Science topic

Climate Change and Agriculture - Science topic

Explore the latest questions and answers in Climate Change and Agriculture, and find Climate Change and Agriculture experts.
Questions related to Climate Change and Agriculture
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
5 answers
We are looking a SSCI journal that do not need processing and publication charge to publish a a case study on perception , community vulnerability and adaptation measures to climate change. Your suggestions would be appreciated.
Thanks.
Relevant answer
Answer
I'm afraid things have changed. These journals are charging a lot now so it is hard to find one that is not. If anyone finds a climate journal not charging as of 2021 please list it.
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
9 answers
Especially for tropical and Islands agro-ecosystem
Relevant answer
Answer
The solution is to establish a "bank of genetic resources" and
  • Sperm bank
  • Ova bank
  • Biobank
  • Biological database
  • Germplasm
  • Seed bank
  • Plant genetic resources
View the countries' activities for the conservation of genetic resources through the link below:
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
27 answers
Climate change and agriculture are interrelated processes, both of which take place on a global scale. Climate change affects agriculture in a number of ways, including through changes in average temperatures, rainfall, and climate extremes (e.g., heat waves); changes in pests and diseases; changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide and ground-level ozone concentrations; changes in the nutritional quality of some foods;[1] and changes in sea level.[2]
Climate change is already affecting agriculture, with effects unevenly distributed across the world.[3]Future climate change will likely negatively affect crop production in low latitude countries, while effects in northern latitudes may be positive or negative.[3] Climate change will probably increase the risk of food insecurity for some vulnerable groups, such as the poor.[4] Animal agriculture is also responsible for CO2 greenhouse gas production and a percentage of the world's methane, and future land infertility, and the displacement of local species.
Relevant answer
Answer
The rise in temperature leads to an increase in the amount of water loss through Evaporation and transpiration. Therefore, greater quantities of water are needed for agricultural production, and higher temperatures lead to an increase in fungal and viral diseases and insect infestation.
I think that high temperatures are more dangerous than a reduced rainfall
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
5 answers
Hello everyone,
In my study I have found that due to climate change, the freshwater availability in the basin is declining which has put large parts of the basin under water stress conditions, thus water insecurity for the residents. Now I further need to assess the impact of decreasing freshwater availability on food security in the basin. I have the data of around 15 years regarding seasonal (kharif, Rabi and perennial crops) agricultural production in tonnes along with the area cultivated in hectares at sub-district level. Using these data, how can I quantify the impact of climate change on food production? I am specifically looking for particular index or indices which can be derived from the available data for aforesaid purpose.
Your suggestions and comments are really appreciated.
Thanks and regards!
Priyank Sharma
Relevant answer
Answer
Climate change affects both directly and indirectly
Direct by influencing the yield per unit area
Indirectly by affecting production costs due to, for example, a decrease in the water level of the river and thus requires more costs for transporting water and increasing the amount of water lost by evaporation and thus increasing the amount of water required for irrigation ... etc.
You can use the above parameters in the study
I ♥ hope my suggestion is useful to you
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
30 answers
What are the main impacts of climate change on agriculture ?
Relevant answer
Answer
First of all there are a lot of statements describing the effect of climate change on agriculture. Some of them were shown before and I will add an additional one: https://19january2017snapshot.epa.gov/climate-impacts/climate-impacts-agriculture-and-food-supply_.html
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
4 answers
Including growth performance,challenges that may appear, etc.
Relevant answer
Answer
For forest plantation probably may not good because need a long time to get revenue which is >=30 years compared to batai or acacia which only need less than 10 years to harvest. However, if for butter production might be faster to get revenue. It will be good if planted in mix plantations, where can also increase the biodiversity .
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
19 answers
is TKS helpful in combating CC
Relevant answer
Answer
There were many other factor which need more improvements to develop and increase agricultural impact. Global climate changes may be future challenge.
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
36 answers
Several articles have been written on climate change as threat to water resources and agriculture especially it impacts on crops yield. most of the articles concluded that climate varibility has impact on crop yield. How can this be proved beyond a reasonable doubt as factors responsible for low crop yeild also includes Soil condition, Crop varieties and Management practices. I will like more evidence on this matter.
Relevant answer
Answer
Maybe the effect of climate change is more on yield and quality variability than on mean yield. Models suggest our climate with global warming is having more extreme weather. The biggest issues are heat and drought but heavy storms are also a concern. Stability of yield is important particularly for subsistence farmers. To address the issues we must make changes in our systems and management tactics. In many areas winds flatten the banana and plantain crops such issues might be addressed by dwarf cultivars windrows to some extent. Many issues related to drought can be addressed by increasing soil organic matter which will also help counter act over enrichment of the atmosphere with greenhouse gases.
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
8 answers
Dear all, Greetings!
My next step is to linking climate change with agriculture in terms of strengthening SDGs.
Any suggestion, topics regarding this burning issues or beyond.
Thank you.
Relevant answer
Answer
Since I work in the field of agricultural sciences, one of the important thrusts in our field today is how to exploit the climate resilient features of existing germplasm of crops that we currently cultivate
one of the very ambitious project in this regard is exploiting the traits of CAM plants.
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
14 answers
Why there is need of extension strategy to overcome the effect of climate change...
Relevant answer
Answer
Innovation technology can be a strategy method to over come climate change on agriculture.
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
17 answers
Sustainable agriculture is a strategy to mitigate the impacts of climate change on agriculture and the impacts of agriculture on environment.
Relevant answer
Answer
Your question is very generalised and involves a great variety of issues. Please have a look at enclosed PDF...
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
5 answers
all journals which are good indexing please send it to me.
Title "climate change and agriculture a review paper ,
Thank you
Relevant answer
Answer
Please follow the below given ResearchGate link.
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
4 answers
There is a need of integrated assessment modelling for climate change impacts evaluation.
Intra-sector for agriculture (including rapid spatio-temporal changes in soil fertility, ground and surface water availability, cropping intensity hike for meeting food demand, rapid change in insects-pests dynamics).
Inter-sectoral (for agricultural impacts_- energy, health, socio-economic concerns, industrialization, atmospheric pollution, communication, etc.
Climate change on agriculture - well documented, mostly on point results & lack of regional validations
Existing Models deal with crop-weather interaction in solo, with boundary  conditions for other bio-physical and socio-economic aspects fixed, in most of the studies. 
Need to evolve IAM (Integrated assessment modelling) at this this stage
There should be some research group working on this aspect, or formation of a group to initiate these actions in near future
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
8 answers
what are good way to write because i am writting review paper not one single country but overall so please write in your way so that i can understand,
Limitations and Future Research Direction
The national level data might not depict the true picture of the impact of climate change on different agroecological zones. Therefore, to take the regional differences into account, region-specific studies should be conducted. We know that Pakistan is a diverse and rich land, and in this way the discrepancies would be removed, resulting in a balanced picture of the country.
If you have another limitations or future outcomes please add here
Thank you
Relevant answer
Answer
first of all there is not much change , its a man made variability, and if at all some country is facing change, then there are both drawbacks as well as positives
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
20 answers
Dear Researchers,
I would like to ask how I can related climate change with the vegetation cover change?
Change in vegetation cover is detected by RS & GIS tools using AVHRR GIMMS NDVI3g images.
Regards
Naveed
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Naveed,
To answer this question, one way is to start by asking the right questions. First of all, you must not assume the climate has changed by default, as has become the norm. This could be done by calculating the anomalies of important climatic indices such as humidity, rainfall, temperature, soil moisture in your specific study area etc. As an index of vegetation change, you could use the NDVI or related indices provided by NASA via its GIOVANNI data portal.
Now, since vegetation change may have a number of drivers related or unrelated to climate, depending on your study area and review of existing literature, identify all possible causal variables. Therefore, in addition to climatic indices, you need data on socio-economic indices (population change, land-use/land cover change, volume of timber trade),soil erosion etc.
After collecting your data on ensuring the quality, then proceed to the analysis stage. You could consider analytical techniques such as a combination correlation analysis, PCA analysis, Multiple regression analysis, causality analysis , or even advanced machine learning (data mining) techniques such as ANN.
By interpreting your results, you will ascertain whether change is driving vegetation change, and to what extent, or whether it is more of a combination of multiple complex inter-related factors.
Another point to note is that for any assessment of climate change in particular, your data must span at-least 60 years (two climatic data points).
I hope this helps, and good luck with your research.
Regards
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
7 answers
I want to start my PhD research on Climate change impact assessment and adaptation in public health in Nigeria.I would like to know methodology to use tofor this research. I need to ask how can a specific methodology helps in defining the frontiers of my research. Can someone share a Conceptual framework on similar kind of research? I hope I can improve my question after your kind responses
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
8 answers
HI everybody,
my question is OBJECTIVES(CLIMATE CHANGE AGRICULTURE PRODUTIVITY USING RS &GIS?
can you please suggests and gave some objectives so that I can know for work and some gaps if possible
Thank you
Relevant answer
Answer
Your comparison should go yearly then if u have all datasets perhaps u can also use ndvi against all parameters too. That should be interesting.
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
6 answers
The temperature is raising from year to year, the intensity and frequency of rainfall is diminishing. If the current trend continues, what will be expected towards food security after five years? And what solutions must be designed?
Relevant answer
Answer
Food science is one aspect to achieve food security, but its importance is often seen too high. The assumption that too little food is produced to feed everybody on the planet is incorrect. Actually enough food statistically is around, but not everybody has access to what is available. Food science can cause increase in the cost of food making it unaffordable for poor people. The Green Revolution is an example for this. High Yielding Varieties cost money, fertilizers, pesticides and other high costs for external inputs make agriculture costly. Still plant science can help to better adapt agriculture for exampple to a changing climate. One aspect that brings issues around food securty together is the sustanable livelihood apprach. The e xternal aspects of these approach includes seasonality of all sorts that can threaten people's livelihood security. Of course livelihood security is much broader than food security, but there are a lot of overlaps, especially in times of climate change..... Crucial is to keep the basis of food production is good shape. Envrionmental degaradation is very dangerous from such perspective. Second is the distribution / access to food, which is to remove poverty. To better understand what is needed one needs to be aware of the different facets of food security. Food security is a situation that exists when all people, at all times, have physical, social and economic access to sufficient, safe and nutritious food that meets their dietary needs and food preferences for an active and healthy life This is how the FAO defines food security. It combines food production, distribution and consumption, looks into cultural and individual food preferences and also at quality aspects of food both from a nutrition perspective as well as from the perspective of food safety. Climate / environmental changes can have impacts on all these aspects, on food production, food distribution / access and food consumption. Food production and climate change all food crops have their optimum what climatetic conditons such as temperature, rainfall, etc are concerned. Especially extremes (too cold, too hot, too wet, too dry) can have devasting impacts. Some plants can tolerate a wide range of conditions, while other plants are rather little flexible to adapt to changing climatic conditons. In addition natural hazards (floods, cyclones, droughts) can have devasting impacts destroying crops in the fields. This all does not mean that only negative impacts are from climate change to agriculture. E.G. the temperate zones towards the poles will have warmer climates allowing longer vegetation periods, longer for crops like wheat. The impacts thus have to be established in regional or even sub-regional dimensions. Access to food and climate change this addresses in particular the changes of food prices as a result of climate change. Here in particular countries are effected that already now import big parts of their food requirements, like Kiribati, Tuvalu and other atoll states. Already today food imports make much of their imports and have very negative impacts on their BoP situation. On the micro-level afford rising food prices. They have to change to cheaper foods, often of lesser quality. McCarthy, J. F., & Obidzinski, K. (2017). Framing the food poverty question: Policy choices and livelihood consequences in Indonesia. Journal of Rural Studies, 54, 344-354. Cramer, L., Huyer, S., Lavado, A., Loboguerrero, A. M., Martínez Barón, D., Nyasimi, M., ... & van Wijk, M. (2017). Methods Proposed to Evaluate the Potential Impact of Climate Change on Food and Nutrition Security in Central America and the Dominican Republic. Moragues-Faus, A., Sonnino, R., & Marsden, T. (2017). Exploring European food system vulnerabilities: Towards integrated food security governance. Environmental Science & Policy, 75, 184-215. Chandra, A., McNamara, K. E., Dargusch, P., Caspe, A. M., & Dalabajan, D. (2017). Gendered vulnerabilities of smallholder farmers to climate change in conflict-prone areas: A case study from Mindanao, Philippines. Journal of Rural Studies, 50, 45-59.
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
3 answers
Osallistu joukkoistamiseen täällä: www.opal.fi/joukkoistaminen
Kestävässä tehostamisessa pellonkäyttöä optimoidaan kohdentamalla tuotantopanokset oikein: tarvittaessa lisäämällä niitä korkeatuottoisilla lohkoilla ja taas vähentämällä heikkovasteisilla lohkoilla.
Ympäristöllisesti, taloudellisesti ja sosiaalisesti kestävällä tuotannon tehostamisella on mahdollista pienentää satokuiluja hyvätuottoisilla pelloilla ja laajaperäistää huonommin tuottavat tai kaukaisemmat pellot esimerkiksi viherlannoitusnurmiksi, reuna-alueiksi, luonnonhoitopelloiksi tai riistapelloiksi. Näillä toimilla voidaan saavuttaa mm. ilmastohyötyjä, kun voimakkaasti muokattavan peltoalan osuus vähenee ja ympärivuotisen kasvillisuuden osuus kasvaa. Nämä muutokset tukevat myös monimuotoisuuden ylläpitoa maataloussektorilla.
Lue lisää: www.opal.fi/hanke
Katso videot kestävästä tehostamisesta: http://bit.ly/2wEdLwe
Relevant answer
Answer
Will you please send English translation
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
47 answers
Agricultural productivity is undoubtedly being affected by global warming and climate change. The rise in carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, associated temperature rise and rainfall have physiological effects on plant/crop growth and yield. One cannot consider single factor's effect on productivity. The interactive effects of carbondioxide enrichment, temperature rise, rainfall, soil nutrients are very complex and hard to simulate and anticipate the impacts. Again it varies from rabi to kharif, C3 to C4 plants, tropical to temperate, region to region, soil to soil, and many others. Further there are direct and indirect impacts. The issue gets more complex while considering the indirect effects of varied soil quality/nutrient status, decomsotion/mineralization, evapouration, salinization/alkalization along with the incidence and intensity of pests and pathogens which find the changing climate regime favourable for them. Coastal areas will face double jeopardy. Salt water intrusion may pose the conventional crop production before a big question! Freshwater sources will also be affected. Salinization Naturally, to ensure food security a reality the climate resilient adaptation strategies needs to be holistic and integrative in nature  taking due consideration of all of the above issues.  
Please participate in this very significant and thought-provoking brainstorming event on RG platform and contribute with your thoughts, information and knowledge, which is the ultimate resource to tackle the impending crisis.
Relevant answer
Answer
The question is far to complex to answer generally. An answer needs to specify the location, the kind of crops, and a lot more. CC is not always a challenge, at times increasing CO2 and temperatures can even improve conditions for crop growth. There has been plenty of research done on this. Also plenty of publications that provide overviews and syntheses (e.g. the IPCC reports, which direct also to relevant research).
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
7 answers
This year the "Kanikonna" - scientific name "Cassia fistula" has blossomed so early unlike in normal years as like in the month of April, Vishu Festival which is the beginning of Kerala New Year.  The traditional knowledge of indigenous people says that it is connected to the incoming drought or wet situation that may occur but this say is  without any scientific basis., I wish to get some information from those who have done any similarity studies on this aspect..
Relevant answer
Answer
 Dear
in your observed tree it may be a falling fruit (fruit senescence),  because some species retain fruiting still the next flowering season sets OR - It depends on frequency of rainfall pattern and temperature, you must have data of leafing, flowering and fruiting, it may be because of intermittent rainfall, some species respond to leaf and flower bud but they may fail to set  fruiting due (lack of pollinator) 
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
9 answers
I know that this represent a big problem to global warming because is a cycle, as this contribute to the high temperatures of planet and in the same time these bubbles are a consequence of the high temperatures that cause the thawing of the poles that allowing the outflow of methane of the subsoil. 
Relevant answer
Answer
There is some evidence that the release of methane from gas hydrates had a significant impact on the end of the ice age - Think of how much heat is required to melt ice hundreds of meters thick, causing the face to melt back in the order of a km per year.  The transition between 'cold' and 'warm' shows up in the glacial record as occurring faster than the resolution of the cores (about a decade at 300,000 years back).  Nothing could be done to prevent that then, and in the absence of a cheap, clean, and simple energy source, nothing really can be done now to prevent this from occurring.  The ride is going to be pretty bumpy...  
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
16 answers
do weather forecast influence farmers decision making on crop management?
Relevant answer
Answer
There is strong relationship. Increasing Agricultural Productivity and Resilience Through Effective Dissemination of Agro-weather Advisory Services is followed in many countries.
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
4 answers
I am building an agent-based model of the international cotton market looking at labor requirements and the impact of climate change. Any resources on the environmental factors that most impact yield or on the labor inputs required for cotton harvest would be really helpful. 
Relevant answer
Answer
Respected sir my own research was on the impact of weather on cotton,you can see the published paper in my profile.
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
5 answers
How do seasons and climate change affect sugarcane crops?
Relevant answer
Answer
Mulching can be used to reduce evaporation losses
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
557 answers
Climate change is a global phenomenon , and is taking place ever since , earth came into existence . There are well marked cold and hot cycles in the history of earths climate. However , these changes have been observed more rapid in the last 100 years or so. Looking at the definition of soil,  climate is the most pre-dominant  factor  responsible for changes in  developmental process of soil . Resultantly , soil physico-chemical as well as biological properties are the consequential changes of climate change. Such changes offer much bigger challenge for better soil fertility management vis-a-vis sustained crop production . In this background , i propose following questions to our learned colleagues to please throw some lights , so that the subject could be better understood with regard to soil fertility management : 
*What are the components , shall we consider while dealing with climate smart soil fertility management ?
*Which nutrients are more vulnerable to climate change related issues?
*Do you feel, we need to devise  newer strategies of soil test -based fertilizer recommendation?
*Do you feel, we need to revisit our long pending crop-based recommended doses of fertilizers ( RDF).
*How shall we address the changing dynamics of nutrients in relation to climate change?
*How shall we bring periodical changes in land use in view of climate change  related issues?
* What is the ultimate strategy of soil fertility management vis-a-vis climate change ?
Thanks and Regards 
Relevant answer
Answer
Thank you, Dr. Srivastava, for choosing this important subject for discussion in this forum. Recently I reviewed the trend of climate change and its impact on soil C and N availability to crop plants. I would like to share with you the salient findings.
(1). There is now unequivocal evidence that the earth’s surface has warmed during the past 100 years, which is mainly attributed to the anthropogenic activity. An analysis of surface air temperatures over India showed that the annual average surface temperatures have increased over the years with a trend of 0.56 °C/100 years, which is close to the global warming trend. These warming trends of surface temperature also may have an impact on carbon and nitrogen stocks of the soils.
(2). The climate model projections based on IPCC AR5 CMIP5 models (Chaturvedi et al. 2012) reveal that surface air temperatures including night time temperatures are expected to increase further. The all-India rainfall and extreme rainfall events are also expected to increase in future. Under the business-as-usual scenario, mean warming over India is likely to be in the range of 1.7-2.0 °C by 2030s and 3.3-4.8 °C by 2080s relative to pre-industrial times. Likewise, all-India precipitation is projected to increase by 4-5% by 2030s and by 6-14% by 2080s compared to the 1961-1990 baseline. There is consistent positive trend in frequency of extreme precipitation days (more than 40 mm d-1) for decades 2060s and beyond. 
(3). Studies on climate change impact on soils of the US Great Plains (Follett et al. 2012) show that soil C and N stocks are strongly negatively related to mean annual temperature and positively related to the ratio of mean annual precipitation to potential evapotranspiration, suggesting that they are equally vulnerable to increased temperature and decreasing water availability. Based on these empirical relationships, a 1 °C increase in mean annual temperature could cause a loss of 1900 kg soil organic C and 180 kg soil organic N ha-1 from the top 10 cm of soil over 30 years, but the decrease will be mediated by water availability.
(4). In the context of climate change, soil management practices must constrain the loss of SOM and decrease the vulnerability of soil organic C and N stock to loss. Management practices that minimize soil erosion and reduce evapo-transpiration may help offset C and N loss from the soils. The response of N dynamics to climate manipulation at the ecosystem scale is difficult to predict because of the complexity of plant-soil interactions.
(5). A medium-term field scale study into effects of simulated climate change on soil N mineralization was conducted in a calcareous grassland in southern England (Jamieson et al. 1998). The experiment utilized soil warming cables, automatic rain-shelters and a watering system to examine two climate change scenarios: warmer winters with summer drought, and warmer winters with enhanced summer rainfall. Results from control plots showed a strong seasonality of mineralization with highest rates in autumn and winter and lowest rates in summer. Water availability is the main constraint on microbial processes and plant growth. Unexpectedly, additional summer rainfall had no direct effect on N mineralization at the time of application (summer). The treatment did, however, significantly (~0.05%) reduce rates in subsequent autumn and winter months. In contrast, summer drought significantly increased N mineralization rates in autumn and winter. Winter warming similarly had no direct effect on N mineralization in winter but decreased rates in spring. The observed treatment effects resulted from changes in organic C and N input, in plant litter, resulting from the direct impact of climatic manipulation on perennial plant growth, death and senescence.
We also need clear understanding of climate change impacts on availability of P, K, S, Zn and other micronutrients in soils.
With the help of such information, we'll be able to formulate climate-smart strategy for soil fertility management.
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
8 answers
After analyzing the way scientists calculate the average earth temperature change (summing anomalies to daily 'normal' temperature, averaged over 30 yrs), and after hearing that every year during the last decade or so the earth temperature increase is breaking the record set the year before, it came to my mind that we may be witnessing not a continuously warming trend but something else.
As farmers, we have noticed that the growing season is slowly shifting, even in the tropics where we live. That may be more discernible in temperate zones. Let's say, the day January 1st will start a decimal of a degree warmer in 2017 than that of 2016. Assume that is not a warming, but simply an offset in the calendar-date (say, the temperature pattern that corresponded to January 2nd). The usual 30-yr averaged temperature of that day would not absorb such a shifting in temperature and we would treat Jan 1, 2017 as a positive anomaly. If this shift continues from then on, we would gather positive anomalies daily, easily breaking the 'temperature increase' record the year before. This may happen not necessarily because of a warming, but because the yearly temperature pattern has a minor offset with the calendar year.
If you observe this 'temperature increase' at one geographic point, it is easier to compare it with other evidence and discard such false alarms, but when you sum this up globally, we have no other way to verify it. I am sure somebody must have thought about this before, but I could not find a reference to it in usual places. Hope I stated the problem sufficiently clear, so that those of you who work on this issue on a daily basis could indicate if there is an error in this argument.
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Mr.Kashyapa, your reasoning is understood. Calendar has no role to mislead temperature, for a day, month or year, it is monitored in decade, century and thousand years like this and can not be easily sensed in a year or two. From this observation, it is clarified that ambient temperature is rising over the previous decades and centuries. Melting of glaciers on last few years at Antarctic regions and rise of sea level are clear indications of global warming. We may be staying in comfort air conditioned rooms and temperature rise may not be felt, but it is a fact that ambient temperature is on rise.
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
12 answers
Past studies have commonly taken five years duration. For example how many times were you affected by drought during 2010-2015. I would appropriate your views on this.   
Relevant answer
Answer
Dr. Jack,
You can visit website of Ministry of Environment, Bangladesh. The other point is the chapter that I have provided you is based on our project activities, Funded by Norway. Three organizations were involved: BIOFORSK of Norway, BRRI and CEGIS of Bangladesh. The book was edited by J. C. Biswas and M Maniruzzaman. I will try to give you certain references- pls not now.
Regards
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
12 answers
Dear Fellow researchers,
Climate change is perhaps one of the major challenges facing the world today. I am interested in studying adaptation to climate change and estimating resilience in the context of dry land agriculture. 
I would want to get more insights on the following:
1] Plausible econometric methods of measuring adaptation to climate change
2] Econometric modelling of resilience
3] Linking adaptation and resilience to poverty
Kindly provide me with empirical literature if you can. Thanks in advance.
Kind regards,
Dennis Olila 
Relevant answer
Answer
 hi 
 I think it's beginning to be choosing the title and choose the research problem and the situation of study and hypothesis to serve the orientations of research with the adoption of the style of strategic analysis Good luck to you
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
17 answers
What are climate change variables?
What variables bear direct economic effect (whether positive or negative) to agriculture?
What principle could be adopted to measure or actually quantify the effects of these variables on agriculture?
What staitical tool or regression model could be adopted?
I really want to know if the effects of these variables have been measured or can be measured
Please any help, file attachment or webpage redirection will be well appreciated
Relevant answer
Answer
What are climate change variables?
Basically they are variables or elements that partly or wholly describes  characteristics of the climate
What variables bear direct economic effect (whether positive or negative) to agriculture?
Temperature, rainfall, humidity, sunshine hours, solar radiations, water vapour etc
What staitical tool or regression model could be adopted?
The Ricardian based model
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
10 answers
  1. Citrus water requirements may vary as it is grown in tropics as well as on sub tropics. What should be the criteria to estimate the water need of the citrus cultivars like mandarin sweet orange and lime groups ?
  2. Kindly give the precise methods of estimation in climate change situations. 
Relevant answer
Answer
Nice question Dr Shirgure . What are the basic principles of computing water requirement . What kind of paradigm shifts while computing the water requirement , have taken place , I am more willing to see.  The methods which look into the intrinsic soil properties to dictate the water requirement of crop like citrus, probably hold more promise in years to come.    
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
5 answers
I'm working on 'impact of Climate Change on Agricultural Productivity in Ahmednagar District, Maharashtra'  therefore I need help.
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Sandip,
What type of analysis in agro- climate are you interested in?
I have done a small part of study in agro-climate.
what data of climate and agricultural productivity of ahmednagar are you having? which analytical techniques you have in your mind?
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
9 answers
Effects of climate change are evident now on all walks of life. How it will affect the soil salinity and ground/surface water quality in Indian condition. Your frank opinion is invited. 
Relevant answer
Answer
For irrigated agriculture there was no correlation between soil salinity and climatic variables while the changing environment had changed groundwater quality and depth. I had found a relationship between soil salinity in irrigated area, irrigation water quality and Leaching Fraction (LF). Then I was able to predict the future trend of soil salinity with changing irrigation water quality and under some scenarios for LF.
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
19 answers
Relevant answer
Answer
It is indeed silly, but if we were to stop treating water, it would solve the "problem" of the large human population and this might indirectly end the anthropogenic release of greenhouse gasses.
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
18 answers
It puzzles my mind very much. I have observed sudden stimulus to growth of ornamental plants after receiving the rain water. Although crop growth is also improved to some extent but similar effect is not visible on it.
Relevant answer
Answer
In general I agree with the views of Drs Ghafoor and Hepperly. Among  several reasons I believe nutrients in rain water could be responsible for the observation. Also it appears  that the nutrient requirement for unit dry matter production is low for ornamental plants compared to some cereal crops .So the response is quick and remarkable in ornamental plants.I compliment Dr.Singh for interesting observation.
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
3 answers
I am using DSSAT v 4.6 to study the impact of climate change and agromanagement practice on water footprint of rice production in an irrigation project. So, during the calibration of DSSAT, I need to calculate the genetic coefficient, how can it be done?
Relevant answer
Answer
DSSAT is a versatile model, used extensively by the global community, genetic coefficients differs from cultivar to cultivar, due to differential phenology, plant processes behaviour, source-sink relations, water & nutrients uptake  and final growth and yield of crops. You definitely have to gather information from already conducted trials for pheno-phases (duration), growth and yield or yoy need to conduct experiments (preferably multi-locational) and thereafter run GLUE for getting the coefficients.
You can also search literature for the specific cultivar, may be some researchers have already generated them which you can check for your condition and thereafter use in running the model
regards 
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
7 answers
If so, do they need government intervention or merely to rely on their own means?
Relevant answer
Answer
Actually, small resource- poor farmers should diversify their livelihoods and both governmental and public sectors should be involved through the participatory approach.    
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
1 answer
Millipedes are known not to be pests of crops but recently there have been cases of potatoes being attacked by millipedes in both Kenya and Uganda. What could be the cause, is it climate change?
Relevant answer
Answer
Hello Oliver,
I see that your question has remained unanswered for almost 2 years. Have you found some answers since then? Personally, I am not an expert on millipedes, but I know that some species are crop pests. However, they are among the neglected ones, which may explain why nobody at ResearchGate could give you an answer. I know one other country in Africa where they are considered a serious pest. That is Cape Verde. There too, they attack various tuber crops, like potatoes and carrots. I can't tell why they have only recently been reported in Kenya and Uganda. Either people woke up to them or certain changes, like climate change, have caused them to become a bigger nuisance.
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
17 answers
Does anyone know what's the general framework to analyzing the impact of climate change on agriculture? I want to do a research on this topic ad need to know the steps I should consider in my research.
I appreciate your kind answers in advance.
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Roozbech,
You have got some excellent advice already. The essence in these studies is to understand the context in which you are operating. The impacts of climate change, or for that matter any external influence on the production system, will be determined by the operating context that will influence the flexibility one has to adapt to the changes in ways that minimise potential impacts.
The exposure, vulnerability and potential impacts framework has therefore been used widely. Understanding the scale relevant to your work can make a big difference in the ultimate use of your findings.
Kind regards
Thilak
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
65 answers
In my opinion, not all the adaptations are a response to climate change. For example, late sowing, attributed always as a response to changing climate, may be, most of the time, an outcome of crop intensification. When we are cropping multiple crops the sowing of these crops may shift early or late which actually is not a response to climate change. Similar to this, what other adaptation you think are not a response to climate change
Relevant answer
Answer
1998 is loved by the denier community. Although that community is vanishingly small, funny how one always pops up whenever climate change is discussed.
I live in a part of the world where seasonal weather variations (and hence agricultural production) are strongly affected by El Nino/La Nina (aka ENSO - El Nino Southern Oscillation). People may argue about temperature variations until the cows come home but one thing that is much less arguable is rainfall statistics. Basic meteorology: when it's wet it's warm, when it's dry it's cooler. The status of ENSO is in turn strongly influenced by the state of the North Pacific Interdecadal Oscillation (IPO) which is basically due to warm water sloshing backwards and forwards across the North Pacific over decadal time scales. Interdecadal rainfall and river flow data in New Zealand match IPO swings quite nicely but in the North Pacific it's much more pronounced. In its current state (since about 2000) the warm water has spent most of its time on the western side, hence we see floods in China, nasty typhoons to the south and droughts in California. This probably also accounts for the observed small decline in average land temperatures in North America, likely due to reduced cloud cover at night. Once the IPO flicks back (sometime in the next 5 - 15 years) watch out - droughts in China are likely to significantly compromise crop production and large quantities of California wash into the sea (in between the heat waves). The role of climate change in all this? Warming ocean temperatures intensify the effect. The arctic is isolated from the IPO by circumpolar winds and being virtually surrounded by land, hence steady ocean warming continues to further reduce sea ice and the Greenland ice cap year after year.
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
8 answers
What methodology should be used for measuring the impact of climate change on the agriculture productivity and what variables should be included,  particularly with reference to crop and vegetables. 
Multiple regression or logistic regression will be sufficient to measure it or otherwise any other models will be used? 
Relevant answer
Answer
I sense you have continuous dependent variables, in which case multiple regression would be more appropriate. May be good if you say a bit more about the measurement of your variables. 
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
12 answers
Land conflict effects land use (and deforestation in Brazil).  Can anyone give me good examples of places where contention between groups (e.g., mechanized interests and subsistence farmers) is leading to loss of native wildlands (forests, savannas, etc.).  I wish to generalize my research to a broader, possibly global, perspective.
Relevant answer
Answer
Land conflicts are taking place primarily because unequal distribution of it and secondly because of unscientific use of it. Thirdly in the name of development also land of the dependents being acquired by the state- corporate-builder nexus in many Asian countries including India.  
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
15 answers
The journal should be affordable i.e. charging less than 50 US dollars.
Relevant answer
Answer
Consider Green Open Access. It is free and you can usually get a journal with better impact factor as there are few paid open access journals with very strong reputations (PloS ONE being an exception!). Most traditional subscription based journals allows this.
You publish in the best possible traditional subscription based journal your manuscript can qualify for and after the manuscript is accepted you proceed to make a post print version of your manuscript which you can put on your university homepage, Reasearchgate and several specialized depositories.
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
10 answers
Food (Agriculture and fisheries and aquaculture produce) is the lifeblood of every country as it contributes to national food security, national social stability and environmental protection. Climate change is projected to cause a rise in global air temperature, sea surface temperature, atmospheric CO2, sea-level and an increase in the frequency and intensity of extreme events (storms, cyclones, floods, droughts, heat waves and bush fires). Whether warming will enhance bioaccumulation of contaminants (such as uptake of toxicants) in food? The food chain (water-soil-plant-human) pathway is recognised as one of the major pathways for human exposure to contaminants. The warmer climates are known to be favourable for the proliferation of insect pests and microbial pathogens. There are reports that there will be proliferation of algal blooms in aquatic environment (freshwater and marine) which produce toxins. Climate change (intense rainfall, flooding) will increase runoff of contaminants into waterways. Some of these contaminants (e.g. pesticide, trace metals, dioxins) are very harmful (i.e. carcinogenic) and many of them have properties of bioaccumulation (accumulate in a living organism). Where there will be water scarcity due to droughts, people will be forced to use contaminated water for irrigating food crops or growing fish.
Question: Whether contamination in agriculture, livestock, fisheries and aquaculture products will be enhanced due to climate change?
Relevant answer
Answer
Golam - were you asking a question or offering an opinion?
Predictions of crisis due to population growth have been made for decades (recall Ehrich's book "The Population Bomb".).    These have not proved accurate and global health and welfare have actually improved (see the Human Development Index).
To your question - microbial risks in food are primarily man-made and due to compromises in harvesting and postharvesting hygiene protocols. not so much for temperature exposure during growth.  Could imagine sludge supplementation based risks but not aware of data that shows risk with temperature change.  
EPA projects (http://www.epa.gov/climatechange/impacts-adaptation/health.html#ref1)  increased risk due of salmonella growth at higher global-warming temperatures but that does seem a but simplistic. (at least to me).  Salmonella contamnation is most often a function of poor personal hygienes in fields through processing and cooking and risk is associated with presence rather than numbers.  Suppose the case coud be made for night soil supplement/polluted water irrigation but haven't seen data risk assessment of projections.  Does anyone have these?
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
7 answers
I'm working on the effects of climate change on endemic plants in the Mediterranean regions and I'm looking for some recent bibliography to read as background.
Relevant answer
Answer
If you look into my latest publications you will find several papers in mediterranean endemic halophytes and climate change impacts both by modelling approaches and by mesocosmos trials.
Cheers
Bernardo Duarte
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
5 answers
With changing climate it is expected that wheat yield will decrease especially with rise in night temp but with extented duration wheat yield increases? Then what is overall effect
Relevant answer
Answer
Points-of-thoughts from my side: 1. As non-C4-plant wheat will reduce its growth and yield-potential tremendously by rising night-temperatures. Question is whether breeding can rather quickly --- parallel to night-temperature-increase --- produce some better adaptations. 2. Alternatively check for C4-plants fit for the newly developing eco-systems evolving from climate-change; the plant-kingdom is sooo big and diverse...and many new species just wait for being selected for human nutrition and plant-based production. 3. Internationally checking for wheat-varieties from tropical-belt-areas with high altitudes: I remember the large wheat-fields in various highlands of Tanzania, scientifically and breeding-wise much supported by Canadian development support. There is much experience and many varieties. 4. In mixed crop-stands --- due to synergies in rizosphere (allelopathy)--- surprising effects may be triggered; thus try it out. 5. During nights the cooler airs in mountainous areas are "flowing" downhill. One can use that  principal by assuring non-hindered streams towards the wheat-plots. Walking around the area during nights will quickly guide.
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
5 answers
What are the possible projects?
Relevant answer
Answer
The IMAFLORA http://www.imaflora.org/ and the IMAZON http://www.imazon.org.br/pagina-inicial-en?set_language=en&cl=en are important centers for Climate Chance Investigations in Brazilian Amazon.
At the same time the Federal University of Amazonas (Brazil) is developing a project with traditional communities in Amazonas State. The aim is to promote resilients and productive agricultural systems (such as agroforestry) to reduce and mitigate the C+ emissions. The project is in the beginning (started this year), but we can talk about it.
best regards 
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
3 answers
Rice-ecosystem plays major contribution for ethane emission in agricultur
Relevant answer
Answer
You will find methane emissions when there are no other electron receptors present. So at (very) low redox potentials (<-200mV at least). The interesting bit in rice paddies is the flood-dry cycle that is applied, and its influence on the redox potential and subseqeuent methane release.
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
3 answers
What are the impacts of climate change to the seaweed industry all over the world? Does climate change affect the productivity of the seaweed industry? 
Relevant answer
Answer
1) If the exposure during low tides happens to be more than normal,bleaching will result in death of the directly exposed algae,say like Enteromorpha,Ulva,Padina & Gracillaria.
2) Greater amount of swarmers could be killed,thereby increasing detrital load of coastal waters.
3) Forms like Sargassum, Turbinaria,Cystociera & other alginophytes will be least effected.
4) Algae growing in tropical areas will get smaller amount of time for its optimal growth time during sea weed season.
5) Sporulation of 2X & X stage will be restricted to a narrow range of time, & in such a scenario,the relevant epiphytic algal & animal polulation Q & Q will be reduced.
6) Delicate forms like Porphyra may vanish from some of the tropical waters.
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
10 answers
Climate change adaptation.
Relevant answer
Answer
Climate change is a product of over industrialisation of developed and developing countries, not the result of the subsistence-livelihood based actions of poor communities which are largely close-to-nature..
But unfortunately these poor communities face the brunt of climate change, due to their proximity to natural living. Their lifestyle itself is a mix of innovation and ingenuity for survival. The best help is self-help.
Innovative ways to adapt to climate change in poor communities of developing countries could be:
1. Food: First increase food security by investing in long term measures; Kitchen Garden, Backyard fishponds, Bee culture, Domestic animals, Horticulture, Olericulture, barter instead of currency exchange-Getting back to basics. When food supply is assured thus, wider and bigger things can be considered.
2. Water: Check dams to recharge ground water, desilting ponds, rain water harvesting measures,
3. Flora: Raising water friendly tree species, Raising high-demand crops on small land holdings for urban markets.
4. Fauna: Encourage mini-ecosystems with wider range of species to ensure resilience through richness in biodiversity. Creating conditions for various species to breed and propagate, which can than be harvested at sustainable rates.
5. Education: Attitude change is the single most effective factor which can make or break a community's will to survive. Therefore education should be a high priority goal,even in times of hardship. Education means the capacity and maturity to put responsibilities over rights, differentiate between short and long term investments, needs over luxuries, putting the community before the "I".
6. Co-operatives: Pooling resources with similar communities and individuals can alleviate hardship in times of scarce resources.
7. Political: Good leaders are to be encouraged to lead by personal example. This will also safeguard the community against exploitation by middle men and outsiders who have no stake in the community's well being. Ordinary community members should be informed of their rights and resist urban-centred mega projects which do not give much back to the community except for grabbing their land and other resources in the name of 'development'.
8. Understand the negative effects of consumerism, urbanism, mindless entertainment
9. Take measures to keep the community together by promoting Culture, Language, Religion and nature friendly way of life.
Hope this helps.
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
1 answer
This is a topic in which I have considerable interest and have published an article in Crop Protection (Paterson et al. 2013). I would be interested in any discussions on this topic.
Relevant answer
Answer
Dr. Paterson
in South America (Colombia), several epidemic cycles of bud rot have been strongly linked to environmental changes in a matter of 20 years. The epidemicvos events are becoming more frequent and more debastadores.
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
4 answers
Redox potential influences on methane emission.
Relevant answer
Answer
Hi Shantu,
HEre some elaboration on redox conditions in wetland soils. Nutrient cycling in lakes and freshwater wetlands depends heavily on redox conditions.Under a few millimeters of water heterotrophic bacteria metabolize and consume oxygen. They therefore deplete the soil of oxygen and create the need for anaerobic respiration. Some anaerobic microbial processes include denitrification, sulfate reduction and methanogenesis and are responsible for the release of N2 (nitrogen), H2S (hydrogen sulfide) and CH4 (methane). Other anaerobic microbial processes are linked to changes in the oxidation state of iron and manganese. As a result of anaerobic decomposition, the soil stores large amounts of organic carbon because decomposition is incomplete.
The redox potential describes which way chemical reactions will proceed in oxygen deficient soils and controls the nutrient cycling in flooded systems. Redox potential, or reduction potential, is used to express the likelihood of an environment to receive electrons and therefore become reduced. For example, if a system already has plenty of electrons (anoxic, organic-rich shale) it is reduced and will likely donate electrons to a part of the system that has a low concentration of electrons, or an oxidized environment, to equilibrate to the chemical gradient. The oxidized environment has high redox potential, whereas the reduced environment has a low redox potential.
Hope this helps somewhat.
Measuring is performed with a standard redox potential electrode.
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
8 answers
I am mostly interested in a UK/European context, but examples from any country/continent would be interesting. Re: unambiguous, earlier sowing dates may not necessarily be a result of higher winter/spring temperatures, they could be the result of technological advances of cultivation equipment.
Relevant answer
Answer
Bastiaan,
I would suggest looking into Phenological records in the U.K. and then linking them to weather data. I am working on this in Germany - where phenologcal data is free to download, as well as a limited number of daily weather data series. The complete set of weather data must be paid for but gives one a tremendous amount of data to work with. I am currently focusing on maize - where technology, especially breeding has resulted in more cold-tolerant varieties that enable earlier planting. But trafficability is a major, and relatively rigid determinant and can be pretty well explained with a few meteorological variables e.g. rainfall and temperature. The trends in temperature, while perhaps clear from a broad persepective, show some surprising nuances. And the facets of risk aversion and learning horizons must be considered. Overall, there is a roughly 0.2 days/year trend toward earlier planting. Look me up at the U. of Giessen if you want - maybe we can work on a paper together.
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
3 answers
I want to start my PhD research on Climate change impact assessment and adaptation in agriculture sector in a river basin (Indus River, Pakistan). I need to ask how can a specific methodology helps in defining the frontiers of my research. Can someone share a Conceptual framework on similar kind of research? I hope I can improve my question after your kind responses
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Muhammad, it dependent on the specific impacts you want to focus and on the phenomena that you want to consider into your analysis. The ricardian model, for instance, is a nice approach to analyzing impacts on farmer's net revenue talking into account adaptation. A wrote two papers on advantages and disadvantages of differente approaches.. .. You will found both among my pubblicazione on rg profile... All the best! Maria
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
3 answers
Looking for an expert in this topic, who can give me a guide to answer this research question
Relevant answer
Answer
This question is a bit hard to address without any information on the spatial scale at which you are looking at this. At global scale, there are a whole range of Integrated Assessment Models that address this question. Similarly, for Europe there is a so-called Integrated Assessment Platform (see http://86.120.199.106/IAP/), in which you can explore the effects of climate and socio-economic scenarios on a range of impacts.
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
5 answers
The discussion is expected on the probable impact of all the possible climate change variables (temperature, Co2, precipitation, etc.) on physical, chemical, and biological attributes of soil health and productivity, and how those changes might impact agricultural productivity, ecosystem services and environment.
Relevant answer
Answer
In those areas getting more frequent rain shower, soils will become softer and therefore a higher need to innovate lighter machineries. Positively, to scientists, they need to innovate lighter Materials for making implements etc. Handy and mobile machineries for draining excess water will also be needed. For Plant pathologists, new pathogens or reemergence of pathogens may be expected. New micro environment situation is for sure creates a new thinking for the pro let solving. Thanks.
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
6 answers
If a questionnaire is used to collect data on adaptive capacity of farmers to extreme climatic conditions and if we depend more on the data collected through the questionnaire survey, what impact it will have on the study results.
Relevant answer
Answer
It depends in part where you are gathering your data. I would suggest solid reading on resilient communities and adaptive capacities. But the primary method I would recommend (especially if your participants are anywhere in South East Asia) is good solid participant observation. I work with farmers in India and I find that when they are completing questionnaires, their responses are often choreographed according to what they think is a good response. It's often very different to their lived experience. Even if their responses don't contrast with their lived experience entirely, participant observation will reveal a far deeper and more complex reality than anything remotely formal such as questionnaires and surveys etc. If this is your first time with this particular social/ cultural group of farmers I would suggest participant observation first. Then on the basis of the themes and threads gathered from that, design your interview questionnaire after some time of participant observation. Your questions are much more likely to be relevant. I discovered this after a recent trip to India where - being "familiar" with India - I designed a survey I thought was highly relevant, only to discover many of the questions were repetitive and/or irrelevant to the farmers and important areas not considered. A good reminder and lesson for me. Participant observation keeps us humble. And skilled.
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
4 answers
The adoption of technology in agriculture (drip irrigation) could be relationated with climate variables.
Relevant answer
Answer
In Sri Lanka many water conservation techniques in agriculture were intriduced i.e. drip or sprinkler irrigation. As Sri Lanka is not facing accute water shortage and as the rainfall is high these technologies are not that popular among farmers. In addition, as water is not priced and as it is free in Sri Lanka for agricultural purposes, the adaoption of such technologies is poor.
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
3 answers
I have been invited to go to Maharashtra and meet with farmers who have been practicing Sustainable Yogic Agriculture (SYA). I'm leaving in ten days so I have limited time to get a solid research proposal together. Therefore, I'd like some guidance from others on how to make the most of this research opportunity (my training is in anthropology and ethnography).
SYA is a process where farmers combine meditation with traditional organic farming. Quantitative data regarding crop yield, nutrition and economic benefits are available (see attachment).
The UN (where I work representing an NGO) is interested in local innovative projects that are improving the lives of - and making tangible contributions to - local farming communities. They are also seeking disaggregated data. So there is a need for both qualitative and quantitative data.
I have a week with the farmers, so Participant Observation will be the foundation of my time there. And focussed interviews. Areas of interest I'm considering at the moment are the effects of SYA on farmer health and wellbeing, within individuals, families, communities. There are also broader issues and challenges such as market access, attitudes of local and regional government, problems with seed sharing, political pressure/ support, affect on farmer suicide.
I wonder if some of you who have experience and expertise in the area of agricultural research could make some suggestions as to how to make the best use of the farmers time, and my time too. So I can return with something that can make a real contribution to this important area of food security, climate change, agricultural innovation and farmer wellbeing.
With my thanks and appreciation.
Relevant answer
Answer
Greetings Archana and apologies for my tardy response. Thank you very much for this. I will look at the link you sent to learn more. Great to know you are from Maharashtra and interested in this area.
I have just started communicating with a group of farmers from the Hudson Valley who would like to start learning the simple methodology behind SYA so they can start applying it in their farms as soon as possible. From New York to Maharashtra! If it can really impact on the wellbeing of farmers in terms of livelihood, inner wellbeing and physical health then it's really something to consider. I also have support from the First Secretary here at the Indian Mission to the UN. So at all levels there is interest.
Let's keep in touch. I appreciate your offer to help with your local knowledge of Maharashtra too. I'm sure we can find a way to work together in the future. There is a SYA Facebook site which will tell you a little more.
Many thanks and all the best.
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
1 answer
I am working on a report related to the use of agrometeorological products and
services for Policy Decision Makers by governmental and international organizations, NGOs (for example Red Cross, Care, World Vision). I need assistance to list the appropriate organizations and Agencies, to have links and examples of applications for policy, to document uses of products.
Relevant answer
Answer
United Nations Environment Programme http://www.pnuma.org/english/index.php
The Poverty-Environment Initiative (PEI) of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) - See more at: http://www.unpei.org/#sthash.xVNOLwLH.dpuf
Project for ecosistems services ProEcoServ www.proecoserv.org
  • asked a question related to Climate Change and Agriculture
Question
5 answers
I'm currently working on ecophysiology of tea ecosystem, in that we are trying to understand the correlation and the impact of climate in crop productivity changes using 20 years meteorological data of the study site using R statistics of VAR package. In order to assess the impact of climate to the 2050 or 2100 scenario I wanted to do Ricardian analysis. I have meteorological, yield and revenue data, kindly give your ideas/comments/ to do the analysis and ideas regarding spatial analysis.
Relevant answer
Answer
@ Ahmad
thanks for your commends, we trying to study the three tee growing regions this came under three grids and three different geographic locations. we tring to project the same in spatial models in the we should know the coefficient values that will be used in projection models. I understand the the risk of site specific models however statistical downscalling will help to creat a region specific model upto 24km.
If possible i wll try to get Mr. Kurukulasuriya, in this regards