Science topic

Bioremediation - Science topic

Bioremediation is the use of microorganism metabolism to remove pollutants. Some examples of bioremediation technologies are phytoremediation, bioventing, bioleaching, landfarming, bioreactor, composting, bioaugmentation, rhizofiltration, and biostimulation.
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Hello everyone,
I would like to get your opinions based on your experience on what other utilities can enzymes (Which can degrade petroleum hydrocarbons) be used for rather than cleaning the oil spills?
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Have a look at this useful RG link.
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Culture media for Bioacclimitization of Cd and Cr by indigenous bacterial strains.
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Biosorption mechanisms depend on the type of bacteria strain. It requires the standardization of the media during your studies. For comparative studies, it can be a minimal salt medium and a nutrient-rich medium like LB.
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I am working on a mycoremediation project and trying to sperate the mycelium from the soil it is growing in to test for pollutants. Just looking for some new ideas.
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There are several methods that can be used to separate mycelium from soil, depending on the specific goals of your project and the resources available to you. Some common methods include:
  1. Filtration: This method involves using a filter paper or mesh to physically separate the mycelium from the soil. This method can be useful for small-scale experiments, but may not be efficient for large amounts of soil.
  2. Centrifugation: This method uses a centrifuge to separate the mycelium from the soil by spinning the mixture at a high speed. The mycelium will collect at the bottom of the centrifuge tube, while the soil will be suspended in the liquid medium.
  3. Sieving: This method involves passing the soil-mycelium mixture through a sieve to separate the mycelium from the soil particles.
  4. Decantation: This method involves allowing the soil-mycelium mixture to settle and then carefully pouring off the liquid. The mycelium will be collected on the bottom of the container, while the soil will be suspended in the liquid.
  5. Flotation: This method involves adding a reagent to the soil-mycelium mixture that causes the mycelium to float to the surface, where it can be collected.
  6. Sedimentation: This method involves adding a reagent that causes the mycelium to aggregate, and then the agglomerated mycelium can be separated from the soil by sedimentation.
It's worth noting that some of these methods may not be effective depending on the type of soil and mycelium you're working with, so it's a good idea to try out a few different methods and see which one works best for your specific project.
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Hello everyone!
I was recently asked a question on whether biodegradation of microplastics into smaller plastic particles (e.g. nanoplastics) by microbial communities actually increases the toxicity of plastic particles and thus not a commendable bioremediation approach?
My immediate response was that the extent of biodegradation is of great importance when deciding on the effectiveness of bioremediation techniques. Given that the biodegradation process continues until mineralization of plastic polymers, then this approach could be confidently backed up. What are your insights on the matter? How could we defend bioremediation approaches knowing that degradation of microplastics might give rise to smaller plastic particles with behaviors that are harder to control and predict?
Any contribution is appreciated.
Cheers!
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Dear Kamyar Amirhosseini, there are various reviews on this topic. First insights are encouraging. Please have a look at the following sample documents. My Regards
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How bioremediation play an eco- friendly approach for environment pollution management? How are bacteria used for bioremediation and water environment?
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Bioremediation as a method of remediating polluted environment has many notable advantages compared to other methods of remediation, the foremost being its eco-friendly features, which include minimal site disruption, permanent waste removal, and elimination of long-term liability.
Currently, microbes are used to clean up pollution treatment in processes known as 'bioremediation'. Bioremediation uses micro-organisms to reduce pollution through the biological degradation of pollutants into non-toxic substances.
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I want to know the extraction of pesticide protocol from the soil sample in a suitable solvent so that it can be analyzed using GC-MS/LC-MS or HPLC for the presence of pesticide.
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https://doi.org/http://doi: 10.11648/j.sjac.20210904.12
Here, we describe a protocol used to detect Chlorpyrifos residues in soil
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Hi All,
I recently joined as a Guest editor in Frontiers in Environmental Chemistry where I need to find team members as a co-editor to launch a research topic related to Biocatalysis, Bioremediation, Enzyme engineering, Microbial Enzymes, and Enzyme Immobilization. If anyone intrested to join mail me at sonal.mahajan@dypiu.ac.in.
Will mail the detailed information to that person
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Thank you .. am interested.
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I'm using Sporosarcina pasteurii to remove heavy metals from wastewater by producing metal carbonates. The issue I encounter is that high metal concentrations (i.e. Co 2g/L) strongly inhibit bacterial growth and activity.
One of the existing solutions is to isolate another already metal-tolerant strain (such as Lysinibacillus sphaericus). (source :
I have read that it is possible to adapt a bacterial culture to a high concentration of metals by serial acclimatisation, where the bacteria are successively grown in a medium of increasing metal concentration. (source : 10.1016/j.wasman.2018.07.010)
Can this method be adapted to ureolytic bacteria? Are there any examples?
If not, what other methods would you suggest?
Thank you !!
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You can do it by adapting bacterial culture to a high concentration of metals by serial acclimatization. and I can suggest you to induce mutation in your strain, using a UV lamp. this process is called"induced mutagenesis" it's easy and generally used for random selection of mutants. in your case, it's a positive selection of high-concentration heavy metals resistant mutants. good luck.
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I have seen a great number of research papers reporting the use of pathogens such as Klebsiella pneumoniae for the production of biosurfactant for various use. But releasing such pathogenic strains directly in the environment may show pathogenicity in human and other animals. Hence, I am interested to know from the experts of this field that how do they justify the use of such pathogens for the production of biosurfactants?
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Microbes can be used in bioremediation of environmental pollutants as they exhibit a vast nutritional capacity. The eradication, degradation, detoxification and immobilization of various physical and chemical wastes can be done by bioremediation involving microorganisms. The degradation and transformation of pollutants (hydrocarbons, oil, heavy metal, pesticides, dye’s) is carried out enzymatically. The rate of degradation is determined by two factors; biotic and abiotic. Methods such as biostimulation, bioaugmentation, bioventing, biopiles and bioattenuation are common worldwide and as per their specificities have advantages and disadvantages as well.
(PDF) Microbial Bioremediation. (researchgate.net)
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I am looking for conditions and criteria for developing a microbial consortium for the purpose of bioremediation
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In addition to @ J. C. Tarafdar ,
Many pollutants in their degradation process are not mineralized easily and immediately; but may pass through stages of degradation steps involving the production of several intermediate metabolites. For a microbe to fit into a microbial consortium for the remediation of a given pollutant, such organism must possess necessary enzyme repertoire capable of degrading one or more of the intermediate metabolites of the pollutant.
Also, biostimulation, biosparging, bioventing, etc may also improve the bioaccessibility of pollutants to the available microbial consortium.
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Hi, friends.....I am working on white-rot fungi for bioremediation. the medium that I use is czapex. unfortunately, I don't see any growth while their enzymes are producing!!
These fungi have good growth on PDA and PDB medium but not in czapex. while all of the papers have reported with czapex
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Je pense qu'il faut utiliser un autre milieu que le czapex que tu as utilisé. Il y a plusieurs types de milieu pouvant servir à faire pousser les white Root fungi ,les champignons de la pourriture blanche comme les lentins etc'.et avoir des bons résultats.
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We are looking for crude oil samples for some bioremediation experiments. We can't seem to find any from scientific chemical suppliers like Sigma. If anyone knows of any suppliers that would be great!
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Use above link to purchase the crude oil
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How to select compound for bioremediation by bacteria by its genome analysis?
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Although Haruna Yahaya Ismail has interpreted and answered the question very well with his expertise/experience, the question in itself does not make sense.
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I am working on a Plastic Bioremediation Project and need to pre-treat the plastic waste samples before further work can be done.
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Biswajit Debnath Thank you so much! The chapter has everything I need.
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Am currently undertaking bioremediation of hydrocarbon in soil using biostumulating agents (biochar). However, much has been talk about bacterial in this regards that is why i wish to check for fungi if possible...
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It depends upon what kind of oil is target for biodegradation for example, some species of Aspergillus are known to degrade the Aliphatic hydrocarbons and Penicillium and Fusarium are applied for aromatic hydrocarbons. Some Aspergillus species are also known for bioremediation of Aromatic hydrocarbons.
There are lot of literatures present regarding this issue. some of them that can help are-
Ezekoye, C. C., Chikere, C. B., & Okpokwasili, G. C. (2018). Fungal diversity associated with crude oil-impacted soil undergoing in-situ bioremediation. Sustainable Chemistry and Pharmacy, 10, 148-152.
Quintella, C. M., Mata, A. M., & Lima, L. C. (2019). Overview of bioremediation with technology assessment and emphasis on fungal bioremediation of oil contaminated soils. Journal of environmental management, 241, 156-166.
Imam, A., Suman, S. K., Ghosh, D., & Kanaujia, P. K. (2019). Analytical approaches used in monitoring the bioremediation of hydrocarbons in petroleum-contaminated soil and sludge. TrAC Trends in Analytical Chemistry, 118, 50-64.
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I have heard that injections of yeast and molasses can slowly clean up a site contaminated with dry-cleaning solvents. Does anyone know of any scientific literature supporting this? Any information on this or any other methods that do not require landfilling of contaminated soil would be very helpful. We are more interested in soil than groundwater, but information on methods for either would help. Thanks.
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The process is called reductive dechlorination. You can find many references if you look using this term, also cometabolism is suitable key word. It is commonly applied in many countries
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In ex-situ bioremediation water aeration is essential for effective microbial activity. How can I estimate the amount of water to add to each amendment mixture during bioremediation process to obtain effective remediation for the chosen length of period?
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Our company treated more than 450,000 tons of contaminated soil ex-situ during last seven years. Our common practice is to perform monitoring of technological parameters in given time periods (3 to 8 weeks). According to the results of moisture determination, we calculate the amount of water needed to be added to reach optimum technological water content in treated soil.
Regards
Vit
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Bioaccumulation is actually uptake of substances by organisms from their surrounding environment. It is a metabolically active and energy driven process. If this is to be considered as a type of bioremediation then it is to be accepted that bioaccumulation of pollutants by lower organisms and their subsequent transfer to higher trophic level (biomagnification) is also bioremediation ! And we humans are also partaking in this process !
So it would be more appropriate to consider biodegradation, biosorption, photo remediation etc. as executing processes of bioremediation.
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Bioaccumulation is one of the strategies adopted by lower and higher organisms during the detoxification of xenobiotic compounds. Some circumstances in some organisms might lead to the formation of a highly toxic substance with the involvement of biochemical pathways, at that time we cannot consider as a remedial process.
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I am engaged in remediation of industrial wastewater using biological methods like phytoremediation, but I am confused in choosing a suitable plant for phytoremediation of industrial wastewater. Please can anyone guide me for choosing the suitable plant for phytoremediation of industrial wastewater? In addition, what criteria should be used in selection of plant too?
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Apium nodiflorum (L.) is a hydrophytic plant forming dense submerged populations occurring along streams and rivers of Europe. I have experimented this plant for the adsorption of heavy metals Fe, Zn, Cu and Mn from aqueous solutions and I observed that this plant sustains a satisfactory adsorption efficiency and removal capacity for these metals. Since this plant has the ability to grow at high rates in a wide range of environmental conditions, it can be used to wastewater treatment from high (toxic) concentrations of metal ions.

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Hi all,
Considering that one has the whole genome sequence (annotated) of a bacterium and wants to know if it has the potential to cause human diseases, what steps would you recommend (insilico)?
I noticed that one of my novel species falls into the phylogenetic cluster of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and is closely related to P. alcaligenes (which was isolated from human blood samples and is also responsible for bioremediation purposes) based on genome tree.
Does this affiliation can be trusted with respect to the pathogenecity tendency?
Thanks,
Timsy
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Hello every one
My question is about how much roatation of centrifuge machine is required to process the sample taken out from flask incubated to study the bioremediation capacity of an bacterial strain.
and details of chemicals required for it.
Thank you.
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Dear Kumar,
There are so many aspects of sampling and preservation. For that, the scope and extent of the metal analysis need to identify.
1. If you need to identify Dissolved Analytes metals by AAS, you can use centrifugation at 5000 rpm 15 min, and then filter the supernatant by 0.2 um membrane filter. Then acidify with conc HNO3 (to pH <2), and you can store. But, even 0.2 um filtration also can contain Bacterial endotoxins and immediate analysis would be preferred.
2. If you need to identify bacterial attached recoverable metal fraction with available fraction, you can acidify first and then follow the previous step.
3. If you need a total metal content, you can follow the Microwave-assisted digestion with HNO3 and follow the filtration. digested sample can be store after the filtration bit longer time.
See the following materials for further knowledge, EPA 200.7
Section 8. SAMPLE COLLECTION, PRESERVATION, AND STORAGE.
Thank you.
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Dear Fellows,
I'm working on Bioremediation in a storm water drain which is receiving domestic sewage from nearby areas where proper sanitation facilities are not available. This drain is not a channelized structure means width and depth are not same along the complete length of 14 Km. It's receiving sewage through 5 lateral lines also. Total flow in the drain is 120 MLD (Million Litre per day).
I'm using Bioremediation process with strict and facultative anaerobic bacteria. My question is:
Can we calculate Mass balance in such drain where dimensions can't be calculated properly?
Secondly the concentrations of major pollutants are also changing tremendously with the flow?
If anyone having experience working such project please advice me for the same.
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The best way is to assume a short reach of the channel where you can assume factors constant. You can also consider putting a kind of a wear on the channel to enable you measure discharge in that small reach.
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Bioremediation of plastic and polythene is a major environmental concern. In order to get rid of this utility of enzymes need to know. Please suggest recent development/literature for the same. Thank You..
Regards,
Dr. Vinaya Tari
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Plz see the below paper
DOI: 10.1007/978-3-030-02369-0_6
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Bioremediation of diesel oil-contaminated soil-related question. possible ways of isolation would be greatly appreciated.
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Maurice Ekpenyong, thank you very much, professor. Useful hinds.
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Is this bioremediation have a scope in current & future?
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There is no doubt in the matter that bioremediation is a pollution free method with least cost.
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Bioremediation of environmental pollution/contamination/degradation in the less developed nations
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Some developing countries are gradually adopting modern biotechnology which has enhanced the development of climate-smart crops, as well as enhanced phytoremediation of polluted environments. Developing countries especially in Africa have several indigenous biomass producing plants and hyperaccumulators which are yet be identified and harnessed. Genes involved in heavy metal tolerance such as metallothioneins needed for metal hyper-tolerance, phytochelatins required for improved HMs tolerance and sequestration in vacuoles, and glutathione can be introduced into plants used for phytoremediation for enhanced accumulation and detoxification. Genetic engineering could also be used to enhance metal transporters, to obtain overexpression of such metal transporter genes which subsequently increases the abilities of hyperaccumulator plants to sequester such metals from the environment at a faster rate. However for this to be possible in the developing world, they will need to embark on capacity building to have experienced researchers who can utilize the technology and also identify indigenous plants within the region with phytoremediation abilities. and invest in the technology transfer while taking necessary biosafety measures to ensure no harm is done to the environment.
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Why microbial consortium is more effective in bioremediation of contaminants than the individual strains?
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Bioremediation is a multistage process. Mostly one bacterial strain cannot effectively degrad a chemical contaminant to non hazardous forms. Different strains can help in transformation of the contaminant as different forms of it's degraded products thereby achieve a complete biodegradation. Furthermore different microbial interaction (like co-metabolism) also play a crucial role in effective biodegradation. Therefore, the selection of different strains of microbes for the consortium is very important.
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We need nigerian local substrates apart from spent mushroom for the bioremediation of crude oil polluted soil.
We want organic based substrates with high nutrient levels.
Thanks
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My findings is not just limited to SMS, fish wastes etc, palm oil mill effluent has been used effectively for bioremediation studies because of the consortium of microbes capable of degrading spilled oils on soils as energy sources...so much more
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Working on Bioremediation potentials of some fungi from E-waste dump sites. What are the possible genes to look for in them?
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@Dr Asemoloye Michael
My mistake!!!!!......I probably did not notice the "E-waste" dump site referenced in your question.
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How do I interprete B and Afor metal adsorption? I found B and AT value 1.05 and 49.08 respectively. please tell the importance of the above mentioned parameters in biosorption?
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Dear Loren,
Here is your answer for determination of physical or chemical sorption from Temkin isotherm.
From Temkin isotherm, you got the value of two constants i.e. Temkin isotherm equilibrium binding constant (L/g) (= A) and Constant related to heat of sorption (J/mol) (= B). After getting heat of sorption value, you have to convert it kcal/mol from J/mol. If heat of sorption value is less than 1.0 kcal/mol, then physical adsorption is occurs. And its value 20-50 kcal/mol, then chemical adsorption is occurs. If heat of sorption value is in-between (1 - 20 kcal/mol), than both physical and chemical adsorptions are involved in the adsorption.
I think this answer may be helpful to your research.
With Regards,
Dr. Himanshu Patel
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I am working on a project where I am testing the resistance of a certain bacteria to copper and was testing it by adding copper at varying concentrations to r2a agar. However, despite sitting in a cold room for a week the agar at 0.08 M Cu 2+ is completely liquified and 0.00321 M Cu2+ is like a slushy. The other agar concentrations solidified. Is this happening because of the copper concentration and is there a way around this?
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I actually had to look it up, because I know that bacteria normally don't like copper but this has been checked on Agar plates.
Looking around a few articles, it looks like your concentration is quite high.
Ma et al. [1] used a concentration of ~0.015 M (1,000 mg per L) and regarded it as very high.
But generally should not be a problem with solidifying. I would try to make a simpler medium like LB, as R2A uses a very low concentration of Agar, or supplement to ~10% agar and see if that works.
And it could always be a foolish problem like: missed calculation, bad ingredients etc. Try making it again with fresh reagents.
Good luck!
[1] Ma, Y., Rajkumar, M., & Freitas, H. (2009). Inoculation of plant growth promoting bacterium Achromobacter xylosoxidans strain Ax10 for the improvement of copper phytoextraction by Brassica juncea. Journal of Environmental Management, 90(2), 831-837.‏
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Many researches on Bioremediation are done in the Laboratory under a controlled environment, temperature, nutrient, and so on.. But.. How do we actualize bioremediation on the field where these factor can not be controlled, how do we ensure the survival on these microbes when introduced invivo?
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A common practice is to evaluate autochtonous microbial consortia and determine theire bioremediation capacity. Many times it is more efficient to improve conditions for autochtonous bacteria than perform bioaugmentation.
According to my experience (we treated over 2 million tons of contaminated soil and sludges from the year 1993 in the Czech Republic, Slovakia, the Netherland, Sweden, Germany) only 10 % sites need bioaugmentation.
Best regards
Vit
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I think your editor will naturally do this job for you after submission.. You can get emails of authors from related published journals and suggest them as potential reviewers during dubmission
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Respected sir,
My area of research is also bioremediation of pharmaceutical components in waste water samples. My query regarding to is there any cost effective method for analysis and detection of pharmaceutical into waste water .
my another query is on which basis i should select site for sampling
kindly assist me, I shall be highly obliged to you sir.
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We use a variety of soil treatment methods, especially bioremediation treatment of deserted soils, which are contaminated with oil and oil products, and positive results are obtained. It is important to choose plant species that are suitable for soil-climatic conditions
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Hello all,
I am growing pesticide-remediating bacteria on minimal media (LeMasters Richards minimal media) where pesticide is the sole carbon source. The bacteria grows in a nice chunk so I know I have enough.
I've used the phenolchloroform with CTAB method, the Qiagen Powersoil kit, and sonication using Colvaris. I've been in contact with the companies to adjust the protocols to see if I get any results, nothing. I do multiple PBS washes of the bacteria every time. I tried heating the bacteria up and incubating the bacteria in lysozyme. Nothing seems to work and I don't understand why.
I ended up getting a little bit of that bacteria and growing it in LB which is isolated just fine; however, I am interested in eventually getting transcriptome information so I need the isolation to be in the minimal media.
Does anyone have an idea of why I get no DNA from this bacteria growing with pesticide, or other possible tests I can perform?
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Sikder Nahidul Islam Rabbi is right it could be inhibition. It could also be that the method of lysing the cells is shearing the DNA or not strong enough to break the cell wall. You can try different methods of lysing. You could try and send it off to a company for the DNA extraction and see if they can do it.
How are you measuring the quantity of DNA?
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Bioremediation Biodegradation
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Matthew B Paddock has stated very clearly and rightly. In addition to his answer I would like to add few more points.
If bio-remediation is mediated by bio-degradation, then it is more likely be enzyme mediated which is either mediated by bacterial secretion or by direct application. You can find a similar work associated with this type remediation you can go through one of my research works "Construction of potential bacterial consortia for efficient hydrocarbon degradation".
Another kind of bio-remediation could be assisted with bio-absorption. In this case the remediation is more likely to be mediated by chemical interaction between the absorbent and the pollutant and most of the is independent to any enzymatic reaction. For reference of this kind of bio-remediation you can also another work of mine entitled as " Fruit waste management by pigment production and utilization of residual as bioadsorbent".
Thank you,
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I am trying to search some literature on genes involved in degradation of classical naphthenic acids (NA). I have previously worked with CYP and ALK gene family but they are mostly studied for n-alkanes degradation, i.e. hydroxylases. Here, my question is that what is the scope of these genes being involved in the degradation of NAs. The substrate range for these genes is mostly up to C22, and they generally target straigh chain compounds; however, NA are often higher than C18 and are cyclic carboxylic acids. Can someone comment on it based on her/his experience? I would love to hear speculative answers/suggestions too. And if some knows that which genes are specifically involved in NA degradaton, or similar model compounds, I would appreciate to know that as well.
Thank you very much!
Arslan
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Maurice Ekpenyong I have already read this paper. I am looking for very specific and expert opinion on my question. This paper doesn't address my question at all.
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By applying a patented technology we can induce aerobic condition in the groundwater of a remediation site. Simultaneously we can influence the redox potential. I am struggling to find a reference in the literature that point toward an optimal potential for the metabolism of these two contaminants to occur in AEROBIC condition.
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If redox potential would be 100 mV, it is rather questionable if any dissolved oxygen would be present in water. For Biodegradation of MTBE much more important is presence of dissolved oxygen (aerobic conditions) in the environment than redox potential value.
Try google to find more information on MTBE biodegradation. There is planty of information there.
Good Luck
Vit
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Several studies mention using agar amended with mercuric chloride when isolating mercury resistant bacteria. Is there a lab method available for preparation of these plates? If no, what are some details to consider when working with mercuric chloride agar?
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We have done this in our lab and what we found is the best way is to wait for the agar to cool to a temperature you can handle safely with gloves on, quickly spike in the HgCl2 and move fast for pouring your plates.
Doing this in a regular fume hood is advisable if you can manage to have a bunsen burner in there to keep the flame, although a biosafety cabinet is also okay if it maintains your sterile field. One thing to keep in mind is you should not UV the cabinet with plates inside of it as Hg is sensitive to UV light and will volatilize.
As for disposal, it depends on what you're plating. In Canada, we work in a level 1 which means no pathogens, as such we prioritize disposing of the Hg in a solid waste container. If the microbes you are working with are pathogenic, it is more likely they will prioritize you get rid of the biohazardous material first by bleaching, then disposing into Hg solid waste.
As for sterilizing the HgCl2 I would not recommend filter sterilizing with a syringe or vacuum setup because Hg has a high affinity for many filtration membranes (particularly those made with PES).
What we have done is autoclave and filter sterilize ultra filtered water (0.2 µm pore size) and then created a stock from HgCl2 acidified with HNO3. Something to keep in mind is it is highly unlikely something grows in this type of stock because 1) the Hg concentration is high 2) the HNO3 drops the pH to ~2 or 3 and 3) there are no nutrients to support rapid growth. If you store this stock in the fridge in the dark there is even less of a reason to suspect you will contaminate. I would argue you're more likely to contaminate while pouring plates than anything else.
You want to make sure your stock is at the concentration is should no matter how you handle it as the microbes will not be exposed to the full concentration of Hg amended to plates given that most of it will be below the surface of the plate. If they are aerobes, they will not dig or grow into the agar anyway. So double check your total Hg concentration before moving on. Best practice for Hg dictates that you have a principal stock conserved with HNO3 from which you prepare a fresh working solution daily.
For some more information on it please see my papers where I discuss my Hg stock handling methods:
I hope this helps, good luck.
Daniel Gregoire
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For research regarding phytoremediation using cactaceae, specifically gymnocalycium.
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No Cactaceae have not the reputation to hyperaccumulate heavy metals.
Regards
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Methodology of BTEX removal in groundwater
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Useful links:
2. Bioremediation of Petrochemical Hydrocarbons (BTEX) – Review
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Why are trace elements or vitamins not included in some of the bacterial minimal media like Bushnell Hans media?
Are trace elements not essential for bacterial growth?
If, for example, any carbon source like Tryptophan is used in such a minimal media without any trace element, will the Tryptophan degrading bacteria will grow in it?
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Minimal media contains the minimum possible nutrients for colonial growth, generally, without the presence of amino acids. This media are often used to grow "wild-type" microorganisms, also, can be used as selective media for or against recombinants or exconjugants.
Typically, Minimal media contains: Water, carbon source, and various salts, to provide essential elements such as magnesium, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur.
But, supplementary minimal media contains a single selected agent, usually an amino acid or a sugar, which allows for the culturing of specific lines of auxotrophic recombinants.
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In immobilized algae beads, nutrients such as NH4 and PO4 get adsorbed by the immobilizing matrix (such as alginate), following which they are assimilated by the microalgae via process of photosynthesis. In most research studies, the removal of nutrients by immobilized algae beads is much higher than blank beads. So is the assimilation process faster than the adsorption process?
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It more complex then rate perse. When algae (or any living organism) assimilate nutrients they convert simple, small molecules (here NH3 and PO4) to large complex molecules (proteins, nucleic acids etc), and finally to new cells. The absorption on the alginate is a much simpler process. Furthermore, given the above the alginate (or any other absorbing material) will reach saturation much faster as there is no conversion. Thus the rate of alginate (absorption) + micro-algae (assimilation) will be much faster.
And two small correction:
(i) Photosynthesis of micro-algae does not assimilate NO3 or PO4 directly. It provide the cells with a carbon source. The oxygen produced by the water splitting in the photosynthetic could result in oxidation of NO3 to nitrate though.
(ii) The process does no have to go "absorption in alginate --> assimilation". Depending how you make them the alginate beads can be pretty pours.
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The composition of the BH medium is as follows:
MgSO4 - 0.2g/L
CaCl2 - 0.02g/L
KH2PO4 - 1g/L
K2HPO4 - 1g/L
(NH4)2SO4 - 1g/L
and FeCl3 - 0.05g/L
Thank you!
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This medium lacks nitrogen source, so it depend on the nutritional requirements and N sources is one of them?
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I am currently working on hydrocarbon degradation studies using microorganisms. I'm worrying that the hydrocarbons might attack the nylon membrane filter. Thanks for the response!
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Kiara Nicole De La Cruz Rodriguez You may try sterile PTFE filter.
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I am presently working on a bioremediation experiment on PAH contaminated sediments with ammendment of various organic nutrients and results show high increase in PAHs (both low and high molecular weight) at the end of the treatment . There is certainly an interference with other organic metabolites because for each of the various bioremediation treatments, the higher the bacteria abundance, the higher the increase in PAH at the end.
I am presently trying to rinse the sediments twice with deionised water before analysis to solve the problem of interference. What else could I do?
Thanks
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The samples were analysed by Gas Chromatography/ Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) (U.S. EPA method 8270E SW-846). I will look at all the recommended articles and choose an alternative method for analysis. I will be back to give a feedback. Thanks
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Dear Members,
I am pursuing my PhD degree from vit university, india. I wish to apply for short term visiting fellowship (3-9 months) in different countries (except USA,UK, FRANCE, KOREA). My domain of research includes the study of microbial diversity in high background radiation area and their adaptive strategy. I passionately want to work in the field of radio ecology and bioremediation of radioactive waste which are similar to my research interest.
I look forward to any suggestion of research laboratory/ institutes/ universities related to my field of research.
Thank you all in advance.
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Greetings!
You have a wide scope of opportunities around the globe. I had come across some labs in Germany,
*DLR-Germany (You can apply for DAAD-overseas fellowship)
*European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) research centers (You can opt funding option from EMBL schemes)
I would suggest you to consider USA and France for short term internship programs since they have more funding options and has active research in the topics you are interested in. I shall be glad to give you further details.
Cheers!
Manobala
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Hello everybody I have a question for my small research. Which is a better parameter to describe the effect of heavy metal toxicity in plants- is it biomass (wet weight) or dry weight?or both are appropriate ? And if both of the parameters are appropriate what is the relation between the parameters and heavy metal toxicity in plants ?
Thank you, and sorry if I am asking too much
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Growth, and negative effets of trace elements thereon, can be assessed in different ways. In the "heavy metal" literature, root elongation in vitro has often been used; fresh or dry mass as well; of course mass determination is destructive. There are a lot of methods based on measurements of physiological processes (photosynthetic rate, etc.). It all depends on your objectives.
Most important: do never forget that "toxicity of a metal" or "tolerance to a metal" is always relative; you need to include in your design a control material (genotype or species), to which your own study material will be compared.
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best approach nowadays
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The question has no this or that as the best approach. Each is unique. e main difference between bioremediation and phytoremediation is that the bioremediation is the use of living organisms either to degrade, detoxify, transform, immobilize or stabilize environmental contaminants whereas the phytoremediation is the use of plants removal of contaminants. The use of either depends totally on the purpose and suitability
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Currently, we are in a process of editing a forthcoming publication entitled "Pesticide contamination of freshwater and soil environs: impacts, threats and sustainable remediation approaches", to be published by Apple Academic Press (AAP), Exclusive worldwide distribution by CRC Press, a Taylor &amp; Francis Group.
Following are some tentative titles
 Environment and Pesticide pollution
 Pesticide pollution vis a vis Human Health
 Chemical Pesticides: integrated methods in assessment and monitoring
 Pesticide pollution: risk assessment and vulnerability
 Bioavailability and bioindicators of pesticides
 Pesticide contamination in water: Perspectives and Concerns
 Pesticide pollution in soil: Exposure and hazards
 Pesticide bioaccumulation: A threat to ecosystem services
 Bio-pesticides: Importance and Challenges
 Bio-magnification: Process and associated threats
 Pesticide contamination and Agriculture
 Bio-pesticides and Organic Agriculture
 Integrated Pest Management vis-a-vis Bio-pesticides
 Biocontrol Agents in organic agriculture
 Pesticide pollution: Management and Challenges
 Pesticide Remediation: methods and importance
 Pesticide bioremediation: issues and challenges
 Microbiological aspects of pesticide remediation
 Advances in pesticide bioremediation technology
 Role of biotechnology in pesticide remediation
 Phytoremediation of pesticide-polluted water and soils
 Microbial degradation of complex pesticides
 Nanoremediation: Lab to Land approach
 Wood chips and bioreactors for sustainable treatment of pesticide contaminated water and Soils.
Interesting contributors can text their e mail ids so that we shall send them the official invitation.
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Dear Suraj Negi, kindly drop your email Id here, so that we can send to you formal invitation and other required details.
Thankyou.
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2nd Springer Euro-Mediterranean Conference for Environmental Integration (EMCEI 2019: www.emcei.net), 10-13 October 2019 in Sousse, Tunisia
1. EMCEI-2019 has now opened to receive submissions until 15 May 2019. 2. Accepted papers will be published in the proceedings by Springer before the conference. 3. EMCEI-2017 proceedings by Springer was indexed in Web of Science (ISI). 4. Best extended papers of EMCEI-2019 will be published in Springer journals after the conference. 5. More details at: https://www.emcei.net/
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Following............
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I am working on isolation of heavy metals resistant bacteria that can be used as microbial inoculant in bioremediation of metals polluted sites and have been using LB agar as my isolation medium. But I read that LB medium is not a good medium to be used in isolation so I need clarification on this.
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I agree with much of this thread. In our lab we generally used defined medium that emulated the freshwater, marine and soil environments that we were attempting to isolate microbes from as much as possible. The level of organic carbon, trace nutrients and electron acceptors available will all play an important role in which microbes you attempt to isolate. I agree with Kshitij Dhameliya that it will also depend on what metal you are interested in. For example, my experience with mercury revealed that different mercury resistance are tied to the redox environments that microbes inhabit. Dedicated detox strategies are generally found in aerobic bacteria, whereas non-specific tolerance strategies are found in anaerobic bacteria (see my reviews on the subject here:
I also agree with Miguel Uyaguari for using plates as it can be a little more feasible to manage but I found doing isolations on the benchtop in liquid culture can be just as effective and offers more control. It can also shorten your timelines because not all strains like growing on a plate.
I think moving to a defined medium and using concentrations gradients for your metals or metal mixtures of interest is the best idea. My issue with LB is the following: although it is very easy to make this is a medium that has largely been tested on mesophilic enteric bacteria that does not represent the environments you're likely working in. There are a large number of recipes out there for isolating metal resistant bacteria, try looking up something for the strain Cupriavidus metallireducens which is super-resistant to a variety of metals. What you could do to perhaps ease some of your experimental difficulties is amend some defined medium recipes with trace amounts of yeast extract to ensure you're supplying enough trace nutrients and complex carbon sources that may be required for other members of the microbial community to thrive. Sometimes, metal resistant bacteria depend on metabolic hand offs within the community to really thrive.
All of this to say: rich medium is not representative, try and create a more defined medium so you can better target the metals and microbes of interest. This may take longer but will ultimately make for a stronger experimental design. If anyone in this thread cares to discuss things further, please let me know!
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I am about to do PAH analysis on crude oil containing my fungal samples. I have tried methods such as using hexane to separate my fungal samples from the oil but to no avail because the organic matter refused to separate from the oil.
I am faced with the situation of possibly doing PAH analysis without separating the fungi sample from the oil. I am not sure if the presence of my fungal samples will have any effect on the results of the PAH analysis or if the PAH analysis would work. The PAH analysis method I would be doing is the IP 391.
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In addition to Grzegorz's answer, I would also 'spike' a sample and calculate the %Recovery.
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I need to prepare a stock solution(50 ml) containing 50 mg/ml of Cr(VI). So, how much amount of K2Cr2O7 must be added in the stock.
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I need to prepare a stock solution (50 ml) containing 50 mg/ml of Cr(VI). So, how much amount of K2Cr2O7 must be added in the stock
Dear Aarthy,
Based on my chemistry knowledge, Potassium dichromate VI (K2Cr2O7) is an oxidizing agent that oxidizes in aqueous solution to produce potassium cation (K+) and chromium anion (Cr2O72−). It has Molar mass of 294.185 g/mol
From your question, 50mg/ml (i.e. 0.05g in 1 ml) is equivalent to 50g/litre
As such, the Molar conc. of your preparation = 50/294.185 = 0.170 M
For 1L preparation, measure 50g of Potassium dichromate VI and dissolve in 1000ml of distilled water.
For other preparation you can use this formula (M1/M2=V1/V2). Where M1 (50g) and V1 (1000ml) is the mass and volume of known; M2 (mass of unknown) and V2 (volume of your preparation)
e.g. For 100ml preparation, measure 5g and dissolve in 100ml of distilled water
Finally for 50ml preparation, measure 2.5g of Potassium dichromate VI and dissolve in 50ml of distilled water.
Hope it helps. Best regards
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Hello! Im working on my thesis on Fungal Bioremediation and I noticed that my subcultured fungi took on a different color compared to our initial inoculation of it on PDA. I would like to ask if it is possible that fungi morphology could change if the fungi is exposed to different environments or media?
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Yes, it is possible. When fungus grow on different media or different environment exposure, their morphology could be change because of different substrate, environment parameters and medium condition.
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Hi i am Dr. Zakuan from International Islamic University in Malaysia. I am a senior lecturer in the department of biotechnology. My research focus is on environmental remediation (bioremediation and phytoremediation). In our department, we do have a lot of underutilized research laboratories due to lack of basic research facilities for specific research. Current situations are not allowing us to purchase any equipments anymore. Even research grants are so limited and very small to be used to purchase basic lab facilities. Therefore, i am looking for potential international collaborators who would like to invest of facilities in our laboratory.
Thanks
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Thank you for the suggestion!
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I have downloaded hundreds of materials online but none of them gives me the detailed methodology I see.
Most of the works do emphasize on sand/soil whereas I seek just for river body/ water column.
Essence of the methodology is to know the method to use and also to find out what (and why) the concentration of the white rot fungi to contaminated water used for the mycoremediation.
Please I red experts on this and also has materials.
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Vincent Onyekachukwu Onyeche I suppose the reason that you cannot find any mention about the use of white rott-fungi for remediation of crude oil spill, it means remediation in liquid medium is, that white-rott fungi were intended for degradation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons at first, not for degradation of other components of crude oil like n-alkanes, BTEX and many more (I mean remediation in the field). There is more reasons for that. Because water solubility of polyaromatic hydrocarbons in water is very very small, the biodegradation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons dissolved in water was not intended. Liquid media for degradation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (and other components of crude oil) were used in laboratory research only.
Best regards
Vit
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A partner from the European side of the Mediterranean area is urgently needed for an international project in the following topics:
Explore and exploit new metabolites and biomolecules, enzymes and genes; promote biotechnological applications and patent deposits
Evaluate the potential of marine litter from macro and micro-pollutants, including nanomaterials and plastics; assess its impact on marine organisms and develop in situ bioremediation actions
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oh, if this project deadline what about if you need to do a cooperation ?
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Am working on bioremediation using some particular plants, I want to determine if there is a gene resoponsible for the effective remediation by the plants.
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It is now possible to isolate a specific region of a genome, to produce a virtually unlimited numbers of copies of it, and determine the sequence of its nucleotides overnight.. please refer to " isolation, cloning, and seqencing DNA" in Molecular biology of the cell. 4th. edition. ( ncbi.nim.nih.gov
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Dear All,
I am working on an experiment in which I used industrial effluent to grow water hyacinth.
I was just wondering if I could use an effluent stirring system (continuously) to facilitate maximum exposure of pollutants to the roots of plant?
What is the possibility of this process being it be helpful and feasible?
With Regards
Pankaj
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If not native to your area, it may be considered invasive and nuisance if released. It sounds like you have a well controlled system, and probably if floating, most of the roots are not attached to bottom, so mixing increases the exposure and uptake as suggested.
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Chlorpyrifos,
Furfural,
Azoxystrobin,
Indole
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These are routine agrochemicals. Just step a little further in some village and get these from there agricultre stores.
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Dear professors
i am asking about the extraction of heavy metals from plant tissue which use in bioremediation of polluted soils by HM ?
also we are preparing fungal culture to assess its ability in HM removal in labs.
Thank you for Help
Mazin
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Many thanks to you Dr Sara Sayed
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I am working on myco-remediation of heavy metals by using mushrooms and I want to demonstrate the metal removal during the growth phase of mushrooms, because certain mushroom species actively captures metal ions from their contaminated substrate.
My question is that can I use BET theory to validate and present my experimental data?
If yes?
Then please could anyone tell me what are the steps to follow?
If No?
Then, why? and Which possible and exact model can work in my case?
The mechanism of removal is given in the attached image.
Thank you !
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The answer is no. BET theory will get you nowhere. My understanding of phytoremediation of metals in soils is something like this: Plants (or in this case fungi) produce ligands that are excreted to the soil during the night, when the plants are respiring. These ligands chelate the metals (mostly divalent) so that they are water soluble. During the day (when plants pump water, the metals are taken up with the water. For mushrooms, the questions are: do they produce and excrete ligands?; when do they do this (is water ever returned to the soil?; and are these ligands similar to those excreted by plants? Regarding BET theory: yes, root surface area is an important property, but this alone does not tell you anything about the physicochemical process (complexation) or transport mechanism (water flow).
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PFCs standard for environmental analysis.
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Dear Me Essam E K Ahmed :
Please describe your request more precisely and thoroughly.
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We have used microbes n the recent past with some positive results, We also need a salt water resistance one for use with our other applications at sea.
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A wide variety of bacteria have been identified which are able to biodegrade hydrocarbons in both terrestrial and aqueous environments. The capability of the strains depends on several factors, such as concentration of pollutants, operating conditions, and population of the microorganisms. It is highly recommended to use indigenous microorganisms for remediation of the contaminated environment since they have been able to survive in the presence of pollutant. For instance, we used indigenous Pseudomonas aeruginusa and Bacillus subtilis, and we observed a very promising results in TPH removal. In addition, Trichosporon sp. and Penicillium citrinum, and Pseudomonas aeruginusa have shown that they are able to remove hydrocarbons in highly saline environment.
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I have been doing my literature review on bioremediation but considering my non biological background, I am unable to decide which option should I be further going deeper: bacterial remediation or phytoremediation
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Dear Gerd
Good point and very interesting.
Here to a nicely name product " Paris Green" was used! This was in early parts of last century and even later, sprayed on Tobacco farms in the pristine Ovens mountain Valley of NE Victorian, Australia. It had the highest breast cancer rate in the country in days gone by, known also for other cancer littered through faming communities, including prostate cancers.
When it comes to toxicities one needs to distinguish between toxic and carcinogenic, or both combined risks. There are no measured standards of safety for arsenic species or combinations, and in effect the safest level of arsenic is zero. There is actually no safe level of arsenic and there have even been studies showing 1 ppb As increase in drinking water has measurable intestinal cancer associated.
What is apparent though from Medical Geology studies within mining communities with regards to prostate cancer for example an increase of arsenic as measured in toe nails is discernable. But when these nails show a combination of selenium and Nickel the prostate cancer risk from this arsenic is ameliorated.
Others working in Bangladesh anecdotally have mentioned diet to, for instance low foliate and B vitamin levels were a risk factor, presumably from repair mechanisms. 1/3 of our folate is produced by bacteria in the gut. Arsenic changes this microflora. Foliate of course is a component in DNA synthesis and purine, methyl and ribose arsenates are know, so this may have a bearing on abrogating their impacts, though unknown as yet how. These diets can also abrogate other metal toxicities., such as lead.
In any case workers close to these systems should consider such ameliorating factors of arsenic toxicities and carcinogenesis. On aspect selenium in combination with foods rather than inorganic supplementation may be more useful.

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Micro-bioaugmentation technique is used for heavy metal removal from soil. i need details about this process.
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I need to know how rhamnolipid degrade the crude oil.
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Thanks to all of U.
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hi, everybody, I wondered if there is a fastest and sure method or protocol for determining the electroactivity of bacteria and yeast in few day other than potentiostat/galvanostat .
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  • ACS Synth Biol. 2017 Oct 20;6(10):1860-1869. doi: 10.1021/acssynbio.7b00009. Epub 2017 Jun 21.
Development of a Bacterial Biosensor for Rapid Screening of Yeast p-Coumaric Acid Production.
Transcription factor-based biosensors are used to identify producer strains, a critical bottleneck in cell factory engineering. Here, we address two challenges with this methodology: transplantation of heterologous transcriptional regulators into new hosts to generate functional biosensors and biosensing of the extracellular product concentration that accurately reflects the effective cell factory production capacity. We describe the effects of different translation initiation rates on the dynamic range of a p-coumaric acid biosensor based on the Bacillus subtilis transcriptional repressor PadR by varying its ribosomal binding site. Furthermore, we demonstrate the functionality of this p-coumaric acid biosensor in Escherichia coli and Corynebacterium glutamicum. Finally, we encapsulate yeast p-coumaric acid-producing cells with E. coli-biosensing cells in picoliter droplets and, in a microfluidic device, rapidly sort droplets containing yeast cells producing high amounts of extracellular p-coumaric acid using the fluorescent E. coli biosensor signal. As additional biosensors become available, such approaches will find broad applications for screening of an extracellular product.
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aerobic and anaerobic treatment during secondary treatment level is a part of bioremediation. I am looking for another methods of bioremediation of wastewater treatment??
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Dhivani Garg:
concerning BIOREMEDIATION of wastewater: BIOREMEDIATION means elimination of pollutants from soil, groundwater, wastewater, air using microorganisms (bacteria, yeast, fungi, algae,.....). But when we are talking about wastewater treatment, we are talking about "BIOLOGICAL METHODS" commonly. It means to use BIOREMEDIATION for wastewater treatment is generally correct.
Biological methods which could be used for wastewater treatment classified according to electron donor givem by Rami is OK. But we can use also further biological methods like nitrification, denitrification, anaerobic biological treatment, activated sludge (aerobic treatment) and many more. It would be easier to answer your question when you specify, for what purspose you want apply bioremediation. Your question is to general.
Best regards
Vit
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I'm planning my Undergraduate Research Project and am very interested in the field of Bryology (I'm majoring in Botany), and Plant Soil Feedback, but am having a tough time coming up with a topic. I thought I wanted to do my project on the effectiveness of bryophytes in bioremediation of hydrocarbon contaminated soils, but my interests have since shifted. Thanks in advance!
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Dear Ms. Kaleigh,
Congratulation on narrowing down your topic of research.
If it is within your 'league' then you can also study the microfloral and microfaunal diversity within retort cells of peat mosses such as Sphagnum, to shed light on the resident floral and faunal composition in various phytogeographic regions and also their contribution to the enrichment of ambient soil or soil microflora and fauna.
In any case I wish you success in all your endeavours.
Sincerely,
Dr. Abhishek Mukherjee
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I was more concerned about the industrial pollutants been contained in the sludge. While dealing with wastewater coming from whole city including both domestic as well as industrial wastewater is having huge concentrations of varied nature of chemicals. Should bioremediation be considered as a viable option or there is some better way out to deal with this scenario?
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if You want to remove organic micro pollutants from sludge, aerobic treatment is usually successfull. this can be composting, reed bed treatment or aerobic post treatment of digestor sludge.
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Dear all, we are currently working on Bioremediation of heavy metal by using fungi with the help of formula;
Qe= (Ci-Cf)V/1000 M.
Whereas Qe = mg of metal ions uptake per gram biomass (mg/g), Ci=initial concentration of the metallic ions (mg/L); Cf=final concentration of metallic ions (mg/L); M=dried mass of the biosorbent in the reaction mixture (g) and V=volume of reaction mixture (L).
While, We have following supposed values;
Ci= 381 mg/L
Cf=4.28 mg/L
V= 50 mL
Dry Cell Weight (M)= 7g
Anyone having expertise in this formula Please help us. As we have tried but final result should be in mg/g which is quit contusive. Thanks
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you have (381-4.28) * 0.05 = 376.72 * .05 = 18.836 mg that has been fixed
compared to 7 g of biomass = 18.836 / 7 = 2.69 mg of metal / g of biomass
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Hello everyone,
what are the current research topics in the field of bioremediation of contaminated soils ?
Thanks
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could be:
On effects caused by disturbances and contamination On strategies and technologies for prediction, prevention, and protection Research, strategies and technologies for identification and characterisation On strategies and technologies for treatment, remediation and reuse Strategies for risk assessment and management Research on and the implementation of quality standards International regulation and legislation.
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why is MG1655 used to conjugal transfer using as donor strain WM3064 ?
this mechanism is used in article= Toward Bioremediation of Methylmercury Using Silica Encapsulated Escherichia coli Harboring the mer Operon
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Because it is a strain widely characterized and used in the laboratory. What I recommend is that you review the genotype in detail in case you are making modifications in the genomes that could generate incompatibility of the strains and check if the strain has an active, modified or inactive Restriction-Modification System, since that will help you to increase the conjugation rate.
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What are your views on the use of OUR (oxygen uptake rate), SOUR (specific oxygen uptake rate), BOD (Biological Oxygen Demand) and DO Dissolved Oxygen) in measuring biodegradation and bioremediation of crude oil?
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