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Biological Conservation - Science topic

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Questions related to Biological Conservation
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What innovations have been used in recent years to help protect the environment?
Please reply
Best wishes
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Hi,
I coordinate the sending of PAID solidarity corps servants by French government for NGO doing direct action for conservation into the world.
The servant (often with M.Sc in science), are paid (480€/months, during 10-12months, get insurance and stipend for the travel).
The NGO provide accommodation and real mission in conservation.
If you know NGO needing free motivated manpower, please contact me.
CONSERVATION in ACTION! =D
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Hi,
we decided to go back to our origins and relaunched the Parrot Researchers Group. The mission of the Parrot Researchers Group (PRG; formerly known also as Working Group Psittaciformes or as Research Coordination Committee on Parrots) group is to establish and promote research needs and priorities, with particular attention to regional conservation strategies to the parrots of the world. To achieve this, the PRG
1) Promotes parrot research,
2) Establishes research needs and priorities, with particular attention to regional conservation strategies,
3) Identifies and addresses barriers to effective research and conservation of parrots (Psittaciformes).
The PRG is characterised by a regional approach, being organised in four regions (African, Australasian, Neotropical, and Indo-Malayan), a Wild Parrot Veterinary Section, and a Secretary Office that coordinates joint work.
You can read more about our specific objectives in our homepage:
or in the attachment.
We (405 members to date) are currently looking for more researchers to join the group. If you are interested, please, get in touch with me or any of the regional coordinators.
Any questions?
Looking forward to work together.
All the best, JUAN
Dr. Juan F. Masello
Justus Liebig University Giessen
Department of Animal Ecology & Systematics
Personal information, projects and publications
Burrowing Parrots & behavioural ecology
Penguins & energy landscapes
Prions & evolution
The Alliance of World Scientists
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I am interested in how bird song differs on islands and adjoining mainland. Differences in bird song may be a pre-zygotic isolating mechanism and a factor leading to evolutionary differentiation. British islands and coastal areas can be quite windy. Can this be a problem for recording? I am a novice to this type of study so any advice would be appreciated.
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Several animals, especially avians, have successfully adapted to live in cities. The urbanized environment affects these birds both in behavioral, and morphological aspects as stated in several journal articles I’ve read. I have been wondering what would happen to a certain population of birds if their urban environment is lost or if they are reintroduced to the wild after generations of adaptive progress in relation to the urban environment. A lot of articles talk about how wild animals adapt to urban areas, but so far I have not found any regarding the opposite. Considering that most animals raised in captivity don't fare very well in the wild where they are left to their own resources, would these birds exhibit a similar pattern? Would it be different since they are a ‘wild’ urban species and technically not raised in captivity? In what ways would the loss of an urban habitat most likely affect the avian species?
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While shorfin mako and longfin mako have been listed as endangered species, their jaws are still welcome in shark jaw market with poor regulation, as a great number of people ardently display photos of their mako shark jaw collection on Facebook, Twitter and somewhere else. I find that while shark fin trade has drawn much attention, shark jaw trade, despites its popularity, has not been a highlight.
It is really hard to find a paper on the species composition of shark jaw market.
Even worse, some game fishing fishermen killed the living mako sharks and keep their jaws for trade or self entertainment.
Shark jaw trade of endangered species is as harmful as shark fin trade, and maybe even worse. It is because the harm of shark jaw trade has not been revealed to the public, while shark fin trade has been notorious. And some people even find excuses for their collecting endangered shark jaws, such as "this jaw is from a shark that dies a natural death" or "I got it from a legal aquarium".
Do you have any suggestions on mitigation of shark jaw trade of endangered species? Or have you ever studied this problem?
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Some people argue that it is completely acceptable to trade non-endangered sharks species, such as bull shark and blue shark by-caught by fisheries. They hold that even if these sharks are still alive and stand high chance of surviving by-catch if released, it is still okay to kill them and trade their fins, meat and jaw.
What do you think of this problem?
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Catastrophic reports and publications about the rapid loss of species numbers are becoming increasingly frequent. Furthermore, the biomass of common animal species, such as insects or birds, is also being hotly debated.
In contrast, the loss of plant species and their biomass is much less frequently reported. Does anyone know of well-documented reports or publications on massive local or global plant losses and/or massive plant biomass losses?
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The Apo Island conservation project is an example of how a scientist was able to work with local fishermen to educate them about the need for a marine sanctuary. Details at:
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The Amazon forest is on fire and the whole world will suffer the climatic consequences. The main cause of forest fires in the Amazon rainforest of Brazil and Bolivia are the deforestation policies promoted by the anti-environmental presidents Jair Bolsonaro and Evo Morales. We need to do something to stop this. In the long run, these policies will destroy even large-scale rainforests in the region. We are coming closer to the point where there is not enough rainforest left to produce the rain that sustains those forests. The vast Amazon basin will tip into a drought state, which would be devastating for wildlife, the indigenous people, the global climate, and agriculture in the region. Is there something we could do to stop this ecological disaster before is too late ? What is your opinion about this important subject ?
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In the Green List framework , a timeframe of 100 years is proposed to evaluate the recovery potential of species.
Conservation gain is evaluated over the greatest of 3 generations or 50 years. However, what if 3 generations (future gain) are longer than 100 years (future recovery)? This (3 generations greater than 100 years) is the case for longer lived slower growing species.
As we have such an incomplete picture of the worlds species, could future recovery be the greatest of 5 generations or 100 years? Is there an upper time limit that we can reasonably use for future recovery?
Conservation gain: “A suitable time frame for assessing conservation dependence and gain is 3 generations or 10 years, whichever is longer, consistent with the current Red Listing process and providing a realistic time scale for incentivizing conservation action.”
Recovery potential: “setting an aspirational yet achievable vision for the recovery of a species, estimating the maximum plausible improvement that could be achieved in occupancy, viability and functionality across the (indigenous and projected) range of the species, given its life history and habitat characteristics, and the likely land and resource use and recovery technology over the next 100 years.”
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Do you have any idea for to do research on this species? Maybe unexplored yet or needs more further study? Thank you so much ♥️
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Respected Brethren,
Could you suggest me how to prepare a piece of land for establishing a Gene Bank of the taxon Zingiberales? What are the prerequisites and what points must be taken care of?
Thanking, in anticipation.
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I am not sure about how to interpret different values of the Simpson's index of diversity. For example: if I have two communities where
1-D (community 1) = 0.92
1-D (community 2) = 0.89
the first community is about 3% more diverse than the second one. Does this mean that the two communities are very similar or that they substantially differ?
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I am pretty confused about the use of taxonomic diversity and taxonomic distinctness.
Taxonomic diversity can be defined as the average taxonomic path between randomly chosen individuals. It takes into consideration taxonomic differences and heterogeneity (species richness and evenness). Why should we not just decide to use taxonomic diversity instead of Simpson’s index/Shannon index when we know the taxonomy of each species? Moreover, isn’t calculating the taxonomic diversity across different areas more appropriate than other beta diversity indices such as Jaccard Similarity?
Taxonomic distinctness can be defined as the average taxonomic path between two individuals from different species. I don’t understand the point of this index. It doesn’t give us information about the heterogeneity (which taxonomic diversity does), but at the same time it is not an index of the how the different species are related taxonomically (which is delta+). Which information gives us? When is the use of taxonomic distinctness more appropriate than the one of taxonomic diversity? 
Thank you for anyone who will help, I really appreciate it!
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I accept suggestions for readings of publications on veterinary or biological conservation both related to philosophy or if you have this paper:
Fox MW. Towards a philosophy of veterinary medicine.Vet Rec. 1984 Jul 7;115(1):12-3.
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Understanding what drives the large-scale pattern of biodiversity is the vital part of macroecology and conservation. The basis of this study is obtaining high-quality data of abiotic /biotic variables. Nowadays, we are in the big-data era, there are a lot of resources for available data. However, the quality and resolution of these data are uneven which may let many novices feel confused. Therefore, we could discuss this topic here.
DON"T HESITATE TO POST RESOURCES of these HIGH QUALITY and OPEN ACCESS data that you know. Please also provide its time period and resolution.
I wrote a list of several resources on my website that I have knew until now for reference:
Here are some example:
WorldClim (v1, v2): http://www.worldclim.org/
  • widely used in SDM
  • [T] 1970~2000, [R] 30 arcsec
  • historical/current/future
  • a new dataset of climate
  • [T] 1979~2013, [R] 30 arcsec
  • historical/current/future and time series (very interesting)
  • can select specific months and models 
  • multiple remote sensing data for biodiversity study (topography, habitat heterogeneity, consensus land cover, cloud cover climatology and freshwater environmental variables)
  • topography ([R] 1km); habitat heterogeneity ([R] 30 arcsec); consensus land cover ([R] 30 arcsec); freshwater env. ([R] 1km)
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I am trying to determine whether tree cover (in proportions) at one site is affected by stream flow (and thus flooding, periods of drought etc.) recorded at the same site. The tree cover data is limited to a <20 records over the last 50 years while the flow data has a value for every month (average deseasonlised) for the last 30-50 years. What meaningful statistics would be valuable to assess the effects of flow on vegetation cover? I will repeat the process for each site to assess spatial variation.
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Are you interested in joining our Juglandaceae-network?
We are working on global biogeography and conservation of the relict tree family Juglandaceae. However, the distribution and status knowledge of many species of South-Eastern Asia are not well known.
We are searching therefore for local experts of Engelhardia apoensis. According to our knowledge, the species is present in continental Malaysia, Borneo, Brunei, Philippines. Please see the attached schematic map with known distribution (administrative units & countries).
Any information, maps, publications, reports, personal observations, etc. from your region are interesting for us.
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Generally, to maintain ecological status, five factors are considered for a river ecosystem:
1. flowing water that is mostly unidirectional
2. a state of continuous physical change
3. many different (and changing) microhabitats
4. variability in the flow rates of water
5. plants and animals that have adapted to live within water flow conditions.
During water distribution of trans border water resources, only water is considered irrespective of water ecology. If we want to consider river ecology, especially for maintaining fish population, and want to estimate minimum water flow, what procedure may be adopted to identify minimum required flow?
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In my current work, I found a non-linear effect of invasive predators to a native mammal community. That is, the invasive predator had a slightly positive effect to species richness of native mammals when its activity was low, but the effect became negative and rose quadratically when its activity exceeded a threshold. I am trying to explain such findings. Is there any reference explaining this phenomenon? Thank you.
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As a geographer/geomorphologist with interest in nature (karst) protection, I'm dealing with one Natura 2000 site in Croatia under heavy pollution pressure. It is a sinking river in contact karst area exposed to pollution from nearby dump site and sewerage - consequences: pollution of river (destruction of water fauna), its ponor and underground stream possibly up to the distant karst springs. One of the basic problems is in bad delineation of borders not including larger catchment area (small city, suburban area with important percentage of arable land - a lot of anthropogenic pressure) but only small part of river bed. So it is completely inefficient because it does not prevent or reduce the pressure on the protected water habitat of interest. Second problem is that most of Natura 2000 sites in Croatia are poorly managed or not managed at all (no management plans), with badly determined borders/areas drawn without enough scientific fundamentals so their efficiency is questionable in many cases.
I'm searching for any updates on this topic - newer articles with examples. I'm interested in various habitats, not only karst and water, but all good examples of bad decisions in delineating Natura sites and repercussions to habitats, flora & fauna.
Maybe we can start some collaboration in this topic...
Thank you.
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There are different international law, doctrines for Trans Boundary Water Resources, such as:
1. Absolute territorial sovereignty theory
2. Absolute territorial integrity theory
3. Theory of limited territorial sovereignty.
4. Water Rights Based on Previous Use or Prior Appropriation
5. Riparian water rights
Although water covers more than two-thirds of the earth's surface, but 97% is in oceans and 2℅ locked in ice-cap and not available to human beings for consumption. Only 1℅ is termed as fresh water (surface & ground water). Therefore, water as a limited resource that is in great demand. The manner in which this demand is satisfied varies according to the jurisdiction in which a water supply is located. In case of trans-water resources, the upstream country has got upper hand to manipulate the river flow. This manipulation can be interpreted under various approaches and doctrines. Each approach has its weaknesses, and jurisdictions will continue experimenting with established legal doctrines to better accommodate the supply and demand of water rights.
Various treaties concluded to decide on the water. Question arose, either there is any such doctrines exists that protecting the ecology?
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Dear colleagues,
In recent days an article was published in the Washington Post trying to sell the idea that we, humans, should not work towards preventing the extinction of as many endangered species as possible, and that we should only focus on saving species that might help us survived as species as longer as possible. This is the article:
Our colleague Dr. Alexandre Antonelli is organizing a rebuttal and everyone is welcome to sign it. It is currently aimed as a short commentary in the Washington Post, but I believe it might be possible that this would lead to a larger perspective piece in a scientific journals. Please take a look at the short 750-words manuscript and feel free to sign if you agree with the text. To do so, please use the following link and open the corresponding documents: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1VJuKuXDP62NQcBdIuIkCi-LqMyRbORv2?usp=sharing
Best regards,
Eliécer
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Hi,
After finding out about it, I'm using the k-core decomposition method to visualise/analyse the seed dispersal network of Aldabra Atoll as part of my PhD project. It's a great tool to visualise details that are otherwise difficult to grasp with standard plots. I love it that you are providing examples with published networks and I was wondering if you could include some ecological interpretation of the data along with the figures? For example, does it coincides with what was found in the studies/what additional details can we learn from the ziggurats?
Thanks very much for this interesting approach of looking at mutualistic networks (and the k-magnitudes!).
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Hi Luke - Check our Indian fox distribution map published in Mammalian Species (Gompper and Vanak 2006). Similar to the IUCN map, but slightly different.
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I have problem to distinguish exploration and exploitation parameters  of dragonfly algorithm.
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I intend to map the EOO and AOO of an endemic plant of Mauritius using historical and current records to do a reduction analysis. One way would be using GeoCat tool. However, are there any freeware that can do this type of mapping as well?
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I do not know if there have been any changes in the names of the species or if they are different species. Can anyone help me?
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We are trying to assess the potential biodiversity impacts of invasive Green Vervet monkeys on a Caribbean island.
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Looking to protect buried cavity-nest against snakes and mammals predation. Anyone know some reference to this methodology ?
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Summary : I am a student in biology working on an island of almost 130ha in the NW of Madagascar, which has not really been studied yet. I am working part-time in the small hotel on the private island until the end of March and I want to bring a contribution to the pool of scientific knowledge of the region and therewith help with the conservation work of Madagascar
In short, I am in need of advice from professional conservationists as to what kind of scientific data would be interesting for researchers.
Detailed message: 
After arriving three weeks ago in Madagascar, I am now working on a small private island of almost 130 hectares, in the NW of Madagascar, which is part of the "Radama islands" and is located in the "Sahamalaza-Radama islands National Park and UNESCO BioSphere". The island is completely private, having been acquired by a company to build a hotel, and therefore, it has not really been studied yet. I am working part-time in the hotel on the island until end of March, and as a side project, I am in charge of conducting a basic photographic inventory of the fauna and flora of the island for the hotel.
As I wish to contribute to the scientific knowledge of this region and therewith help the conservation work of Madagascar, I hope to be able to be of use, having complete access to the island and being a biologist.
My contract says that all information, reports etc. are confidential "except that which could have academic or scientific importance". So far, after only having had the time to do a few walks and to do a little bit of random sampling, I can already say that, in my opinion, there could be many things of scientific value. Here are a few examples:
1.   Presence of three marine turtle species around the island (Chelonia mydas, Eretmochelys imbricata and Lepidochelys olivacea), which are laying their eggs on the island. => Who could I inform or where could I upload sightings of turtles laying their eggs with GPS references so that the beaches could then be protected?
2.   Presence of a coral reef teeming with life around the island but it is daily destroyed by local fishermen. Turtles are also fished/hunted regularly expect when I stop them.
2.1.      Which book would be advisable to do a beginning of an inventory of the reef? I thought about ordering " King, D. Fraser, V. (2014). The Reef Guide: fishes, corals, nudibranchs & other vertebrates East & South Coasts of Southern Africa. Struik Nature".
3.   Presence of three distinct ecosystems:
3.1.     Forests ecosystem, with three distinct forest types (Casuarina equisetifolia forests, extremely dense dry deciduous forests, relatively open dry deciduous forests).
3.2.         Mixed grassland Savannah ecosystem with no transition zone from the forest ecosystem.
3.3.          Wetland ecosystem with marshes and large ponds.
4.   Large number of "purposefully" introduced species:
4.1.     Three species of lemurs: Black Lemur (Eulemur macaco macaco), Blue-eyed Black Lemur (Eulemur macaco flavifrons) and probably Common Brown Lemur (Eulemur fulvus), with now many different hybrids of the three.
4.2.     Radiated tortoises (Astrochelys radiata, taken from who knows where).
4.3.     Helmeted Guineafowl (Numida meleagris) and Grey-headed Lovebird (Agapornis canus)
4.4.     Indian bullfrog (Hoplobatrachus tigerinus).
4.5.     Tilapia (species unknown).
4.6.     Previously goats (which have now been exterminated).
4.7.     Cats (completely feral and extremely large).
5.    About 50 species of vertebrates identified so far:
5.1.   30 species of birds nesting on the island.
5.2.   Six species of mammals (most interesting are the three hybridizing species of lemurs and two large colonies of Madagascar Flying Foxes (Pteropus rufus).
5.3.   Four species of snakes and five species of geckos.
Precisions are recorded on an excel file which would be available if there is interest as well as a large number of pictures.
My two main questions are, from this basic description, could anyone help me with:
6.   What kind of scientific data could be interesting for researchers in this region?
7.   Who specifically to contact for this? (I will try to contact the authors of the books I have)
And I have a few more precise questions:
8.   How could I record effectively (except for pictures of course) the strange "three way hybridization" going on with the three species of lemurs (Eulemur fulvus, eulemur macaco macaco and eulemur macaco flavifrons)? And as the presence of none of them seems to have been recorded on this island, whom could I contact for this?
9.   As for the presence of these very large cats (verified by sightings as well as by the presence of a large number of rests of dead birds on the ground.): => I am building a wooden box-trap to verify what species of Carnivora is present on the island, but I am not sure what to do if I caught one a feral cat. Evidently, my conservationist instinct would be to kill it, but I am a little bit reluctant to do it "without preapproval" and I feel the need of the authorization of the decision by a senior conservationist before "killing in the name of science".
10.       There seems to be a large number of different mosquito species on the island, would it be interesting to keep the dead ones in alcohol? (I assure you that they end up dead purely because of self-defense on my part)
11.       I am thinking of setting up pitfall traps for the inventory of small mammals, amphibians and reptiles? What data should I collect from the caught specimen (except which species it is)?
12.       As it is the rainy season right now, and it is apparently the only time of year that the island has a little bit of green on it, should I make a herbarium? Whom could I give it to at the end of my contract?
I hope my message is not too badly written and easy to follow!
I would be very thankful for advice or an answer to any of those questions, but if you have no time for tips, just press delete and have a nice day. :-)  And as for the people who would potentially have time and energy to answer, thank you very much in advance! Though, please note that I have a very limited Internet connection, so not enough for Skype, just enough for downloading emails and a few papers now and then.
Here is my email address, in case you would like more precisions or to get in touch with me: jeanlouis.berthoud@gmail.com
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Protecting the right of the local community/country to use their own genetic resources available in  a particular area is an important element of environmental and biodiversity conservation.  However, one of the biggest biodiversity conservation challenges faced by southern peripheral countries is biopiracy and related issues. I am doing some research works regarding that. Could you pleases help me to fin out suitable research works based on that
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It will be a great help if you introduce anyone working in this field or if you know any articles please notify us. we are planing to reduce conflict between local people & wild boars.
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Can anyone suggest how I might go about constructing power curves for permanova tests? I am working on an eDNA metabarcoding community impact study and want to investigate how many replicate subsamples should be analysed in future monitoring surveys.
Thanks in advance for your help!
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Scientific research on animals and conservation efforts are overdirected towards few easily-handled species, e.g. drosophila, daphnia, stickleback, salmon, rat, barn swallow, great tit, and iconic species such as panda, tiger, wolf, lion. Thus, we don't know practically nothing or we have minimal information of most world animal species (at least recognized as such).  Probably, this tendency, which ignore biodiversity, is inevitable for many good reasons, but perhaps there might be a trade-off (including major funds to study difficult and less striking species) 
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Hello,
I know of a few books (Sudfeldt, Christoph, et al. Atlas Deutscher Brutvogelarten. Stiftung Vogelmonitoring Deutschland und Dachverband Deutscher Avifaunisten, 2014.; Gatter, Wulf. Vogelzug und Vogelbestände in Mitteleuropa: 30 Jahre Beobachtung des Tagzugs am Randecker Maar; mit 16 Farbtafeln. Aula-Verlag, 2000.)  which depict the migration routes of european birds based on observations and ringings on a broad scale. But is digital map data available which summarizes those kind of findings into routes or even quantifies the intensity of migration events? I recently read Liechti, Felix, Jérôme Guélat, and Susanna Komenda-Zehnder. "Modelling the spatial concentrations of bird migration to assess conflicts with wind turbines." Biological conservation 162 (2013): 24-32. and was quite impressed by accuracy and coverage of the published maps (I know of the limitings).
Thank you very much
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What passive (preferred) or active control techniques are there to control a large invasive alien arboreal day gecko (Phelsuma grandis – reaching 30 cm or 12 inches long) in a semi-natural habitat, without negatively impacting smaller endemic arboreal Phelsuma geckos (half its size)? Are there any size selective traps or models someone may have tested and found useful in this kind of situation?
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The government of Mauritius has decided to have a culling of our endemic fruit bat Pteropus niger based on the ground that the population is exploding and that they are acting as a pest, devastating fruit trees. This decision goes against all scientific studies carried out in Mauritius. The culling has already started and they have killed thousands of bats so far. Despite online petitions sent to the government, the decision was not re-considered.
Does anyone know a strategy that might help protect this important species?
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Most of basal Heliconiini are supposedly impalatable, like Heliconius. They also show very similar wing patterns including orange and black colors and some paper refer to them as members of mullerian/batesian complex. Can anyone cite papers that describes this patterns?
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One of my objectives is to: Quantify and compare the seed rain of fleshy-fruited, bird-dispersed seeds under trees in weeded and non-weeded area.
Am planning to use random number table to randomly distribute seed traps under trees in both areas.
  • Is there a better alternative to what am about to do.
  • Is it necessary have the same size of the plot in both weeded and non-weeded area. (because I got mix answers where some said it's not necessary and some said it's necessary)
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Ocean acidification due to CO2 increase affect bio calcification.  We can suppose that the same effect can be found in fresh water. However I did not found any research about the effect of CO2 on pound and lac. This is probably because it is negligible in such a limited amount of water. Do you have any knowledges about the atmospheric/pound physiochemical exchanges and the effect of CO2 increase?
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I would like to know which formula would be correct to calculate a value of risk for marine mammals knowing the noise generated by human activities and the density of animals. Data are provided in 0.05° grid and I would like to obtain a map of predicted risk of disturbance for mammals.
Following Garthe and Hüppop 2004 (wind farm sensivity index calculation), I was thinking to do this :
Risk = (ln (density + 1) X noise)
Do you think it is correct ?
Thank you!
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What implications / meaning does a finding have where within-species variation in stress responses (drought and frost tolerance) across a European distribution of a species (a grass) matches the among-species variation among eight grassland species (forbs, legumes and grasses) stemming from the same field site? All plants were grown under standard conditions with only the seed origin being different. Variation was measured by coefficients of variation in five response parameters (Biomass, root N uptake, chlorophyl content, dead tissue biomass, C/N ratio). Thank you for your thoughts!
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Hi,
I want to know the Grime classification of Retama retam. Is it considered as ruderal species like Pinus halepensis because it used in rehabilitation of degraded ecosystem?
Thank you.
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I am looking for acute toxicity data to support pollinator protection measures.
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Indeed, I would like to conduct a study on the analysis of the reliability of ape populations (Bonobo) and the probability of extinction over a defined time interval. This study is in order to improve protection strategies for this iconic and endangered species in the Democratic Republic of Congo. This is a demographic study with statistics, but a good read enable me to clearly define my question. Thank you for your recommendations
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We have data on seabird mortality, injuries and oiling as a result of falling into small pelagic purse-seine fishing nets. We need to evaluate impact of oiling and injuries to the populations, as well as rates of mortality as a result of these injuries and oiling. We have not found any information concerning mortality rates of oiled and injured birds and no information on effects of fish oil on survival capacity birds that have been oiled during this type of fishing operations. Is this oiling different from that of birds being exposed to fish processing plants, which has been studied, and what are the differences?
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I am researching the movement behavior of salamanders. I am first looking for a program, extension, or script that will allow me to determine the overall, straight-line direction, bearing, or trend for an animal movement path, taking into account the sinuosity of the path. From this information, I will also like to determine the angle between this formed line and another line that do not necessarily intersect. I have found a program called MB-Ruler Pro that will calculate the angle between two non-intersecting lines, but it is quite expensive.
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The Barbary macaque Macaca sylvanus is the only macaque in Africa. The species is categorized as Endangered on the IUCN Red List and is listed in CITES Appendix II. This macaque has a relict distribution in Morocco and Algeria. Recent studies have indicated a dramatic decline of Barbary macaque populations in the Middle Atlas and Rif Mountains in Morocco but there is limited available information on its distribution in the Central High Atlas. What must we do to protect the this species?
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I am looking for software that can be used to analyse the colour and pattern of the substrate where ground nesting birds lay their eggs.  Does anyone have any experience with this?
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We are writing us on behalf of the National Museum of Natural History of France (MNHN, Paris, France) and the CEFE (CNRS, Montpellier, France). The MNHN works closely with the IUCN French committee on the production of the French Red List of threatened species since 2007.
The IUCN Red List is the world’s most comprehensive information source on the global conservation status of animal, fungi and plant species and their links to livelihoods. The Red List is a powerful tool to inform and catalyze action for biodiversity conservation and policy change, as well as providing information on population size and trends, geographic range and habitat needs of species.
Made primarily at a global level, Regional Red Lists such as European or Mediterranean Red Lists were developed. Therefore, more and more countries in Europe and in the Mediterranean basin have produced their own list in order to assess their national biodiversity status.
The MNHN and the CEFE-CNRS are interested in completing the general knowledge on how those different Red Lists are used in national conservation strategies in Europe and in the Mediterranean basin. This assessment will help us reveal supranational similarities in species protection strategies (especially among neighboring countries) and understand the potential of Red Lists towards this end. Our objective is to publish a scientific paper providing general recommendations in the uses of Red Lists. To achieve our goal, we are conducting a survey of the major stakeholders involved in the production of National Red Lists in Europe and in the Mediterranean basin.
We already get responses for different countries but there are :
1) too little information for Algeria, Germany, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Denmark, Estonia, Hungary, Lebanon, Lithuania, Malta, Monaco, Norway, UK, Slovakia, Syria and the Ukraine,
2) and no information for Cyprus, Egypt, Greece, Iceland, Romania, Slovenia and Tunisia.
Therefore, we would like to ask you a few questions and we would be very grateful if you could take few minutes to answer our survey. This should take around 30 minutes. We appreciate your time and your commitment to biodiversity conservation. You will find the link to our online questionnaire below. Moreover, we would like to ask you to transfer this message to your colleagues for the cited where information remains partial or absent. In advance, thank you very much for your collaboration.
Please, feel free to contact us if you have any questions or further comments about this study.
Claire-Sophie AZAM, MSc candidate, Red Lists and conservation strategies
Guillaume GIGOT, Red Lists project manager
Bertrand SCHATZ, Researcher in ecology and conservation biology
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I understand that there are commercial units available, but the burrow shape is different for each animal.  I need a system whereby I can record the movement of reptiles in and outof their burrows.  I would prefer to make the receiver and antennae myself (reduce cost) so any infornation on what is required and where to source the parts would be appreciated.
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I'm planning to start a new biodiversity conservation project based on citizen science in Sri Lanka. I don't seem to find any local bodies providing small grants for research like this. I would much appreciate if anyone could suggest a potential opportunity to me.
Thanks.
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The Little Fireface Project in Java, Indonesia aims to conserve the Critically Endangered Javan slow loris (Nycticebus javanicus). We are currently evaluating the use of our slow loris bridges. So far we have found that 3 bridges were badly placed as they were not used for 4 months whereas a bridge that we placed well was used within 2 weeks by lorises and tree shrews. We put up the bridges as one of our study lorises dispersed into the village where she was most likely electrocuted. We would like to know more about the wildlife bridges used by other projects.
I hope that you can help me fill in the following questionnaire about wildlife bridges and send it on to any other organizations that you know who are using these bridges.
Thank you!Ask
 
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In some places in mediterranean environment I've found relevant presence of feral cat. It's well known how can affect to potentials preys, but I couldn't find many information about the competence with other predators
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Species conservation is usually addressed towards common and/or appeal species, many of them Vertebrates. But, what's about the uncommon/rare invertebrates species? How are they (if they are) considered in conservation? The role of these species in the ecosystems are mostly unknown, but this doesn't mean that they have not. Have papers discussion about this issue?
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I am looking for methodology pertaining to trapping designs (e.g., transects, web, grid, etc.) of small mammals to measure the edge effect of an acute disturbance.  For example, if a parking lot were to appear in the middle of a grassland landscape, how far away would the biological footprint be felt by the small mammal community? 10m? 100m? Something in-between? What deisign might I use to determine this?  The three statistics I want to investigate include species diversity, species richness and abundance.  Thanks in advance, and I look forward to any input.
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I have taken a series of fixed area counts within a known area and I want to extrapolate out to obtain an estimate of total N for the area. There is overdispersion, so I do not think a mean is appropriate here. Is anyone aware of any sophisticated estimation methods? Or is a simple proportional approach the best. Cheers.
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Everyone seems to work at the moment on integrating biodiversity information coming from all possible sources but how many organisations, especially biodiversity conservation organisations, have a real open data policy allowing the use and redistribution of biodiversity data aside contributors to the GBIF?
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I'm especially interested on the effects of forest fragmentation and patch size on forest dwelling species such as Platystictidae species.
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If an area is invaded by alien plant species, for the conservation purpose of a native plant species within that area. Would it be wise to remove all the alien species? Is there any possible interaction that makes the native plant species adapt to the alien plant species?
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Since in a multi use MPA, zoning of activities is done, socio- economic factors are taken into consideration, how would this be approached on a terrestrial area.
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I have been studying the numerous similiarities that the catfish and sharks have in common. I have studied the writings of Dr. D. Whitehead of Australia as he compared the Ampullae of Lorenzini of both types. I am wondering if any other researcher has taken up the tasks of comparing the catfish to the sharks or vice versa. I would be very interested in the testosterone levels especially of bullheads and the bull sharks.
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Human immigrants can become lawful citizens of their new countries at a certain point in time. What about plants? Can plants that were for example introduced over 100 years, as in most Australian naturalized species, be one day classified as native species?
Any examples of species will be appreciated.
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A debate question, any views are most welcome!
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I had previously posted the following query: "We are interested in trapping invasive Jackson's chameleons in the wild, any ideas?" We want to control/eliminate chameleons from native habitat. As a follow-up, I had an idea. The ‘io was listed as an endangered species in 1967 under the Federal Endangered Species Act because little was known about this species and raptors worldwide were experiencing significant declines. Today they are only known to breed on Hawaii Island, though historically had a wider distribution including multiple islands. Thinking about the recent rebound of endemic Hawaiian Hawk populations on the Big Island, it occurred to me that if we could release a handful of these birds on Oahu, we could potentially accomplish re-establishment of this endangered species and possibly bring a native Hawaiian predator over to control an ecologically damaging lizard. Raptors constitute major natural predators of chameleons in eastern Africa, as well as other regions.
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I recovered olive mill wastewater for microbiological analyzes and biological treatment.
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I just arrived from an Oxford meeting and I have heard many misuses of the term "rewilding".
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I am writing a short paper suggesting that key phases in the life cycles of such species might be exploited to either reduce or increase their population sizes in systems with differing restoration goals. I am using carp (Cyprinus carpio spp.) as a case study, but interested in finding other examples.
UPDATE: SEE MY COLLATION OF ANSWERS AT THE END OF THIS THREAD
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Many restoration/revegetation/reafforestation projects have goals to improve biodiversity or ecosystem services from a degraded site.
Projects often use monocultures of non-native plants (usually trees) or monocultures of native plants (also tends to be trees). However, at considerable cost, some projects employ a diverse planting approach (a few to many species), trying to match the community that was present initially, with the idea that these diverse plantings give better biodiversity or ecosystem function outcomes.
Apart from the initial differences at planting, I'm interested to get people's thoughts on how good the evidence base is for diverse plantings giving better biodiversity and/or ecosystem function outcomes.
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Despite the variety of international treaties and national laws, and the efforts made by many governmental and non-governmental institutions, is still even more urgent to strengthen new strategies to halt the loss of marine biodiversity in the Mediterranean and encourage a closer cooperation between countries.
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Many methods and activities are used in conservation of forest owls, but what are best practice methods?
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A cost-benefit analysis is required to take one or more actions in order to select the best or most profitable option.
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I'm preparing a new 3rd year module on conservation ecology that I'd like to involve hitting some big theoretical issues and then tying them in to conservation biology. I want to make sure I don't miss any key area because of my own interests/biases.
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I am interested to study on impacts of climate change on butterflies in the Himalaya and to develop a model for future impact.
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Due to native biodiversity loss as a consequence of anthropogenic factors (e.g. land use changes, invasive species, contamination, overexploitation, emergent diseases, climate change, between others)?