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Biomedical Applications - Science topic

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I am searching for a conference to submit my paper but many seems fake. kindly suggest me a conference accepting abstracts on nanobased antibacterial materials.
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Following
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I have prepared a nanocomposite hydrogel by freeze-thaw method and then dried it at 60 degrees Celsius in vacuum oven. What would be the appropriate nomenclature for this gel now? Would it be xerogel or aerogel? Also I have added nanocomposites into it. Can I say it nanogel or nanocomposite gel or porous aerogel?
Your kind suggestions are much appreciated.
Thank you!
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So, it will be either a xerogel nanocomposite or an aerogel nanocomposite, depending on the morphology you will find. The first reference in my last answer deals with this type of composite gels. Best of Luck
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I m going to check the zeta potential for alginate beads (hydrogels with a size of 1 mm diameter)by surpass 3 (with cylindrical cell) but in high pressure (600 or 500 on rinse process), my samples are gone from the measuring cell and disperse in the solution. However, I use a filter and fix the shaft tightly. I,m adjusting the permeability index at 100 by tightening the adjustment screw.
does anybody has some experience with this device?
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For general sample mounting instruction with the cylindrical cell of the SurPASS 3, you can also check this tutorial video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7qO8TBnxJzw&list=PLVPW8NM5rINLjgJOovr9u9-6g_1NRzYZp&index=18
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As all the world is busy in discovering cure for COVID-19, so why not radiation? COVID-19 has been reported to effect the human's lungs and liver (specific tissues), So, what if those parts are exposed to radiation for the rapid recovery of the patients? Is it possible? Or, is there any possibility for radiotherapy of COVID-19?
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I have synthesized mesoporous silica nanoparticles and removed the CTAB via ethanol. Can this ethanol be used again for the removal of CTAB from another batch of mesoporous silica nanoparticles or using fresh ethanol is preferred each time?
I'd be grateful for your guidance
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Riaz A. Khan recovering the ethanol and reuse it for the next batch of mesoporous silica nanoparticles.
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As many studies identified of genetic variants linked to training responses and sport-related traits, we could hypothesize that the R allele was more common in sprint and power athletes and the X allele more common in endurance athletes. Other said, the Middle/Long distance runner (X allele) was would have less response to strength training and Sprinter (R allele) would have less response to endurance training. However, in fact Sprinter would need endurance training to improve aerobic capacity and specific endurance and MD/LD need strength training as well.
Due to the fact, that there are huge amounts of drops outs in athletes career for talented youth Sprinter/MD/LD runners, therefore have a couple of questions :
1. Is any biomarkers we could use to get proper limit of load (Intensity, reps, and recovery) for Sprinter (R allele) while doing endurance exercise or for MD/LD runners (X allele) while performing strength/speed training, so they can keep their genetic potential ?
2. How we could know the proper limit of load/intensity for strength, speed training for MD/LD runners or endurance training for sprinters ?
3. Is the quality of R allele (i.g. speed of muscle contraction) or X (i.g. O2 consumption) allele will reduce due to mismatched training ?
Thank in advance.
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Well Done!
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The unique physicochemical properties of CNTs make them among prime candidates for numerous applications in biomedical fields including drug delivery, gene therapy, biosensors, and tissue engineering applications.
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Limitations of carbon dot or carbon dot based products for commercialization.
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We have tried to address a few things in this direction in our latest review article.
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Please I am looking for a model that has been created using Unity with AI to predict Biomedical Cells growth?. I have found a lot of projects in unity, but all of them about gaming part.
I will be more than thankful if you could help me with links or articles or whatever?
Thanks in advance
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Kind Regards
Qamar Ul Islam
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By referring to some scientific resources we've found that the brain produces Some signals that relate to its activities and monitored by EEG. The question is "Can we force the brain to do some actions by injecting signals (in a direct or indirect way)?".
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Brain–computer interface can also restore communication to people who have lost the ability to move or speak:
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Hi.
We have some carbon nanoparticles and want to check antibacterial activity against drug-resistant bacteria. Before working on drug-tolerant bacteria, Are there any protocols or parameters for checking nanoparticles whether have the antibacterial capability on drug-resistant bacteria?.
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Common fragile sites (CFSs) are large chromosomal regions that exhibit breakage on metaphase chromosomes upon replication stress. As a result, they become preferentially unstable at the early stage of cancer development and are hotspots for chromosomal rearrangements in cancers.
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I am writing a review article on facial analysis in biomedical data science. As part of this there is a section on automatic and manual facial landmarking.
There is a large literature on this topic in computer science, but it is usually more focussed on computer vision than medical applications.
I am wondering if there exists established and respected software for automatic landmarking of facial images in a biomedical context? Any help is much appreciated.
Harry
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dlib is the standard now. you can use it for biomedical images too, as long they are captured with rgb cameras.
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i prepared 1%wt and 2%wt sodium alginate solution with 9 pH and 0.5 molar copper sulfate.
by adding alginate solution to the electrolyte (CuSO4), it is expected to have copper alginate gel in bead form. but i gained very thin very loose small film.
and by adding the electrolyte on the surface of the alginate solution, it is expected to have a thick stable membrane of copper alginate gel that will stay on the surface, but my membrane sinks in alginate solution slowly.
my main purpose is making capillary copper alginate gel.
thank you
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Dear Raheleh Ebrahimi many thanks for asking this very interesting technical question. I just came across two potentially useful articles in which the preparation of capillary copper alginate gel has been described in detail. In this context please have a look at the following links:
Gelatinized Copper–Capillary Alginate Gel Functions as an Injectable Tissue Scaffolding System for Stem Cell Transplants
Also please see:
Modeling capillary formation in calcium and copper alginate gels
Unfortunately these articles have not yet been posted as public full texts on RG. Please see if you can access them thropugh your institution. Alternative you could request the full texts of the papers directly from the authors via RG.
Good luck with your work and best wishes!
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Some patients exhibit unusually fast or chaotic heartbeats and thus are at a high risk of cardiac arrest or a heart attack. An implantable defibrillator restores a normal heart rhythm by providing electrical shocks to the heart during abnormal conditions. Conventional pacemakers work at fixed rate. What will happen if the patient is a football fan (extremely active and excited)?
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This is possible in theory, but there are two points to consider: first, energy supply, and second, the response to neurotransmitters.
To increase the heart rate, it must be possible to create harmony with the body's nervous system so that both increase or decrease at the same time. Increased heart rate should be associated with certain vital signs. In fact, special sensors must be installed in the nervous system to be able to give a signal to the pacemaker.
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I want to make a 6% solution of Texin RxT85A in THF. I weighed the necessary amount of Texin resin and mixed at room temperature with THF with the help of a wooden stick, this did not work at all. Then I put the container on a magnetic stirrer for about 15 minutes, it did not seem to work. Afterwards, I tried an ultrasonic bath and a little bit of heat ( about 40 Celcius), but it seems that the resin completely swelled and fused into one piece.
What could I be doing wrong? Am I supposed to heat up the THF first and then add the resin? What should the temperature be(THF boiling point is 66 Celcius) for the Texin to dissolve completely? Should I have just used the magnetic stirrer for a longer time? I would really appreciate the help. Thank you!
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I understand you need THF solution. I think the surface area of TPU would be important for better solubility. Maybe pulverization or pressing for thinner shape might help to speed up the solving process.
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Is any way or method to seal agarose pad or channels fabricated agarose gel pad to glass slides as like we do plasma bonding with PDMS to glass slides?.
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Good question
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My research is under biomedical engineering. So please anyone suggest some cheap and best scopus indexed journals, which covers science and engineering papers.
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  • Bio-Design and Manufacturing (Best, Q1, free of charge)
  • OnLine Journal of Biological Sciences (Good, Q3, $600 fee)
  • Bioscience Journal (Reasonably good, Q3, $40 per page)
  • Jordan Journal of Biological Sciences (Good, Q3, free of charge)
  • International Journal of Biology and Biomedical Engineering (No great things, Q3, free of charge)
  • EurAsian Journal of BioSciences (at own risk and peril, Q4, free of charge)
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I cannot find the IC50 value of 5-FU against HT-144 cancer cells, as determined via cytotoxicity analysis. I shall be thankful if someone help me with relevant literature.
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Be sure to check out GDSC database. To my knowledge, it is one of the biggest (if not the biggest) database of cancer cell lines and anticancer drugs available.
There is a IC50 value reported for 5-F in HT-144. However you will have to dive into the references to have a good idea of how the value was estimated and if it fits your conditions. As a reference compared to other cell lines or treatments it is still quite useful.
This link should take you directly to where you could find the IC50 for 5-f in that cell line.
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What are different coil shapes used in Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation? What are their differences (in induced current)? Do they have different applications?
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Hi,
Actually, the influence of inductance value in a coil on TMS is eddy current strength. In addition, the coil design in physical configuration can affect the TMS distribution or depth. The TMS coil with eight shapes is commonly used in clinical application due to better high resolution than the round coil.
You can refer to the article below. Good luck!
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I have used TNS & TMS & TACS systems which resulted in the patients awakening.TDCS was a bit effective but even this caused the patient to wake up after some time .
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Although it is difficult to stimulate a human brain while sleeping, however, it's not entirely impossible. TMS would be the best bet at a low RMT keeping the coil holder and navigation fixed beforehand. Also, tDCS can be helpful, however, due to relatively large circumference preferably use TMS.
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Angular shape not spherical
Or
Other than spherical geometry.
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All particles are angular. A sphere is a mathematical concept only.
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Quantum dots (QDs) is growing interest for biomedical applications. At the same time, many scientists are convinced that QDs will never be used for treating patients because of their potential toxicity. Looking forward to get expert opinion and some references.
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Sure. It is probably the fact that the in vitro results are not convincing enough to back up the requirements of a full blown clinical trial. There are several stringent requirements which should be met before a nanoparticle can reach even phase I trial. However, maybe there is something I am missing. You can still check on
To find out if there is any trials in progress at least in US. Best wishes.
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Dear Colleagues,
I am investigating methods to determine the photodynamic activity of photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy. One of the methods being used is absorption spectrometry. A work concludes that significant absorption of light was shown to be prerequisite but not sufficient for high photodynamic activity. My point of view is: When a photosensitizer absorbs more radiation at a certain wavelength, it will produce more Ros (Reactive oxygen species), i.e the absorption maximum will correspond to the wavelength active photodynamic effect best. However, this point of view contradicts the viewpoint in above work. I look forward colleagues to explain this question.
Thanks in advance.
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Nguyen, It seems reasonable that the greater the absorption efficiency the greater the release of ROS. This applies to both exogenous photosensitizers and endogenous porphyrins. We are preparing a paper describing the absorption spectra of intact, live planktonic pathogens, both bacteria and fungi, collected with diffuse reflection spectroscopy. (Please see our papers: "The Black Bug Myth" and "Selective Photoantisepsis" posted on RG). I propose that these absorption spectra, if obtained in vivo, will mirror the action spectrum (clinical efficacy VS WL) of the clinical application.
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I want an initial direction, like how can I use IMU sensors on knees (e.g upper leg and lower leg ) to estimate body state e.g running, walking, climbing, etc. The basic idea I have is to use 2 IMU sensors on knee position (upper and lower leg) , and to get data or make a data set of it. Then process it using deep learning e.g CNN or ANN etc. But point is..are there data sets available on which I can test CNN etc to see either it works or not. Need guidance about data sets, from where could I get IMU knee based data sets, so that I can focus on my algorithm only.
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It seems you are trying to solve a classic problem of human activity recognition based on body-worn sensors. A very good starting point for different datasets, mainly based on acceleration only, is this paper:
I wouldnt recommend using a naked CNN for testing. A classic machine learning approach with a proper preprocessing, some good extracted features (e.g. simpe statistical features, PCA or Codebook) and a classification that supports the understanding of the problem (e.g. kNN or SVM). Good luck and have fun trying :).
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I have been trying to data and wave capture from Philips IntelliVue Monitor using Matlab for our research studies in real time. Does anyone have some code they are willing to share? The community's help in this important matter?
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There are two types of connectors on Intellivue platform, the MIB (ISO/IEEE framing) which is similar to RS232 but has a RJ45 type connector with specific wiring. The other type is regular LAN port which can be connected to a PC via a crossover LAN cable or even a regular crossover cable with Internet sharing or router configuration. See some details here: https://sourceforge.net/p/vscapture/discussion/general/thread/d87f964f/#32be and here https://sourceforge.net/p/vscapture/discussion/general/thread/cb369fa9/
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We are working on physiological sensors and integration with AI systems, some outputs of our study are as follows:
However we would like to hear also from researchers about physiological sebsors and in particular photoplethysmography. Photoplethysmography (PPG) is a optical technique that can be used to detect blood volume variations in the microvascular bed of tissue and used at the skin surface. What are the medical and industrial applications of photoplethysmography (PPG) ? What are the state of art algorithms used for PPG to extract information?
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The Blain Christen lab at ASU is currently working on using photoplethysmography in wearable medical devices. One recent paper on the subject is “Application of flexible flat panel display technology to wearable biomedical devices.” The full text of this and other papers from her group are available here on ResearchGate.
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I couldn't find any precise study on the cytotoxicity of SDS against mammalian cells. Could any one suggest me the range of SDS concentration suitable for biomedical applications? A brief explanation on the possible mechanism of interaction of cells with SDS will be helpful. Thanks.
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I found this article that states that it is cytotoxic at its CMC (critical micelle concentration)
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We can use SPD processes for producing products with many applications. One of them is the Bio application. Do you know about these processes applications in Biomaterials?
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Hi,
The grain size may influence the biocompatibility, so the alloys co-exist better with human tissue. Also, strength is always important for the implants. SPD may give rise to better properties on those aspects.
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Dear all,
I am using the pulse sensor, a low cost device for PPG detection in the index finger
Although I am quite still, the detected signals are heavily corrupted with low-frequency and high-frequency noise . Which simple and robust signal processing technique do you recommend for
solving this case? If it works in real time, much better.
I need the clean PPG on order to measure accurately the heart rate (HR) and the heart rate variability (HRV).
Thank you all!
Fernando
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An optimal filter for short photoplethysmogram signals (https://www.nature.com/articles/sdata201876) with Matlab source code.
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I understand what water swelling behavior means, but how is that related with a materials properties to assist in bone regeneration ?
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Dear Margarita,
I have the following opinion (which definitely is arguable!): Tissue engineering of bone grafts is only needed for volumetric sized defects - small defects in vivo will heal without artificial treatment. Volumetric sized grafts need to support nutrient supply and vascularization not just at the interface of bone graft and defect, but especially within the center of the tissue engineered construct. For that purpose, an interconnected pore network should be designed within the biomaterial. In case of hydrogels, pores might collapse due to swelling of the polymer, and therefore swelling behaviour is crucial for the success of bone healing. It definitely might be from interest not just to measure the mass swelling, but also the volume of the pores over time.
However, as I said, that is just an opinion and open for discussion. One also should consider that swelling is an indicator for scaffold degradation which is also needed for regenerative therapies.
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I am trying to develop nanofibrous by using natural herbs with PVA for using in biomedical application but the developed material is not showing any antibacterial activity against pathogens. Could u please help what should I do to achieve antibacterial property???
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The added herbs are not leaching from your nanofiber mat and therefore in the agar diffusion test you cannot see any antibacterial activity. You can try the method used for the subjective antimicrobial performance testing of textiles, such as AATCC Test Method 147. Non-leaching type antibacterial fibrous mat or film will show no bacterial growth underneath the sample but may not show any zone of inhibition. Although this test method has been developed for the antibacterial performance assessment of textile fabrics but can be used for teh antibacterial performance testing of porous mats or nonporous polymeric films.
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How can i determine the upper limit of storage temperature for metal implants, UHMWPE implants with or without crosslinked structure? During packaging, storage, transportation etc. the temperature changes in a wide range. When i look at the raw material standards (ISO 5832-1, 5832-3 etc.) or the general specification standards of nonactive surgical implants (ISO 14630, ISO 21534 etc.) and specific standards of surgical implants (ISO 21535, ASTM F1378 etc.), i cannot see any ideal temperature condition statements. How can i verify the upper temperature for at least storage stage?
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Oleksandr Oleynik Thank you so much, I thought that before, now I'm sure. Also there are some sort of specifications about sterile storage.
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For more information see the below link:
Have any one, any information about "Cold-evoked potentials (CEP) for brain mapping"?
what is your idea about this machine:
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It would relate well to the "submersion hypothesis" (it's not a thing, but if you google it, there are some studies I've replicated. Also to the p300 wave, as well as the idea of electromagnetic theories of using a Dirac Delta for determining the state of a Laplacian channel (or a 'black-box' in a circuit diagram).
The device seems, based of their data, applicable in determining the change in threshold of a person over certain periods of their life.
However, I imagine your use for it would be along the lines of sending an impulse to see how the nerves respond in different areas of the brain and tying it in to see if it co-correlates with other measures.
My suggestion would be to combine it with an EEG and/or fMRI and see if the differences on each data set line up in any way. My imagination leads me to think that perhaps the forehead and brainstem have both a higher sensitivity and power-band together, arising from a common cause of higher-neural-activity-density. But that's an educated guess.
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I was wondering if the dialysis system has some sort of sensor to detect the right fluid inserted.
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Surely the new technologies for the treatment of water for dialysis and the sterility of the system have drastically reduced the episodes of fever on dialysis. The use of the jugular vein for the insertion of central venous catheters, the use of tunneled catheters and the nursing techniques of aseptic line connection contributed to the drastic decrease of sepsis .Each dialysis center pursues its own strategy with ad hoc protocols. The use of high-or low-concentration citrate for the final filling of central venous catheters. The use of chlorhexidine instead of Betadine for the disinfection of the skin also for the insertion of the fistula needles. All strategies that require lengthy discussions, but above all a widespread conviction of the staff all: doctors and nurses.
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I mean, new wave for peace, should have a what new trait?
For example, religious mans say the meditation can help peace (with positive waves) and sometimes they are right!!
Can you help me for identity these waves?
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Yes..feel more at ease.
How can we measure "feeling". How can we see "thoughts". Why is a life so important? Why are people like Me and You spending our life to save a "life". What happens after I die? Why does it matter?
History is full of people/emperors/kingdoms who vanished and were destroyed. Who once ruled and killed and looted. And today no one remembers them. Many hate them. Does emotions matter?
Because of one word : me, I, my...
When I think I'm right, and I know more..
Thats when I can never think outside the box. I can never think critically, although I may think that I Do quite a bit of critical thinking.
I can never travel the world.. and learn other's languages. And see how different they live. Yet, better than I ever did. And how much knowledge I've missed!!. .so many effective herbs as medicines I've never heard of. Without any side effects! And I have alot more to learn. ..if I will.
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Many people use lenses in order to experience different eye color & also instead of glasses and etc.
It is important to bring lenses out of the eye ,daily otherwise side effects happen like dry eye disease.
So these lenses can be useful.
Is it possible?
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For therapeutic purpose, why not?
Same principle as biodegradable materials.
Site and desgin: as that of the ICL (different material and different purpose)
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Hi!
I'm working on a biomechanical project. In fact I'm want to design a mechanical robot to simulate human gate in positions of walking and running. So I need to record human gate in different speeds and analyze the movement of COM and some specific joints and organs after that.
Can you suggest a required way (tools, devices, software or...) for this project?
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Tools required for Gait-Kinematics only:
  1. 3D Motion Tracker: It can be based on Optical Active Marker, Optical Passive Marker or Marker-less technology. Choice is based on available budget and other requirements (desired accuracy, speed, latency, environment etc.) and choice depends on many factors. There are other technology solutions for 3D Motion like Electromagnetic or Hybrid (Inertial, Accelerometer, Magnetometer) but in case you also need to track humanoid Robots (Metallic), these technologies are not suitable. These are fine for tracking humans.
  2. Biomechanical (Inverse Kinematics) modelling and analysis software: This component (software) will reduce the 3D Motion tracking data of markers/sensors (placed on body segments) from 3D Motion Trackers to motions of body segments. This will help model the body segments as per anthropocentric data of subject, localize joint centers and create a hierarchical , linked multi-body model to compute kinematics like joint angles, linear and angular velocities and accelerations. There are softwares that come with motion tracking system and there are 3rd Party softwares. 3rd party softwares generally provide more flexibility and control in modelling and analysis. Software can have real-time interface to motion tracking hardware or limited to off-line.
  3. 1 or 2 video cameras with synch capability to record reference videos are also good to have.
For kinematics, these will suffice. If you also need Inverse Dynamics (joint force, torques and power), then you will additionally need 6 component force platforms (1 or more) to record GRF and COP, and of course Inverse dynamics capability in the software.
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cell membranes control anything wants to enter or exit .
They are complex comuters which are programed to choose whatever the cell needs.
So they have to cominucate each other in different organs providing their needs.
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To get accurate answers, a specific question is necessary. The question does not say if the "cells" mentioned are prokaryotic or eukaryotic, plant or animal.
And all those who are answering complicated communication methods, you should have first considered the quorum sensing in prokaryotes and Plasmodesmata / Desmosomes, which are the immediate and cytoplasmic connections in the eukaryotic cells
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In today’s world using technology, we can get signals of the brain. the question is can we process these signals and obtain meaningful content? (for example, when the target brain is thinking to a number we show that number in a computer)
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Not yet, but we can right now define normal from abnormal brain response
We can also define ill brain tissue responsible of excessive discharge for example for epilepsy and other neurological disease
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Many people around the world need to use insulin and they are not interested in taking medication in the form of injections. Injections also decrease the patient's quality of life. So is there anyway to deliver insulin instead of injection, for example by taking eye droplet?
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Hi Ahmadi.
Unfortunately, ocular delivery of insulins is likely not feasible for several (a few reasons have already been mentioned-- especially the issue with concentration).
In addition, the residence time for ocular preparations is short. When a drop is administered, there is loss of most of the dose due to blinking and runoff, and subsequent tearing would continue to remove the dose from the ocular region. Being larger molecules, insulins would also be expected to show slow and low systemic absorption (corneal permeation is not a viable route of systemic absorption either).
By the way, for general background, an article by T. Donner is interesting (and available online) at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK278938/
I hope this helps!
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TACS is a device that imports frequencies to your brain in order to persuade your brain’s neurons oscillate by them.
Is it possible to enhance the skills of people with usual intelligence and make them smart by importing gamma ray to their brain?
Does the mechanism have long lasting effects?
Have you ever read something about it?
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Yes, such as periodic modulation of excitability, shifts in spike timing, modulation of firing rate, and shifts in the balance of excitation and inhibition.
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We usually find many papers on theory or experimental researches about nano/microcantilever biosensors. Nevertheless, it is important for me to know which companies are working on it to improve this device for commercial goals?
Is there a final form of this device or technology?
Has this device ever been used in a clinic or hospital complex?
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Dear Saman ,
- There are several cantilever suppliers in EU and US as mentioned in the other answers.
- For cantilever based research, different groups normally using the simulation (FEM, ANSYS) to simulate and come up with their own cantilever designs. The variations are materials ( often are Si, low stress SiN, polysilicon, some polymers..), dimension, and even new cantilever formats (single, arrays, added materials ( often Au) for facilating the biding of receptors, new structuring...). In this way, they bring the added values in research and also make easy of later publishing the paper. This called custom-made designs.
- At Nanosens, we have been offering custom-made cantilevers for various customers (www.nanosens.nl). Most of the case we provide ultrathin ( down to 20 nm in thickness) low-stress SiN cantilvers. We are not often offer Si cantilevers as to make it we need to start from SOI wafers, and currently comercial available SOI , especially SOI with the device thickness in the micron range, has poor device thickness uniformity ( ca. 25% for 4 inc. wafer), subsequently lead to large variation in final cantilever thickness. Low-stress LPCVD SiN layer can be realized within 2 % of thickness variation.
Is there a final form of this device or technology?
No. As mentioned above, there are so much variations. Also, the cantilever forms depended on the measurement setup ( singles or arrays, range of frequency, static or dynamic modes, and recently coupling of opto + mechanics for optomechanical cantilevers...)
Has this device ever been used in a clinic or hospital complex?
Not yet. But I personally think it comes soon . You can take a look at the research group of Prof. Javier Tamayo and Montserrat Calleja , BioNanoMechnics Lab in Spain http://www.imm-cnm.csic.es/bionano/en
You may see that they have been making a great progress to push this device to practical applications.
- Finally, measurement setup is also a crucial important factor for the cantilever research. The Scala system from MECWINS is a personally recommended as its cost is acceptable, and simple in both operation and maitenance.
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We know vitamin E is essential for the body and plays an important role in the body’s antioxidants.
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A pronounced antioxidant α- and γ-tocopherols (vit E), and the antiradical activity higher in α-tocopherol, and antioxidant activity - in γ-tocopherol. α-Tocopherol provides 60% of antiradical effects of all fat-soluble endogen-
antioxidants. In addition to antiradical- α-tocopherol has the highest
greater ability to stabilize membranes and form complexes
with fatty acids, leading to a
increase the resistance of membranes to free
radicals
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How much you know about biomedical waste? Is it not necessary to include this in Environmental Science subject which is a compulsory subject in most of universities at graduate level study.
Is it not a good idea to include practical in EVS or project like plantation of tress and other contributions of students for controlling environmental pollution. This will create a sense of responsibility towards environment.
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In India, biomedical waste management system is not leak proof.
Many used medical items come to the market after just washing in the water. The waste gather in the private nursing homes AMD laboratories are just thrown in the garbage without any treatment. The overall hyginic condition is also very poor. You can get actual picture by collecting the single data:
How many nursing homes/ laboratories/ doctor's chambers/ dentist chamber are equipped with Autoclave and Hot air oven machine?
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i will work by EEG signal for diagnosis epilepsy disease and for it i need to collect EEG signal data base.please help me anyone that work in this field recently.
thankyou
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3-D printers are one of the almost new technologies.
Can these printers be used in biomedical engineering?
(For example, to build artificial veins and arteries, joints, and so on.)
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Applications of AM and 3D bioprinting in the field of pediatrics are diversified. The three main application categories are: (i) Surgical planning, (ii) Prostheses, (iii) Tissue constructs, and (iv) Drug printing
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  • Short stature is one of the problems that some people experience, and people are looking for a solution to this problem.
  • its been known that there are several hormonal treatments
  • I am interested in knowing whether it helps to grow people's height by stimulating the magnetic field of bone cells without using hormonal drugs.
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There are two forms to apply the magnetic field, one is DC field which only acts on magnetic substances as hemoglobin of the blood, but I don't see that there are any special ferromagnetic substance in the bones.
The other kind of field AC to apply with frequency and that is much more difficult to know its effects because it can acts on many different substances due to Faraday's law. But if this were the case, it would be necessary to know quite well the frequency effect on the bone's growth cells (for instance, a resonance) or their associated mechanisms.
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An endoscopy and colonoscopy are usually unpleasant for many of patients. For this reason, scientists are now trying to use”Capsule endoscopy”.
I want to know what problems might arise in their design?
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The conventional endoscopy and colonoscopy devices are unpleasant, but they are fully controlled. The capsule that contains camera and transmitter is not able to be controlled, at least for now. It flows following digestive system within human body. The expected image may not be obtained. As it uses battery and size is matter, one way communication from capsule to external device is preferred, which makes limited protocol can be applied. Error depends only on FEC.
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which element is better?
titanium or zirconium
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I think that Dr. Zappini is providing a nice concise answer but I think that this answer, to a great extent propagates confusion about elements in the periodic table and what happens when you take those elements and use those elements in a formulated chemical. If you choose to read what I've written below here it will be real obvious why Dr. Zappini provided a concise and clear response. I think that it does indeed help but my concern is that it also allows a little confusion to remain.
I'm not suggesting that I can eliminate all that confusion, I might just pile it a little higher and deeper. Regardless I hope that you find this discussion a little stimulating.
Dr. Amirkhani raise the question of "why do we use zirconium in dental implant?"
He asked the question of which element is better, titanium or zirconium.
We need to frame the answer to this question relative to what it is that were trying to determine. Are we looking at osseointegration? Are we looking at physical characteristics?
The reality is that elemental titanium or elemental zirconium will not osseointegrate. Osseointegration occurs between the living bone and the surface of the Implant. Whether it's a close physical adaptation remains unknown or at least uncertain. That does appear as a necessity for an oxidized surface of the implant.
Is it possible to have some fun with this topic? personally I think that it is possible to have a little fun with the topic. I think the main reason that we need to consider it this way however is it should provide a little bit better understanding of elemental metals, chemical compounds and how the chemistry and biology change when we combine things in different ways.
Let's start with an easy one. If I gave you a glass of water to which I added sodium you probably wouldn't drink it. If I gave you a glass of water to which I added chlorine you probably wouldn't drink it. You wouldn't drink a glass of sodium enriched H2O or you wouldn't drink a glass of chlorine enriched H2O but if you had to, you could drink a little bit of saline which is sodium chloride enriched H2O. You wouldn't want to drink much of it and you would probably chase it with a lot more unadulterated H2O but little bit of salt and a glass of water will not kill you whereas enough sodium in a glass of water or enough chlorine in a glass of water could have serious effects on your health. When sodium and chlorine are combined under specific circumstances Salt is formed and the compound sodium chloride acts completely different than either of the elements act by themselves.
Titanium and zirconium are elements on the periodic table. Both of them are classified as metals. If you oxidize either of these elemental materials the material changes its physical properties from the elemental metal into the physical properties of a ceramic material. The surface of a titanium dental implant is an oxide of titanium which by definition is a ceramic. The surface of a zirconium dental implant is an oxide which by definition is a ceramic. When zirconium, combined with a few other chemicals, undergoes oxidation it becomes renamed as Zirconia and that material, zirconia, performs completely differently then elemental zirconium.
We could say the same thing about aluminum. If we oxidize aluminum it becomes alumina. Some of the earliest dental implants were made from oxidized aluminum or alumina.
So is titanium the element, once oxidized, now a ceramic? As the metal titanium is machined the surface of the titanium becomes almost immediately oxidized. That oxidized surface is resistant to corrosion because it is for all intents and purposes fully corroded already. Why don't we call titanium oxide titania? Well if we hunt around long enough we can find a dictionary or two that will describe the term "Titania" as oxidized titanium. But probably the most common use of the term Titania is as a character in Shakespeare's comedy "a Midsummer nights dream."
The oxide of zirconium is a material that has high strength but is brittle. The strength however is such that the brittle failure of the material is fundamentally outside the range of forces that would be seen in the oral cavity.
When people say that zirconia is a white material this is true. The oxide of zirconium is white. When people say that zirconium is white that is not true. Un-oxidized zirconium is gray or silver in color. Un-oxidized titanium is gray or silver in color. A dental implant made of, for all intents and purposes, fully oxidized zirconium is white. A dental implant made from titanium that has a thin oxidized surface is gray or silver because the oxidation is not through and through.
Think of it this way, in paint what is the most common chemical that is added to create a white pigment? Titanium dioxide is the answer to that question. Titanium dioxide, the oxidized titanium, is white in color. My assumption, and I am taking a little bit of a risk in assuming this, is that the physical properties of titanium dioxide do not create strength at a level that would allow it to be used as a dental implant in a fully oxidized way. Conversely the fact that metallic titanium can be machined and if that machining is done in an oxygen environment that titanium implant will have a fully oxidized surface of titanium oxide that will not make the implant white because the surface thickness of titanium dioxide is at the molecular level.
Feel free to think of the next paragraph or two is a little bit of frivolous venture.
When someone says that they have a metal free Zirconia implant I would suggest that this is impossible. If you take the zirconium out of zirconia all that's left is oxygen. Although oxygen is highly biocompatible it does not have the physical strength, being a gas at the temperatures that we would expose it to, to support a dental prosthesis.
If you take the oxygen away from Titanium dioxide you will not have a white pigment, as long as the titanium could be managed in an oxygen free environment, it would be silver or gray. If we then exposed to an oxygen environment the oxidation process would quickly occur but it would occur at the molecular level and it would still appear to be silver or gray. When creating titanium dioxide paint pigment my understanding is that the Titanium is ground into a very fine powder which immediately oxidizes and becomes white.
So I think we know that were not going to make oxygen implants. We need to understand that we are not truly making titanium implants we are using elemental metallic titanium (perhaps alloyed with other materials such as zirconium or aluminum or vanadium) that fundamentally maintain their metallic nature because it's only the surface that oxidizes at a molecular level.
But if we take the oxygen away from Titanium, bone will not osseointegrate to the Titanium without the oxide surface. If we take the oxygen away from zirconia I would suggest that likewise the un-oxidized element totally pure zirconium would not be a good surface for osseointegration.
When we combine a metal with the gas oxygen we can obtain an oxidized metal and depending how the processes performed that oxidized material may occur at the surface or it may be completely oxidized.
So just as consumption of a plate full of sodium or a canister full of chlorine would be a bad idea and yet placing some salt on our eggs will not be terribly harmful, oxidation of a metal can create a metallic oxide, a ceramic, but we can't call that ceramic metal free because we can't create the ceramic without having the metal just as you can't create the salt, sodium chloride, without having the sodium (metal) and the chlorine. Indeed I understand that there are other chemical combinations that create other salts but you probably would want to consume a plate full of potassium either.
The other thing to consider is that you can anodize the metallic oxide surface of Titanium to create a number of different hues. The way that we usually do use it has a titanium oxide surface that is gray or silver but through and anodizing process we can make a pink or gold or blue or green. Then the question is whether or not the anodized surface has the correct surface chemistry to achieve the osseointegration that we so desire but that's another discussion for another day.
I think that Dr. Zappini is providing a nice concise answer but I think that this answer, to a great extent propagates confusion about elements in the periodic table and what happens when you take those elements and use those elements in a formulated chemical. If you choose to read what I've written below here it will be real obvious why Dr. Zappini provided a concise and clear response. I think that it does indeed help but my concern is that it also allows a little confusion to remain.
I'm not suggesting that I can eliminate all that confusion, I might just pile it a little higher and deeper. Regardless I hope that you find this discussion a little stimulating.
Dr. Amirkhani asked: Why do we use zirconium in dental implant?
Which element is better? Titanium or zirconium?
Perhaps my first concern is I need to know how "better" is defined? Frankly neither Titanium nor zirconium are going to perform very well as dental implants, if osseointegration is the goal, without oxidation at the surface of the implant. Neither of the elements are going to fare well as surfaces to which bone will integrate.
Titanium, aluminum, zirconium and a few other metals have been tried as dental implants. If you take commercially pure titanium and add aluminum and vanadium you increase the strength rather dramatically. If you add zirconium, somewhere in the range of 13 to 15%, to Titanium this will increase strength rather dramatically. The surface of the implant however is where osseointegration occurs and if you are asking about which material has better surface properties for osseointegration this is going to be a very difficult answer to provide and probably cannot be provided in any large umbrella answer.
Let's talk about some of the topics that have become items of confusion and see if maybe we can eliminate some of that confusion.
Is it possible to have some fun with this topic? Personally I think that it is possible to have a little fun with the topic. I think the main reason that we need to consider it this way however is it should provide a little bit better understanding of elemental metals, chemical compounds and how the chemistry and biology change when we combine things in different ways.
Let's start with an easy one. If I gave you a glass of water to which I added chemically pure sodium you probably wouldn't drink it. If I gave you a glass of water to which I added chlorine you probably wouldn't drink it. You wouldn't drink a glass of sodium enriched H2O or you wouldn't drink a glass of chlorine enriched H2O but if you had to, you could drink a little bit of saline which is sodium chloride enriched H2O. You wouldn't want to drink much of it and you would probably chase it with a lot more unadulterated H2O but little bit of salt and a glass of water will not kill you whereas enough sodium in a glass of water or enough chlorine in a glass of water could have serious effects on your health. When sodium and chlorine are combined under specific circumstances Salt is formed and the compound sodium chloride acts completely different than either of the elements act by themselves.
Titanium and zirconium are elements on the periodic table. Both of them are classified as metals. If you oxidize either of these elemental materials the material changes its physical properties from the elemental metal into the physical properties of a ceramic material. The surface of a titanium dental implant is an oxide of titanium which by definition is a ceramic. The surface of a zirconium dental implant is an oxide which by definition is a ceramic. When zirconium, combined with a few other chemicals, undergoes oxidation it becomes renamed as Zirconia and that material, zirconia, performs completely differently then elemental zirconium.
We could say the same thing about aluminum. If we oxidize aluminum it becomes alumina. Some of the earliest dental implants were made from oxidized aluminum or alumina.
So is titanium the element, once oxidized, now a ceramic? As the metal titanium is machined the surface of the titanium becomes almost immediately oxidized. That oxidized surface is resistant to corrosion because it is for all intents and purposes fully corroded already. Why don't we call titanium oxide titania? Well if we hunt around long enough we can find a dictionary or two that will describe the term "Titania" as oxidized titanium. But probably the most common use of the term Titania is as a character in Shakespeare's comedy "a Midsummer nights dream."
The oxide of zirconium is a material that has high strength but is brittle. The strength however is such that the brittle failure of the material is fundamentally outside the range of forces that would be seen in the oral cavity.
When people say that zirconia is a white material this is true. The oxide of zirconium is white. When people say that zirconium is white that is not true. Un-oxidized zirconium is gray or silver in color. Un-oxidized titanium is gray or silver in color. A dental implant made of, for all intents and purposes, fully oxidized zirconium is white. A dental implant made from titanium that has a thin oxidized surface is gray or silver because the oxidation is not through and through.
Think of it this way, in paint what is the most common chemical that is added to create a white pigment? Titanium dioxide is the answer to that question. Titanium dioxide, the oxidized titanium, is white in color. My assumption, and I am taking a little bit of a risk in assuming this, is that the physical properties of titanium dioxide do not create strength at a level that would allow it to be used as a dental implant in a fully oxidized way. Conversely the fact that metallic titanium can be machined and if that machining is done in an oxygen environment that titanium implant will have a fully oxidized surface of titanium oxide that will not make the implant white because the surface thickness of titanium dioxide is at the molecular level.
Feel free to think of the next paragraph or two is a little bit of frivolous venture.
When someone says that they have a metal free Zirconia implant I would suggest that this is impossible. If you take the zirconium out of zirconia all that's left is oxygen. Although oxygen is highly biocompatible it does not have the physical strength, being a gas at the temperatures that we would expose it to, to support a dental prosthesis.
If you take the oxygen away from Titanium dioxide you will not have a white pigment, as long as the titanium could be managed in an oxygen free environment, it would be silver or gray. If we then exposed to an oxygen environment the oxidation process would quickly occur but it would occur at the molecular level and it would still appear to be silver or gray. When creating titanium dioxide paint pigment my understanding is that the Titanium is ground into a very fine powder which immediately oxidizes and becomes white.
So I think we know that were not going to make oxygen implants. We need to understand that we are not truly making titanium implants we are using elemental metallic titanium (perhaps alloyed with other materials such as zirconium or aluminum or vanadium) that fundamentally maintain their metallic nature because it's only the surface that oxidizes at a molecular level.
But if we take the oxygen away from Titanium, bone will not osseointegrate to the Titanium without the oxide surface. If we take the oxygen away from zirconia I would suggest that likewise the un-oxidized element totally pure zirconium would not be a good surface for osseointegration.
When we combine a metal with the gas oxygen we can obtain an oxidized metal and depending how the processes performed that oxidized material may occur at the surface or it may be completely oxidized.
So just as consumption of a plate full of sodium or a canister full of chlorine would be a bad idea and yet placing some salt on our eggs will not be terribly harmful, oxidation of a metal can create a metallic oxide, a ceramic, but we can't call that ceramic metal free because we can't create the ceramic without having the metal just as you can't create the salt, sodium chloride, without having the sodium (metal) and the chlorine. Indeed I understand that there are other chemical combinations that create other salts but you probably would want to consume a plate full of potassium either.
The other thing to consider is that you can anodize the metallic oxide surface of Titanium to create a number of different hues. The way that we usually do use it has a titanium oxide surface that is gray or silver but through and anodizing process we can make a pink or gold or blue or green. Then the question is whether or not the anodized surface has the correct surface chemistry to achieve the osseointegration that we so desire but that's another discussion for another day.
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Is loading Anti-Angiogenic Factors on drug delivery systems effective in the process of killing cancerous cells? Would it limit the delivery of nutrients to the tumor?
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It is needless to say that anti-VEGF agent exhibit the therapeutic effect. It has been widely accepted in the clinical settings that bevacizumab, the monoclonal antibody against human VEGF, is effective for the treatment for the patients with metastatic colon cancer. There are two important points you have to keep in mind.
Firstly, the neoangiogenesis of the tumor tissue depends only on VEGF, whereas that becomes to depend on not only VEGF but also other cytokines such as FGF-2, TGF-beta, and PIGF at the later stage of solid tumor.
Secondly, what determines the distribution of the therapeutic agent and oxygen concentrations does not depend on the amount of the intra-tumor blood. Those depend on the distribution of the blood vessels in the tumor microenvironment. The temporal and spatial intra-tumoral heterogeneity of the blood vessels makes it challenging to improve the drug delivery system.
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If Beethoven was alive today, which technology would help him to hide deafness?
According to statistics, 80% of those who could benefit from a hearing-aid choose not to use one. One of the most important reasons for that, is the social stigma associated with common misconceptions about wearing hearing aids. How can bioMEMS help to fabricate miniaturized hearing aids without compromising performance?
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I agree with Ozberk Ozturk.
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According to my knowledge , we use the difference between T1 and T2 in MRI to make contrast . but I have no idea about The T2* time and what is the usage of that .
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Let me add some more technical details to Samson Nivins' answer:
Both T2 and T2* describe the transverse relaxation (i.e., the decay of the MRI signal induced by the precessing transverse nuclear magnetization). T2 describes the decay observed in spin-echo (or turbo-spin-echo, fast-spin-echo, RARE, HASTE, SE-EPI, ...) measurements. T2* describes the decay in gradient-echo (or FLASH, SPGR, FID-EPI, ...) measurements.
Technically, T2* includes additional (static) effects due to macroscopic and microscopic magnetic field inhomogeneities (caused e.g. by blood) and is always shorter than (or at most equal to) T2.
Mathematically, this is expressed by 1/T2* = 1/T2 + 1/T2' (or, equivalently, T2* = (T2' + T2)/(T2 × T2')), where T2' describes the transverse relaxation only due to static magnetic field inhomogeneities.
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The Engineer's Point of View .
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There are basically 2 types. One used aluminum oxide crystals to "blast away" the stratum corneum, but many aestheticians and clients don't like the "sand" blowing all over so they also make "crystal free" units that use an industrial diamond encrusted tip for the exfoliation.
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Dentistry works a lot of time with a drill, high-speed noise can last a long way in damaging dental hearing, so how can we prevent this damage?
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It's important to keep a good condition of the unit by an adequate maintenance programme. Also, the noise exposure level is determined by the reflected waves. Thus, attention should be paid to the acoustical properties of the room (walls, ceiling, furniture).
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In leg amputation the remained bone is rasped to make the edges smoother to avoid tissue injuries. but still there is an unusual structure underneath the skin. 
Why don’t we use an implantable structure to avoid abnormal structure like sharp edges and damp the undue pressure and shocks underneath bones, the same way heel fat pad*(HFP) protects the underlying structures in the heel?
From my point of view, using such implants might also ease the use of prosthetic legs and decrease the possible pain in leg- prosthetic interfaces.
Are there any specific reasons not to use such implants during the leg amputation?
*The heel fat pad (HFP) is a highly specialized adipose-based structure that protects the rear foot and the lower extremities from the stress generated during the heel-strike and the initial support phase of locomotion. HFP cushioning efficiency is the result of its structure, shape and thickness.
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Bevelled bone end + adequate thickness of myoplasty should do the trick. Implant on the bone end is not necessary especially if the prosthesis is not designed to receive weight transmission through the end stump. If we worry about bad soft tissue surrounding the bone end, putting an implant on that area will create more problems, such as rapid implant wear, infections. Higher amputation level with good soft tissue should be put into consideration.
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Does someone have any experience with Cu-catalyzed Azide Alkyne Click Hydrogels, used for any biomedical application? After fabrication of hydrogels and removal of copper,, we do have copper present in trace amounts. Does this amount should of any concern? Secondly, Can somebody tell about the amount being allowed by FDA (Elemental impurities allowed)?
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Thank you for your answer. Yes, there are copper free synthetic procedures but I am just wondering about CuACC click procedures. About how will it act after copper being removed from product. I am more concerned about its interaction with cell viability?
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Please feel free to share any areas relate to the Innovation through technologies.
What do you understand the phase "Innovation through technologies."
Share the Innovation through technologies in your workplace etc
Any related articles etc
Thanks. 
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Innovation is a new technology or idea that is developed to a stage where it is fully ready to be put into practice.
New technology can exist not only in production, but also in all other spheres of human activity culture, religion, music, etc.
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I think I should use Lyle's method, but I couldn't find about planar spiral coils. I want to write a code that with getting the number of turns of each planar spiral coils,and radius and z(distance between two coil) I can calculate the coupling coefficient, I will appreciate your help so much.
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thank you so much;) this was exactly what I needed!
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Cardiac Arrhythmia conditions like Tachycardia and Bradycardia reduce the pumping volume of Heart.
I was wondering, in the case of non-sustained (lasting for few seconds) Tachycardia, Bradycardia, how does the blood flow get affected?  
Thanks and Regards
Pawan Kumar Pandey
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Dr Pesl: Thanks for your reply and sharing research paper.
With Regards
Pawan Kumar Pandey
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I am preparing nanoparticle based drug nano carriers. I have seen in literature people discussing about 'long term stability' of nanocarrier. Long term stability' refer to  how many hours or days ??? What are simple ways or technique by which we can study this.?
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Z-potential and particle size measurements by dynamic light scattering.
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Has anyone used Gelatine from Carlo Erba for biomedical applications? I am asking because they gave limited information related to technical specification.
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Which biomedical application. I think they gave kimited informations because thaey have limited informations
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'
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Not sure if you still need this answer.
One good way is to put the Hindlimb at 90 degrees. Find the femur by palpation. Along with the femur slide your finger dorsally, to the back of your test subject. You should be able to feel Sacrum, a large boney structure. Count 3 vertebrae rostrally and you have L4.
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I'd like to hear from anybody who used/developed laser scalpels: general descriptions, types of surgeries, clinicians feedback, references.
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Coagulation and ablation of biological soft tissue by quantum cascade laser with peak wavelength of 5.7 μm.
Molecules such as water, proteins and lipids that are contained in biological tissue absorb mid-infrared (MIR) light, which allows such light to be used in laser surgical treatment. Esters, amides and water exhibit strong absorption bands in the 5–7 μm wavelength range, but at present there are no lasers in clinical use that can emit in this range. Therefore, the present study focused on the quantum cascade laser (QCL), which is a new type of semiconductor laser that can emit at MIR wavelengths and has recently achieved high output power. A high-power QCL with a peak wavelength of 5.7 μm was evaluated for use as a laser scalpel for ablating biological soft tissue. The interaction of the laser beam with chicken breast tissue was compared to a conventional CO2 laser, based on surface and cross-sectional images. The QCL was found to have sufficient power to ablate soft tissue, and its coagulation, carbonization and ablation effects were similar to those for the CO2 laser. The QCL also induced comparable photothermal effects because it acted as a pseudo-continuous wave laser due to its low peak power. A QCL can therefore be used as an effective laser scalpel, and also offers the possibility of less invasive treatment by targeting specific absorption bands in the MIR region.
Read More: Keisuke Hashimura et al, J. Innov. Opt. Health Sci. 07, 1450029 (2014).
Regards, Leonid Skvortsov
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While dealing recognition problems in biomedical application such as ECG, ECG classification, how can we relate underlying physiology of bio signals with extracted features using signal processing techniques. Is it really possible? 
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I guess so, and properly I would refer to the recommendations from AHA,
and search in google scholar with 
AHA/ACCF/HRS Recommendations for the Standardization and Interpretation of the Electrocardiogram.
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I have been working with nozzles made from silicon nitride wafers for biomedical applications. Recently i am facing a problem, after the substance is being sprayed from the nozzle, its sticking to the surface of the nozzle membrane and cracking it! i have no idea how to prevent that. Does anyone have any explanation to that? whats the underlying mechanism?
Thanks in advance!
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Dear Salmeen,
It is well-known that nozzles made of silicone nitride are cracked as a result of thermal stresses or thermal shocks. To eliminate the possibility of cracking new formula of silicone nitride was invented and patented:
1. Silicon nitride composite refractories consisting of:
20 to 60 wt% silicon nitride;
10to 50 wt% refractory materials in powder form selected from the group consisting of magnesia, spinel, alumina, zirconia and carbides, said refractory materials having grain sizes of 50 microns or more, and
1 to 30 wt% boron nitride,
said composite refractories containing silicon nitride bonds formed by the reaction sintering of silicon, said silicon nitride bonds being bonded structures.
For more on this topic, please use the following links:
Hoping this will be helpful,
Rafik
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In EEG potential difference is measured using EEG electrodes , how can we calculate time since voltage arises at scalp till the electrode actually measures it ? 
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The conductivity of the brain, the skull and the scalp a ratio of 1:1/15:1 was found
Please check the link
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Which Fluid -Structure Interaction (FSI) software is best (simple, easy for analysis and requiring minimum computer hardware configuration) for the simulation of blood flow through the artery? Now I am using COMSOL Multiphysics. Can any one can suggest something other than COMSOL?
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All the articles I find about clinical trials for both albumin dialysis and ELAD (extracorporeal liver assist devices) show positive results and have even successfully bridged the gap to transplant, but when I bring up the subject with the regional transplant committee and hepatologists, they almost scoff at the idea? Any answers as to why?
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Trials of non-biologic support including two controlled trials published last year have failed to show a survival benefit.  These are very difficult to do because patients are very ill and frail - you may cause as much harm as good.  Biologic devices have suffered from poor design - Vital Therapies changed the original design and cell line, and then seemed surprised that the results were not as good as the animal models and initial studies had suggested.  Adding the complexity and cost of an extracoporeal circulation to a critically ill patient is just more complicated than you think.
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Can anyone provide me with working stripping protocol for PVDF membrane ?
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Thanks Kevin for your suggestion.
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the topics of :
RF to DC Rectifier of Energy Harvesting Module for biomedical applications.
Wireless power transfer
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Thank you Dr Esraa, the two paper are very important for me
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I'm trying to classify different classes of exponentially damped signals like dull / resonant / tympanic. I want to extract features from the signals which could be used for training and classification. Which would be the ideal features for this purpose?
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Dear Anurag,
See recent paper by S.Ye, E.Aboutanios, An algorithm for the parameter estimation of multiple superimposed exponentials in noise (2015). 
DOI: 10.1109/ICASSP.2015.7178613
For one prevailing frequency you may indeed use Hilbert transform, as suggested Fernando Soares Schlindwein. However, this approach is also not so simple. First, you should strictly adopt Hilbert-twin algorithm to eliminate ripples on the exponential envelope. Then, one may precisely estimate the signal parameters.
To tackle several exponentially damped sinusoids embedded in noise follow the line of thinking suggested by Ye and Aboutanios.
Yours,
Leszek Magalas
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Hello.
Could you please advice me some books/papers/reviews related to magnetic nanoparticles for up-to-date biomedical applications?
Thank you very much.
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Hello everyone
I want to start my thesis on biodegradable stent modeling. What do you think, would it be useful? Which material do you suggest, magnesium or PLA?
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What type of vessel is it going to be used,? It should be considered that the stent must have adaptive propertives regarding the patient may develope such multivessel diseases, diabetis and of course aging. I believe a drug eluting biodegradable stent  of material  which allows its mechanical and chemical properties managable by taking some medication or special type of radiation would be of high efficacy.
You can have a look at the following articles, 
  1. Martin, D., Boyle, F.: 'Drug-eluting stents for coronary artery disease: a review, Medical Engineering & Physics (2011) Volume: 33, Issue: 2, Pages: 148-163. PubMed 21075668. 
  2. Fully bioresorbable drug-eluting coronary scaffolds: A review, Emmanuel Charpentiera,∗, Alexandre Barnaa,Loïc Guillevin , Jean-Michel Juliard           http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.acvd.2015.03.009
  3. Clinical Outcomes With BioabsorbablePolymer- Versus Durable Polymer-BasedDrug-Eluting and Bare-Metal StentsEvidence From a Comprehensive Network Meta-Analysis, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacc.2013.09.061