Science topic

City Planning - Science topic

Comprehensive planning for the physical development of the city.
Questions related to City Planning
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Dear Colleagues,
We are currently working on a paper where we discuss how far the planning and interventions in cities nowadays ( masterplans, regeneration plans) include decisions based on the analysis/findings obtained from social media data. There is quite a lot of research that has been done, reports, and so on that concur on the fact that these data are rather helpful for the diagnosis and prediction of numerous urban dynamics and for decision and policy making... but so far we find only very few examples (to our knowledge) where these approaches have been indeed implemented in a master plan and executed. We are wondering if there is a published example/report/study that considers social media data for diagnosis/prediction and has had an impact on actual planning decisions... Thanks in advance for your help!
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Dear Dr. Estrada!
You made a relevant point. I tried to find a tool in Finland the country of residence of mine, still I could not find anything. I only tracked down a new research titled as "Digital Urban Planning Platforms: The Interplay of Digital and Local Embeddedness in Urban Planning" published in the International Journal of E-Planning Research in 2021. Maybe you could contact the author Dr. Ari-Veikko Anttiroiko working for Tampere University::
I am not a specialist of the field, he is...
Hope YOU have a Nice DAY!
Yours sincerely, Bulcsu Szekely
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Hello, colleagues!
My name is Christiano Piccioni Toralles, I am a professor at the Inst. Fed. of Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil) and student of the Doctoral Program in Spatial Planning at Un. Coimbra (Portugal), under the supervision of prof. Anabela Ribeiro. I'm here inviting volunteers to collaborate as an expert with my Ph.D. research on urban mobility, specially dedicated to walkability, in an inter/multimodal, inclusive, and participatory perspective.
The form link is found below. It starts with a brief explanation of the proposal and the Consent Form, then moving on to the questionnaire itself.
Globally and mandatorily, this questionnaire has 222 questions with multiple choice answers, except for two open-ended questions (one for the name of your city and the last one for optional comments or suggestions), with an estimated duration of 30 minutes.
This research has as its target audience only professionals who work in urban planning, mainly dedicated to the theme of urban mobility, in public or private institutions, including academic-scientific. Planners, designers, researchers, and teachers are invited to respond. There are no restrictions about their professional qualification (for example, in Urban Planning, Architecture, Engineering, Geography, Public Health, Environmental Psychology, Tourism, Sociology, Anthropology, etc.), as long as they have some experience in the subject.
If you have any questions or would like to request further information, feel free to write on this forum. Or you can contact me by email: <christiano.toralles@riogrande.ifrs.edu.br>.
Thank you for your attention.
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Walkabity has to have some real numerical basis, otherwise its just wasted words.
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I am a graduate student in City Planning at the Indian Institute of Technology currently researching 'Planning Strategies towards Low Carbon Developments in the City with a focus on urban design heuristics. I am conducting expert opinion surveys to improve the quality of the ongoing project. As you are an expert in the subject, It is my humble request to kindly allow me for a brief session sharing your viewpoints on the need for low carbon developments in the urban regions, current progress in this sector and the possibility of a relationship between urban form, energy performance and GHG emissions.
I thank you in advance for your time, efforts and consideration. It should take less than 10 minutes to complete. Your response is highly appreciated!
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I answered and encourage others to do so as well. It is interesting and will hopefully produce useful data.
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I want to measure the ratio of open spaces such as parks and gardens to the number of children in a city.
There are quite a few parks in the city, and their width and fun park vehicles are also very few.
However, my understatement is not based on a scale. I want to compare it with other cities and reach a conclusion based on the number of children in the available park areas. I need sample research and scales on this subject. I would also like to benefit from studies evaluating the subject in terms of city planning approaches.
Thank you for all the help.
Abdurrahman
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Thank you very much, dear Espiñeira and Libardoni. I will consider your suggestions. As you said, although these are not exactly what I want, they will be useful to me in my research. Thank you for your answers.
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The boundaries of my investigations limits by real implementation on cities which are too far from driverless cars, ITS or other hyperllops-like decisions. I carefully examined,perhaps, all the existed models and approaches from japanees "Jamology", limitations of transport flows in the centre (of London,tax model), VANET, platooning, V2X, SCATS, SCOOT, traffic lights management and other methods which have some limitations from 'non detected' [without any sensors] vehicles (old cars, mini bus taxies or so-called "root taxy" , horses and carts , motocyclies, scooters, etc. or the bypass roads (which have exits in the centre of calculating zone and make some deviations in algorithms).
Not everything is solved by the development of public transport. In our city, it is planned to build a subway for 20 years, but the zones of the city are developed according to their own laws without taking into account the plans laid down for the metro, and therefore part of the dug canals under the ground do not meet today's needs.
Similarly, with the development of cycling and pedestrian zones. In countries with sharply continental weather in the cold season, it is unlikely that the city dweller will choose a bicycle instead of his personal car while the temperatures below 20 °C. Bus routes can have a certain effect, but again, dedicated lanes are needed (consider adjustments to the law and traffic regulations) and the replacement of a fleet for more comfortable trips as well as more developed routes. Inspection of road regulation(the police) is not as much interested in solving the problems of traffic congestion. The main indicator of the success of their work is the minimum number of accidents and victims on the roads. Therefore, the lower the traffic flow rate or its "standing", the calmer. Thus, what solution can really be implemented in cities where there are no autonomous and flying cars, where the budget is not enough to build monorails and tunnel stations (junctions) to connect metro, buses and other vehicles in rooms with comfortable conditions (for example, Queensland , New Zealand)?
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Dear Alexei
Sorry for the delay. The Thesis is in Portuguese, but the results were presented in the 2020 PLEA.
FORTES, M. B. ; GIACAGLIA, M. E. ; DUARTE, Denise . Disruptive Technologies on Mobility Raising New Opportunities for Urban Design. In: PLEA 2020 - Planning Post Carbon Cities, 2020, A Coruña. Proceedings of the 35th International Conference on Passive and Low Energy Architecture. A Coruña: University of A Coruña, 2020. v. 1. p. 600-605.
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The development of smart cities is a part of the broader concept of sustainable pro-ecological development based on the use of modern, innovative information technologies and in addition to ecology.
In this way, the development of smart cities also improves people's lives and can make people happier.
Do you agree with me on the above matter?
Please reply
Best wishes
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the impact and the main lessons learned on the topic of the implementation of the smart city by maximizing its skill level "in situ" would be the crucial element in the construction of an "elegant city", and the Technologies would be considered as tools that would allow their interaction with users. What do the results obtained mean about the role of Smart Cities within "urban development"? The example of digital strategy in Vitoria / Gasteiz [BASQUE COUNTRY] with the development of its "CIOP urban platform" is good proof. For any Today's "worth its salt" city, the roadmap to becoming a Smart City is in itself a "long journey", which inevitably begins with recognizing the need for a "sustainable environment".
Cfr.
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I was gathering data about Arsi University Bekoji campus, and I observed something about the city planning. On the right side of the google image (in 2019), you can see the new urban development, and on the left side, what is most probably agricultural villages and Greenfield. The new urban development follows one of the typical city plannings I have seen all over Ethiopia, which follows a grid pattern to arrange the urban blocks and in contrast, the Greenfield has its own block pattern, which I think is the result of the social, cultural, and historical way of arranging plot of lands. It shows the trails of what is left of the ‘traditional planning.’ My whole point here is, why don’t the city planners appreciate and try to incorporate the traditional/ unexplored knowledge into the planning. That way, each city can have a unique experience and preserve the inhabitants’ lifestyle. Of course, my assumptions might be wrong, so if you are from, visited, or lived in Arisi, I would like to know what you think? Or let me know what you think about the planning ? About Arsi: Location: Bekoji, Arsi zone, Oromia region, Ethiopia Population as of 2015: 181, 906 Built-up area: 0.76 sq. km google map: https://lnkd.in/g74-VAm5 #arsi #bekoji #arsiuniversity #agriculturalvillages #savetraditionalplannings
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Thank you for the insight!
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Dear colleagues,
Does anyone know if there is any rainfall threshold (mm/year, month or day, etc.) for a city to be considered "rainy" or "very rainy"? Or the rainfall intensity thresholds (weak, moderate, heavy, etc.)? Are there any international standards, for example from ISO or another institution? If there is a reference to support it, it will help better.
Ditto for wind speed thresholds (m/s or kt) for a place to be considered "windy". Does anyone know any references?
Thank you in advance for your attention.
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Dear Christiano,
The concept of Precipitation Concentration is crucial to understand the spatial and temporal patterns of precipitations. Many authors define thresholds which mostly converge: the most common (you can find in the following open access article) are :
Wet day: >= 1mm/day
Heavy wet day: >= 10mm/day
Extreme wet day: >= 50mm/day
Best regards,
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Cities are increasingly aware of sustainability issues (economic, social & environmental) as part of their long term development but many cities in developing countries are still dealing with basic and most urgent concerns like economic growth, employment generation, housing needs, infrastructure development, water and sanitation etc. How urban plans and planning systems can be put into use to deal with all these concerns particularly in terms of potential development conflicts, barriers and trade-offs?
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In my opinion, in the contemporary scenario of cities, one could argue that today's urbanism occurs as a result of a negotiation between two critical forces that, in contrast, direct the construction of cities around the globe. The first, strongly present after the Industrial Revolution, is the implosive trend driven by an understanding of global development as massive accumulation, encouraging the concentration of the urban fabric in mega agglomerations that operate under the precepts of ‘impatient capitalism’. Thus, in those places where capital is massively placed, what we could call ‘hyper-city’ appears, a series of settlements that exacerbate the attributes of the urban in dense large-scale metropolitan centers. In these contexts, the design of the city emerges as an almost exclusively material exercise, usually disconnected from the deeper understanding of the social implications of urbanism. Here, those who make the city are obsessed with creating urban shows with global resonance. This is the impulse that towards the end of the last century generated the greatest transformations of the built environment, encouraging creation and focusing attention on the appearance of mega urban agglomerations that came to accommodate more than twenty million people. These 'hyper' urban formations, such as Mexico City, Bombay, Sao Paulo or Istanbul, were for a long time the great engines of economic and social growth, but as a consequence of their rapid and expansive uncontrolled development they became largely responsible for the global warming, urban vulnerability and the appearance of the most extreme expressions of social exclusion. Its growth was in a way, faster than any possible reflective conceptualization, and therefore faster than the formulation of the correct intervention protocols. Today, the urban condition is in a very different position. The ‘implosion’ patterns have become ‘explosion’ patterns, repositioning cities at a breaking point, facing an unprecedented condition that offers the possibility of amending the mistakes of the past. The urbanization processes are leaving the massive agglomerations and have begun to move towards a secondary network of urban agglomerations that is growing, expanding, and is still under construction. In this way, at this precise moment and especially in contexts of the global south, urban growth patterns are changing.
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"THIS IS AN ABSOLUTELY SCIENTIFIC QUESTION"
The human being's passion for automobiles is something incredible, but also complicated.
There are countless reasons to make a human being like a car, nor do I intend to discuss here what each one likes most. This passion for car almost always does not let us see clearly and rationally use and acquisition of a vehicle.
However, several studies show that vehicle is almost always underused for its intended purpose, which is actually walking and transporting. Almost your time is spent just standing still and parked (see figure).
Tell us, after seeing figure, in your scientific opinion if shape we have chosen is really useful?
PLEASE ANSWER IN ENGLISH ONLY.
VERY IMPORTANT: Participate only if you are original, be yourself give your opinion, do not put links or texts from "Genio Google" or things found out there on the web! No one has any interest in stupid web answers, if that's the case, please be so kind as to ignore this debate! Also, don't post your hurts and hates, and don't deviate from the subject at hand, thanks.
SOURCE LINK:
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In the future, by changing the public transport techs and types fundamentall, maybe using the vehicles will decrease.
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A relação entre o ruido urbano e a forma como os diversos atores sociais com ele se relacionam tem vindo a ser negligenciada dentro do seio académico (em especial dentro de áreas como a sociologia, antropologia e estudos urbanos). Por certo que, dentro do horizonte das ideias, ligada a uma relação bilateral entre as paisagens socialmente construidas e a evolução das cidades, existem algumas produções (como a de Carlos Fortuna; Augoyard e Torgue; Halligan e Hegarty; entre outros), mas ainda existe alguma falta no sentido da normalização (ou naturalização de G. Simmel) entre os sons e o meio urbano.
Assim, gostaria de perguntar se, dentro dos constrangimentos que a globalização permite, conhecem mais produções dentro desta área?
Obrigado pelo tempo.
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One of the rights of a citizen is his peace of mind. Lack of responsibility for this issue leads to lack of concentration, aggression and ultimately mental disorders of citizens. This is stated in Article 6 of the Charter of Citizenship Rights: Citizens have the right to participate in the performance of legal responsibilities and to provide the necessary financial resources, clean air, public green space and parks, clean and waste-free passages and a city without pollution. Have audio and ecology.
The main sources of urban noise pollution include factories, construction works, noises from the air conditioning system and noises from transportation (aircraft engine noises, car horns). Noise inside the home, such as the sound of televisions and vacuum cleaners, is also important.
Different sound levels based on the distance of each noise source.
Below are some frequently heard sounds with their approximate decibel levels at the same distance from the noise source. As you can see in the table below, it is defined in terms of "dB (A)" when the measurement is made on an "A" scale to simulate human hearing.
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In connection with the progressing process of global warming, the importance of creating and implementing eco-innovations, including architectural eco-innovations, is growing.
Currently, projects are being created: City of tommorow, Eco City, Vertical Forest etc.
Will humanity manage to realize these projects?
Will the global warming effect of global warming lead to the disaster of many urban agglomerations?
Please reply. I invite you to the discussion
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Dear Vera Maura Fernandes de Lima,
Thanks for the answer and your participation in the discussion. Yes, the topic is topical and the importance of this topic may grow in the coming years.
Thank you, Regards,
Dariusz Prokopowicz
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My position is trying to go beyond the idea of dealing with COVID19 as an opportunity but as a paradigm shift that will change every aspect of life and particularly the way houses, neighborhoods and cities are planned and designed. We need to move to an authentic people-based urbanity and architecture. How do you see this from your perspective and your context?
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The SARS-CoV-2 (Covid-19) coronavirus pandemic could have a significant impact on urban planning and / or design if the pandemic was to continue for an extended period of time. If mankind does not solve the pandemic problem in 2021, then anti-pandemic safety issues will be taken into account in the planning and / or urban design of urban agglomerations, i.e. additional and improved air ventilation systems, anti-pandemic design of workplaces in office buildings, buildings of offices and public institutions, etc. However If, thanks to efficient vaccination programs in 2021, the problem of the pandemic is resolved, then the inclusion of anti-pandemic safety systems and instruments in planning and / or urban design of urban agglomerations will not be implemented to a large extent.
Best regards,
Dariusz Prokopowicz
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Do you know any example/case study using state of the art technology for waste management? (e.g., GIS, BIM, Computational tools, Computation Design)
We are working on Construction and demolition waste management in the built environment context, which one can be more useful for waste management in your area (e.g., construction, food, electronic waste etc.)?
We are working on the visualisation techniques and welcome to your participation.
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Hi Samad Sepasgozar your profile indicates that you are from UNSW, Sydney. I would like to suggest you that read a research articles from Prof. Veena Sahajwalla. Her work in the field of E-waste is interesting, additionally you both are in the same university. This could be better for you..!!
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Can any one give a clear definition abut the concept of "Urban Landscape". what does it really mean?
does it mean the streets and sidewalks and building facades, or the place's history and atmosphere?
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The urban landscape is a complex multidimensional system that includes both natural and artificial components. A detailed study of the urban landscape requires the separation of structural elements of both natural and anthropogenic nature from the general concept.
The structural elements of the urban landscape that are anthropogenic in nature include the following elements:
• buildings, engineering structures;
* highways, streets, driveways, dead ends;
* intersections, transport interchanges;
• city square, kuranari, the square in front of individual buildings;
* courtyards, indoor spaces;
* artificial landscaping;
* boulevards, squares, embankments;
* urban design, advertising, small architectural forms.
The natural structural elements of the urban landscape include the following elements:
• different types of terrain;
• watershed boundaries;
* territories with different soils;
* areas with natural landscaping;
• bodies of water.
The structural elements, like the letters of the alphabet, make up the entire variety of urban environment options, and the quality and comfort of the urban landscape largely depends on the quality of its constituent structural elements.
The selected structural elements, being part of the overall system, at the same time themselves, appear to be a complex multi-dimensional, multifunctional structure, and not something elementary. As the famous Austrian architectural theorist of the XIX century Camillo Zitte correctly notes: "... with
from an artistic point of view, just an undeveloped place is not yet a city square. Strictly speaking, much more is required in this respect — decoration, meaning, individuality" [5]. Being one of the recognized authorities in the field of architecture theory, K. Zitte expresses great regret about the loss of artistic expressiveness in urban planning, for the sake of technological efficiency, regularity and simplicity.
As a phenomenon of urban planning art, each structural element of the urban landscape requires its own detailed study, analysis of historical development, classification and typologization, identification of artistic and functional aspects, and forecasting of development prospects.
This applies to buildings, streets, squares, courtyards, i.e. all the above-listed structural elements of the urban landscape.
At the same time, the structural elements of the urban landscape are designed to highlight and emphasize the most important objects of the urban environment, serve as landmarks, determine the hierarchy of urban spatial zones, separating the main from the secondary.
The urban landscape, as an artificial habitat, is designed to meet the numerous, increasingly complex needs of people. For the optimal solution of this problem and in accordance with the requirements for the urban environment, it must perform the following main functions in accordance with the reference standards:
* social and urban planning;
* transport and communication services;
* artistic and aesthetic;
* psychophysiological;
• natural and ecological;
* ensuring security and orientation in your environment.
Each of the functions of the urban landscape can be characterized as follows.
The social and urban planning function of the urban landscape is, first of all, the need to meet the needs of people, based on the awareness of the local way of life, customs and traditions, age, national and group preferences, for this purpose, the basis of urban planning decisions should be based on sociological research.
The transport and communication function of the urban landscape is to provide the shortest, convenient, safe, environmentally friendly connections both within a homogeneous landscape and in the overall structure of the city.
Creating a harmonious environment with high artistic and aesthetic qualities is one of the main functions of the urban landscape. Living in a beautiful, aesthetic environment is the most ancient human need, traced throughout the history of society.
A person as a biosocial being, has specific characteristics.
psychophysiological properties. Therefore, the urban landscape should correspond to these properties as much as possible, and the development of urban planning concepts and models should be carried out taking into account the achievements of a new science — human ecology.
The physical and moral health of people depends on the level at which the natural and ecological function of the urban landscape is performed. High ecological qualities of the urban landscape are one of the indispensable conditions for its existence.
The function of ensuring the safety of people's lives and the ability to quickly and freely navigate the urban landscape, refers to those functions that were realized by specialists relatively recently, which does not make this problem less relevant.
If the urban landscape fulfills its main functions, the quality of the artificially created human habitat will mainly be ensured.
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Gridlock is also called a traffic jam. When I first moved to Texas, only 5 years ago, there was barely any traffic on Highway 380. Now, the traffic is horrible with too much construction ongoing. Poor city planning or no?
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Transportation problems (like congestion) don't always have transportation solutions. Congestion is often a function of poor land use decisions. In the early 1900s, streets in major cities were very congested. Planners believed that spreading development out, at lower densities, would alleviate this problem. And, while the street in the middle of a dense city will inevitably be more congested than a rural street, the highest levels of congestion are often found in suburban areas where discontinuous, low-density, single-use development make walking, cycling and transit difficult (if not impossible). In these places, an automobile is required for almost every activity outside the home. And cars take up enormous amounts of space when parked and even more when in motion.
Discontinuous, low-density, single-use development (urban sprawl) is the result of several key factors:
* Zoning and other land development regulations (land use planning)
* Economic incentives (embedded in both taxes and fees)
* Infrastructure investment decisions (infrastructure planning & budgeting)
* Racial bigotry and fear of integrated schools
Better planning could resolve some, but not all of these issues. In terms of economic incentives, distance- and congestion-based roadway user fees, performance-based parking fees, and replacing the traditional property tax with land value return fees would be helpful policies. Information about property tax reform can be found at "Financing Infrastructure with Value Capture: The Good, The Bad & The Ugly" at https://www.strongtowns.org/journal/2018/2/20/financing-infrastructure-with-value-capture-the-good-the-bad-the-ugly/ .
Resolving problems associated with racial bigotry will require an intentional combination of counseling, self-reflection and action.
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Dear all,
I am currently working on an assessment of environmental impacts from cities built from scratch. Hereby I would like to model different urban growth scenarios in the region of the new master planned cities. The problem is that most of the modelling tools (SLEUTH, GRASS, ...) need historical maps in order to evaluate past urban growth to indicate future scenarios. Obviously this is something I do not have as those cities are not built yet. What I do have are the satellite images of the current state (with its land uses: forest areas, agricultural areas, etc.) and the master plans which I could compose another land use map of.
Do you know any free modelling method, usable within QGIS or an alternative free GIS operator that fits my problem? I was not able to find anything like that so far. Therefore I am very happy about any tips you can give me.
Thank you in advance!
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Dear Tom Hackbarth,
I have recently submitted an article on urban simulation based on CA-MARKOV Approach . So, you can use CA-MARKOV Approach to predict the future urban development surface if the land is flat or plain terrain. For that, you have to generate a future suitable probable surface based on current year using AHP (MCDM) techniques. Thus you can create a base map and a projected map of the same year. In this way you can predict upward trends of urban growth. IDRISI Selva 17.2/ 18.0 software (open source) should be the best software to do the simulation of land use land cover. Best wishes with regards.
For your better understanding, please follow the link given below.
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Different transportation, land-use, environmental, and other corresponding planners propose their work for new city urban plans in order to address the existing problems by identifying the major gaps they had. The existing land-use was following bad planning principles and it is already a failed plan. When planners integrate their proposed spatial plan to existing land use, they will have a real challenge in aligning. So, as a planner, what would be your choice to align the proposal you have with the existing land-use?
  1. Shall i follow the standard plan i have and remove the existing unplanned land-uses( NB: the compensation cost may be too large) ? or
  2. Shall i accept the existing situation as it is and compromise the planning standards?
What is your suggestion?
Any help is appreciated very much.
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From a southern perspective, I will go for option 2. Like @Luis Fernando indicated, we need to rethink our understanding of city making especially in the global south. Obviously the city is being shaped largely by the people as opposed to 'our plans' - let's plan from the peoples perspective (inclusive, participatory planning). Miraftab's piece on 'insurgent planning' will offer you a clearer insight of my point of departure. Hope this helps
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Thematic session (Workshop): Computerized evidence-based decision making
This workshop intends to explore the reasoning process behind how digital evidence is integrated throughout planning, urban design, urban infrastructure and transport projects as well as building and product design processes.
Themes:
Decision making models involving simulations for:
· planning,
· urban design,
· urban infrastructure and transport,
· building design and product design.
Session Organisers:
· Dr. Clarice Bleil de Souza (Welsh School of Architecture, Cardiff University - UK)
· Prof. Valerio Cutini (DESTEC University of Pisa - Italy)
· Dr. Federico Cerutti (School of Computer Science, University of Brescia – Italy)
· Ms. Camilla Pezzica (DESTEC University of Pisa – Italy & Welsh School of Architecture, Cardiff University - UK)
DATES:
April 26, 2020: Deadline for paper submission
May 24, 2020: Notification of Acceptance. June 15, 2020: Deadline for the final version of the Papers Submissions; https://ess.iccsa.org/cgi-bin/login.py
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Yes. It will be a virtual conference
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Keenly looking suggestions about the prospect and challenges of scientific study in Heritage, Indigeneity and Folklore Studies (HIFS) at the educational institution around the world.
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Contrary to what we're taught, tradition is not a static thing. Times change, generations change, and what we know changes. The most stable aspect of any tradition may be its ability to change, making it able to accommodate changing times, changing generations and changing information. Otherwise, no matter how old and once revered, a tradition can disappear like a magician's bouquet, to resurface if--and only if--it becomes timely and relevant again.
If this were not true, we would all still be sacrificing animals on hilltops to reach the ears of our various gods; on the other hand, we can retain a tradition by reinterpreting it. Eighty years ago the majority of people in the USA believed that the story of Adam and Eve was the natural history of the world. Some still do. But the mainstream no longer does, and has retained the tradition by reinterpreting it as an allegory, or poetry, about the beginning of time and the fate of mortals. Where we locate the sacred realm (in the celestial dome or the womb of the earth), our aesthetics, assumptions, aspirations and animosities will shape every aspect of our expressive behavior, and every mark we leave on earth.
We have to trust people to recreate the past, interpret the present and shape the future in their own best interest--no outsider knows better what that is. To best respect tradition, we have to stand back and watch it change, and seek in those changes, the spirit and mentality of the people who generate, modify and maintain these traditions over time, free of molestation from those who purport to know better than they.
Its only when powerful outsiders interfere in the process of a peoples' own strategic and creative changes in tradition, or try to take over; to guide, shape, change, or prevent change in tradition, that harm is done. Instead, stand by. Watch. And learn. Speak out when powerful interests try to take over a peoples' traditions to suit their own interests and agendas. Then let life happen, let tradition adjust, and learn what we can from the changes. Some things will inevitably be lost, yes--but some will always be gained. Watching and learning would be us at our most respectful and creative. If it seems an imperfect solution, its still most likely the best we can do.
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Due to the fact that the land property market is limited, people implement investment projects not only directly on their surface, but also:
  • below them (e.g. tunnels, but also a hotel 100 meters underground) and
  • above them (for example, hanging bridges, as well as offices in "houses" on trees),
  • as well as "in the ground" (including a cave apartment, a hotel in volcanic rocks, an underwater hotel).
Anyway, these are often large and very recognizable investments. Their wide scope induces to ask many questions, e.g.:
  • what investment projects have already been implemented or are planned in individual cities in the world?
  • In what direction can they develop?
  • What ideas that seem impossible today may become possible in the future?
  • How is technology developing, e.g. in the field of construction?
  • Are such projects likely to be affordable for a wider group of consumers?
  • How do these types of investments affect the market value of companies implementing such projects or having them in their investment portfolios?
  • do such investments include the same specifications as classic real estate investments (connected with liquidity, discount rate, rate of return etc.)?
  • Others questions?
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Jaheer Mukthar Kp I am afraid that as it happens in life, in this case we are dealing with positive and negative consequences, e.g. in a natural context. Therefore, it is important to supervise this type of investment so that their location would cover rather areas where the positive effects will be maximized and the negative minimal (in each case it is to some extent an interference in nature). I wonder if they are already emerging somewhere in the world or will they arise in such unusual locations, e.g. special zones for business?
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Good morning RG community,
Seeking guidance please!
I had an interesting email exchange regarding sustainable fire safety operations, machine learning, and sustainable smart cities today. Bottom-line, my colleague could not accept my position (sustainability applies to Fire Safety & Planning.
Advice please, how would you convince a very bright researcher to think more broadly? Obviously, fire safety is more pressing but my colleague does not want to discuss a small project scope change could create an important technology innovation for all society.
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Hi John,
I need to understand your concept of fire safety sustainability. is the research geared towards design approach or technology/science innovations or pahaps both. whichever, you need reserchers that has background knowledge and interst in these areas.
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Different transportation planners use different criteria to suggest or to propose a public bus route for one city.
There are different considerable factors to be used as a reference to propose such projects such as Traffic volume, future population dynamics, decision-maker's point of view, land use characteristics and other demographic characteristics may be used as a reference to propose a public bus route system for one Metropolitan city.
And, To consider the whole things in one case, it needs special, long preliminary investigations and careful attention.
I know that there are a bunch of planning concepts from different literature, But, i need a clear image on what were the necessary and obligatory planning criteria that must be considered in proposing public bus routes for one developing countries?
Any help is appreciated. It is open for learning-teaching discussion.
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The advantahe of bus routes is the quick ability to vary routes and pickup points as ridership demand changes. Population catchment area of a route is a key evaluation criterion...that attribute can help in selecting bus stops, bus frequency, and actual routes.
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Hi Guys,
I am writing a forecast over the future of Emden, a 51,000 inhabitants town in the north west of Germany which is heavily dependent on the automotive industry. The Volkswagen Group now plans to re-structure its plant here switching from fuel-driven to electronic cars and set ambitious goals as to the year 2023.
Yet, given the sluggish technological and sales performance of electronic cars so far, it is questionable whether this aims can be achieved. If not, I guess there would be major disruptions to the regional economy, in terms of rising unemployment, decreasing tax income, repercussions for the real estate sector, and others.
Detroit is a major example to what might happen to a city or region when the major employer(s) vanish or decline. That is why I want to include a case study over Detroit into my research.
I now ask you, if you know somebody who made some research over the economic history of Detroit, up to the presence. People who can offer economic, statistical, regional development and/or city planning expertise are welcomed for an exchange of ideas.
Don’t hesitate to contact me over this platform or my e-mail:
Alternatively, you give me a hint where to find the appropriate person. Also, if you have any ideas what other towns or regions had to suffer from a decline of one leading industry or company.
Thanks a lot for your ideas, your efforts, and your support!
Reiner, Professor for Economics, University (HS) Emden-Leer
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Detroit had many factors including the redesign of the factor from vertical to horizontal that contributed. If you want a more comparable city look at Flint, MI which is a more similar size and was decimated when GM pulled out in the last 1970's early 1980's.
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According to Christopher Alexander, beauty arises out of the wholeness, which is defined mathematically as a recursive structure, and exists in space and matter physically, and reflects in minds and cognition psychologically.
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Beauty is deep in structure rather than on the surface. Do you agree upon?
Yes, because what is visible is temporary (i.e. if will fade away when time passes by) & what can't be seen on the surface is more long lasting & valuable.
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Exactions are payments in one form or another to local governments to get development permission. The payments could be cash, land, or building of public facilities.
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Hi Peter F. Colwell , the purpose of exactions is for fiscal sustainability and economic growth. The notion of fiscal sustainability is a field of analysis and recommendations of international agencies and many scholars. However, fiscal sustainability analyzed in most of the literature refers to the general control of public finances, especially in relation to public indebtedness. The answer to this question is brought by the Territorial Engineering that innovates in this field. It requires evaluating the fiscal sustainability of territorial programs and component projects. On fiscal sustainability, I recommend the following classic titles:
- BLANCHARD, O. J. (1990). Suggestions for a New Set of Fiscal Indicators, OECD Economics Department Working Papers, No. 79, OECD Publishing.
- BUITER, W. H. (2004). Fiscal Sustainability. Paper presented at the Egyptian Center for Economic Studies in Cairo on 19 October 2003. Revised in 2004. London: European Bank for Reconstruction and Development.
- BURNSIDE, C. (2005). Fiscal Sustainability in Theory and Practice: A Handbook. Washington: The World Bank.
- CHALK, N, R. HEMMING (2000). Assessing Fiscal Sustainability in Theory and Practice. In: Banca d’Italia (2000): Fiscal Sustainability. Rome: Banca d´Italia. Web Document: http://www.bancaditalia.it/studiricerche/convegni/atti/fiscal_sust;internal&action=_setlanguage.action?LANGUAGE=en
- INTERNATIONAL MONETARY FUND (2002). Assessing Sustainability, International Monetary Fund, Washington, DC. Also available at: http://www.imf.org/external/np/pdr/sus/2002/eng/052802.pdf.
- POLITO V, M WICKENS (2005). Measuring Fiscal Sustainability. Centre for Dynamic Macroeconomic Analysis Conference Papers 2005. Castlecliffe: University Of St Andrews.
- TER-MINASSIAN T, M ALLEN (2004). Public Investment and Fiscal Policy. Washington: The International Monetary Fund.
- VICKERMAN R (2007). Recent Evolution of Research into the Wider Economic Benefits of Transport Infrastructure Investments. Discussion Paper N. 2007-9. Boston OECD/ITF Joint Transport Research Centre.
On economic growth:
- AGHION P, S N DURLAUF (2005): Handbook of Economic Growth. 2 vols. Amsterdam: Elsevier
- ALESINA A, R PEROTTI (1994): The Political Economy of Growth: A Critical Survey of the Recent Literature. World Bank Economic Review. 8, 3: 351-371
- BARRO R J, SALA-I-MARTIN X (2004): Economic Growth. 2nd Edition. Cambridge (Massachusetts,Estados Unidos): The MIT Press.
- EASTERLY W, R LEVINE (2001): What have we learned from a decade of empirical research on growth? It's Not Factor Accumulation: Stylized Facts and Growth Models. World Bank Economic Review. 15: 177 - 219.
- KLENOW P J, A RODRÍGUEZ-CLARE (1997): Economic growth: A review essay. Journal of Monetary Economics 40,3:597-6
- PRITCHETT L (2000): Understanding Patterns of Economic Growth: Searching for Hills among Plateaus, Mountains, and Plains. World Bank Economic Review. 14: 221 - 250.
- ROMER P M (1990): Endogenous Technological Change. Part 2: The Problem of Development: A Conference of the Institute for the Study of Free Enterprise Systems. The Journal of Political Economy, 98 (5): S71-S102
- VAMVAKIDIS A (1998): Regional Integration and Economic Growth. World Bank Economic Review, May 1998; 12: 251 – 270.
- WONG P K, Y P HO and E AUTIO (2005). Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Economic Growth: Evidence from GEM data. Small Business
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The distinction between tourism planning and urban planning may be determined by how the nature of tourism differs from that of community development, physical (infrastructure and facility) planning, and land use planning. Tourism planning usually focuses on the interests of specific groups in the population, particularly those in the private sector like tourism corporations, while urban planning usually seeks to serve the interests of broader society. Tourism planning often is focused more on the facilities and infrastructure that serve tourists such as associated leisure and hospitality sectors. Urban planning is generally more inclusive in its field, trying to pay attention to all the fundamental sides of quality of life and community development, although this varies from one location to another. Moreover, while urban planning is a basic social necessity, essential for the control of development and property values, tourism planning is not seen as a fundamental public necessity, thus voluntary cooperation is often less critical for public discussion.
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Dear Colleagues! How do you think the concept of "University 3.0" in the world is already outdated? Is there a chance to build a "University 4.0" for those who have not passed the "3.0" stage?
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Hi! Do you know the work of Ronald Barnett. He is on RG. Listened to him once, very interesting, he is ”imagining the university” https://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ihe/article/download/6085/5330 by a constructed concept play: ”The research university”; The bureaucratic university; ”the ecological university” etc and discusses in papers, books and lectures about 40 such concepts of the form ”The xyz University” (maybe more now). Here are some of his slides - see on the second half of the series especially https://slideplayer.com/slide/6222483/ . He is rather critical to ”the entreprenerial university” but kind of likes ”the ecological university” more, but has criticism there as well. Quite interesting framework for nuanced discussion.
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Urban dictation contributes significantly to the sustainable development of cities.
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Dear Dr Ihsan,
I agree with you that (Decision makers lack information, and they do not seek to acquire specialists to improve urban conditions) specially in middle east counters such as Iraq so I think a part of these responsibility on the NGO and Academic members to spread awareness between the community as well as Decision makers about that .
regards
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I am working on update master plan of the city
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Dear Dr Dhirgham,
Actually, the scale is the difference between urban planning and the urban design so the question is what that will be because of this situation??
regards
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Most developing countries are witnessing the intervention of influential actors (especially politicians) in the urban planning process, To benefit from the resources provided by cities
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When the influences of politicians are negative, as they relied on specific agendas, developers, and elites when they have made their decisions, we should strengthen the roles of planners and public participation in the planning process. You can also have a look on these references.
- Sewell, WR Derrick, and John Terence Coppock. Public participation in planning. John Wiley & Sons, 1977.
- Innes, Judith E., and David E. Booher. "Public participation in planning: new strategies for the 21st century." (2000).
- Catanese, Anthony James. The politics of planning and development. Vol. 156. SAGE Publications, Incorporated, 1984.
- Vasu, Michael. Politics and planning: A national study of American planners. UNC Press Books, 2018.
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Hi all,
I am very new to the research gate website and I was wondering if the community might be able to help me out.
I am currently writing an essay for my March Part II at the University of Westminster. The subject is the Bishopsgate Goods Yard in Shoreditch, which is a vacant site since 1964 and one of the biggest brown fields left in central London.
In conjunction with my essay, I am trying to write a section that deals with land value in London and another on planning policies. For some reason all the people I have reached out to have avoided answering any of my questions.
I was wondering if within the Research Gate community anyone would be able to answer my questions regards to these two subjects or better even know people that actually work for Planning at houses of parliament or developers that could give me hard facts on land value in London?
Apologies in advance if these kind of discussions are perhaps avoided on this website but I am getting to a point where I feel I need to do anything in order to have even one answer back.
All the best,
Thom
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Hi Thom,
Greenbelt policy has been at the heart of discussion on land value and land use policy in London. You might find the following papers useful for your research.
Gant, Robert L., Guy M. Robinson, and Shahab Fazal. 2011. “Land-Use Change in the ‘Edgelands’: Policies and Pressures in London’s Rural–Urban Fringe.” Land Use Policy 28 (1): 266–79. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.landusepol.2010.06.007.
Han, Albert T., and Min Hee Go. 2019. “Explaining the National Variation of Land Use: A Cross-National Analysis of Greenbelt Policy in Five Countries.” Land Use Policy 81 (February): 644–56. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.landusepol.2018.11.035.
I can send you my article if you don't have access to the journal.
Hope this helps.
Albert Han
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Business cycles continue to last longer. They are increasingly being extended through active interventionist monetary and socio-economic policies. Implementations of large infrastructure and energy investment projects often require longer, long-term construction and implementation periods. Countries with large resources of production factors, including financial, human and technological capital can implement large investment projects in the public sector or as part of public-private partnerships. In China, for example, the modern technological metropolis Shenzen was built from scratch in China during the 30th anniversary. There are planned at least two similar large infrastructure and metropolitan projects, including a modern city, self-sufficient in crops and a significant portion of other commodities, a modern city that is to be built from scratch in a maximum of 30 years as a new technological development metropolis.
Were the countries and corporations of the highly developed Western countries able to draw inspiration from strategic management with large investment projects in the public sector that are currently implemented and designed in countries such as China?
Please, answer, comments.
I invite you to the discussion.
Best wishes,
Dariusz Prokopowicz
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It is difficult to put current or recent China's projects as a source of inspiration for Western countries. Delta works is the largest public project in the Netherlands. It was accepted in 1958 and it was completed in 1997. The initial plan was for 25 years and the estimated costs -- 20% of the national GDP of 1958.
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What are the main concerns/issues for the small- and medium-sized cities in planning and implementation of ELECTRIC bike-sharing & car-sharing stations from both spatial (location of a station) and power source points of view?
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Some concerns that you should consider to achieve your goals are (1) the locations, that would be used for distributing your stations in the city, should be placed at accessible paths (well-connected streets); (2) locations of bike-sharing and car-sharing stations should take into account the infrastructure (they should be close to the electricity sources and easy to be maintained); a good campaign - relied on a questionnaire method to know how they would act and what they need - for preparing the public to adopt this program in their daily life.
Look at these references.
- DeMaio, Paul. "Bike-sharing: History, impacts, models of provision, and future." Journal of public transportation 12, no. 4 (2009): 3.
- García-Palomares, Juan Carlos, Javier Gutiérrez, and Marta Latorre. "Optimizing the location of stations in bike-sharing programs: A GIS approach." Applied Geography 35, no. 1-2 (2012): 235-246.
- Rickenberg, Tim A., Andreas Gebhardt, and Michael H. Breitner. "A Decision Support System For The Optimization Of Car Sharing Stations." In ECIS, p. 207. 2013.
- Jorge, Diana, and Gonçalo Correia. "Carsharing systems demand estimation and defined operations: a literature review." European Journal of Transport and Infrastructure Research 13, no. 3 (2013): 201-220.
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How much the size of spatial area affects traffic generation within the area and the resulting traffic volumes in the relevant city (public transport or individual transport)?
Is there any method of theoretical approach how to describe this issue?
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So, you are looking for a direct link between traffic and area extension. At the best of my knowledge this issue has not been investigated. Traditionally, I would refer to 4steps modelling approach instead gravity model. For you pueposes, gravity models should work only if the population ans /or other attributes are uniformely distributed.
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The Public transpiration system of all developing countries are getting popular because of the integrated transportation development projects.
Having practice a different kind of technology with developing country public community is hard to continue. The world have lot of experiences. Can we share some ideas. It will add more values for my project
Thank You
Dilshan
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Dear Dilshan,
Here are some experiences from Singapore on developing an integrated multi-modal transport system.
Hope you find these articles are interesting to read.
Best, Tao
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There are more advantages and disadvantages in regional planning. so it should have critiques and make new strategies to over come this disadvantages. Please add your ideas.
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Regional planning has potential to address more of socio-economic and sustainability issues than just physical infrastructure. Most of the regional planning actions are focused on urban regions which in itself is centered around mother cities and its hinterland. Physical planning of regions have taken out people from its ambit of concern. Regional planning should have inclusive strategies, resource sharing abilities and bridge the urban -rural divide. The regional resources and its utilization (not exploitation) must be addressed by focusing on the natural resources. Its not prudent to being more urban centered which looking for expansion beyond cities physical limits. The administration of the regions which largely historical and geographical basis encompasses the security of resources for future. Most of the regions globally have exploited the regions for its resources, and left to fend for themselves while looking for good opportunity somewhere else. The cultural imprints and nature of region must be respected not only for protection of local culture but also to reduce the regional conflict. The national character of planning somewhat disregard the regional aspiration which can be addressed by more participatory and community based planning.
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I'm checking some modelling frameworks (LEAP? TIMES? MESSAGE? EnergyPlan?) to perform the validity of several types of measures regarding city planning, smart measures, etc.
Thank you in advance.
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Dear Diego García-Gusano,
here are some literature with methods and tools for Smart City Energy Planning. Some of these may be interesting for you.
Best regards
Anatol Badach
Smart City Energy Planning: Integrating Data and Tools
A new way for Smart Energy Planning in cities: the INSMART solution
Study on City Energy Plan and Control
Extensible Energy Planning Framework for Preemptive Tasks
Methods and tools for community energy planning: A review
GIS-based urban energy systems models and tools: Introducing a model for the optimisation of flexibilisation technologies in urban areas
A review of urban energy system models: Approaches, challenges and opportunities
An Integrated Planning Framework for the Development of Sustainable and Resilient Cities – The Case of the InSMART Project
Research in city energy planning and it's development strategy
Developing a city energy modelling tool and approach
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By making a city's public transportation system completely free of charge for all users, at all times, one can dispense with fare boxes, card readers, turnstiles, and inspectors. For buses or trams, this would enable much faster boarding, and therefore vehicles would spend less time at stops. Further speedups are possible by providing wider doors, and boarding by rear doors.
Less time spent at stops means faster trip times, especially during rush hours. When each bus or tram can make more round trips in a given time period, fewer vehicles will be needed to transport the same number of people. This represents savings in both capital and operating costs.
How much speedup can be anticipated, and how many fewer vehicles would this entail? A related question would be: in going to a free public transportation system, how many more riders would use the system, and how would this vary based on the amount of trip speedup?
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Thank you, Manu! That looks very interesting! I recently discovered that the Urban Planning people at McGill are doing studies in this area, eg Ahmed El-Geneidy. I have yet to contact them, though.
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If we developed a rural area to become a city, what kind of social impacts should be addressed, both positive or negative impacts?
In those areas many people live and their livelihoods depend on local resources. Meanwhile the infrastructures still lack facilitation.
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Population Change, Healthy lifestyle or Quality of life, Social cohesion and sense of belonging, Housing conditions, Access to employment and education, Civic participation and empowerment
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In my article "When knowledge is power: grassroots participatory initiative as a process of resource development" I claim that residents are initiating informal grassroots participatory initiatives to intervene in planning-related decision making and adjust planning deliverables according to their spatial interests, perspectives, and needs (i.e., local knowledge). In the process of addressing their goals, residents face powerful players, e.g., jurisdictions and private developers. The question arises: which resources could help residents interact with powerholders to obtain their support for incorporating local knowledge into plans? Based on two case studies this paper claims that communal resources – including environmental and civic awareness, social capital, planning knowledge and political capital – are needed to develop residents’ initiative and increase residents’ success in incorporating local knowledge into planning.
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I suggest you look at the concept of community capacity. This can be strengthened and measured and there are a number of publications and tools available-see my RG contributions as a guide.
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I am looking for a university or a research institution in the field of urbanism and city planning that is interested in hosting and funding a series of seminars that are related to the impacts of political change and politics on the built environment as well as the physical transformation of cities.
Some topics could be:
Transformation of cities post the Arab spring revolutions
Urbicide and postwar reconstruction
Border settlements and regions
New Capitals
Forced displacement
Impact of the waves of migration on cities
Planning for control.
Any suggestions?
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I am willing to help if you provide more information. This includes
1. Time of the year?
2. Number of attendees wishing to attract?
3. Conference committee?
4. Registration management?
Thanks
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Real estate agencies (REA) do not just accept all the properties that sellers are willing to sell thru them.
I have no prior experience, but I imagine that there are some criterias that REA check and decide if a property is marketable (and profitable) for them too, and not only to the seller.
For example, a REA might not want to take care of a very nice villa in the middle of the nowhere in the Alps.
Or, it might not want to take care of an almost destroyed refuge in an unknown place.
Could you provide a few general example of types of properties, such as strange parking lots, unusual land parcels or strange city places...
Free room to your fantasy!!
thx for the help,
Nic
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Hi, your question is really interesting. After consulting with my friend who is also a property agent, a conclusion was drawn which states that, at least in Malaysia, there is no such standard criteria or checklist that helps REA to decide whether a property is sellable or not. Selling a property requires marketing strategy and marketing strategy is a common sense.
My friend believes that there are always ways to sell a property. The most important thing is how the REA presents a property and to what target customers. However, there are certain rule-of thumb that a REA needs to take into consideration in order to ensure a property is saleable, such as cleaning up, redecorating, tidying up the outdoor surrounding, fixing any cracking, pest damage, unsafe wiring, broken windows, or anything else that may put buyers off etc.
At last, regardless of the quirks, condition, and location of a property, there is always a right buyer out there for every property.
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Gaining UK planning consents, particularly in the south-east, is particularly challenging to architects.  We would like to identify any extant research pertaining to the way in which sustainable or green building rating systems address--or can address--the practical realities prevalent in gaining statutory planning, or 'zoning', consents.  The notion of 'practical realities' refers to the difficulties that clients continually face in making sustainable design measures beyond building regulations stack up financially and practically in terms of gaining planning consents.
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Good morning Mr Kulczak
In direct response to your question, I am not aware of any research related to your question.
Although I am not aware of the particular difficulties that architects may experience in obtaining planning permission in the south-east of England, based on my professional experience this is more of a UK wide issue at present that likely stems from the disparity between the authorities ambitions and the reality on the ground influenced to a great extent by the austerity in general and in particular within the public sector. In this context I personally see the sustainability rating systems to be more of a hindrance that an help. To achieve a particular sustainability rating it not only adds to the construction costs, but also add to the design cost and time. Yet, I do not recall coming across publications that actually determine the 'payback period' of going up from a rating that can reasonably be achieved to a higher one that is more onerous, or even determine the 'payback period' for going for any rating at all. Whilst, I do not doubt the likely long term contribution of any environmentally rated building, I firmly believe to be more beneficial to go through a more widespread general improvements delivered by the Building Regulations than to seek BREEAM Excellent or similar from any building of 1000 sq.m. or more, or from any residential development of 10 or more dwellings, as it is often the case.
If required or desirable, subject to the economic viability test, the environmental ratings should be reserved for truly capital project with abundant resources, where the prestige of the future user is at stake or where market demands it and is prepared to pay for it.
With Best Wishes
Vladimir Ladinski
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adaptive reuse of historic buildings, carbon, sustainability, city planning, urbanization
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Very simply adaptive reuse and repurposed historic buildings enhance sustainability by:
1. By being able to be maintained over a long time
2. Minimising cost ( saving on demolition and new construction)
3. By being adaptive social forms ( transform according to social changes)
4. By helping social cognitive skill through fusing old techniques with the new.
5. By way of preservation/conservation of existing environment (this further helps in addressing important macro issues such as climate change)
Hope these directions help.
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Hi, looking for data about low-carbon city planning to help me in my MSc dissertation which will link with Value Engineering. 
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For monitoring UHI with test beds at different locations in a city, how much geographical area/radius should be assumed in each location in order to evaluate the influence of various geographical and topographical features on the urban temperatures in each given location? 
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At some point the radius of 300 o 500 meters may make sense since this is the walkable minimum distance. that affects the morphological form of the part of the city.
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I am looking for historical data (1950 to present) of water sources for drinking in some cities in the USA. I was wondering if there is a specific source for these kinds of information?
Or I have to look for the data for each location separately?
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I get regular updates/newsletters fro Circle of Blue (social@circleofblue.org)
In a latest newsletter I found the following links which may be useful to you:
This network has links with many archives, etc. They may be able to help you, as they publish current and older documents at times.
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I would like to know of world-wide examples where Temporary uses and Spaces are used as a 'testing' tool for traffic and/or urban design project. Whether the Government, municipality or developer decided to 'Trial' or Test the potential project before investing in the permanent change in the public realm.
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See the publication by Bishop and Williams, Temporary City. Also, times square in NYC is a great example and the practice of <Temporary breakfasts>
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Can anyone suggest good work about the (social) structure of residents of co-housing projects? I'm interested in studies, surveys which analyse the structure of residents based on aspects like the economic situation, education, age,social class, ...
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Dear Maximilian,
Here are some of the papers I read on the subject. I hope you'll be interested:
- Francesca Bianchi, "Le co-housing en Italie entre rêve et réalité. Une recherche sur les aspirations à la co-résidence", International Review of Sociology, 2015, 25-3
- Jones, Katharinan "Immigrating to a cohousing project", Communities 168 (Fall 2015): 51-52.
- Christiane Droste, "German co-housing: an opportunity for municipalities to foster socially inclusive urban development?", Urban Research and Practice, 2015, 8-1
- Betsy  "Women in Cohousing: Pioneers, Visionaries, and Leaders", Communities, 2008, 138
- DiCalogero, Charlene, "Cohousing for Non-Cohousers", Communities, 2009, 144
Best regards
d.
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Dear Researchers,
There are new developments across world to accommodate increasing population, but these developments are changing the character of the neighborhood – mostly adopting modern elevations and Glass facades. Can you please share your views and related research in this field please?
Regards
Uma Jadhav
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Dear Uma, 
New built forms are often criticised being ignorant to local, social and cultural values of the traditional forms. As you and other researchers clearly stated earlier, the main reason for this is the rapid urban transformation in many cities causing the loss of place identities, a lack of sense of place and the homogenisation of cultures. My particular stress is on “Sense of Place” (SoP), because changes and the transformation in the built environment is inevitable and sustaining SoP is the only way to protect the character of the neighbourhood. 
For this purpose, the design of new developments in line with traditions is a well-promoted strategical approach. However, the challenge is to find how to bridge between the new and the old. I am not sure, if you are only focusing on facades/visual appearance/aesthetic pleasantness, but currently, typo-morphology based design approaches are gathering momentum in developing new design guidelines and strategies to sustain the place identities in the new developments at different levels of resolution from a building level to urban level.
For the theoretical background, I’d suggest you read the following papers. Amongst these, you can check out Peter Larkham’s works since he is currently focusing on the heritage conservation in reconstructed areas.
Hope this is somewhat helpful for you.
Best wishes,
Duygu
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"The ability to bring together experts, national and international specialists in integrated urban regeneration, as well as others involved in the rehabilitation process, it is essential when it is presented as the main alternative the model followed so far. Also, allows progress in defining a methodology for the design and evaluation of plans and programs of rehabilitation, the goal of the National Research Plan I + D + i project “Urban regeneration, intervention in housing estates from 1960 to 1980 . Urban integration, social cohesion and environmental responsibility. “(BIA2011-26973), currently underway.
With these premises, from the Department of Urban and Regional Planning (DUyOT) of ETSAM are organizing the seminar “Urban regeneration: social cohesion, environmental responsibility and urban integration” to be held on 29,30 and 31 October 2012 in the School of Architecture of Madrid (ETSAM). This seminar, the result of the granting of aid for complementary actions of the National Research Plan I + D + i 2008-2012, linked to the research project of the National Plan I + D + i currently underway, is part of the line Rehabilitation research and urban Regeneration developed by the department and the Research Group in Architecture, Urbanism and Sustainability (giau + s) and included in this platform."
Director: Agustín Hernández Aja.
Scientific Coordination: Ángela Matesanz Parellada, Carolina García Madruga, Cristina Fernández Ramírez e Iván Rodríguez Suárez.
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It all depends on which government(s) have constitutional authority over cities, on the specific proposals for "urban renewal,"  and on whether third parties (developers, community associations, etc.) have also committed substantial funding to the prospective project.  Trade-offs will need to occur between (a) the benefits of widespread financial support, and (b) the restrictions in the design and operation which sustainability will require.
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Dear Dr. Mounir
Do you know which countries do not allow you to fragment agriculture lands,  and which countries do not allow you to buy extra land from neighbors?
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Excellent response from Geoff , Peter , and other colleagues. Let em add another piece of information regarding Land Laws. In north-eastern parts of India , there still exists a Land Tenurial system . Infact,  land Tenure is a major influence both on the maintenance of soil fertility and on the ability to intensify agriculture on a sound scientific basis. Recognising the that farmers mus have robust access rights to land . if they are to invest in it . Donors have supported Land Reforms Programmes that increase the security of the tenure. Improvements in Land Rights often result in only gradual improvements in productivity. 
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I am looking for opinions, as well as articles, on the relationship between the formation of town/city planning and the formation plural society.
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Absolutely! Urban Planning can create gentrified and segregated communities, which are ethnically and socially homogeneous. This happens in most cases and in general poor planning displaces discriminated sectors of the population to the margins while the wealthiest and dominant classes occupy the most desirable sector of the city. This can be seen quite clearly in Paris, London, New York and many other major cities. 
 On the other hand, a good planning process can lead to multicultural, plural and diverse communities where different social groups and ethnicities can flourish.  
For further reading:
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Urban Infrastructural requirements with in Indian Context and Role of Indian Users including Architects.
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Dear Anoop,
You could have a look on the writings of Isam Shahrour, Professor at Lille University, who publised a lot concernin this topic in the last years.
Best regards,
Christophe
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in the context of the just started European H2020 project MOBILITY4EU, I would like to know how many cities in Europe and also elsewhere have developed SUMPs. Is there a dynamic there, do many more cities develop such strategies that European institution want to see more and more developed?
It seems a big issue to find a source for the monitoring of this, crawling in the jungle of European projects.
I found elements in the Eltis project, but does it exist other sources?
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At least few Lithuanian municipalities (Klaipeda, Kaunas, Palanga and other) working now on SUMPs and they will be ready in about 4-5 months.
Some other municipalities have new SUMPs: for example Utena
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A case study can be a shopping mall in an urban scale perception: The spatial environment present within a shopping mall has unlimited variation interns of sizes, texture, colour and much more. How does it affect the shoppers or in other words, how do shopper react to these spatial qualities?
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 Niven Krishna Murdamoothoo
Consult the books of business management, especially the books of Retail Management.
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town planning & regional planning
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Spatial Implication can be observed when governments
(A) Prepares the land use plan and impacts the valuation of land and property
(b) Regulates the land utilization there by resulting in planned and un planned areas
(c) Regulates the finance and affects the real estate market there by affects the construction industry
(d) Finance policy for the banks and state supply of properties have positive and negative impacts of markets and density or sprawl of cities are affected.
(e) Govt helps the large corporate and public sector organization to procure land through govt. help is intervention in the market when large sum of lands are brought and sold impacts the development trends leading to progress and deterioration of cities. 
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Currently I'm doing research on the priority factors in the provision of clean water infrastructure in the Bandung metropolitan area (indonesia), more specific to low-income communities.
I will use Analytical Network Process (ANP) method to seek factor priorities that will determined by the government through the planning agency and the local water company.
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few factors include cost and accessibility to user. Distance travelled to access the water
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Most of our towns and cities (even cities in Manila) are not well designed resulting into non-functional communities. This maybe because many of our planners or planning committees are non-functional as well.
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Recently in Melbourne, Australia, efforts have been undertaken to develop sub-regional (~1 million population) integrated plans which consider water supply, sewerage and stormwater systems in one work package, and link these with smaller scale growth area plans. I am wondering if there are other notable cities in the world which have attempted a similar task? Or if not, is there any notable academic literature which describes/compares actual water industry water infrastructure planning functions? (integrated or otherwise) 
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Depends on what is defined as integration - urban master plans incorporate different aspects - water, wastewater, stormwater/drainage but each one is modeled separately though using same demographics, geography, etc. data. With all the GIS capabilities some are trying to integrate the three hydraulic models but this doesn't always work as  storm events will usually have little or no impact on  water models where the sources of water are deep aquifers. But then there are storms events which impact wastewater models  because of inflow and infiltrations from combined or separate sewers but these events are usually programmed after calibration studies. Any a few links for your perusal below: 
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Obviously, I believe that the time period can be subjective based on the requirements of that particular country and other trends but still I want to know precisely.
For an example lets say that we need to make a prediction about the population of the city, furthermore lets posit that our prediction has a strong correlation with the city-plan it self, then we would have to make an assumption that the city-plan will not be changed for a particular time period, which is the standard time period (i.e. if there exists such a standard) the city is designed for.  
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Dear Sandun,
This is an interesting question, though it's quite difficult to get a unique answer. I can tell you what is currently done in Italy, precisely in the region of Milan (Lombardia). Be aware that this applies only in that area, as other Italian regions have different legislation and planning procedures.
When an urban plan is done (things can be different in case of regional or provincial plans), we have to consider that a city council is elected every 5 years. Because of this, the strategic part of the city plan forecast the development of that city in 5 years. Then, we have a statutory part of the city plan (which can last until this is changed. Usually, the statutory part of the plan is changed according to the strategic one).
Because of this, when we forecast what has to be done, we (urban planners) are required to 'size' the plan development according to both: 1) the probable demographic evolution, and 2) the related need of services. 
This is because in Italy -and in region Lombardia- we have standards to respect (e.g. 26.5 sqm per each resident living in a city/town, divided per 'education facilities', 'green areas' such as parks, 'parkings', and 'others').
Therefore, We have first of all to check the current ratio between existing services and the population living in the city. Then, we forecast the population change in 5 years. In the end, we know how many services (and which ones, e.g. parkings in case there are not enough) we need to provide for the whole population estimated to live in the city/town 5 years from now.
This could be helpful to give you an idea about how things work in an Italian region, at the local scale.
Please let me know if you are interested in this topic, and I will provide you more information on these practices.
Kind regards,
Umberto
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What's the difference between shrinking city and declining city? Can anyone suggest literature on these two topics?
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To Gerhard: I am sure that discussions of this sort are very much discipline-related and are a proof of  a general lack of interdisciplinarity. It would be worthwhile to trace the history of the study of "shrinking" cities in economics,demography, geography, political sciences, anthropology,etc. to understand who claimed what concept on which grounds and how some standard expressions became dominant. 
However, in my understanding (I confess I am a geographer), shrinkage has a spatial connotation, involving a two or tri-dimensional space - like the shrinking size of mushrooms when you dry them. So, it makes sense to speak about a shrinking space, but not about a declining space. There can be dispute about shrinking or declining economies and population - both verbs apply to them since they are multidimensional concepts -, but it is more obvious to talk about a declining migration than a shrinking migration and about a declining Gross Regional Product rather than a shrinking one. 
To Xina: you should follow (with the necessary distance to take the Chinese context into consideration)  the following discussion list: URBAN-SHRINKAGE-AND-RESILIENCE@JISCMAIL.AC.UK. Much of the well-quoted literature is related to the central and east European countries and their transition process to capitalism, but of course, the political, economic and demographic path of China is very different.
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A student of Holford at Liverpool claimed that Holford insisted of two means probably from USSR on controlling urban growth and correct urban illness: a) town and country planning law, b) zoning. But zoning is not a British invention nor practice. Zoning originated in Prussia and formalized in the US.
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In mainstream planning, Corbu and CIAM are not considered important. Their contributions are framed by architects and urban designers, not planners. The Euclid case is the establishment of constitutionality of zoning by the US Supreme Court based on the legal argument of police power to control nuisance. Before that, Goodrich in NY and his associated established the zoning code for NYC. But earlier attempt using zoning was in California in the 1880s to exclude Chinese laborers. Zoning also exported to Japan in the late 19th century. Through colonization of Korea and Taiwan, the system was established. The Chinese planning pioneers started discussing zoning in the 1920s. Also planning and zonning are about use, connection, flow, employment; CIAM folks had a shallow understanding of city functions. The earlier attempt on planning was in public health on trashes, drinking water, sewage, and diseases control. 
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The White Paper on Transport (2011) has set as an objective to reach buy 2030 an essentially CO2 free urban freight distribution in major cities. What are in your opinion the most promising research alleys one should focus on to reach asuch an objective? Should we concentrate on technologY? Regulation? Stakeholder involvement? Innovative policy formulations? And who should we involve in the research? Why?
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Dear Edoardo
Good question. The issue is complex hence one does need to work on all factors.
I am working on this area since last two years and have exchanged ideas with various stakeholders on the feasibility of the proposed solutions. I started with a technology factor discussing how different stakeholders (including regulators) can work together to achieve the white paper goals of modal shift. For e.g. Internet based multimodal exchanges for consolidating road transport to rail to reduce CO2 emissions.
Please see an article I wrote on it. Does this answer your question? 
Best regards
Anuradha
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i want to do a research about planning mitigation for disabilities, especially for physical disability. I want to know the needs or the facilities for them during disaster
Thankyou :D
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Hi,
You can explore a research documentation from Handicap International- http://www.handicap-international.de/fileadmin/redaktion/pdf/disability_management.pdf
Also have time to read this research paper- http://www.preventionweb.net/files/9706_DisasterManagement.pdf
Hope this will solve your query.
Thanks
Yash
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The Compact cities are generally attributed with high density urban development having increased socio-economic diversity and improved public realm providing ample opportunities for social interactions and exchanges with pedestrian friendly and closed knit urban form having equitable access to goods, services and facilities thereby minimizing environmental degradation, thus sustainable. But at the same time there are the literatures which point out that high density development have poor quality of life. so my question is "what could be the attributes of a Compact Cities & are they really sustainable? if not then can they be sustainable? and how?"
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Md. Fuzail,
Compact city is the opposite of diffuse city. It is not necessarily high density. What is important is the diversity of activities in every part of the city. Economic, social, cultural, housing, government and so on. It is sustainable because it reduces mobility, reduces energy consumption and reduces carbon footprint.
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Street art is a low cost tool for urban regeneration/redevelopment inclusive of all stakeholders of a community or city as it can alter public perceptions and is a separation of art form and crime.
Since urban regeneration is a process and an outcome, street art can be a key driver in urban regeneration/redevelopment. Therefore, I believe street art can successfully assist and encourage urban regeneration of cities, places and communities. This is viewed as physical, economical and social drivers to successfully implement and transform changes to underprivileged places and communities in order to reinvent, rejuvenate, occupy the city, building, urban space and community via adopting new life, improved quality of life, urban beautification, community participation, pedestrian networks, economic advancement and a cultural and lively community/city.
Some prime examples of this is:
   - Hoiser Lane / Melbourne, Australia
   - PowerHouse / Geelong, Australia
   - Rio Cruzeiro Favela Painting project / Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
   - Philly Painting project / Philadelphia, USA
I would like to understand your view to this and even your added information that may assist this idea of street art and urban regeneration. Feel free to add to the list of examples above.
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