detached from the real world in which real people live. It compares itself to physics, and seeks the same kind of 'objectiveness'. The big problem of course is that physics is - or at least up and until quantum physics came around - is about things outside and independent of us. The experiment in the lab is a valid strategy there, where you are seeking to observe measure and understand things you cannot just assess and grasp with the naive, naked eye. So you need measurement machines and controlled conditions to get what you seek. Cognitive psychologists (and behaviorists before them) tried to make 'human beings' into the same kind of beings as atoms, molecules, rocks and steam engines. This perspective only works up to a certain extent. Yes we learned a lot that way. The Dutch neurologist F.C. Donders was among the first to substract response times of two tasks in order to find the amount of time it took for the brain to complete an assumed inner procedure (the procedure being activated by what was different between the two tasks). But I would certainly not put experimentation as the only valid method for getting an understanding of human cognition. First person accounts (careful analysis of your own experience) is another approach, ethnographical observation (what anthropologists do) is another. Then there's interviews, and the case study approach. Next, most of cognitive science is based on *computational modeling* - based on the idea that if you can design and build a machine that acts 'intelligently' (say, a Google Car that drives by itself) then perhaps you have understood something of how human beings do that same thing. Furthermore there is a long tradition of philosophy and from it we still learn new things about how people think, what thinking is, what experience is, what consciousness is, and so on. Doing philosophy can sometimes learn us more about human cognition than a lifetime of experimenting 'in the dark'. Finally I would like to mention Action research in which one actually *intervenes* into a person's cognitive practices, also a 'design' approach: for example one builds and providing a human user with a certain tool (say, a new App for your IPhone) and by gradually adapting that tool to this person's needs until it works as it should, one can learn a lot about what that cognition of that person is all about (if the tool works and helps that person, than apparently the tool 'couples' to a persons cognition and becomes part a person's extended cognitive network - and so we have learned specific things about how that network operates).
I think the experiment (especially in the lab, based on a physics paradigm that even physicists no longer believe in) is severely limited, overrated, and based on an impoverished account of what counts as 'scientific'.
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I am looking for publications that explore the Baddeley's hedonic detector, in working memory model. I find out just few papers.
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Renzo, thank you for your reply.
I tried it but I found just a few articles. I looking for publications outside of these database. 
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Very often patients of memory clinic complaints of misplacing things  or forgetting topic during conversation. Is it possible to infer whether it is due to impaired attention or working memory?
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thanks
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I am planning a secondary analysis study and am interested in large trials (more than 500 participants randomised) that would have recruited a typical Alzheimer's disease or dementia sample in a pragmatic setting.  
The intervention isn't important, but a range of clinical and patient or carer reported outcomes would be useful.
Those with data made available to researchers would be of particular interest.
Edit for more explanation:
With thanks to those who have answered already, my original question above was not very clear.
I am not looking for a specific intervention, I am interested more in understanding the trajectories of patient and carer reported outcomes in people with Alzheimer's disease.  Cohort studies are unlikely to be much help because of the large gap between assessments (and generally high attrition rates among people with dementia), and so secondary analysis of large pragmatic trials is likely to be my best option.
Hence I am looking for large trials, conducted ideally in the last ten years, with PROs assessed frequently and with data that could be made available to researchers.
I have looked at the Alzforum and other lists of trials, but there are thousands of trials reported and I thought someone might know something that would save me days of searching and trying to negotiate access to data.
Thanks again.
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CATIE is the largest one I knew. I added the link as follow:
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A Paradox?
It is well established that severely depressed patients have deficits in their autobiographical memory - their memories are 'overgeneral' and lacking in any detail.
Studies suggest that severely depressed patients tend to ruminate on memories of misfortunes in their lives. But if severely depressed people cannot remember the past in any great detail, how can they ruminate with any great detail on only their misfortunes?
Is the answer that rumination is more likely to be found in mild/moderate cases than in the more severe forms of depression?
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The problem seems to be that the working memory is unable to get rid of irrelevant negative information.
De Raedt, R. & Koster, E.H.W. (2010). Understanding vulnerability for
depression from a cognitive neuroscience perspective: a reappraisal of
attentional factors and a new conceptual framework.
Cognitive, Affectiveand Behavioural Neuroscience
, 10, 50-70
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It can be a link or simply name and title. Your help will key one. Thank you.
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Alexander,
I understand what you mean...I just think it is feasible if you choose an n people randomly than observe them without their knowledge. Make your own scale from 0 to 10 for example and see what you can find. Then you can compare your results with another researcher who does the same thing over the same n people. I will be very interested to see the results. I mean do not you think it is important to statistically measure how many pathological cases we are talking about. How many people are on the verge of deviance , how many are really deviant etc...
But you are right-I totally agree with you ..
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Great idea Ursula, thanks for bringing attention to this "partially forgotten" theory of memory.
Indeed, it is time to start testing this theory with wet lab stuff.
One key will be to get spatial resolution high enough in the brain structure to detect the waves and coincidences in action using electrophysiology.
What frequency would work best?
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Olivier,
Sorry for escaping into a parallel e-mail discussion! Now I'm back again on ResearchGate.
I had been confused by your last question! I did not understand why you need high resolution capability of the theta waves. Thank you for clarification!
As I told you, in my holographic hypothesis I don't need at all high temporal and/or spatial resolution for encoding information. For me, 'information' is not encoded in single cells, not even in small cell assemblies. In the holographic analogy 'information' is represented by a comprehensive pattern of waves and oscillations (w/o) distributed over the whole brain, especially distributed over more than one sensory system. 'Information' is reaching the brain as a 'concerted action' of a huge amount of w/o stemming from the outside world and reaching a variety of sensory systems (visual and auditory and/or olfactory and/or tactile, etc.); these w/o representing the 'information' will be recognized instantaneously AS A WHOLE by a comparably huge amount of neurons. This is the very moment where synchronous impact – high temporal correlation of several inputs – is required. Spatially, they are distributed over the whole brain. For me, 'Binding by Synchrony' is an event which takes place when 'informations' – represented by w/o – are entering the sensory systems. The w/o are bundled to 'informations' by synchrony, i.e., they are characterized and identified by synchronous arrival. To emphasize: w/o do not encode information, they ARE the information! The 'inner representation' of an outside world object is equivalent to the sum of all w/o reaching the brain from this and similar objects.
The holographic storage of the w/o reaching the brain from the outside world requires not only the participation of a variety of sensory systems, it always requires, in addition, the involvement of a variety of subcortical regions which we attribute to the EMOTIONS.
In the German text, I posted on ResearchGate, I made an attempt to explain my view. Unfortunately, I did not translate it up to now. Hopefully a can catch up soon.
Ursula
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We intend to conduct research related to the inflammatory theory of the genesis of mental disorders.
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Epilepsy impacts the performance of cognition, but nowadays there is no multicenter study about it.
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There are some projects going on. For instance, there are the NIH common data elements for epilepsy that were proposed a year or two ago. This is simply supposed to serve as a common core of tests that will allow for gathering data across studies.
There are also some larger collaborations. For example, in the US, we are about to start a multisite study looking at the affects of laser ablation that will be sponsored by Visualase, Inc.
I would also advocate for making sure that we don't get too fixed on a set battery of tests. A lot of my work is looking at functions that are not routinely assessed in epilepsy surgery settings, but are proving to be very detrimental when they occur. I think we are likely still missing a number of cognitive areas that could be important to cover and can learn a lot from examining the cognitive neuroscience literature on what targeted brain regions are supposed to be doing.
Daniel Drane, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Neurology and Pediatrics
Emory University School of Medicine
Affiliate Associate Professor of Neurology
University of Washington School of Medicine
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I want to assess attentional bias.
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Hi Soraya, this review article might be of some use: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02699930903205698#.Ut6LIpDFKSM
They go through various paradigms which are used to look at the role of emotion in attention, such as the emotional stroop task and visual search.
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The task would have to be one where headache severity would predict cognitive performance.
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I'm not an expert on chronic headaches, are those patients specifically worse on certain cognitive domains? I could imagine it to be a non-specific problem. If you're searching for an association with a cognitive measure you may need to find a task that results in enough variability. You could use the WAIS-IV Digit Symbol task, for instance. Performance on this measure can range from 0-133.
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I am interested in cognitive evaluation of the state of drowsiness by the tests that would least interfere with the state itself.
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Statistical predictions with "normal curve"
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It is said to be a 50 item based questionnaire that is very useful to profile social cognition. Could somebody share it or lead me to it?
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I'm afraid I do not have a copy but I would be very interested in also obtaining one!
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Is there a variable that is a common factor in determination of disability?
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I did not find any relationship between IQ and GAF in Schizophrenia patients
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Clinically, in chronic hepatitis C patients with cognitive impairment, what is the relative contribution of prior drug abuse, HIV, liver fibrosis, psychiatric morbidity (depression, sleep disorders) and/or fatigue?
Theoretically, viral infection of the brain has been evoked. But what is the impression of causality by the clinicians in the field?
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When looking at the litterature, some imaging studies (like the PET study of Heeren et al out of the Weissenborn group) combine HCV RNA pos with HCV RNA neg patients (both groups HCV Ab+) into one "HCV group". Is that justifiable? Some might say that given the fact that former HCV patients also seem to be impaired it's ok, and in the light of potential "occult HCV" in the CNS, but what's your take on this? Is it ok?
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I'm wondering some of the benefits and any relevant research conducted in the speech-language pathology field in rehabilitating patients with cognitive deficits
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It depends what kind of cognitive deficit is being targeted, and what population you're looking at. There's a great paper from Bergquist and colleagues in Brain Injury (2008, Vol. 22, iss. 11, p. 891-897) which documents the successful outcomes of an internet-based cognitive rehabilitation program for adults with TBI that might interest you, if you haven't seen it already. I've also read plenty of successful telehealth applications to aphasia therapy.
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Bipolar disorder, autism is correlated with both distractibilty and creativity
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I think that during bipolar manic state, due to racing thoughts and less top down control of thoughts the threshold for being distracted by many thoughts in the mind is lowered and the bipolar are able to see new relations and integration because they are automatically distracted. Some consider creativity as going the trains of thoughts away from the route that is possible when we are highly aroused and distractible. Its my opinion only. Any research related to this idea?