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Child Sexual Abuse - Science topic

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Call for Book Chapters: (For Malaysian Authors Only)
I cordially invite you to join this project as author of chapter(s). The suggested topics are as follow. You’re welcome to suggest other interesting and suitable topic.
· History and Philosophy of Psychology
· Uniting our Nation
· Addiction
· Bias and Discrimination (Ethnic Minority)
· Reducing Crime
· Bully (School and Workplace)
· Mindfulness
· School Psychology (Instruction and Learning)
· Gangsterism
· Mental Health
· Transgender
· Learning disabilities
· Cyber Crime
· Psychology of Religion
· Suicide and Prevention
· Eating disorder
· Art of Parenting
· Relationship
· The Psychology of Migrant Workers
· Child Sexual Abuse
The expected word count is between 3,000 to 5,000 words. These guides are not meant as strict requirements. You may invite your colleagues, friends, or students to write a chapter.
Start your chapter now by emailing me at edupsypositive@gmail.com. Tell me your chapter title and co-authors names (if applicable) by 30th September 2018.
Full manuscript submission : 20 Oktober 2018
For further detail you may reach me at - 016-4323453
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Dear Sir...If any call for Chapters, please let me know.
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** This research is now coming to an end. Thank you to all those who have responded. **
Dear colleagues,
onlinePROTECT (led by Dr Hannah Merdian and Prof Derek Perkins) are conducting a research study on Non-Photographic Abuse Imagery (NPAI). NPAI may include computer-generated and drawn images showing child sexual abuse.
We would be grateful if you could point us to any published or unpublished literature or ongoing research on NPAI. Such literature may include definitions of NPAI, its cultural conceptualisation, legal classification, behavioural impact, relation to any technological developments or any other related topic you may consider relevant in the conceptualisation of NPAI.
We are also looking for professionals working in this (or a related) area to join an expert panel on NPAI – please get in touch if you are interested.
We appreciate your help.
If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to get in touch with us.
Best wishes,
Dr Hannah Merdian & Prof Derek Perkins
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In Seto and Eke (2015), on the development of the CPORT, we reported that approximately a third of the sample had NPAI (CGI/anime; not including stories). NPAI was NOT predictive of sexual recidivism in our analysis.
Link to the 2015 article on ResearchGate here:
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I am particularly interested in physical reactions to rape trauma, child sexual abuse trauma and such.
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Hi Ann,
This is something I'm just starting to research in my PhD studies. Here are a couple of articles to get you started.
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Hi all!
I would like to invite you to participate in completing an online questionnaire (phase 1) of my PhD research. I am a PhD Law and Criminology candidate (Doctorate) from the Institute of Criminal Justice at the University of Portsmouth. This survey is targeting the general public’s perception of paedophilia, child sexual abuse and prevention strategies. I would really appreciate as many responses as I can gather so please feel free to share the survey link with others who may be interested. Please note: you have to be 18 or over to participate. If you have any questions please email me on lauren.stevens@port.ac.uk
Many thanks in advance!
Lauren Stevens
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You are welcome, looking forward to see the questionnaire
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We are looking for prevention/intervention programs or good practices about child sexual abuse in early childhood institutions (kindergartens, pre-schools) worldwide. If you know any scientifically proven effective prevention/intervention program please share the relevant papers or pages in English.
Thank you for your help, Zsuzsa F. Lassú (Hungary)
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hi am passionate about child protection issues, however what work in a given environment may not work elsewhere, therefore consensus building discussions and brainstorming is key to answering this partinet question of what is the most viable intervention
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Hi there, I'm wondering if anyone can help with suggestions for
a trauma symptom measure that might be suitable for pre/post intervention use in a service helping men who have been affected by unwanted sexual experiences (may be recent or historical)?
We need to measure pre to post symptom severity so ideally there should be a decent level of sensitivity to change, and feasible to use in routine practice. The service offers both 1:1 counselling and group based interventions.
I'm hoping someone may be able to suggest the magic measure!
Many thanks :-)
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You are very welcome
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I am interested in and in dire need of good questionnaires that measure the perception, knowledge and understanding of Child Sexual Abuse specifically among adults. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
Cajetan
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Thank you Zain,
I have this already and its a good. Certainly, the materials you have sent me so far will be useful at one point or the other. Am only trying to see if I could get a questionnaire that meets my specific need otherwise your materials would play a great role.
Am really grateful.
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Questions included in measures that purport to test the knowledge of CSA prevention in children often employ vague phraseology that is open to misinterpretation. As such, how can these measures be relied upon to accurately assess children's knowledge of CSA prevention?
Here are 4 examples of questions with vague phraseology:
1) "You always have to keep secrets". The child participant is being asked to write down TRUE or FALSE.
Of course, from the perspective of the CSA prevention researcher, there is nothing vague at all about the wording of this question. After all, one of the most basic rules of CSA prevention programs is that NOT all secrets should be kept! Some secrets are good/safe/ok and some secrets are unsafe/bad/no-ok.
So, from the researcher's point of view, if the child answers TRUE, that indicates a lack of CSA prevention knowledge.
But is that really accurate?
Let's try to think about this for a moment from the child's perspective.
Of course, if the child who gave the answer has participated in a CSAPP (=child sexual abuse prevention program) that explicitly talks about different types of secrets and how some secrets are ok and can be kept, whereas others are not safe and should never be kept (which, to the best of my knowledge, basically all CSAPP's do), and that child nevertheless responds TRUE to the above questions, then, yes, it certainly makes sense to say that we have measured that the child did not gain in his knowledge (in this regard) from participating in the CSAPP.
But what if we're talking about a child who has never yet participated in a CSAPP? CSAPP outcome measures are to a great extent based on measuring children's knowledge pre-exposure to the CSAPP and contrasting that score with the score he gets post-exposure to the CSAPP. Ok, so we're talking about a child who has never yet been exposed to a CSAPP, and we're trying to figure out what, if any, CSA prevention knowledge he is lacking. And lo and behold, the child answers TRUE to the above question! There you have it, he is lacking in CSA prevention knowledge! And if post-exposure to the CSAPP he correctly answers FALSE to the above question, then we have proved that the CSAPP is effective in increasing CSA prevention knowledge. Right?
Wrong. At least, in my opinion. Allow me to explain.
The child has never been exposed to a CSAPP. So now we have to try to get into this child's head and figure out what he is probably thinking when he reads the words "secrets" (remember, the wording of the question is, "You always have to keep secrets"). Is it going to cross his mind that the question is inclusive of the following scenario: Friendly man (known to the child) reaches his hand into child's pants and molests child. Man says to child, "Let's keep this our little secret, ok?" So I ask you, is it going to occur to the child - who has never yet participated in a CSAPP - that the question is referring even to such a scenario? Probably not. So what type of scenario is going to occur to the child when he reads the question, "You always have to keep secrets"? In all likelihood, the child is NOT going to interpret the question in the manner that the researcher intended, and the only thing that is going to occur to the child is that the question is talking about innocent secrets that friends share with each other. So, if the chid answers TRUE, is that an indication that he is lacking in CSA prevention knowledge? Not at all!
The very same child who "incorrectly" answered TRUE, would in all likelihood have correctly answered FALSE had the question been worded clearly and specifically. Had the question asked, "You always have to keep secrets, even if it's a secret about how someone touched your private parts", it is very possible that the child would have correctly answered FALSE.
2) "You have to let grown-ups touch you whether you like it or not". Based on the extensive explanation above, it is not hard to imagine that a child who has never been exposed to a CSAPP might not conjure up in his mind the possibility that the question is inclusive of abusive touch. He might be thinking of things like his dad pulling him by the arm (in a non-abusive manner) to bring him to bed despite the child not wanting to go to bed, his mom wiping the ketchup stain off his cheek despite him wanting to immediately go out to play, or the doctor performing an appropriate examination despite the fact that he really would prefer to go without it. So, if the child "incorrectly" answers TRUE because these types of scenarios are the only ones coming up in his mind when he reads the question, does that indicate lack of CSA prevention knowledge? Had the question been worded clearly and specifically, perhaps the result would have been different. For example, if the question would have been worded, "You have to let grown-ups touch you whenever and however they please, even if its your private parts that they want to touch", isn't it possible that the very same child would have correctly answered FALSE?
3) "If a friend's dad asks you to help him find their lost cat, you should go right away with him and help." If a child "incorrectly" answers TRUE, is that an indication of lack of CSA prevention knowledge? How can you assume that the child realizes that the question means "without asking your responsible adult" since the question did not specify that? For all you know, the child may be interpreting the question to be referring to the value of being willing to forgo personal comfort for the sake of helping others? Perhaps the child thinks that the question is just testing to see how much he cares about the value of loving-kindness and helping others, and he is completely unaware that the question is trying to test if he knows that you first have to ask your parent (or other responsible adult) before going anywhere? Isn't it possible that, had the question been worded "If a friend's dad asks you to help him find their lost cat, you should go right away with him and help, and don't take the time to ask your parents permission if you can go", the same child would have correctly answered FALSE?
4) "Someone you know, even a relative, might want to touch your private parts in a way that feels confusing." A child who has never yet been exposed to a CSAPP would almost certainly respond to such a question with a, "What in the world are you talking about?! Hey, buddy, you've got the wrong kid! No-one in my family is messed up and I don't know any messed up people!" So the child would "incorrectly" answer FALSE. But what if the question had been worded to say, "It's not ok for someone to touch your private parts just because you know them or they are your relative", what are the chances that that very same child would not correctly answer FALSE?
The upshot of these challenges to CSA prevention knowledge measures is that they seem to deliberately employ vaguely-worded questions that employ phraseology that only post-exposure-to-CSAPP's children would be familiar with, instead of employing clearcut, specific wording that would make it clear to any child exactly what the question is getting at, and by employing the vague type of phraseology instead of explicit wording, aren't such measures inevitably going to produce unreliable results?
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Double-barrel question content is pervasive and common. Needs rectification principally.
Hope this helps
Mattt
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Questionnaire on perceptions of child maltreatment
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Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire (JVQ)
or
Adverse Childhood Experience (ACE) Questionnaire
Can be of help.
We are using JVQ in a multisite research project including UK, India and Nepal.
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I am doing research upon awareness about child sexual abuse among parents of preschoolers, please suggest some methodology to ask parents about child sexual abuse.
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Dear Vrinda Arora,
You have selected a nice topic for the research.
Unlike parents in the west Indian parents may not openly discuss the child sexual abuse.
I wish you conduct an online interview using Google form without asking the name and telephone numbers of the respondent .
There are many email database companies which can give you the list of parents from the school databases. Treat that list as the sample frame. use the simple random sampling method to collect the data. Do not look at the response rate. You can collect responses across India. Later you can check data validity and reliability to filter. Further,
Second way of collecting the data is through NGOs who are working in this domain.
Third, government data bases from women and child welfare department.
Thanks and regards,
Prasad Kulkarni.
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I am currently conducting a systematic review on offender characteristics associated with transnational child sex offending/ "child sex tourism". Is anyone aware of any unpublished/ongoing research that I may be able to include in my study? Any help is greatly appreciated!
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Thank you very much for your help, Brendan, I will look into this.
Best wishes,
Sarah
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Dear Ian,
What do you think about that child sexual abuse might facilitate sexual atypical behaviors?
Best regards!
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Hi Rodrigo,
Interesting question. I haven't worked with children who have experienced sexual abuse, so my thoughts are based on what I've read in the research and my impressions. I can see some children developing PTSD symptomatology from experiencing sexual abuse, especially if the abuse was rather severe, invasive, involved violence, or occurred over a long period of time. Such symptoms would include nightmares, flashbacks, recurrent or intrusive memories of the abuse, feeling unsafe in the world, having a sense of guilt or shame over what happened, being distressed by reminders of the abuse, emotional 'numbing', and physiological symptoms (e.g., exaggerated startle response). I agree with you that the reactions of others can be a contributing factor to some of the more internal psychological symptoms of PTSD, like a sense of shame/guilt. But, at the end of the day, while we cannot say the abuse causes some of the symptoms, the external causes of symptoms wouldn't be there without the abuse having taken place. I'm ambivalent about this and am willing to accept that "abuse causes these symptoms" to be a reasonable explanation. That's not to say that people involved in the life of an abused child should not be careful in their reactions.
My thinking of late on this is in line with what you have said. For children who do develop problems after sexual abuse, the majority will have problems with "abnormal" behaviour that is not really a trauma-response. The pathway from abuse to these kinds of behaviours is complicated and we don't really understand them well. But I imagine this is the result for most children.
On top of this, I think that there is a good number of children who are not harmed by sexual abuse in any lasting way. Older children, such as teenagers, who do not experience violent or coercive sex with an adult, but have sexual contact with an adult in the context of a pre-existing and caring relationship may even experience the sexual contact as positive. There is reasonable evidence to support this last claim.
So, I would say, based on the research I've read, some children will have a trauma-reaction to sexual abuse, some will show problematic behaviours for a long time after the abuse, some will have no lasting consequences, and some will even see sexual contact with adults as positive.
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I would be grateful to have your opinion about the research priorities in child sexual abuse. I would like to initiate a qualitative study with focus on understanding the separate and synergistic consequences of child sexual abuse on victims.
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Thank you so much Dr
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In Malaysia,There is a whopping number of 37, 263 rape cases, involving girls as young as six, reported from 2000 until 2015. This which means there is an average of eight rape cases reported daily in the country, statistics based on a Parliamentary reply to Batu Kawan MP Kasthuri Patto last year. The shocking statistics showed more than half of the total rape cases were committed against minors between the ages of 13 and 15, with up to 16, 265 victims and followed closely behind by 10, 289 victims over the age of 18. Out of the 37,263 cases, 2,854 victims were sodomized while 4,739 were incest-rape cases. Rape is often debated in the Parliament, with various quarters calling for the government to amend the existing rape laws. Although there so many ways to reduce but there are still cases on sexual abuses. Even parents have important role in protect their own child, still there are some parents are abusing their own child. In this case I would like to find the appropriate way to stop sexual abuse.
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I'd like to echo Ben's comments: Sexual abuse is a complex problem that all societies are struggling with to greater or lesser extents. Because there are multiple factors, multiple solutions will be needed. Public awareness and education, school-based prevention programs, bystander interventions, law enforcement, shifts in policy. 
The only thing I'd add is that (young) men must be part of the solution, addressing culturally-shaped attitudes aboutt women, sex and consent, in challenging their peers if they see something worrisome, and in supporting the women around them.
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In my researching childhood trauma there are many ways to approach treatment and recovery but, is there one true way of dealing with child molestation?
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Abdelfattah Alkhawaja
I want to thank you the article was very helpful.  This information is very beneficial and will allow another path of recovery.
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I am working on the link between sexual abuse and gastrointestinal disorders. I would like to make a survey. Therefore I am looking for a brief standardized screening instrument - in English, or eventually in German. The study will be conducted in Austria.
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I cant offer a screening tool but interested in your looking at a link between CSA and GI disorders. When you say link are you thinking about medical or mental health consequences that result in GI symptomatology? There is a clear link between signs and symptoms in girls who experience genital touching primarily reflecting historical details that reflect trauma as a result of the sexual contact. There has been very little research regarding physical signs and symptoms of children who experience anal penetration or if your talking about the whole GI tract it could include oral trauma. Can you clarify what link your looking at?
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I am looking for some article about the use of "NICHD protocol interview" with mental retardation children.
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I would recommend the Book "Tell Me More" which summarized such research.
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I am trying to venture into the recent debates on the issue. I am have data to see the effects of gender on the ways adolescents cope with sexual abuse in vulnerable situations. I would like to know what groundbreaking theoretical work has been done on the same in very recent years. 
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Te sugiero:
- Resiliencia en niños vìctimas de abuso sexual: papel del entorno familiar y social, disponible en http://www.raco.cat/index.php/EducacioSocial/article/viewFile/250183/369145 
- Un nuevo estudio sobre el abuso sexual infantil y la resiliencia de los niños, disponible en:  http://bice.org/es/un-nuevo-estudio-sobre-el-abuso-sexual-y-la-resiliencia-de-los-ninos/
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I am currently working on a project which will explore the impact on the child regarding the disclosure of their therapy notes for court proceedings in sexual abuse cases. 
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Hello Katie,
My email is JEE509@bham.ac.uk
Best Wishes
Jessica
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can anyone suggest a questionnaire on sexual abuse in childhood  and resilience?
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You might look at Michael Ungar's work in Canada
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I am doing a study on the issues and dilemmas interviewers endures when interviewing preschool children that are alleged to have been sexually abused.
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The American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children has promulgated Guidelines for Investigative Interviewing of Children which may be useful. Professor Tom Lyon is a prolific researcher, interviewer, and author whose publications can be downloaded at www.bepress.com. His 10 Step Model is the basis of our child interviewing training here in California.
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I  wish to know if any one has developed a model on prevention of chld sexual abuse.If so can you give me the reference.kindly help
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Hi Hema,
There is a vast amount of literature available in relation to 'Mandatory Reporting' which deals with prevention of child abuse in general, including sexual abuse. However, the efficacy of this approach is much debated. I can point you in the direction of Ben Matthews an Australian academic in this regard.
Also you could check out the resources available from CPMERG, a global child protection monitoring group established by Save the Children and UNICEF.
Regards,
Joe
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Currently I am investigating the magnitude of sexual violence incidents in children (adolescents) aged 18 and below at an urban setting. My data source was a hospital's rape clinic register. The preliminary data came up with an alarming rate of completed rape incidents and the majority of victims were below the age of 10. Among these 30% of the children were boys. Since the data was a hospital's register it could not be representative of those who did never report to the hospital or any where else. To make a meaningful use of the data I decided to follow it further and find out what the legal system did with the cases reported to it. I wanted proportions of prosecuted incidents among those reported to the police. There were no researches in my country that tried to answer this question. The problem is however, sexual violence is considered a private matter and little attention is given to preventing it by authorities due to which I could not get an assistance from the local government to peruse the study. I am trying to access some sort of solution to this challenge if some one happens to read this and had similar problem before and know how to solve it. I can attach my research protocol if requested even for review by members.
Thank you
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sir Girman it is a very good study.being the Gyanecologist I have come across the many cases of the sexual violence in all ages,but sir you rightly pointed that most of the violence is with the children below 18 years of age.hospital data is a good resourse for collecting the data but it could be the tip of iceberg.awareness of the society is must.the government records gives the number of cases even more. am on the committee of sexual rehabilitation and relief scheme which is practicing in our country.any more help you will need for publishing the study reports, sir I will extend my possible help.i think sir you are doing good thing it will help in the policy making also.thank you.
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I need it for my research project regarding sexual abuse prevention education. 
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Thank you for the responses. I was able to get the document from Dr. Tutty!
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The Act would mandate every adult "witnessing" an act of sexual abuse on a child to report it or face criminal penalties.
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In Ecuador also, all suspicions of child abuse have to be reported. However, the follow up of these reports are problematic because we don't have enough and well trained  support systems (social workers, foster families, psychological services) to help the family deal and the abused child with the issue of abuse (considering that the fact is that most abuse cases are from family members) after the report. What I see happening is that the child may end up in a difficult situation trying to deal with the consequences for the abuser (who is a family member) and the family end up trying to deal with a "family problem". In many cases, the child ends up denying the abuse because it feels worst for the child what is happening with his/her family dynamics than the abuse per se. This is a huge problem for the child when the report is done! Big catch!
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I am currently working on a manual for perceptual screening (psychological tests: memory - attention etc) for child victims of sexual abuse in Greece. I am looking for material (books, reports, articles, guidelines) about the neuropsychological assessment before the forensic interview or (before) the courtroom testimony. The objective of this assessment is the preparation of child witnesses and the evaluation of his/her credibility according his/her developmental stage.
Any suggestions regarding tests, screening tools?
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Are you looking for a method to test memory capacity or a method to test credibility of the child or for a way to determine whether the information that is obtained from the child is valid? There are several tests of memory capacity that can be used for arriving at a general memory capacity of the child. I should be able to point you in the direction of a test if I better understand what you are looking for.
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There appear to be correlations among the symptomology of child sexual abuse with ADHD, PDD, ASD, ODD, Bipolar, Anxiety Disorders, and Schizophrenia. Has anyone found other correlative misdiagnoses?
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My collaborator Prof.TSS Rao helps you in this area of research. contact him at- tssrao19@yahoo.com