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During the lent of 2020 the COVID-19 pandemic hit the UK and a national lockdown was announced. This turned churches into overnight studios for broadcasting their live services and Zoom meetings and turning pastors into TV Host and producers.
According to Cressman (2001:46), the pandemic has impacted how societies function and relate to each other, and this is the reason why I am conducting this research on 3 Pentecostal churches in Slough, United Kingdom to discover how the pandemic affected the church, the community and its doctrinal theology. It is important for this research to be conducted as it highlights not just the theological aspect of an individual or community but opens up to discovering how individuals react to be isolated behaviour and how the church overcomes different situations it is facing through its community.
The gathering of believers according to Adebola (2020:224) is first read in the Acts of the Apostle (2:1-5) where they gathered in the temple to pray and before that to discuss the replacement of Judas Iscariot.
Scholars agree that the above event being described as the first Christian gathering. I agree with Adebola the community from the beginning has been centred around the church and not just from a theological factor but also a social factor. This exciting research will explore the activities taken by Pentecostal churches in Slough during the COVID-19 pandemic, and the differences they had to adjust to as an organisation to achieve the set goals by adhering to new religious rules.
This research will also show how the church and the community were affected from a theological manner, I will research the change in the delivery of service and methodology, the discouragement to not taking the vaccine and its effects on the church and its members. This research will look at the virtual church and the importance it has played in the existence of individual churches. Through interviews with members, we will investigate how members adapted to prayer meetings, bible study groups which were previously done collectively.
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Wow this is really helpful Thank you for sharing this. Bless you
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Hello, good afternoon. My name is Maria João Soares and I'm a Senior Researcher at Lisbon University (School of Arts and Humanities). I've published to chapters in Historia Geral de Cabo Verde, vols. II e III concerning church history. I will like to read the article concerning Nossa Senhora da Conceição church at Ribeira Grande and similar articles, because have read the one concerning Nossa Senhora da Luz church. Could someone send them to me?
Best regards,
Maria João Soares.
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Hello Maria,
maybe this article (Um espaço devocional da corte portuguesa: A igreja de Nossa Senhora da Conceiçâo de Vila Viçosa -Séculos XVII e XVIII))can help you:
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I have been involved in researching the effectiveness of representative missionary teachers in the South during the 19th century. I am interested in what qualifications were required in order to receive financial support, and how much and how often such teachers received money or materials. Who supplied what was needed to educate the poor? Did all teachers receive the same degree/amount of support? What conditions might cause withdrawal of support?
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Thank you! I will look into it.
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I am looking for some resources to help establish some of the earliest facts around key missionary personnel from pentecostal mission work. Can anyone help me?
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Dear David, the link does not work anymore  :-(  I'm looking for the same information as Allan before =D
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I am currently working my way through the testimony from scripture in John Corrill's 1839 pamphlet on the early history of the church (see link #2 below). On page 14 of the pamphlet, when discussing the patriarchal blessing of Jacob bestowed upon Ephraim and Manasseh, John Corrill refers to "Genesis viii, 11, 20", which makes no sense. Given that the right chapter is Genesis 48, we can assume that the "xl" was dropped during write-up or printing. So no problem there. But the verses are confusing as well; in the modern KJV (which is aligned with the 1611 version at link #1 included below), the verses should be v16 and v19. Did the KJV have a different verse arrangement in the 1830s and 1840s, or was Corrill just quoting from memory, like Luther sometimes does, and missing it by a bit?
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The books of the Jews are in a different order but can be searched in ancient libraries containing the oldest copies. There is a manuscript in the Bibliotheca Alexandrina indicating this.
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The phrase "unión hipostática" occurs once in the writings of San Juan de la Cruz, like a received phrase which came to his mind at that time. Where did he learn it? Not from St Thomas Aquinas - apparently, Thomas does not use that exact phrase. I have not found it in Duns Scotus (also taught at Salamanca where Juan studied), nor in Melchor Cano or Luis de León. Authors speak of personal union, or even of union according to the hypostasis. But the exact phrase is 'hypostatic union'. The exact Greek equivalent I find in Leontius of Byzantium, but that is a rather distant link. The Diccionario de Autoridades offers examples from the 17th century. In fact, the Enciclopedia del Idioa of  Martín Alonso ascribes 'hipostatica' to 17th - 20th centuries. But where did 16th century Juan de la Cruz learn the phrase?
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Hypostatic union was formally confirmed at the First Council of Ephesus in 431, and was made explicit in the Nicene Creed. The Greek term hypostasis was used by the Stoics, and it's also used (infrequently) in the New Testament (Hebrews 1:3).
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I'm working on an article on Franciscan missions in the Philippines in the 17th-18th century. I know they had chapter meetings every so often to decide on mission-related issues. But I haven't found a good definition of what a "capitulo definitorio" is. I'd be really grateful if anyone could lead me to an ecclesiastical dictionary or any other publication.
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Thank very much for the reference!
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Church History, is there a record of any sort with regard to the founding of Zion churches and how they descended?
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Philip Jenkins has some information about ZCC in his book The Next Christendom: The Coming of Global Christianity. The index lists the pages.
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I know only the work of
BLUE, Ellen. (2011) St. Mark´s and the Social Gospel: Methodist Woman and Civil Rights in New Orleans, 1895-1995
John Patrick McDowell (1982). Social gospel in the South: The woman´s Home Mission Movement in the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, 1886 -1939.
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Dear prof. Dr. Dunaetz!
Thank you very much for these interesting and precise indications.
As a good number of missionary pastors has been trained at SMU or Candler, and the missionary [female] educators at Vanderbilt, some of the text may be of great help.
My basic thesis is that Social Gospel Influence in the South are more present than research is awared of.
Helmut Renders 
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I am researching declining main line churches and the rapid growth of mega churches in the Tri-State area (Philadelphia, New Jersey, and Delaware). If anyone has information as to the location of published research articles or dissertations on this subject please let me know where I might finds those articles.  
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See link to Hartford Institute's Megachurch research page.
In addition, I have included links to a couple of dissertations. I am sure there are many, many more.
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The idea is to find investigate how various Christian strands organise their offerings, ie the methods use in taking offerings, number of times offering/s is/are collected during worship service, motives for taking the offerings, and the method believers use in paying their offerings (ie high tech or cash). Believers can also provide me with these information regarding what takes place in their respective churches.
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I'll respond to your second question first, about some current practices that I'm aware of, although I do not know of any large-scale studies. I'd be interested in seeing what you discover.
In our United Church of Canada, a mainline denomination that is heir to both the Methodist and Presbyterian tradition, offerings are incorporated into the Sunday worship service as part of the liturgy.
As we do not traditionally emphasize tithing, this is usually referred to as the "offering of gifts" (and sometimes, "collection"). Liturgically, it's followed by a doxology, the emphasis being that of gratitude for what we have received, and presenting gifts as a symbol of our commitment to be followers -- it acts in a similar way to an altar call in other traditions, although less individualized and less emphasized. It would take place once in the service, although if there is a particular emergent need, there may be a "love offering" or a "retiring offering" that is voluntary, often after the service as people leave.
There is a shift to pre-authorized payments, rather than cash/cheque (our rural church congregation is about 50% of each).
While this pattern is typical for mainline Protestant churches (Anglican, Presbyterian, Methodist, United Church) in the US and Canada, in my experience, I don't know of any comprehensive study that is available.
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In Mexico, stone crosses carved with symbols of the Passion of Christ were typically erected in the atrium of a church or convent during the colonial era as part of the effort to convert the indigenous population to Christianity. Many have survived in situ and a handful are in museums and in private hands as part of their collections. The name of any such museum or collector and its location or contact information are requested as part of my research on Mexican Stone Crosses.
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I recommend the following sites:
As for private collectors and other museums, I think you must visit the churches, convents and oldest monasteries and places where ancient brotherhoods are, because they retain much of that heritage. Texcoco located in the "State of Mexico" has many places like that, but if you're in the city of Mexico, you could visit cathedrals and seminars.
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Can anyone refer me to any of Eastern Christianity's approaches to incest regulations or kinship matters? Thanks in advance.
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I'm not sure of a good source of general information - the Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium has an entry for "marriage impediments" that might be useful - but in terms of a specific instance illustrating Eastern Christian notions of what could constitute incest, the case of Nikephoros II Phokas and Theodora is interesting.  In the History of Leo the Deacon there is reference to arguments that Nikephoros' marriage to the widow Theodora was unlawful because Nikephoros had stood as godparent to Theodora's children by her first marriage.  This, curiously enough, was considered incest of a sort.  Not the general example you were probably looking for, but the quirky exceptions are always interesting too.
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I wonder if some legal (both: Church and civil) regulations were more important than social and economical processes?
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I couldn't say about the time you are asking, but for the early middle ages, and especially carolingian times, we have some episcopal estatutes that order the establishment of parish schools (you can download my articles about schooling in the early middle ages, they are however in Spanish). Apart from that, for mere practical reasons, parish priests needed to offer some sort of education to local boys, even if just to ensure the continuity of the religious services. Besides, I must remember you that one of the spiritual works of mercy is precisely "instruct the ignorant".
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The Nicean Creed formulated in AD 325 has been touted as a confirmation of the belief in the divinity of Christ. But was there not dissension amongst the Bishops present? Namely a divide between followers of Arrian and Orthodox believers led by Athanasius.
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Raymond, You are supporting a far more conventional understanding of Nicaea than I do, I freely admit. However, I would also note that I did not present all the evidence I have available to challenge the traditional view. I think there is ample evidence available to strongly suggest that the traditional view is flawed. However, as I am still writing the paper in which I present the additional evidence I am not presenting everything in this forum. However, an understanding of Roman culture and a review of Constantine's actions, as well as statuary suggests that both Athanasius and Eusebius were rather loose with the truth, and that subsequent Christians agreed with the official version.
Just one aspect of this additional evidence would be that the Arian issue was not finally settled until several more decades passed, and even then it was settled on the battlefield by the Huns, not in any theological discussion.
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How can we further divide the discourse in churches and how can we differentiate between the different services? What is the basic difference in their discourse?
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Thank you for your answer, Ahmad! Your research domain is very interesting. Personnally, I am not a specialist of Church discourse or religious discourse bu I am working in the field of discourse and text semiotics. I agree with your suggestion that religious narration, homily, and so on are different genres which can be "produced" within or by a Church discourse ("Church" here as a specific social actor) but they also can be produced by other social actors such as, for instance, the community of believers, of pilgrims, of religious writers, of poets, ... and also of politicians, and so on. In this sense, a religious narration or a homily can be produced inside but also outside the Church, ...
Best regards, Peter.
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I'm making researches on a few underground places of worship in Italy, so it would be of a great help if I could compare with similar places in Europe.
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A temple built before the pyramids
Hal Saflieni Hypogeum: 3600-3000 BC
Malta!
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I am trying to sort out Rabanus Maurus intellectual connections with people from Eastern origins. Is there any updated study that might shed some light on this matter?
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Get in touch with Bill Schipper at Memorial University in Newfoundland. He is still working on Rabanus' encyclopedia.
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The background of this question is the issue of whether the apostle Paul could have criticized the Roman empire in his letters without any danger (cf. John M. G. Barclay: Why the Roman Empire was insignificant to Paul).
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Dr. Helig,
My dissertation advisor at Harvard University Divinity School is the late Prof. Dieter Georgi. He passed away in March of 2005. His doctoral dissertation completed at Heidelberg (in the late 1950s/early 1960s) is: The Opponents of Paul in II Corinthians. His dissertation was originally produce in German.
The English translation of Prof. Georgi's disseratation was published in 1985 (via Fortress Press, in Philadelphia, PA, USA). Prof. Georgi's interest in Paul remained quite pronounced throughout his scholarly life.
His habilitation published in German in Germany in 1964 is on The History of Paul's Collection for Jerusalem. That work, too, was published in English in 1992 under the title: Remembering the Poor: The History of Paul's Collection for Jerusalem.
Another work of Prof. Georgi's that might be related to the question you pose is: Theocracy: In Paul's Praxis and Theology (1991).
In addition, I think a collection of essays published in 2004, less than a year before he passed away, might, more than any other of Prof. Georgi's publications be relevant in relationship to your question above. The book is entitled: The City in the Valley: Biblical Interpretation and Urban Theology (from an SBL series: Studies in Biblical Literature).
I hope that what I have shared above might prove helpful.
Thomas M. Scott, Th. D.
Associate Professor of Religion
Clark Atanta University
Atlanta, GA