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What are some good sources on the connection between religion and environment?
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Try to read some scientific sources of Islam through reading of Quran and Prophet words you can realize about your subject.
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Mysticism is often treated as the opposite of science. But is it? Please see
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Yes, it does: in fact, current biomedical technology has made it possible to visualize brain images when a subject is in a mystical trance or meditation ("Definition, Philosophical and Scientific Bases of Mysticism", by Raúl León Barúa
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20453/ah.v57i0.2796), it has even been related to Quantum Physics ("Quantum physics and mysticism not ensino de ciências", by TR Rocha, TM de Carvalho, CM Felício - Research, Society and Developmen, 2020 - rsdjournal.org-DOI: https://doi.org/10.33448/rsd-v9i12.11131)
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I’m a student of philosophy and religious studies. I’m also someone who practices mindfulness techniques to deal with stress and the effects of some permanent physical injuries. I’ve been impressed by how mindfulness has improved my life, and I’m interested in learning more about its history, how it works, and how it affects others. As part of a research project, I’m asking mindfulness practitioners some basic questions about their relationship with mindfulness to better understand how people use, understand, and benefit from their practice.
If you’re interested in participating, please complete my short survey and feel free to pass it along to others. It only takes about 3 minutes since it consists of just 3 demographics questions and 4 questions about mindfulness. It is 100% anonymous and will not ask for any contact information. The survey closes at 5PM EST on April 2nd, 2021.
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This is really interesting, important and good questions for researchers consumption.
Keep it up !
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"What is life?" question answered such;
Dostoevsky: "Hell"
Socrates: "Agony"
Nietzsche: "The Power"
Picasso: "Art"
Gandhi: "The War".
What is "Life" for you?
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Life is happiness, confusion, upliftment, sadness, thankfulness and surprises
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I'm interested in both Christian and Buddhist perspectives.
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Similar to Jesus 
2500 year old Buddhist Precepts in today's language
1.  Show loving kindness
2.  Develop Generosity
3.  Cultivate Contentment
4.  Be Honest-don't lie- have integrity
5.  Be more aware- be mindful...
6.  Assess the negative and how it affects work etc. 
7.  How we treat others can be affected by our mood
8.  The law of an abundant universe actively sends out positive energy even during difficult circumstances.
 Luke says, "The kingdom of God is within."   The Buddhists’ say, "We are all lit up from within as if from a sacred source." [LamSuryaDas, pg. 15]. 
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Hello everybody!
At present I'm studying the occurrences of a Cārvāka/Lokāyata stanza in Buddhist and Jain texts. The stanza corresponds to Haribhadrasūri's Ṣaḍdarśanasamuccaya 81:
etāvān eva loko'yaṃ yāvān indriyagocaraḥ |
bhadre vṛkapadaṃ paśya yad vadanti [a]bahuśrūtāḥ ||
It occurs in other texts according to different variants. Apparently the older Sanskrit version is preserved in Candrakītri's Madhyamakāvatārabhāṣya where we read:
etāvān eva puruṣo yāvān indriyagocaraḥ |
bhadre vṛkapadaṃ hy etad yad vadanti bahuśrūtāḥ ||
Of all the sources in which this stanza occurs, I unfortunately don't have at my disposal the following two:
  • Jinabhadra's Svopajñavṛtti auto-commentary on his Viśeṣāvaśyakabhāṣya: Malvania, Dalsukh (ed. by). 1966-1968. Acārya [sic] Jinabhadra's Viśeṣāvaśyakabhāṣya with Auto-Commentary (3 Parts), Ahmedabad: Bharatiya Sanskrit Vidyamandira. The stanza occurs twice in Part/Vol. 2, pp. 344 and 439.
  • Hemacandrasūri's Ṭīkā commentary on Jinabhadra's Gaṇadharavāda: Vijaya, Ratnaprabha and Dhirubhai P. Thakar (ed. by). 1950. Kṣamāśramaṇa Jinabhadra Gaṇi's Gaṇadharavāda: Along with Maladhārin Hemacandra Sūri's Commentary. Ahmedabad: Sri Jaina Siddhanta Society. The stanza occurs once, p. 10.
I therefore ask you if someone can help me by replying to this message with the three Sanskrit versions (if in transliteration, please with diacritical marks) of the stanza as they appear in each of these three occurrences.
Thanks in advance and have a lovely day!
kr
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Question closed. Thanks to the researcher who kindly provided me in private with the information I needed.
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I am on the study of modelling a theory of Buddhist Public Relation based on the cultural Public Relations. though there are some asian communication theories of Prof. Wimal Dissanayaka, Prof. Shelton Gunathilaka
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Dear Andrija and Marques,
Thank you very much for your great support on my request.
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Making the creator supreme is part of the quest for the ego for a super-identity. The ego identifies with greatness in order to glorify itself. This lays the foundation for Narcissism in religious thought.
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Yes I agree, but religion and a supreme being are also a manifestation of man's frailty, weakness, fear and feeling of helplessness. Man "creates" a super being that will give back life to a loved one, protect one from natural disasters and calamities, rescue him from poverty, violence and threats, and bring him to a heavenly paradise.
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Eastern zen-inspired world-views depart from the lived (experientially, cognitively, embodied and phenomenologically) assumption that everything is connected to everything else. On an fundamental level there is consequently no difference between me and you. What does this entail for an ethics to be developed?
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The common good is accomplished when you respect the other as yourself. This is a very basic principle that is on the basis of both western and eastern ethics, whether you call it ethics or dharma. The thing is that we can find at the root of all moral discipline some mental purification technique. And this is the point where eastern cultures are more advanced and can teach western cultures specific techniques and practices that lead to a higher awareness in every daily action. With the space created by this discipline and awareness, we shed light on what is ethical or what is dharma, he duty of each one of us. Note that the path chosen, and its truth, is no better or worse than another, but it is just a choice, according to one's needs and the environment in which one lives.
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I'm exploring the ways of identifying the significance a of Sri Lankan social-healing ritual. it possible to get an answer from Cognitive neuroscience or Cognitive physiology?
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Dear Julian, I'm delighted to hear that you are researching on the same matter. I'm new to the subject area of Cognitive neuroscience and, am and was combing through books and journal articles in search of material on all sensory perception. I'm craving for identifying the uniqueness of the Sri Lankan social-healing ritualistic experience and going to explore the possibilities of re-creating the very experience in the contemporary theatre practice. It is the practical component of my practice-led PhD research.
I believe that the uniqueness of aforementioned ritualistic experience is lies on the basis of all-sensory perception. I'll be grateful if we could continue this conversation further. I'm extremely curious about your theoretical models and looking forward to being familiar with them. Many thanks. By the way, I love golf so much :) Indika Ferdinando, PhD candidate, Monash University, Australia.