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NO. No one on Earth can claim to "own the truth" -- not even the natural sciences. And mathematics has no anchor on Nature.
With physics, the elusive truth becomes the object itself, which physics trusts using the scientific method, as fairly as humanly possible and as objectively (friend and foe) as possible.
With mathematics, on the other hand, one must trust using only logic, and the most amazing thing has been how much the Nature as seen by physics (the Wirklichkeit) follows the logic as seen by mathematics (without necessarily using Wirklichkeit) -- and vice-versa. This implies that something is true in Wirklichkeit iff (if and only if) it is logical.
Also, any true rebuffing of a "fake controversy" (i.e., fake because it was created by the reader willingly or not, and not in the data itself) risks coming across as sharply negative. Thus, rebuffing of truth-deniers leads to ...affirming truth-deniers. The semantic principle is: before facing the night, one should not counter the darkness but create light. When faced with a "stone thrown by an enemy" one should see it as a construction stone offered by a colleague.
But everyone helps. The noise defines the signal. The signal is what the noise is not. To further put the question in perspective, in terms of fault-tolerant design and CS, consensus (aka,"Byzantine agreement") is a design protocol to bring processors to agreement on a bit despite a fraction of bad processors behaving to disrupt the outcome. The disruption is modeled as noise and can come from any source --- attackers or faults, even hardware faults.
Arguing, in turn, would risk creating a fat target for bad-faith or for just misleading references, exaggerations, and pseudo-works. As we see rampant on RG, even on porous publications cited as if they were valid.
Finally, arguing may bring in the ego, which is not rational and may tend to strengthen the position of a truth-denier. Following Pascal, people tend to be convinced better by their own-found arguments, from the angle that they see (and there are many angles to every question). Pascal thought that the best way to defeat the erroneous views of others was not by facing it but by slipping in through the backdoor of their beliefs. And trust is higher as self-trust -- everyone tends to trust themselves better and faster, than to trust someone else.
What is your qualified opinion? This question considered various options and offers a NO as the best answer. Here, to be clear, "truth-denial" is to be understood as one's own "truth" -- which can be another's "falsity", or not. An impasse is created, how to best solve it?
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"Only dead fish swim with the current implies that those who swim against the current are those who wish to invoke change; who want to control, manipulate, and improve their environment. People who swim upstream make things happen. They are the movers and shakers; the innovators and inventors; the disruptors of the world. There is nothing new downstream; only that which is old and boring, ancient history, the past, the been there and done that... the tried and true. One must swim upstream to find and explore new territory; learn new stuff, have new experiences. To create; fly; soar."
But those who try, find it hard to not "go with the flow." The solution maybe to swim like a salmon, making the least waves. With the same principle, it works on a swimming pool, trying to improve personal "best times" -- and tells one why a deeper pool is faster.
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Can anyone reccomend me some books which provide a general overview of late roman and/or "byzantine" history?
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Here are ten excellent recent books: 
1. Alan Cameron, The Last Pagans of Rome. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011.
2. Averil Cameron, Byzantine Matters. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2014
3.  Matthew P. Canepa, Two Eyes of the Earth: Art and Ritual of Kingship Between Rome and Sasanian Iran. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 2009
4. Conant, Jonathan. Staying Roman: Conquest and Identity in Africa and the Mediterranean, 439-700. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012
5.Kaldellis, A., Hellenism in Byzantium: The Transformation of Greek Identity and the Reception of the Classical Tradition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007.
6.Kaldellis, A.,The Byzantine Republic: People and Power in New Rome, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2015.
7.McEvoy, Meaghan. Child Emperor Rule in the Late Roman West, AD 367-455. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013.
8 Moorhead, J. The Roman Empire Divided
9.Millar, Fergus. A Greek Roman Empire: Power and Belief under Theodosius II, 408-450. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 2006.
10.Neville, Leonora A. Heroes and Romans in Twelfth-Century Byzantium. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012
Averil Cameron, John Haldon, and Warren Treadgold also have some good surveys
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Good morning,
I try recent references on the topic " Byzantine foot" ( Byzantine Archaeology and Architecture )
thank you very much
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Well, I think we can find a good answer in the classical way. The Pantheon is an sphere of 100 roman cubits; The Royal Palace of Carlos V at the Alhambra is designed under the castillian measuring system, in my opinion. The ground plan is based in a 150 castillian cubits side square and circles and squares with ad quadratum relationship.
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Foreign Ministry Archives of Turkey are closed for all researchers, and the Republican Archives of the Prime Ministry of Turkey (Ankara) doesn't have a goog relationship the Turkish Foreign Ministry.
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Well, I too hope it won't take a couple of years. Until that time comes, I will change my interests in that topic. I hope that our constant inquiry in this situation and public interest will speed up the process.
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Seeking for respectively as monuments and symbolism of this visualization in ecclesiastical monuments to the 18th century, with relevant bibliography.
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read the book, The Year 1200: A symposium.
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Can anyone refer me to any of Eastern Christianity's approaches to incest regulations or kinship matters? Thanks in advance.
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I'm not sure of a good source of general information - the Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium has an entry for "marriage impediments" that might be useful - but in terms of a specific instance illustrating Eastern Christian notions of what could constitute incest, the case of Nikephoros II Phokas and Theodora is interesting.  In the History of Leo the Deacon there is reference to arguments that Nikephoros' marriage to the widow Theodora was unlawful because Nikephoros had stood as godparent to Theodora's children by her first marriage.  This, curiously enough, was considered incest of a sort.  Not the general example you were probably looking for, but the quirky exceptions are always interesting too.
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Is this simply a morale factor?  Or is there a qualitative difference between the Norman knight and Byzantine cavalryman?
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I'd also be interested in knowing whether you're referring to a particular battle, such as Civitate, James.
Johannes makes some good points, in particular with regard to heavy vs light cavalry, but it really depends on the context you are looking at.  If you are looking at the period after cataphracts had disappeared from the Byzantine armed forces in the late 9th/early 10th century, but before their place was taken by any alternative heavy cavalry, then Norman knights would have been very effective against Byzantine light cavalry.  But that would also be dependent on whether the terrain favoured the Normans, and several other factors.
In open plains or desert, light cavalry can destroy heavy through slowly wearing their opponents down through projectile fire from far enough away to avoid face to face fighting.  There are many examples of that.
Another factor, though, is whether one side knows what to expect from the other.  If the Byzantine cavalry you refer to were light cavalry only used to  fighting other light cavalry, then being charged by heavy cavalry for the first time could catch them completely off guard.
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Byzantine Empress Euphrosyne (824-929)
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Try in the Byzantine coins catalogues ,DOC-Grierson;MIB-W.Hahn; Sear etc .I think that you'll find mainly conventional and hiratic portraits ,as on coins they usualy appear...Is hard to find something very "near by" the original and natural image !!!Almost same situation for the other Euphrosyne Kamaterina Doukaina (the wife of Isaac III Angelos (1195-1203).
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I am working on a book chapter on the fifth-century soldier-emperors.
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Thanks for those, I did not have either...though I had Croke's other article.
Cheers,
Mike