Science topic

Blood Biochemistry - Science topic

Explore the latest questions and answers in Blood Biochemistry, and find Blood Biochemistry experts.
Questions related to Blood Biochemistry
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
3 answers
Good day all
What is the best position to draw blood from the arm?
Is he sitting or lying down or standing, and why?
Is there a difference in the results that appear through that and why?
Thanks in advance
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Luay A. Al-Helaly,
In the country where I live, blood is drawn from the arm in a sitting position. Vaccinations against the SARS-CoV-2 (Covid-19) coronavirus are also performed in a similar way, also in a sitting position. The point is for the patient to be comfortable, blood collection or vaccination to go smoothly. According to current standards and recommendations, vaccination against the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 (Covid-19) is made in the left shoulder. So I do not know why in the information campaign encouraging to vaccinate, in the spot of the film information and advertising campaign, which involved, among others, of a famous actor, people known from other commercials appear, and there is a situation that suggests that vaccinations are supposedly being made in the right shoulder. Apparently, the authors of this government-commissioned information campaign did not take the above-mentioned knowledge into account when directing it.
Regards,
Dariusz Prokopowicz
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
3 answers
Some researchers have claimed that Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) can enter cells and make the environment more "alkaline" by soaking up protons. Many publications discuss only 2 nitrogen atoms that can accept a proton, however the molecule possesses 3, and therefore I would be interested to learn about the transport of HCQ, which is in the diacid form in the commercial Sulfate compound, is potentially in a triacid form in the stomach and is known to be predominantly in the diacid form in Blood at pH 7.4.
There is research demonstrating that the acid form is hydrophobic, compared to the neutral compound, which accounts for its much lower activity against Plasmodium, in which the neutral compound is lipophylic.
How many molecules of HCQ per cell have been found in clinical settings, and would this have any real impact on internal pH compared to natural buffers?
Relevant answer
Answer
The environment that's supposed to be made more alkaline is only the endosomal compartment, not the entire cell or body. Naturally, endosomes slowly become more acidic, on their way to becoming lysosomes. Many viruses sense this acidification, and use it as a trigger to fire their endosome escape functions and enter the cytoplasm. If this fails, the virus will likely be destroyed once the lysosomes become mature and loaded with protease & RNAse.
To prevent endosome acidification, a traditional chemical buffering system is likely not the correct mechanism. This would more likely be achieved by a specific phamacological mechanism, like interrupting membrane integrity or inhibiting a proton transporter. I have seen remarkably little work on this, and all of it only in cell culture.
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
5 answers
Respected ALL
Please share the normal haematology, blood biochemistry and Serum mineral profiles of wild carnivore and particularly Leopard will be of much help. Please share the research articles or any other references related to it.
Thanks and Regards
Partha
Relevant answer
Answer
Thanks dear
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
4 answers
Dear all,
Does any of you is aware of any paper identifing proteases / peptidases on human serum samples?...... I could find them on pubmed.
Regards,
Relevant answer
Answer
Thank you Keagile,
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
5 answers
I will be treating heparinized whole blood with a small molecule for various timepoints and then extracting RNA for qPCR.
Do people recommend incubations in tubes or plates/dishes?  5% CO2/37C or only 37C?  I am set on the RNA extraction part, but fairly inexperienced with the prior steps, so any hints or tips would be well appreciated.
Relevant answer
Answer
following
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
5 answers
My clinical study measured the blood biomakers (glucose, insulin, glucagon, GLP-1, GIP, amino acids, etc) at baseline before an intervention meal and at multiple time points after an intervention meal.
We did this measure three times using three different intervention meals at three different days. My main objective is to compare whether there is any difference in the change in blood biomarkers after different intervention meals.
There are several AUC calculation methods to do this, such as the total AUC, incremental AUC (ignore the area under baseline) and net incremental AUC (subtract the area under baseline). How to determine which one to use and what is the rationale?
Relevant answer
Answer
iAUC (incremental ...) is the most recommended and approved method. Follow iAUC
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
4 answers
Hormesis is a concept to explain of adaptation of body to certain dose of Toxic substance. if some condition in exercise like of produce of Free radical, reactive oxygen species, decrease of pH and etc be a toxic condition for body can we called exercise for one of factor of hormesis? what is your idea?
Relevant answer
Answer
Merry TL, Ristow M. Mitohormesis in exercise training. Free Radic Biol Med 2016;98:123-130. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/285392332_Mitohormesis_in_exercise_training
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
7 answers
I want to coat my own tubes with a heparin solution, but can't find any evidence anywhere on what amount of heparin powder I need to add to solution so that the tubes are coated appropriately. I've seen units of 10 IU/mL mentioned, but don't know what this translates to in mass units.
Relevant answer
Answer
I think that 10-15 units (IU)/ml of blood is enough for anti-coagulation !
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
10 answers
Researches claimed that this blood is more efficient for medical use than blood collected from donors. Patients with rare blood types will benefit the most.
Relevant answer
Answer
The term "Artificial blood" is a misnomers and can't be prepared in laboratory. There is a limitation of stem cells culture in vitro and component in whole blood is much more complex.
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
25 answers
  • If a person carries a blood group A resists disease, more than the person that carries a blood group B carries.
  • A blood type (also called a blood group) is a classification of blood based on the presence and absence of antibodies and also based on the presence or absence of inherited antigenic substances on the surface of red blood cells (RBCs). These antigens may be proteins, carbohydrates, glycoproteins, or glycolipids, depending on the blood group system. Some of these antigens are also present on the surface of other types of cells of various tissues. Several of these red blood cell surface antigens can stem from one allele (or an alternative version of a gene) and collectively form a blood group system. Blood types are inherited and represent contributions from both parents. A total of 35 human blood group systems are now recognized by the International Society of Blood Transfusion (ISBT). The two most important ones are ABO and the RhD antigen; they determine someone's blood type (A, B, AB and O, with +, − or Null denoting RhD status).
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Dr. Ali F Almehemdi
Blood types help us to fight diseases and tell us what major disease epidemics a given population suffered in its recent history, (e.g. in the last thousand years). For example, most native Americans belong to group O. It is believed that this is due to a syphilis epidemic and that the O type were better at fighting off the disease. Group A and B make people more resistant to cholera, while AB confers the most resistance. O offers virtually no immunity against cholera. B confers weaker protection against plague. This is probably why B is more common in North-East Europe, which was virtually unaffected by the Black Death during the Middle Ages.
A-type carriers are the most likely to survive plague, but suffer from a higher rate of heart disease, because their blood is more likely to clot. They are also at increased risk of contracting smallpox and developing cancer of the esophagus, pancreas, and stomach. Type O, contrarily to A, is slightly protective against cardiovascular problems. It also boosts resistance against tuberculosis, but increases the risk of venous thromboembolism and developing duodenal and peptic ulcers. It also attracts more mosquitoes (through which malaria is transmitted). A recent study revealed that people with type O blood are less likely to get pancreatic cancer, but also stomach, breast, ovarian and cervical cancer.
The ABO blood group system isn't the only antigen system found in humans. There are about 30 human blood type systems: Rhesus, Kell, Diego, Duffy, Kidd, and so on. Each have a role in immunity. Some are found only in some specific populations and completely absent elsewhere. This is the case of Diego antigens, found only (at low frequency) among Mongolic people and Amerindians.
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
6 answers
I have recently been advised by a microfluidics device manufacturer to add additional EDTA to EDTA-coated microcollection tubes, since mouse blood tends to form micro-clots.
How much EDTA should I add to an estimated 1ml volume of mouse blood? (Keep in mind that the tubes are already pre-coated with EDTA). 
Thanks
Relevant answer
Answer
Twice the concentration used for human blood, since the hemostasis system of mice is pretty procoagulant when compared with the human one.
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
25 answers
I am attempting to isolate neutrophils from human blood samples. From most protocols I have seen, the process requires 4% Dextran and using Histopaque-1077. Is the Dextran necessary? I want to do this Tuesday and do not have time to wait on a reagent to arrive. Also, I have Ficoll-Paque instead of Hisotpaque. Is that a reasonable substitution? They have the same density.
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Olivia,
Try HNP-1, CD66b and MPO to confirm presence of PMNs.
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
4 answers
Previous studies have indicates that reactive microglia expresses molecules such as CD 40 which are necessary for antigen presentation. Can these molecules be detected in clinical blood samples or any other proteins specific to microglia which can be detected in blood?
Relevant answer
Answer
Short answer, no markers that are not also found on other cell types in the periphery.
In the absence of a condition which perturbs the BBB there are no microglia in the blood. Your question is important and one with active investigation because it would be useful for neuroinflammation biomarker research.
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
9 answers
I want to make a stable blood sample. In my study, I want to make a comparative study of many hematology devices and I want to try many blood sample from different sources.
I've seen many protocols, all of them old Patents, I don't know which I should depend on.
Relevant answer
Answer
At our Institution we have a protocol (WHO/LAB 97.2) for whole blood preservation (glutaraldehide 0,37%, formaldehide 2,7%, trisodic citrate 26%, and antibiotics) which is intended, precisely, for CBC blood counters. You can seek it in the WHO page. Success!
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
2 answers
I looked for the answer to this question but I couldn't find any satisfactory answer. I think it is reliable with strong coordination ability of Fe3+ in comparison with Fe2+. However, I need a full explanation. I will be glad if anyone can help.
Relevant answer
Answer
Oxygen oxidizes ferrous to ferric. Does have affinity towards ferrous. This property is used for oxygen transport by hemoglobin. But iron is buried in a pocket guarded by histidine residues. This prevents oxidation of ferrous by oxygen but the affinity helps carrying oxygen. In ferric form, affinity is lost and cannot carry oxygen.
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
7 answers
Ferrozine (disodium 3-(2-pyridyl)-5,6-bis(4-phenyl sulphonate)-1,2,4-triazine) is a water-soluble Fe(II) chelator. When chelated to iron, the complex absorbs light at 562 nm (molar absorption coefficient = 27,900). Copper can also be bound by ferrozine, however copper binds more strongly to another chelating agent, neocuproine.
          Iron can be released from protein through oxidation with acid-permanganate (1 hours at 60oC). Excess permanganate and released iron can then be reduced with ascorbate (RT for 30 min). Released iron must be kept at a pH of 4.5 – 5.0 for it to remain soluble. Acid-permanganate is an equal mixture of 1.2 M HCl and 0.285 M KMnO4
       Given that the Mr of haemoglobin is 68000 and that for serum albumin is 66000, calculate the number of molecules of iron per molecule of protein.  Use the known textbook value for the amount of iron in haemoglobin to calculate the purity of your sample.
Hint: a sensible strategy might be to start by constructing a calibration curve for the reaction of ferrozine with iron. Assays will need to use a control protein (non-Fe containing) for reference.
Another hint: A ratio of 1:5:10 would be appropriate for reagent B: acid-permanganate: sample.
Materials provided:
Haemoglobin (1.5 mg/ml)
Bovine serum albumin (5 mg/ml)
Ferrous ammonium sulphate (anhydrous?)
1.2 M HCl
4.5 % (w/v) (0.285 M) KMnO4
Reagent B containing:            6.5 mM Ferrozine
                                                13.1 mM neocuproine
                                                2 M ascorbic acid
                                                            5 M ammonium acetate.
Relevant answer
Answer
does anyone have this protocol?
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
1 answer
There are several molecular forms of Cholecystokinin (CCK), of which CCK-8 and CCK-33 are the two frequently used molecular forms in pharmaceutical infusion studies to induce fullness and reduce hunger in human/animals.
However, in dietary studies, which involve participants to consume a test meal, which molecular form of postprandial plasma CCK should we assess? What are the methods available? What are the advantages and disadvantages?
Many dietary studies have not been explicitly stating the molecular form of CCK analysed, although some did mentioned CCK-8, CCK-33 or total CCK being measured.
So how should be make decision around which form of postprandial plasma CCK should be analysed in appetite studies?
Relevant answer
Answer
Cholecystokinin-8 regulates hepatic glucose production through a CNS-dependent CCKAR mechanism which may be defective in the setting of obesity.
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
3 answers
 Like Superoxid dismutase For ELISA technique
Relevant answer
Answer
The difficulty with freezing enzymes is what the defrost cycle enzymes are degraded. It is then necessary to use a cryoprotectant such as glycerol before freezing. Than we can storage 6 months or plus
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
1 answer
how liver regulates the blood level of amino acids?what is blood level of amino acid ...?i have found this written on a website
Relevant answer
Answer
Is this paper helpful at any extent ? 
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
4 answers
In many instances a small amount (5-30 ML.) of blood from the external surface of body is let out. In the process of homeostasis, some chemical parameters might change. I wish to know- what are the changes in the biochemistry of blood that take place eg. pH and after how much time does the compensatory mechanism stop?
Relevant answer
Answer
Small amount like 5-30 ml don't have significant role in changing any parameter within human body . 
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
5 answers
Why to use Sodium Citrate vacutainer for Microparticle study and not EDTA and Heparin vacutainers?
Relevant answer
Answer
Hi Mansai, the choice of anticogulant may have more to do with being able to compare the microparticle results with other lab tests that have used citrated-blood.
Regards, Rosemary  
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
4 answers
Hi,
I am looking for C57/BL/6 mice (8-10weeks age) blood plasma biochemical parameters, i.e., blood urea, ALK, GOT, GPT, cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL, LDL.
I need these data as control mice data.
Thank you,
Relevant answer
Answer
A good place to start looking is the Mouse Phenome Database at phenome.jax.org
From the MPD main page, click on "Phenotype" and browse the blood measures, or click on  "Strains"  and follow the top links on the next three pages to get to the available phenotypes for C57BL/6 mice.
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
2 answers
Human blood has ph range 7.35 to 7.45. I want to about refractive index of different ph value. kindly suggest me a link or research article where I get refractive index values for different ph blood sample.
Relevant answer
Answer
Blood pH does indeed affect the RI. The percentage of HbA1C in the erythrocyte is directly related to the RI. pH affects the charge on the Hb molecule. This is well established and you can find more information in most text books. *Try a keyword search (Google or Bing) for texts or articles on hemoglobin and/or glucose levels in blood as related to pH and RI. You will find plenty of sources.
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
20 answers
Dear sir, Regards.
During preparing the serum i found that the supernatant clear part is gelatinised? and when i repeated with a new batch of blood, same animals showed gelatizisation again? what may be the cause sir? and what may be the condition.
Regards
Partha
Relevant answer
Partha - coagulation is slow in plastic containers. Can you collect the blood in sterilised glass tubes, or transfer the blood to such tubes and store forr at least one hour before centrifugation?
If you collect in plastic tubes you can add glass beads or thrombin and CaCl2 to your blood after collection. This will speed up the clotting process.
Whar is the serum used for?
Best regards
Johannes
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
2 answers
Dear colleagues, I was wondering if there is a relationship between the concentration of proteins such as Albumin, ALP, and ALT on both sides of a cell membrane where secretion occurs? An example would be the ALP protein level increases by 10% in human bold plasma. Will the final product after secretion from the plasma delivery most likely also increase by 10% from its original concentration after a while?
Blood plasma (ALP up 10%)  ->  secretion process in the membrane  ->  Final product on the other side of the membrane (ALP up 10%)
Thank you 
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Martin: Though proteins in the aqueous humor resembles those in the plasma, they are actively secreted by ciliary epithelium cells.  The secretion rate of a specific protein in the humor may be proportional to the liver production, the change(s) of which should be more subtle than the plasma.  As immunoglobulins are the main proteins, I'd suggest to monitor sIgA (secreted) in plasma to establish any correlation.
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
13 answers
I have prepared PRP from Sodium citrate whole blood and have 1M CaCl2 solution, problem is I have limited sample to test this part of the study on. Previous studies have used 20mM but the ratio of PRP to CaCl is not disclosed. Any one have any tips on what concentrations to try. I have 6 samples that I can try but one of those will have to be the whole blood in order to compare.
Relevant answer
Answer
I am in agreement with the doses mentioned in the diferent answers. However, you should consider that EDTA is not adequate anticoagulant for PRP preparation. Because this substance could be harmful for live cells and technically is very hard to concentrate platelets when this substance is used. I strongly recomend you to use anticoagulants as sodium citrate or ACD-A.
You must also consider taht many calcium chloride preparations could produce calcium precipitates in gels from PRP. We prefer to use calcium gluconate (9.3 mg/mL) in a ratio 1:10 for PRP activation.
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
4 answers
asking about thrombin level and not activity
the measure could be in conventional units or any unit
Relevant answer
Answer
Thrombin in blood froms stable complexes with antithrombin (AT3), fibrin (AT1), heparin cofactor 2, or alpha-2-macroglobulin. In the latter complex thrombin still has amidolytic activity. In the other complexes thrombin has lost its enzymatic activity.
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
3 answers
Dear Colleagues,
Can you please provide some good datasets of blood biochemistry and cell count data available for academic use?
Relevant answer
Answer
The standard reference for Hematology is by Williams. It covers both Blood Chemistry and Blood Histology.
Hope this helps.
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
4 answers
Capillary refill time is one of the sign of dehydration and shock. Capillary refill time is widely used by health care workers as part of the rapid cardiopulmonary assessment of critically ill children because it is a marker of increased peripherally vascular resistance. I think that capillary refill time is a vital sign. What is your opinion about this topic?
Relevant answer
Answer
I am thankful for your response. I think that if new devices are used to detect the capillary refill time to provide more accurate measurements, it is more valuable physical sign and it may be considered as a vital sign. I am sending two articles about this topic as attachment.
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
5 answers
I want to perform lipid panel tests on 200 mice every other week for about 3 month. if I use ordinary spectrophotometers which work with ordinary cuvettes, it requires a huge amount of reagents. Besides, based on the catalog of the kits we have, it needs to draw at least 700 microlitter of blood to acquire about 400 microlitter of serum. this is impossible because if you draw 700 microlitter of a mouse blood, it will die or at least it suffers from a huge amount of stress.
so, I had an Idea! is it possible to use a nanodrop or other microvolume spectrophotometers for blood biochemistry tests such as lipid panel?
if it's possible, I will be able to perform all the tests on a single mouse with less than 10 microlitter of serum. in addition, based on my calculations, I will consume at least 50 times less of the reagents.
did anybody use nanodrop for such applications? or heard/read about it?
thanks a lot
Relevant answer
Answer
The pathlength in a microplate well is the height of the liquid in the well, which is directly proportional to the volume (if the wells have vertical sides, which is usually the case). You can measure the height of the liquid, approximately, in wells at the edge of a transparent plate. However, it isn't really necessary if you can make a standard curve.
The greater the volume in the well, the greater the absorbance for a given concentration of substance. So you might want to use the largest practical volume. However, large absorbances aren't as important as you might think. An absorbance of 0.1 is usually sufficient. There will be a slight well-to-well variation in the baseline absorbance of up to +/- 0.01. You can do a pre-read of the empty plate to record this baseline and subtract it from the final measurement, if necessary.
Another consideration is mixing. It's difficult to mix the contents of the 384-well plate when the wells are nearly full. Trituration (pipetting the solution up and down a few times) is not a good way because it is usually causes bubbles to form, and you can't make a good measurement with bubbles in the well. You can mix the plate by holding it with one hand while tapping it several times with the other. Mixers designed for 96-well plates don't work well for 384-well plates. The Eppendorf MixMate is a good instrument for mixing 384-well plates. You have to be careful with it not to spill the contents from too-vigorous mixing, especially if you have solutions with a lot of protein or detergent, because of the low surface tension. It's a good idea to practice a little before committing your precious samples.
If you can lay your hands on multichannel pipettors pitched for 384-well plates, your work will go a lot faster than if you use single-channel pipettes. But you can also use multichannel pipettors intended for 96-well plates. They dispense into alternate wells of a 384-well plate.
Be careful not to dispense air bubbles into the wells. You can avoid this with proteinaceous or detergent solutions by pre-coating the pipet tips. Draw up the solution and dispense it back into the reservoir once or twice before doing the actual dispensing.
If you do get some air bubbles at the top of the wells, you can usually burst them by blowing a stream of methanol or ethanol vapor gently over them. Get a laboratory squeeze bottle, the kind with a straw inside. Remove the straw and put in a small amount of solvent. That way, only the vapor comes out, not the liquid.
Once you have experience with regular 384-well plates, and if your absorbance is more than sufficient, you may be able to switch to low-volume 384-well plates and use even less reagent. Pipetting is trickier, however, because of the small size of the wells.
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
3 answers
We are looking for large repositories of blood biochemistry and other clinical data linked to mortality and other events. Any recommendations are highly appreciated. 
Relevant answer
Answer
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
5 answers
Besides fasting blood sugar and glycaeted haemoglobin, what is the current guideline for use of fructosamine and glycaeted albumin as biomarkers of hyperglycaemia?
Relevant answer
Answer
Fructosamine can replace the glycated hemoglobin for example in pregnant women because it represents the glycation of proteins, especially albumin, and reflects the glycemia of 15-20 days before the determination. 
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
3 answers
 I want procedures for catalse , super oxidedis mutase , para oxinase enzymes for blood sampels???
Relevant answer
Answer
Your question involves three different enzymes, so the discussions and answers might not be easy to follow. I would suggest you to ask a different question for each enzyme, next time.
Below are some references for catalase and superoxide dismutase, with detailed protocols. I could not find a PDF for the oldest references, but the papers with more recent modifications of the protocols might be more useful anyway.
As for para-oxydase, were you referring to the PON1 enzyme? I attached a few papers on that as well.
I also link to other threads in researchgate with similar questions.
All the best with your work!
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
7 answers
Dear Researchers
Please suggest me about "Methemoglobin determination/estimation/mesurement".
I want to estimate Methemoglobin amount present in the blood of rat.
I will induce Methemoglobinemia in a rat by using some chemicals.
Some paper suggest to use Co-oximeter for this purpose. But I did not find any protocol related to this in the detail.
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Gaurav Kumar I wish to help you to realize your research about the methemoglobin argument, which is also  my field of research interest.
I cite the article which explain the procedure appliable to human or animal blood:
CLIN.CHEM.25/8,1388-1393(1979) F.Lee Rodkey, Thomas A. Hill, L.Loring Pitts and Robert F. Robertson.Spectrophotometric Measurement of Carboxyhemoglobin and Methemoglobin in blood.
With regards
Lucijan Mohorovic,MD,PhD
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
4 answers
Any researcher relevance to the field of genetics.
Relevant answer
Hello Bradi
Concerning the DNA extraction, using cow's blood, i suggest you use the Buffy coat, avoiding excessive red cells. Just like 300 microlitres is ok for the extraction.
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
15 answers
In my lab we normally do cell culture (For karyotyping) from fresh sample, just after collecting in heparinized tubes. Now we are thinking of doing some sample which will come from a longer distance. Its probably takes 10-16 hr to reach in our lab.
Is it possible to do the test with retaining its maximum quality?. If so then, what measures should I need to take during sample transportation?.
So I am asking this question to know about the storage condition that i need to ensure during transportation.
Relevant answer
Answer
Cytogenetic analysis after 10-16 hr of sampling usually still work pretty well. The heparinized samples should be mixed well by inverting the tubes several times and best be shipped at room temperature.
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
13 answers
Stimulation with IFN-g or LPS in 15mls conical tubes mounted on a rotator inside an incubator at37'/0%CO2 for 24hr (so the blood continuously moves around within the tube).
I am trying to quantify the expression of an intracellular protein via flow cytometry in monocytes (gating these cells from whole blood analysis via expression of CD14, CD16, CD45 and HLA-DR). so far i have stimulated undiluted whole blood with vary doses of the two stimulants obtaining poor results.
Relevant answer
Answer
As a reminder, if you want to really quantify (meaning absolute quantification in terms of numbers of molecules of specifically bound MAb to this Ag, aka sABC) an internal Ag, you have to correctly choose your fluorochrome and optimize permeabilization/washing steps*.
Also remember that (act.) monocytes do harbour high autofluorescence (higher than any other blood cells) from flavins/NADP ... Maybe you want to prefer red-emitting fluors. One trick I have seen (long ago) in the litterature to reduce autofluorescence of monocytes is the addition of Trypan blue as a quencher (though I presently do not find the - old -ref.).  Also avoid PE since PE is the fluor most prone to interferences from counter-staining reagents (tandems, FITC ...).
If you do want to go to sABC, then you may consider using our CellQuant Calibrator kit, or QIFIkit from DAKO. This may work even for intra-cellular staining. see e.g. *) "Involvement of Peripheral Benzodiazepine Receptors in the Protection of Hematopoietic Cells Against Oxygen Radical Damage. Carayon et al Blood 1996:3170-78 or "Expression of Bcl-2 and Bax ..." Sermadiras et al Br J Dermatol 1997; 137:883-9.
Hope that helps. PP
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
9 answers
Iwe have a project looking at leukoreduction effects in equine whole blood stored over 5 weeks in CPDA-1. Oxygen tensions are ~200-225 mmHg by week 2 in leukoreduced bags, slowly increase from 60 to ~100 in non0leukoreduced bags. CO2 increases to ~80 mmHg in lekoreduced and stays there by week 1, increase is to about 120 mmHg in non-leukoreduced. I am trying to sort out why?
Relevant answer
Answer
Hi Jim! pH is a bit acid, and progressively more so with time. In LR blood slight increase in PCO2 with thime, big increases with non-LR blood over time. O2 vewry different between LR and non-LR blood, more than 250 mmHg in LR blood by end of week one. Thank you for the suggestion re: nitrogen in bag. :-)
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
6 answers
People! I collected blood samples, separated the plasma and frozen it, but when the samples were transported to my laboratory, they unfrozen.. I don't know how long they remain in this situation (unfrozen). Do you think I can use them to analyse lipids, triglycerides, uric acid, cholesterol, lactate? I can't lose them it's for my mastership!
Relevant answer
Answer
Thank you very much, people!
I analyzed the samples and the results were similar from those that I found on the literature..
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
6 answers
I am doing targeted protein quantification by mass spectrometry. The interesting protein called frataxin. It is about 14-18 KD protein in mitochondria inner membrane. I heard how to get mitochondria enriched cells or platelets from fresh whole blood, however, my future samples will be frozen whole blood in EDTA tubes. How can I get mitochondria enriched part? Thanks.
Relevant answer
Answer
Hi, I am not sure, but maybe you will find the answer at macs miltenyi Homepage, they offer mitochondria Isolation kit, I used it for cell culture. But I don't know if it is useful with blood, ask the technical Service. cheers.
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
8 answers
Hi,
I received a blood bag for PBMC isolation with subsequent T-cells triage required. I received it yesterday evening and put the bag at +4C. I wonder if I can do a ficoll etc NOT the next morning but the morning after? So it will rest for 24+ hours at +4C... Is it bad for the experiment? 
Thank you in advance!
Relevant answer
Answer
I agree with Suzanne – Room temperature storage increases viable cell yield and reduces activation and cell death induced by 4°C storage overnight. I believe  4°C makes membrane RAFT areas more rigid - locking signaling molecules together that may have been mean to be a transient interactions. People who work with granulocytes do NOT use blood stored overnight at 4°C because that process  activates the cells.
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
3 answers
I would like to know if there is some portable analyzer similar to those that measure lactate, e.g., Lactate Pro. 
Relevant answer
Answer
Thank you very much!
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
5 answers
Dear all, 
I'm currently trying to detect the signals of intracellular LC3 in isolated eosinophil from human blood. After being purified (the purity is ~ 99%) and treated, eosinophils are harvested, permeabilized immediately (with 0.1% Triton-X) and incubated with PE-LC3 antibody, and resuspended in 1X HBSS. Recently I got two problems: 
1/ Another cell populations shift towards SSC high/FSC high. This makes it harder to gate the general population.
2/ In some samples, signals of PE-LC3 were very high. So I think maybe it's due to unspecific staining. 
Is there anyone has encountered these problems? I appreciate any help you may provide. 
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Christmann, 
Thanks for your help. Can you please tell me your protocol for fixing primary cells? Thank you. 
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
3 answers
I have found red cell sodium values (calculated values only unfortunately) to be 'low' - sometimes 'undetectable'. I am guessing that a value around mmol/Litre
Relevant answer
Answer
I ' m glad I could help you.
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
13 answers
I would like to ask if there is calcium really unnecessary for thrombin activity ? I've found one publication, where they claimed that thrombin is Ca-dependent enzyme ... but there was no reference to this statement. I need to use thrombin to cut-off GST from my fusion protein, but my protein-of-interest is vulnerable to Ca and Ca lowest it's activity.
Here is the quote from one paper that mess my mind:
We have found that recombinant TGase loses activity in a matter
of hours in the presence of calcium, so we were concerned that
the calcium-dependent thrombin-mediated cleavage of Lai’s GSThTG2
fusion protein would lead to significant loss of activity of
the resulting hTG2.
Relevant answer
Answer
Calcium is necessary for the activity of complexes which participate in thrombin generation but not for its activity.
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
5 answers
The solvents we use are acetonitrile with formic acid in a Genevac MiVac
Relevant answer
Answer
In fact we buy prepared QC from Arvecon. In our centrifuge evaporator, the max temperature that we can use is 80°C and this is not the real temp. in the sample because this the value of the evaporation chamber. THC is boiling at 157°C in its pure state so I think this will be ok. I'll say you that in a few days :)
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
5 answers
For me, the availability of each Amino Acid in fasting blood RELATIVE to all others is more significant metabolically, than the absolute values of each AA (which are currently assessed individually to ascertain whether each falls within a said 'normal range' or not), as:
Consideration of all amino acids together and relative to each other, provides context, as well as strengths and weaknesses of the metabolome as a whole. 
Relevant answer
Answer
I think both might be important, depending on your biological or scientific question. The % abundance may be more signifficant for some metbolic disease (like phenylalanine ratio). However,  the absolute concentration is very importantant in relation to the concentration of other metabolites or the value of the hematocrit.
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
10 answers
I want to measure hematocrit on small samples, but don't have a microhematocrit centrifuge.
 Is there a special insert that can be used in a normal centrifuge, or just another method that may be used altogether?
Relevant answer
Answer
of course you can. i frequently use regularcentrifuge to measure hematocrit. just ad 2 - 3 cm long styrofoam into the centrifuge tube to help the capillary tube stand up. turn the sentrifuge on, measure it, done :D i wish this is helpful
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
7 answers
I need to detect some heavy metal concentration from plasma and do some enzyme essays from serum or both. Please suggest me if there is any technique in which both plasma and serum can be harvested safely from the blood.
Relevant answer
Answer
Plasma is derived from samples of blood collected using an anti-coagulant and spinning the cells down. Serum is collected after clotting of the blood.
So in my opinion you need either to collect two tubes of blood one with and one without anti-coagulant or divide the sample after collection over the two different tubes.
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
1 answer
We have blood contained in paxgene tubes and would like to know whether Trizol method would be effective in isolating RNA. Is there any modification to be made in the trizol method, for isolating RNA from blood contained in Paxgene tubes to obtain maximum yeild and integrity.
Blood samples once collected in paxgene tubes are stable for a long time and are required to be extracted using the paxgene extraction kit. Instead of using the kit, I used trizol method for the same, and got a single faint band(opposed to 3 bands). 
Relevant answer
Answer
It should be efficient. Just follow step by step the protocol, paxgene tubes shouldn't be influential.
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
5 answers
Does anybody know if it is possible or have a protocol for measuring citrate synthase activity in serum? I have already measured activity in skeletal muscle and want to see if the changes can be tracked in the blood stream.
Previously I used a protocol using DTNB to measure the reaction between acetyl CoA and oxaloacetic acid.
Relevant answer
Answer
The Srere procedure you used for assaying citrate synthase in muscle should work in serum though I would expect very, very low levels in serum unless you had some sort of muscle damage and/or mitochondrial damage.
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
1 answer
I have three frozen, centrifuged blood samples in Yellow-cap vacutainer ACD tubes. They are currently being stored at -80C, and I need to extract DNA from them. They fill about 1-2ml of the tube per sample.
If they thaw out, will the buffy coat layer stay separate, or will the layers merge right away?
If the layers merge, I will be able to extract just from the buffy coat, otherwise I will have to extract from whole blood.
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Devan,
I frequently isolate DNA from both frozen and fresh blood samples of 2 ml using simple salt extraction method. Add 5 volumes of RBC lysis buffer to the thawed sample and vortex for 2 min and incubate at RT for 10 min. Spin at 2000 g for 20 min, discard the supernatant but leave the pellet with tiny amount of buffer. Then add 1 ml of RBC lysis buffer and repeat the above step. Then add 2 ml of WBC lysis buffer with Proteinase k and vortex for 2 min, incubate at 50 deg C for 3-4 hrs or until the pellet get solubilized. Add 200 ul of 3M sodium acetate, and incubate at -20 deg C for 1 hour, spin at 12000g for 10 min, transfer the supernatant and precipitate the DNA with double volume of cold ethanol. Wash the DNA pellet with 70% ethanol, and dissolve the semi-dried pellet in required vol of Tris, pH 8.5 or sterile ultrapure water.
Now your DNA is ready to be estimated and other down stream process. This method is applicable for both frozen and fresh blood.
all the best wishes,
regards,
Rajkumar
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
1 answer
We are trying to figure out how long to give for stability - ie. can we premake them and how long are they good for?
Relevant answer
What kind of solutions you want to know .
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
9 answers
I am attempting to quantify a particular protein in red blood cells and I want to remove hemoglobin so that it will not interfere with the assay that I am using. 
Relevant answer
Answer
On both soluble and membrane protéine extracts from RBCs, I successfully depleted Hb through IMAC chromatography with nickel-loaded phase, the same way as for the purification of His-tag proteins. Have a look at this paper : 
Journal of Proteomics
5 December 2012, Vol.76:181–193, doi:10.1016/j.jprot.2012.05.004
hope that can help you ;-)
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
11 answers
We have power trips going on quite frequently in our lab and to say the least this is a nightmare for my PBMC isolations. I was wondering if it would ruin the layer separation permanently or is there still a chance to get a nice layer by resuming the spin after electricity restoration? I wanted an opinion from someone who has experienced such an event.
Relevant answer
Answer
From my experience the biggest problem will be if the brake acts due to a power failure as this will ruin your layer on the Ficoll (or whatever you use). But how your centrifuge reacts to the power cut (break on or off) could depend on the type of centrifuge you use.
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
4 answers
We are using human I-FABP kit to detect in pig plasma samples. I cannot find any literature on abundance of I-FABP in plasma, only in cells. We want to optimize this protocol. We know the total protein concentrations in our samples, but I'm not sure where to go from here. 
Any tips, tricks, and general information is most welcome!
Relevant answer
Answer
Hi Ivana
Yes, the way you are doing is also valid, where in you first normalize all samples to the same protein concentration and then dilute either 1:10 or 1:2.
The way I did was, I started with the same weight of tissue across different tissue samples. Then, I did different dilutions of the samples to check and see what dilution falls within 25%-75% of the standard curve. I also did a BCA assay to determine the protein concentration of the samples. Once I got the protein concentration of the specific antigen from the ELISA data, I divided that with the total protein concentration to appreciate the actual differences of the specific antigen between samples.
Yes, you are right. If your samples after background subtraction are negative, then you should extend the lower end of your standard curve to determine the lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) of that assay. To do this, I ran 3 sets of standard curves in triplicate on two different plates, calculated the % CV (a sister of SD) and % recovery for each set of the standard curve. If % CV (SD/Mean*100) is 10% or 15% and % recovery (observed conc/true conc *100) is between 80%-120%, then that lowest point on the standard curve (across all standard curve sets) that obeyed the rules you set for %CV and % recovery cut-off was considered the LLOQ. Again, you can determine if you want the % recovery to be 80-120% or 90-110% and for the % CV to be below 10% or below 15% or below 20% (which is the max).
It is also possible that your antigen is not completely soluble in the sample diluent. Adding 0.1% SDS or 0.1% Triton-X-100 to the sample and standard diluent might help solubilize your antigen better, thereby help interact with the capture/detection Abs. When doing this, I would first test just the standard curve, with or without SDS/Triton-X-100, and see how the signal improves and then extend it to the samples, at which point you should test the standard too.
Another possible explanation is that your antigen may not be completely extracted while processing the plasma. This happened with my antigen. I used a number of different methods (RIPA/SDS/Triton) to extract the antigen. SDS worked very well for my antigen. Mine was a transporter protein, which is a transmembrane protein. Because it is not a soluble protein, but a membrane protein, it needed 10% SDS during the sample processing step to completely solubilize the protein.
Also, unless the kit that you purchased from the company has passed good quality control, and is a reliable company (like Innotest or Covance), ELISA may not work, just because the company sells. I had a not-so-good experience with one company out in the market, and ended up developing my own. Sometimes, companies sell products with a part of the recombinant protein (fragment), rather than using the full length protein, whose folding will be different from that of the full-length antigen in the sample.
I hope these tips help improve the ELISAs. Always, please  feel free to contact if you have any further questions.
Best wishes,
Chandana
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
9 answers
I tested some blood serum parameters like HDL, LDL, trigyceride etc. and leptin in albino wistar rats. When I look at the literature I could not find a direct answer about right timing of blood collection. If I applied sample collection in the same way, same time, same row for all animals, can eating of rats before blood collection still create a huge individual variance differences and avoid to have significant data for treatment? Please help me, I am completely confused.
Relevant answer
Answer
You are likely to get less inter-animal variation if your rats were fasted.
The reason we use fasting is to eliminate some of the variability between different animals. When you leave rodents with unlimited access to food, not all of them eat at the same time or even the same amounts. If you have multiple animals in a single cage, you will often notice some differences in their weights. All of this plays into what you may see in serum levels of various measurements, especially parameters that are known to be effected by feeding status, such as the ones you are measuring.
If your experiment requires levels from animals that fed ad libitum, that's a different matter.
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
7 answers
Has anyone ever quantified the relative yield of RNA from whole blood, serum and plasma, preferably from the same original sample?
Thanks in advance,
Anna
Relevant answer
Answer
Thanks Jonathan. It's a valid point to double check when reading publications.
I personally think that the practice of adding RNA carrier to RNA extraction is a bad one, and I have been using either linear acrylamide or glycogen successfully for many years - not with serum, but with low numbers of cells.
A
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
1 answer
Is known  molecular kit could determine all U variant?
Relevant answer
Answer
Hi Chunying Li,
I have so far never seen an anti-U - but maybe the article in the link might help.
I am not aware of an PCR kit determining U variants - however, in Germany this is probably seldomly needed. You should ask African colleagues, maybe they are more experienced with this problem due to the "higher" proportion of U negative people there...
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
2 answers
It is well known the high affinity of clotrimazole for the haeme moiety.  I wander whether its binding to haemoglobin has been studied and if it depends on the oxido-reduction state of the Fe atom. I would greatly appreciate any comment.
Relevant answer
Answer
As we pointed out in our paper in AJPCELL in 2008, clotrimazole interacts with P450 proteins, hence with heme group containing molecules, like hemoglobin. We do not know the role of P450 in the regulation of IK channels. It would be interesting to use hemoglobin as a simpler accessible molecule  and study its interaction with the heme group as function of its oxidation state. 
From Page C830 of AJPCell 294, 2008:
Neither typical inhibitors of Big conductance (BK), other
voltage-gated K channels, Small conductance (SK) channels,
nor known blockers of the connexin family were effective
(Table 2) (15). Only CTZ with an approximate IC50 of 25 M
and completely at 50 M prevented Kc loss (Fig. 10). This
concentration range is comparable to published CTZ doses in
other epithelial cell systems, with intermediate conductance
KCa3.1 (IK) channels involved in RVD (29, 60). TRAM-34, an
inhibitor of IK channels not involving the P450 protein like
CTZ (56, 66), also reduced Kc loss by 50% and less Rb influx
suggesting that the two inhibitors act through different mechanism
either at the channel or regulatory level.
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
2 answers
I need to know about new techniques can use to look for circulating histones in plasma from patients who may be exposed either to trauma or injury, or may be as a result of diseases.
Relevant answer
Answer
Thanks for all of you to answer me
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
4 answers
Hello all,
We have been trying to isolate RNA from whole blood using different kit methods (Promega and others) but we get degraded RNA every time. Please tell us any manual method like Trizol and CTAB method in which we do not need to extract buffy coat first. Also indicate the homogenization procedure. Is it true that haemoglobin binds RNA and precipitates with it so that is why we are not getting RNA?
Many thanks
Relevant answer
Answer
RiboPure™ RNA Purification Kit for blood (Life Technologies) works very well. Trizol LS Reagent (also Life Technologies) also works well. Here it is the protocol: https://tools.lifetechnologies.com/content/sfs/manuals/trizol_ls_reagent.pdf
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
6 answers
I wanted to get a feedback on the use of infrared or Raman spectroscopy for detection of breast, cervical lung cancers or in detecting blood biochemistry. 
Has anybody used the method for detection of markers such as EGF, p16, CEA, CA125 for early cancer detection?
Relevant answer
Answer
I was co-chair of the conference, and am editing the proceedings. let me know if there is a more specific area of interest for you.
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
5 answers
I Want to extract Angiotensin peptide from blood, already i have synthesized biologically active Angiotensin with higher purity, Now i want to extract natural peptide and compare the biological properties of both, Am looking perfect procedure from Experts.,
Relevant answer
Answer
I thing saranya bharathi method is most common method to extract proteins but most of the case it won't work.,
Some protein extraction methods we compare means we can get enough idea.,
if i found any i will get back here...
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
10 answers
I've tried an ELISA with mixed results so I would like to confirm the results by western blot.  However, serum does not run well on PAGE gels.  Any idea if lyophilization and resuspension in water will help?  I ran serum on a 10% gel and it was close to the worst gel I've ever run in my life.  If anyone has any helpful suggestions, I would appreciate them.
Relevant answer
Answer
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
1 answer
I would like to measure and monitor pentraxin 3 levels in ICU patients. Any experience how to store the serum samples and where? Also I can't find the half life of PTX 3 in the literature any ideas. Thanks.
Relevant answer
Answer
Hüseyin Bey merhaba
Ekte sorunuz ile ilgili bir literatür gönderiyorum, -80 oC de analiz zamanına kadar örnek saklanmış, iyi çalışmalar dilerim.
Türkan Yurdun
Does low pentraxin-3 levels associate with polycystic ovary syndrome and obesity?
Figen Kir Sahin,1 Serap Baydur Sahin,2 Gulsah Balik,1 Ulku Mete Ural,1 Yesim Bayoglu Tekin,1 Medine Cumhur Cure,3 Senol Senturk,1 Suleyman Yuce,4 and Erkan Cure5
Tubes containing EDTA with 2 ml were used collecting blood. The blood then was immediately transferred to centrifuge tubes which contain aprotinin (0. 6 TIU/ml of blood) inside. The tubes were gently rocked several times to inhibit the activity of proteinases before being centrifuged. The centrifuge process was carried out at 1600 g rate for 15 min at 4°C condition to obtain the plasma that was stored in -80°C freezer until the time of assay.
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
2 answers
In my lab I use Olerup-SSP HLA-Typing tray kit for HLA-A,B,DR typing of patient and donor prior to check the match-ability for organ transplant .We use manual (data sheet) to find the serology and allele regarding found bands, so is there any software available to analyze the HLA-Typing ?
Relevant answer
Answer
Score software. Check Olerup homepage!!
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
7 answers
Which is maximum time lag between blood drawing (clot formation) and centrifugation? Is there a way to increase this time (to e.g. 24h)?
Relevant answer
Answer
May recommendation to froze the serum.
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
2 answers
manual method can be used for accurate measurement of plasma corticosterone level
Relevant answer
Answer
In Ron de Kloets lab we routinely used the CORT RIA from MP Biomedicals. We adjusted the standard curve by adding two lower concentrations (6,25 and 12,5 ng/ml) to make sure we would detect low basal circulating levels of corticosterone. Also you just need 5-10 microliters of plasma to run you assay.
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
7 answers
One should add aprotinin before centrifugation of samples for plasma or serum isolation and then freeze for subsequent small peptides' determination. If this step has been missed, is there any sense in adding aprotinin after thawing such samples?
Relevant answer
Answer
Hi Steingrimur, thanks for your additional comment. I agree with you on the fact that plasma contains a balance of proteases and anti-proteases. As a matter of precaution, aprotinin could be added before freezing (ideal) and, if not, right after thawing to limit the risks of protease activation that results from thawing. The choice of the anti-proteases can include aprotinin, that inhibits fibrinolysis and the intrinsic coagulation pathway, or others. Benzamidine has been used at lab scale for its anti-protease activity. Best, Thierry
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
4 answers
Aggrastat is an alpha2b beta 1 integrin inhibitor
Relevant answer
Answer
Hi Augusto, I found this paper looking at gpIIbB3 antagonists:
However, I cant find the mechanism by which Tirofiban (Aggrastat) inhibits gpIIbB3. It is not an RGD containing small molecule like other gpIIbB3 inhibitors.
Do you know the mechanism of how Tirofiban inhibits gpIIbB3?
Plus, I found this paper saying that Eptifibatide and 7E3, but Not Tirofiban, Inhibit αvβ3 Integrins on smooth muscle cells
Eptifibatide is an RGD mimetic peptide and 7E3 is an anti-B3 monoclonal.
I'm bringing this up because I found some papers showing that platelets express avB3
Albeit that avB3 expression on platelets is much lower than gpIIaB3, it could have an effect in your assay.
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
3 answers
It took me half an hour to separate serum from Guinea pig blood by allowing blood to stand still in a slant position at room temperature followed by centrifugation. I need a quicker means of serum separation to produce high-titre complement.
Relevant answer
Answer
For separating serum from the blood cells you should use a tube without any anticoagulant , sterile empty tube will be fine , after taking your sample , say 5 ml or so leave the tube in a standing position for about 20-30 minutes ( it can take shorter time than this so you can check it preiodically ) after that you will find your blood to be clotted , centrifuge at 20 c degree , 1500g for 10 minutes then remove your serum very quickly and flash freeze it in -80 c to preserve your complememnt for next assay.
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
3 answers
Can anybody help me with platelet surface modification studies while interacting with a herbal extract?
Relevant answer
Answer
actually i have isolated few phytochemicals which boost-up platelet count very rapidly and maintain optimum level. so i want to study the mechanism that how they are doing so. there may be 2 possibility. one is regarding growth factors and another is regarding morphological modification. I am not very sure. but i really want to do this study to know the mechanism.
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
3 answers
I will like to collect blood for both PCR and ELISA. I want to avoid using two different tubes. Is it possible to do ELISA from blood collected in PAXgene tubes? Or will the preservatives interfere with the assay? I know it is fine for PCR but is it okay for ELISA?
Relevant answer
Answer
It will not interfere because in ELISA, we are always detecting immune substances.
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
2 answers
What is the best way to preserve bloodstream Trypanosomes for both short and long period storage?
Relevant answer
Answer
@ Aaron, thanks for the answe
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
7 answers
I have read a lot about drawing blood from Wistar rat and I have knowledge about different techniques. For my current research, I need a technique that wouldn't include the death of the animal (e.g decapitation). In the past, I have tried drawing blood from tail (which seems to be the easiest way), but unfortunately I didn't succeed, what so ever. I need help with drawing blood from Wistar rat and I'll be happy to have any NEW methods or any extraordinary tips.  
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Mohammad,
Blood can be collected from the retero-orbital plexus (ROP) into heparinised or non-heparinized eppedorf’s tubes as per your requirement, You may see some presentations on this on google too. It is a very easy technique of blood collection. I am sure you will be easily learning the same.
We have used this technique during pharmacokinetic studies in rats as well as efficacy studies.
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
4 answers
A preliminary demonstrated that I could not find any specific diseases that nitric oxide and S-Nitrosothiols are really good predictors for. 
Diseases such as alzheimer's are so big that i doubt providing clinicians with a quantitative skin-nitric oxide/ S-Nitrosothiol level would be relevant.
Thank you!
Relevant answer
Answer
Nitric oxide was identified as EDRF (endothelium derived relaxation factor) in 1980, using aortic rings. This establishes a link between NO and endothelial damage (impaired vasodilation). A gradient of the NO synthesizing enzyme, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), has been detected in the aorta, which correlates with the gradient of lesions (endothelial damage). Endothelial damage and atherosclerosis are, therefore, linked with NO.
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry
Question
13 answers
I am planning to determine the amount of Zinc released and distributed from Zinc oxide Nanoparticles in in vivo conditions in organs and blood of mice. As cost and availability of instrument is a limiting factor, I would like to know techniques other than ICP-AES/ ICP-MS for the analysis.
Relevant answer
Answer
I doubt that you can measure by any method the release of zinc from nanoparticles into the blood of mice. The normal zinc concentration in blood is so high that a contribution from nanoparticles could only me measured for unrealistic high NP concentrations
  • asked a question related to Blood Biochemistry