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Dear,
I am interested in shortening plant names that I have in my phyotosocialogical table. In fact, I would like to carry analyses with Vegan Package, but as the plants names are too long I have been advised to shorten them. However, I want to know whether or not there is conventional code to shorten plants names (the genera and the specific epithet at the same time.
Thank you!
Evans, E.
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There is no standard rule to shorten plants' names. we can use initial 2-2, 3-3, 3-4 letter code (genera : species). It all depends on the author. even in some cases, we can't use initial letters. eg. Vanda tessellata and Vanda testacea we can use VANTEL and VANTES for better understanding.
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I performed micrografting on mutant for ABA transport and most of them didn't succed. I'm considering that the mutation might have hindered the vascular regeneration. Do you know how ABA could affect vascular regeneration?
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I would suggest you study the following article
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Light (PAR) is necessary for photosynthesis. But how to calculate the minimum amount of sunlight necessary for the expected growth of a crop( no crop loss ) and beyond this PAR the plant is considered to be subjected to low light stress?
Is there any paper of systematic protocol?
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To optimise most plant growth it is recommended that they receive 500–1000 µmols of PAR light for every m² (PPFD). Less than this and growth rates will be low :)
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In the advent of climate change, conditions suitable for local species could be significantly altered. Hence, planting characteristic tree species of the planting sites may not be feasible. There are several pieces of literature recommending the use of composite provenance in order to restore climate-resilient characteristic tree species/forests. However, the issue of outbreeding depression is a concern. So, my question is: in the advent of climate change, would it be wise to use planting material from composite provenance for forest restoration?
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As much as possible, determining the provenance of seed sources to be used in reforestation should be supported by seed source movement trials. The evolution of different genetic variants of the same species from different regions occurs in response to a variety of factors, not just mean annual temperature differences. Depending on the driving climate factors in your region, genetic variants of the same species may develop different phenotypic traits based on a wide-range of climate variables that you may not be able to predict a priori: eg., growing season precipitation, mean hottest/coldest month temperatures, average number of growing season days with precipitation, etc. Your management goals should also inform your planting decisions. Are you managing for wood quality/timber production? Rapid growth? Drought resistance? By mixing provenances from different areas without prior testing you may guess correctly which variants may do well in an altered future climate or you may not. Variants you have planted may grow more quickly in a drier, warmer climate, for example, but may experience reductions in wood strength and stiffness that could impact their stability and or commercial value. Any large-scale forest restoration should be back by systematically designed and installed seed source movement trials that seek to identify genetic variants that display specific phenotypic responses to the specific climate scenarios you anticipate will unfold in your geographic region. If such trials are not in place for your species of interest and if it would take too long or be too expensive to implement them, it would make sense to look for seed source movement trials conducted for related species from areas with similar present and anticipated future climate. I also recommend reading the works of Harrington et al. from the northwestern United States for more information on this subject: (https://www.fs.fed.us/pnw/pubs/journals/pnw_2017_harrington001.pdf).
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These are the microscopic images of a fruit pulp observed under Binocular microscope at 40x.
Please help me identify the same.
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I believed that the spring shape is the xylem of the plant
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How can you say leaves are fresh in terms of its moisture content? Is a 100% moisture content possible? Does it mean that plant leaves that were harvested and subjected right away to IR moisture balance will give us a result of somewhere near 100%?
On the other hand, does "dried leaves" have specific moisture content values to be regarded as "dried" e.g. moisture content should be below a certain percent (10%).
For reference, I am studying Cymbopogon citratus leaves.
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How determine the moisture content in fresh leaves?
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Hello everyone,
I did the assembly of chloroplast genomes for some Boraginaceae species, in a few species, I got an orientation problem where the rbcl gene position is within the circular shape in a clockwise direction, and the atpB and atpE genes position is are outside the circular shape in the anti-clockwise direction (please see the picture), and this is a different result from most assemblies of chloroplast genomes that have been published !!!. (usually, the rbcl gene is outside the circular shape and in the anti-clockwise direction while the atpB and atpE genes are within the circular shape and in a clockwise direction)
I am using Chlorobox to draw the gene map after Novoplast finishes the assembly, this issue happened with only two of 7 samples, the two samples are from the same family !!!, I change the seed and reference many times and still got the same result.
Any idea what I need to fix this?
Thanks!
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I think that maybe you have used blunt end digestion endonucleases, this makes inserts to be ligable in both directions (as your experimental results suggest). If that's the case, maybe this information is useful:
Both the Costa and Weiner or Delphi genetics Staby methods could fix this orientation problem.
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This species is encountered in Kokrajhar town of Assam, India. It is thin walled bamboo. As per my knowledge it seems to be Schizostachyum sp. I request the peers to kindly help me identify the same.
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It looks difficult to reach any conclusion from the above posted pictures.
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Already tried everything. I got my hands on a version for Linux but I cannot make it work. 
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GITHUB
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I am planning on bringing some plant material (leaves of carnivorous plants) from Ireland to the UK, the leaves will be stored in buffer/ silica.
One of the plants is CITES listed I know I will need the permit for that but I am unclear what if any phytosanitary/ other permits or certificates I will need to bring the leaves over. Most of what I read on government websites talks about bringing in live material or restricted plant parts (goods requiring prior notice).
If anyone with more experience with this can help me with a list of what I should make sure I have filled in that would be greatly appreciated.
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I would recommend that you contact the Horticultural and Plant Health Division of the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine (DAFM) (In Ireland) and Centre for International Trade (Foss House) Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA), a branch of Department of Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) (In the United Kingdom). Each agency is involved in the process and certification of moving plant material and potential consequences of this. If you provide each agency (via their contacts pages) with information about what you intend to send they will provide you with the appropriate documentation and permits that you might need. You'd also need letters of recommendation or similar from the company/institution/department that you're sending from and is expected to receive it while doing the actual shipping process.
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How can micro CT be used in botany? Has anyone used a similar method in botanical studies? Can you send links to similar published studies?
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No CT micro
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Burning offer
I think it would be wiser to unite all the flora of the world first. In today's world, where the mobility of species and globalization have increased, limited local or country flora is no longer sufficient. For this, we must combine the family identification keys and number the species like a license plate, so that each species has a code number. Even if the name changes, the code remains the same. Endemics should be lettered with their own country code and Continents with their own code. (endemic, Asia, Turkey, 1750) ASTUR11750, or (America, USA, 18420) AMUSA18420. This code can then be associated with local names.
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Yes, they are necessary. However, the current digital methods can reduce the consumed time and the efficiency of identification.
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I have a manuscript which is a combination of literature review and research. I have asked Plant Journal and Journal of Experimental Botany. They do not publish hybrid papers.
Anyone knows what journals that accept hybrid paper of review and research?
Many thanks.
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@Ling Li You can make two-parts article under one name. First for review and second - for research data.
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I would like to know more about how aquatic macrophytes are distributed in Morocco, North Africa.
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Have a look at this useful RG link.
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I would say most invasive alien plants are synanthropic species in that they were introduced intentionally for horticulture or other cultivation purposes, or they were unintentionally introduced but are 'weeds' that thrive in disturbed areas and associated with cultivation at some point. I'm struggling to think of good examples of non-synanthropic invasive plants, but I can think of animal examples.
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Many of here offered examples are wrong. Synantropic means introduced, acclimatized and naturalized for alochtonous species, and widespread on secondary habitats for autochtonous species.
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Among the cultivated primroses, I observed a plant with 5 stigmas and styles. I could not find a report on this. Does anyone know the reason for this feature? Is there a report on this?
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It seems normal and okay to me :)
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I am not ruling out that answers are already in some published papers.
Could you please give more references?
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With the data of each variables, PCA can give good results
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How many times greater will the elastic modulus of the trunks of mature urban street trees be than that of their seedlings? For example, Acacia confusa. Thank you for your generous help and suggestions.
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Philip John Wilson Thank you very much for the suggestion.
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I wonder that if I would know the mathematical relationship to find the root propagation of a fibrous rooted coconut tree (Coccus nucifera) or a tap rooted mango tree (Mangifera indica) then I can excavate the entire plant safely and install it in a better place if I need to have a building construction where already a tree was planted. This would be the most sustainable approach considering the human requirements and ecosystem wellbeing.
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simv lembro ja ter lido que existe um padrão de distribuição espacial de biomassa.
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I will appreciate it if someone can share it with me because it is not available on the journal's website.
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You could probably pick a style that is very similar and already in Mendeley, look at some of the articles in the journal and do the small edits yourself to get the proper citation style format through the CSL Editor. Otherwise you could probably contact the journal, since they must have the proper formatted style.
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Hello,
In addition to transpiration and assimilation, which physiological, anatomical or morphological traits you think could have significant impact on water use efficiency in plants?
Moreover which WUE assessment technique you find to be the most robust and representative?
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Can anyone help me identify this Orchid?
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It looks Paphiopedilum spicerianum (Rchb.f.) Pfitzer
Thanks!
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Between the new plant species and the plant subspecies exists narrow differences, When somebody can decide it? what are the essential elements to do it?
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What is the species? This question remained unanswered since time immemorial. Tools of classical and molecular taxonomy will remain of little help in this regard until taxonomists can provide a satisfactory "definition" not only of the basic unit of classification (i.e. the species) but also of every other rank in the hierarchy of the plant kingdom. Only then shall we know the difference between a family and a subfamily, a genus and a sub-genus, a species and a subspecies, etc.
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Suppose we have the data for the number of flowers, fruits, branches, leaves (R1=3; R2=3; R3=4; Mean 3.33).
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Yes, it makes sense, but you need to specify that it is the mean (i.e. the average) and it is useful to give some indication of its accuracy such as the standard deviation or a confidence limit. However, do not give too many decimal places - 2 decimal places might indicate that your measurement has an accuracy of 1 in 100, three decimal place an accuracy of 1 in 1000, and so on. Hence, beware that you are not participating in 'pseudo-accuracy'.
If you feel that an integer number is what you want, there are two other measures of the centre of a distribution that might appeal to you. One is the mode, i.e. the most frequently occurring number. The other is the median, i.e. the central observation when they are ranked from , say, smallest to largest.
As an example, if your counts are 3 3 3 4 3 3 2 4 3 3 4 2, then the sample size is 12. the sum is 37 and the mean (average) is 3.1 (well 37/12 is 3.083333333, but being aware of pseudo-accuracy 3.1 is best). As the data contain 7 '3s', 3 '4s' and 2 '2s', the most frequent observation is 3, which is the mode. The median is the mid-point in the series 2 2 3 3 3 3 - 3 3 3 4 4 4, and hence is also 3. So you can say:
Mean = 3.1 (perhaps also quoting the standard error, etc.)
Mode = 3
Median = 3
Choose whichever you feel is appropriate - they are all statistically accurate statements about your data.
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I took some samples of a plant and their seeds and I leave in germination. when I make this process this plant start to make a smell like onions or I don´t know sulfur odor. I need to know the name of this plant, I can´t find the relationship of odor with this type plant.
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I need to know the name of this plant. I appreciate the help.
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Pleroma urvilleanum (=Tibouchina urvilleana) is correct identification. https://powo.science.kew.org/taxon/urn:lsid:ipni.org:names:77206410-1
Thanks!
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I expend almost 2 months trying to find the name of this tree, if you know it I will appreciate the help.
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Pittosporum undulatum Vent. is correct identification. This Australian plant species was widely introduced in the late 1800s as an ornamental tree to different parts of the world including South America.
Thanks!
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I´m searching for the name of this flower. I thought that it was a kind of trifolium pratense but I really am not sure and appreciate your help!
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Foresters usualy use a clinometer to calculate the tree height. These can be quite expensive to buy, but I don't know if using smartphone apps is accurate enough for measure canopy height. Do you recommends using automatic clinometer apps for field research ?
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I was using "Smart Measure version 1.7.7" for measuring height of trees planted along streets within settlements. I am moderately satisfied with the precision. I found the optimal distance to carry out the measurements from a distance about 2-4 times of the tree height. In most cases, however, I was not able to measure from the optimal distance because buildings, parked cars, etc. made it impossible.
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Generally in botany, angiosperms endosperm is triploid except basal angiosperms, i.e. ANA grade which have diploid endosperm (link attached). So now I am asking: what about magnoliids?
What do we know about the process of double fertilization and endosperm ploidy of magnoliid seeds?
NOTE to "the commenter": I would appreciate it very much if you leave my TOPICS tags untouched!
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These are the structures from plant powders when observed under binocular microscope. Can anyone help me identify these
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Just try to add more data and also a scale bar. That will help.
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I've been collecting & planting seeds of butterfly host plants for the restoration program. And I need research references especially for tropical Southeast Asia native species (include all types of herbs, bush, or shrubs). I looking forward to having some recommendations from botanical experts.
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Legumes and Ficus tree is strong candidate as reforestation starter and able to grow in harsh condition. Both are important agent for fixing soil quality.
But in term restore forest birds habitat, which one is can profide more ecological service? Which on is needed first? Ficus to support frugivores species or Legume as insect refugia to attract insectivores?
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Ficus...but Legumes can also play a great role in arid and Saharan areas.
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According to the evaluations we have made among our colleagues on this subject and our own inquiries, another requirement has emerged. This means that there is a lack of standardization of the numbers used in the world's herbaria and given as the plant type codes. For example, for a plant samples of a species, collected from Turkey, stored in Geneva (G) herbarium, it has a different codes in other herbarium. For this reason, the species should be presented with the herbarium codes to be added to the country origin codes. Or some other digitising and coding systems. In this way, both the origin is indicated and even the collected plants can be classified. What do you guys think about it?
"TUR-G 125" instead "G 125"
Country codes are given below:
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The idea of standardising herbarium numbers is ill advised. Apart from the fact that it may create uncalled-for additional work if implemented retroactively, it may hamper the purpose of herbarium numbers which, usually, are accession numbers. There is some tradition, in smaller institutions in particular, for using herbarium numbers as a surrogate for collectors' numbers, which means that they are assigned to duplicate specimens as well, whether stored in the original place or distributed as gifts or on exchange. This leads to problems and errors; in particular, accession numbers are unique and can thus be cited in order to differentiate between duplicates, which is sometimes essential when it comes to type designation.
As an aside, there is already a system in place that is well known and widely used, which having been implemented in the JStor Global Plants images database (https://plants.jstor.org). It is not confusing and does not cause additional labour: it uses any existing herbarium numbers prefixed by the official "Index herbariorum" herbarium code (or "acronym"). The numbers are prefixed by the adequate number of zeros to match the longest extant (or foreseen) number used in that herbarium.
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Is it appropriate to name organisms after people? Names convey messages and reflect attitudes! Is it ethically appropriate to dedicate a plant or animal to a person for whatever reasons? Sandra Knapp, Maria S. Vorontsova, and Nicholas J. Turland refer to this as "symbolic ownership" in "A Comment on Gillman & Wright (2020)" in Taxon https://doi.org/10.1002/tax.12411
BIOPAT e.V., for example, offers to name new species at wish for a donation of at least 2600 Euros (who do these organisms 'belong to'?). One can dedicate a scholarly work, as a book or journal article, to a person – but a living organism? Wouldn't it be preferable to adhere to the common practice of allocating descriptive names and to ban anthropocentric patronymic names and 'graveyard taxonomy' from biological nomenclature via the 'Code'!
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With your proposal you raise three issues:
  1. Switching to “indigenous” names in scientific nomenclature (your reference to Knapp’s paper).
  2. Abandoning the habit of creating scientific names after people.
  3. Abandoning an alleged “antropocentrism” in naming species.
1) As regards the first issue, we should always bear in mind why the Linnean system gained its key role in science: avoiding the Babel of local (= indigenous) names and establishing an universal naming system to vehiculate names within the scientific community. What Linnaeus did in his system was abandoning a plethora of local (=indigenous) names. Linnaeus’ Systema Naturae was mostly dealing with European species and as such he wiped thousands of European “indigenous” names off. In Europe the same species has often a different name not only depending on the country but often depending on the town/village or the valley or the small island (and this is normally true also elsewhere in the world). Nobody in Europe complains that local (=indigenous) names have been “shadowed” by scientific names. People are free to use local/indigenous names in their daily life but when switching to science they know that there is another language to follow, ie., scientific nomenclature. I don’t see any reason why this should not work outside Europe. Are “indigenous” people of Africa, Oceania, etc. different from us?
2) as regards the second issue: I don’t see anything bad about naming species after people. It’s an habit as old as scientific nomenclature and I don’t see any valid reason to abandon it. We still have millions of species to be named and relying exclusively on morphology for chosing their names would greatly limit our imagination and envetually would make remembering names more difficult. I suppose that you are aware that in zoological and botanical literature there is a fluorishing publishing of books on the etymology of zoological and botanical names and having patronymic is often felt much more entertaining than having only boring morphological names. The claim that some recipients of names were bad guys (of course, based on your own values) and that therefore we must “punish” them by eliminating those names is nonsensical. The past is the past and we cannot change history. Furthermore it would be utterly presumptuous to think that our values are the truth and that therefore we are entitled to judge other people and their political, religious or cultural habits and beliefs.
3) As regards your claim that naming species based on our cultural view is “antropocentric”, this is another extremely questionable point. Honestly: do we have any other point of view which is not ours (and therefore antropocentric)? The answer is obviusly not. We are the only intelligent organisms on this planet and we are the only ones who have created a complex language, which requires to have names for every animal and plant. Are animals and plants intelligent enough to appreciate or dislike names? Obviously not.
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Research articles
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Plant taxonomy is considered the mother of botany because all other related disciplines evolved from it or cannot be neglected their necessity. If you explored all aspects of a plant species/samples, if you cannot identify their name, the entire work gone waste. Like the kids go without a mother, your entire research will be meaningless without taxonomy.
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Good research is based on good relationship between the mentor or supervisor and the scholar. What are the qualities a supervisor or mentor must have to have a healthy and friendly environment in the laboratory?
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Please have look on our(Eminent Biosciences (EMBS)) collaborations.. and let me know if interested to associate with us
Our recent publications In collaborations with industries and academia in India and world wide.
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Universidad Tecnológica Metropolitana, Santiago, Chile. Publication Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33397265/
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Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Icahn Institute of Genomics and Multiscale Biology,, Mount Sinai Health System, Manhattan, NY, USA. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29199918
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Sincerely,
Dr. Anuraj Nayarisseri
Principal Scientist & Director,
Eminent Biosciences.
Mob :+91 97522 95342
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HI All,
I'm doing a survey as part of an Audacious program (https://www.startupdunedin.nz/audacious), which essentially is a StartUp initiative at Otago University. I'm curious to understand what level of programming do biologists these days need during their day to day research.
For all the biologists out there here are some questions to start the discussion on this topic:
1) Have you done any programming till date? If so which language did you use and for what purpose?
2) How have to overcome programming limitations? For example, did you get the work done through bioinformaticians, or sought help from your programming friend, etc?
3) Have you used online biological databases for your research? If so, which one?
4) How much of artificial intelligence have you used in your research? Do you see AI potential in your current work?
If you have anything else to add, please feel free.
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Please have look on our(Eminent Biosciences (EMBS)) collaborations.. and let me know if interested to associate with us
Our recent publications In collaborations with industries and academia in India and world wide.
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Universidad Tecnológica Metropolitana, Santiago, Chile. Publication Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33397265/
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Moscow State University , Russia. Publication Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32967475/
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Icahn Institute of Genomics and Multiscale Biology,, Mount Sinai Health System, Manhattan, NY, USA. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29199918
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with University of Missouri, St. Louis, MO, USA. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30457050
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, USA. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27852211
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with ICMR- NIN(National Institute of Nutrition), Hyderabad Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23030611
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with University of Minnesota Duluth, Duluth MN 55811 USA. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27852211
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with University of Yaounde I, PO Box 812, Yaoundé, Cameroon. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30950335
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Federal University of Paraíba, João Pessoa, PB, Brazil. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30693065
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with collaboration with University of Yaoundé I, Yaoundé, Cameroon. Publication Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31210847/
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, 48080, Leioa, Spain. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27852204
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Publication Link: http://www.eurekaselect.com/135585
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with NIPER , Hyderabad, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29053759
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Alagappa University, Tamil Nadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30950335
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Hyderabad , India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28472910
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with C.S.I.R – CRISAT, Karaikudi, Tamil Nadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30237676
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Karpagam academy of higher education, Eachinary, Coimbatore , Tamil Nadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30237672
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Ballets Olaeta Kalea, 4, 48014 Bilbao, Bizkaia, Spain. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29199918
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Hospital for Genetic Diseases, Osmania University, Hyderabad - 500 016, Telangana, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28472910
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with School of Ocean Science and Technology, Kerala University of Fisheries and Ocean Studies, Panangad-682 506, Cochin, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27964704
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with CODEWEL Nireekshana-ACET, Hyderabad, Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26770024
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Bharathiyar University, Coimbatore-641046, Tamilnadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27919211
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with LPU University, Phagwara, Punjab, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31030499
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Department of Bioinformatics, Kerala University, Kerala. Publication Link: http://www.eurekaselect.com/135585
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Gandhi Medical College and Osmania Medical College, Hyderabad 500 038, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27450915
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with National College (Affiliated to Bharathidasan University), Tiruchirapalli, 620 001 Tamil Nadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27266485
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with University of Calicut - 673635, Kerala, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23030611
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with NIPER, Hyderabad, India. ) Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29053759
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with King George's Medical University, (Erstwhile C.S.M. Medical University), Lucknow-226 003, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25579575
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with School of Chemical & Biotechnology, SASTRA University, Thanjavur, India Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25579569
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Safi center for scientific research, Malappuram, Kerala, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30237672
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Dept of Genetics, Osmania University, Hyderabad Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25248957
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Institute of Genetics and Hospital for Genetic Diseases, Osmania University, Hyderabad Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26229292
Sincerely,
Dr. Anuraj Nayarisseri
Principal Scientist & Director,
Eminent Biosciences.
Mob :+91 97522 95342
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The contribution of the old journal Sunyatsenia to botanical research in China and adjacent regions has been reported by Zhao et al. (2016) in Phytotaxa 269: 237–270. Does anyone know how we can access to the journal's content outside of China. Is any electronic source available?
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Hello Hong Truong Luu,
I have asked the librarian at our Botany Library about digitizing this journal for BHL (Biodiversity Heritage Library). She told me that a request was made more than 6 months ago for the Chinese partners in BHL to digitize Sunyatsenia. However, there seems to be no progress yet, maybe due to pandemic. She (the librarian) will send a message today to encourage this journal to move ahead on the priority list. Keep checking the BHL web site and in time the journal (at least the volumes not under copyright) should appear there. Best, George
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Can turmeric be used as a substitute for the other comercially availble antifungal agents during plant tissue culture?
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I have not had the experience of using turmeric as an antimicrobial agent in PTC. In our country, this substance is much more expensive than conventional disinfectants. On the other hand, we know that turmeric has antimicrobial properties, but it is a natural phenolic compound and its negative effect on cell growth and proliferation has been reported. Also, in my opinion, since this yellow substance reduces the transparency of the culture medium and the environment becomes opaque, I preffer to use the transparent materials.
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(Like we use munsell colour charts)
Are there any published article used that method for their taxonomical identification ?
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The colour of an image is subject to distortions from lighting, the specific camera used and other factors. There are ways to identify colours properly, for example, a ColorChecker/Macbeth Chart or other color charts can be used while taking the photograph to properly balance the colors in the image. The image is then analysed using image analysis software, for example Matlab or ImageJ. I don't think the use of these types of colour identification websites are reliable for the type of analysis that you are interested in.
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Hello, I am currently an undergraduate student at Purdue. I am currently looking at potential research topics to get into during graduate school. Right now I work in a botany lab studying ABA levels in deciduous trees. However, in my own free time, I have been obsessed with the interaction between tree species through different mycorrhizal networks. I have a decent list of researchers working on this topic (I will put their names below), but I was wondering if there are any schools or individuals I should strongly consider and reach out to before applying.
1. Rolf Geisen (Max Rubner-Institut, Germany)
2. Marc Stadler (Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Germany)
3. John Pitt (Australia)
4. Jens Frisvad (Technical University of Denmark)
5. Vit Hubka (Charles University Prague, Czech)
6. State Key Laboratory of Mycology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences http://english.im.cas.cn/rh/rd/Mycology1/
8. Dr. Catherine Aime (Purdue University)
9. Songlin Fei (Purdue University)
10. Peter Kennedy (University of Minnesota)
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Ectomycorrhizae have many differences from Endomycorrhizae. Each one has it's own mode of action with the plant root which related with.
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Based on a resent question; what is the difference between a saprophyte and a saprotroph?
In Greek saprophyte would be saprós (“putrid; decayed; rotten”) and phyte ("plant") thus meaning a plant that will live of dead or decaying organic matter. Saprotroph on the other hand, would be saprós (“putrid; decayed; rotten”) and trophē (“food; nourishment”) and thus include all organism with this lifestyle.
It seems as if the term saprophyte would be incorrect as plants are in actuality not saprophytic. The same problem comes in with saprophytic vs saprotrophic. My concern is this, why were we taught that "saprophytic" or saprotrophic fungi are saprophytes as this would seem to be incorrect. Recent publications and textbooks still refer to saprophytes. Has the term saprophyte been abolished or regardless of the difference we now consider saprophyte and saprotroph as synonyms?
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Just now, both terms saprophyte and saprotrophic are be used in the field of fungi papers. So, both terms refer to fungi which feed and grow on dead things such as: plant debris, organic materials, dung etc.
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Dr.Muhammad Azhar Khan Department of Botany Hazara University Mansehra
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As you know, Monstera is very popular house plant and some has unusual mutation with reduced number of chlorophyll and in some cases, chlorophyll pigments completely lost in leaves. Is it possible to make chlorophyll degradation in leaves under lab conditions?
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To investigate the impact of chlorpyrifos I need to understand how much concentration is taken into the plant and how that affects the average concentration of phytohormones, thus instigating phytohormone deformity in post-germination growth. I want a relatively simpler method than high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry or if not can I understand the process of doing this in a lab.
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If you just want to quantify, you can try ELISA kits. There are several ELISA kits available on the market for Chlorpyrifos and different phytohormones like IAA, cytokinins, etc. I have never used them myself so I don't know about the selectivity and sensitivity. But most likely, even if you use ELISA kits, you'll still need to do some purification and concentrating after extraction, if not by HPLC then at least by fractional extraction with different solvents of various polarities, followed by freeze-drying in vacuum to concentrate.
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What are the research and Job opportunity for botany graduates and masters?
How they should be trained at university level to make themselves ready for industry
what are the industries hiring botany graduates and masters?
whats skilled based knowledge enrichment is needed for Botany graduates ?
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Need orientaion on applied issues related to botany , how well , the subject connects with environmental research , especially while talking about the ecology and botany complimenting each other so well...forest ecology research another area
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What are the precautionary measure that we can adopt to prevent the sprouting while drying the plant sample for herbarium?
Please suggest
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Microwave (or an oven) will act fine, killing the tissue. But change paper frequently after applying it, especially with succulents.
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Is it possible that different species of particular plant encountered in a specific forest area is totally different from the previous report when surveyed after about a decade? If yes, what can be the tentative reason?
I feel that it is probably due to lack of proper identification and authentication.
Please help to find a reason.
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Which is why journals should demand that voucher specimens be deposited in a given herbarium before accepting a paper for publication, so that identifications can be verified. As it is, journals, even of supposedly high standing, pullulate with irreproducible results.
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I'm doing some spatial analysis of fig trees, using the locations of trees as a point process for Bayesian modelling.
I'm considering whether to include the proximity to rivers as a spatial covariate in the analysis, and specifically, whether to log-transform this variable- if figs increase at a log scale in proximity to rivers.
I'm studying figs in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo but haven't found much information about this relationship in this part of the world, so any & all info is appreciated.
Best wishes & stay safe!
Sol
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Fig trees (Ficus) are often ecologically significant keystone species because they sustain populations of other spcies .
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The journal "Annali di Botanica" that appears in the JCR journal list (Plant Sciences category; Q3; position 170/28 in 2018) is not included in the Research Gate journals.
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Thanks Gabriel.
We wait that it will soon be included in RG
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I intend to study the relation between the beginning of the flowering season for different wooden plant species and the meteorological conditions over the years. For that I need to identify those periods from satellite imagery.
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You can use Landsat-8.
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If a taxon is described using three specimens, one with flowers, one with fruits, and one sterile, considering fruits and flowers are essential for unambiguous identification of that species, and all but the sterile specimen are lost, it clearly needs to designate the sterile material as lectotype.
That is the obvious, but then a problem comes up. As the species can only be identified using flowers and fruits, a single epitype will never be sufficient dealing as type.
Would it hence be possible to designate two specimen as equally serving epitypes?
In another case, if an epitype, lets say with flowers, was already designated, would it be allowed to designate another epitype (or "epiparatype") due to amguity of the first epitype?
Unfortunately, I found this not addressed anywhere. Or maybe I just have overseen it?
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Dear Sergei L. Mosyakin,
this is exactly the issue. In case of ambiguous original material (of which anything is the holotype or a lectotype can be selected), we still have the possibility of designation of ONE additional epitype, which is "conserved" if it is not in conflict with the type.
This is clearly not desirable as taxonomy evolves and "additional" characters using for differetiation of taxa may be discovered. If these characters can not be derived from an existing epitype and epitype further supporting the holo-, lecto-, or neotype AND the previous epitype would be necessary.
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I am attaching the photos of a Rubiaceae member for identification which I have taken from Oddanchatram, Dindigul district of Tamil Nadu, India.
I request the specialists to identify the plant.
Thank you.
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It looks close to Oldenlandia corymbosa L.
Thanks!
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Dear all taxonomists
Do you think that the problem which we had with Zootaxa in this year is an accidental or we should expect similar problems in the future? Not only for Zootaxa but also with other taxonomic journals. Do you think that we can do something with it? Any strategy or ideas? Do we have this problem only in zoology or also in botany?
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I don't understand this and similar discussions. There are hundreds of quality journals that publish alpha taxonomy articles in many fields. Why all attention is focused on Zootaxa?
I never publush my research in paid journals because this is a cheating business. However, this does not apply to journals of scientific societies, where member contributions are required.
Here is just a brief list of free quality international peer-reviewed journals (referring in Scopus and Web of Science core collection) that publish articles on animal alpha taxonomy (many of them are with open access; also many journals publish alpha-taxonomy on fossil records):
Zoology/Entomology:
1. Zoosystema (Scopus, WoS core collection) - chargeless
2. Acta zoologica academiae scientiarum hungaricae (Scopus, WoS core collection) - chargeless, open access
3. European journal of taxonomy (Scopus, WoS core collection) - chargeless, open access
4. Zoosystematica Rossica (Scopus) - chargeless, open access
5. Zoologicheskii zhurnal (Scopus, WoS core collection) - chargeless, open access
6. Zoology in the Middle East (Scopus, WoS core collection) - chargeless
7. Invertebrate zoology (Scopus) - chargeless, open access
8. Acta Zoologica Bulgarica (Scopus, WoS core collection) - chargeless, open access
9. Ecologica Montenegrina (Scopus) - chargeless
10. Annales zoologici (Scopus, WoS core collection) - chargeless
11. Arthropod sytematics and phylogeny (Scopus, WoS core collection) chargeless, open access
12. Zoologischer anzeiger (Scopus, WoS core collection) - chargeless
13. Turkish Journal of Zoology (Scopus, WoS core collection) - chargeless, open access
14. Arthropoda selecta (Scopus) - chargeless, open access
Entomology:
15. Annales de la Société entomologique de France, N.S. (Scopus, WoS core collection) - chargeless
16. Insect systematic & evolution (Scopus, WoS core collection) - chargeless
17. Far Eastern Entomologist (Scopus) - chargless
18. Entomological Review (Scopus) - chargless
19. Fragmenta entomologica (Scopus) - chargless
20. Caucasian Entomological Bulletin (Scopus) - chargeless, open access
21. Russian Entomological Journal (Scopus) - chargeless, open access
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We know that bamboo shoots are highly nutritious, low in fat and calorie. Did you ever tasted bamboo shoots recipe? If yes in what form.
What is the name of the recipe in your native place or language?
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Yes, I can confirm that bamboo sprouts are tasty. I ate bamboo sprouts as a side dish in various dishes, most recently in broth with soy noodles.
Regards,
Dariusz Prokopowicz
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Hello everyone. There are some databases which gives taxonomic names and authors of Plants. 
Some of them: 
The International Plant Names Index: http://www.ipni.org/ipni/plantnamesearchpage.do
My question is which of these databases most reliable? For example for Rosa damascena in Plant List database author name is given as Herrm. However, in International Plant Names Index it is given as Mill. Which one is correct? Are there any other plant database that gives correct information about taxa. Thank you.
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I understand it is taxonomy but maybe you can find on any database like phytozome? There are many databases concerning genomics in plants perhaps more than in taxonomy. It does not have to be wrong or mistaken at least in taxonomy. Could be two sides of the same name, species, genus, etc in the same way humans are Haplohrrini Catarrhini.you could check this in any database. Check the date or the papers if you can. Rosa as in Rosaceae? Maybe it is best to check a specific database as Rosaceae. Taxonomy not just in general but maybe of the species. (There is a strong component of taxonomy of roses).Check, there maybe right at the same time. Mill as in the variety? Zea Mays, orzya sativa, japonica or indica (IX) (Like rice variety Japanese ) .could the roses have different colour in petals?
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Hi, I hope you are doing well
I'm a college student interested in botany and everything related to it. Lately I've been so into classification of plants and I don't know how to find a resource. I want a good book, website or any resources (must be from 2009 and above) to depend on for getting informations about this field. Can you please help me with it?
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Hi,
I would recommend to start with these two, which should be easily accessible and provide a wealth of information to get started with botany. They might not be newer then 2009, but i am sure they have newer editions with updated phylogenies and data.
JUDD, W. S., CAMPBELL, C. S., & KELLOGG, E. A. (2008). Plant systematics: a phylogenetic approach.
SIMPSON, M. G. (2006). Plant systematics. Amsterdam, Elsevier/Academic Press.
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Namely, carob tree is not flammable as pine trees which are very flammable especially in the dry part of the season. So, I wonder, does any mediterranean country use carob tree in planning security forest fire protection belts in order to prevent the mediterranean forst fires or to control them?
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Actually, in Lebanon, earlier years ago, some local organizations took initiative in this field. However, those initiatives were shy and didn't show local importance due to the unawareness of citizens. In result, fire risks were not prevented and we lost a significant part of our forests.
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Please provide relevant publication related to mass multiplication of inoculum, procedure for inoculation, scoring and your valuable suggestion.
Thank you.
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I used to notice in our food culture in Iraq that a person who suffers from anemia or loses blood is advised to eat celery with the spleen, and I did not know the reason until after my academic studies of plant pigments (chlorophyll) and the Similarity large between them and hemoclobin, as well as that the spleen is the cemetery of iron.
How can some customs and traditions be correct even though at the time of their spread there was no great scientific progress as is the case at the present time?
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Hemoglobin is the red pigment in blood that is capable of transporting oxygen Chlorophyll is the green pigment in plants and certain organisms that is capable of trapping the energy of the sun to enhance the process of photosynthesis.
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In all six Zelkova tree species mature fruits fall with the entire twig, and the dried leaves that are still attached function as a parachute, carrying the fruits a few metres away from the parent tree (see attached pictures, first photo: twig of Zelkova serrata from Taiwan, second: dispersed twigs of Z. abelicea from Crete). 
Does anybody know other similar examples of such dispersal mechanisms in other trees/woody species?
For more images of fruits, and more details on the relict tree genus Zelkova see www.zelkova.ch and the publications available on this webpage.
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We have published new research paper on this topic (see the attachment).
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Can you imagine the research is possible without the internet? Please discuss it..
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Dear Sandip Kumar Gupta,
Once it was.
Even now, it is possible.
Thanks
N Das
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We are going to do a seed germination experiment but found that most of the previous research used distilled water as a control solution for seed germination. As distilled water is devoid of any nutrients then plasmolysis can occur during seed germination. Can anyone suggest what should be the perfect composition for the seed germination solution as an experimental control?
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Dear Paul Chandra Sekhar Chandra Sekhar Paul according to the ista "International Seed Testing Association" procedure distilled water is used for seed germination
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Can anyone please suggest some related topic or area in microbiology and immunology except COVID/SAARS?
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molecular virology