Science topic

Ayurveda - Science topic

Ayurveda is a health care system of traditional medicine native to India and a form of alternative medicine. The earliest literature on Indian medical practice appeared during the Vedic period in India, i.e., in the mid-second millennium BC. The Suśruta Saṃhitā and the Charaka Saṃhitā, encyclopedias of medicine are among the foundational works of Ayurveda. Over the following centuries, ayurvedic practitioners developed a number of medicinal preparations and surgical procedures for the treatment of various ailments. At an early period, Ayurveda adopted the physics of the "five elements"; Pṛthvī (earth), Jala (water), Agni (fire), Vāyu (air) and Ākāśa (Sky) — that compose the universe, including the human body. The Chyle or plasma (rasa dhātu), blood (rakta dhātu), flesh (māṃsa dhātu), fat (medha dhātu), bone (asthi dhātu), marrow (majja dhātu), and semen or female reproductive tissue (śukra dhātu) are held to be the seven primary constituent elements – saptadhātu of the body. Ayurveda stresses a balance of three elemental energies or humors (tridoshas): Vāyu vāta (air & space – "wind"), pitta (fire & water – "bile") and kapha (water & earth – "phlegm"). According to some sources Up to 80% of people in India used to use some form of traditional medicines, a category which includes Ayurveda.
Questions related to Ayurveda
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
7 answers
Blockage of arteries is a common problem during theses days, which may lead to myocardial infraction or heart attack. Once the plaque is formed, it cant be removed. The problem can be overcome either through bye-pass surgery of heart or by putting a stent at blocked portion of the arteries. So my request is to know that is there any chemical individually or in combination in Allopathy / Ayurveda that can reverse the plaque formation.
Relevant answer
Answer
Thanks, dear Mahesh Golla for your kind suggestion.
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
2 answers
Jufa is a European native plant and being used in Ayurveda and Unani system of medicine since long. It's one of the ingredients of Gojivhadi kashyam and Jufex of Aimil Pharma.
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
10 answers
As per Ayurveda, honey should not be consumed with substances which have Ushna Virya (warm potency substances)
Relevant answer
Answer
Honey or Madhu should not be taken with warm items or not to be processed. Only one condition i.e. as Shodhana dravya as Oushadha it is given in lukewarm. Vamana Oushadha Kalpana.
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
3 answers
Ayurveda, TM of India, advises to avoid Curd intake in diseases that have Kapha dosha predominance like Diabetes, Respiratory problems; in diseases arising out of Raktha dusti (Blood tissue vitiation) like Skin diseases and also in conditions where the digestive fire (Agni) is weak like during Night time. Regarding this Curd advisory, Ayurveda has very clear fundamental concepts and the findings of which have also been noticed in clinical practice as well.
Here I want to know are there any other Traditional system of medicine which has similar or any other observation about Curd intake?
Relevant answer
Answer
Sir! in the ayurvedic text a wide description is available related to curd. use of curd in relation to seasons when to eat or when not to eat. it is also described when to eat on daily basis, with the mixing of other substances. these all are for healthy individuals.
in some cases it is contraindicated because of its property.,
I don't think such a huge description will be available in other traditional medicines.
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
12 answers
It would be great if we get information regarding this from all around the world. Like we have Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) in Ayurveda, Indian system of Medicine.
Relevant answer
Answer
Interesting discussion to follow
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
3 answers
Vasti is panchakarma procedure in Ayurveda
Relevant answer
Answer
Asthapana and Anuvasana types of Basti (enema) for the cure of Vatika Vikara because immediately after entering the colon, they strike at the very root of the vitiated Vata and when it is overcome in the colon, even the entire vitiated
Vata dwelling in other parts of the body automatically alleviated.
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
3 answers
Ministry of AYUSH, Government of India is performing an adorable task in combat with COVID. But there is a section which opines that it may strengthen if Rasaoushadhies are also part of the protocol .
Relevant answer
Answer
Greetings sir , Anand Chaudhary
its a very relevant question in the current scenario, when the country is drowning through this pandemic wave .... myself an early stage traditional medicine researcher, Indian traditional medicine is very rich in terms of immunity-boosting power and create a shield against this virus but we have to take care of this things also...
When a formulation improves the overall immunity then it is effective against viruses. Riders include healthy blood cell count (Erythrocyte, Leucocyte & Platelets), Hb (good Hb levels infer good oxygenation blood capacity), etc.
there are several herbs like giloy, mulethi, aswagandha, guduchi , amla ......
components like withaferin , EGCG , have proven their activity , we need more research on this regards and the main clinical study
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
3 answers
Oil massage to newborn in India is practiced since Centuries and especially mentioned in Ayurveda. Which provides tactile stimulation to newborns and infants, also improves blood supply and reduces stress, results in better sleep (one of the importance factor for normal secretion og HGH). One of the theory established in pathogenesis of SIDS is chronic low grade hypoxia. Countries like USA are having more incidence of SIDS, where such practices are minimal. Can we hypothesized that Oil massage plays important role in preventing SIDS.
Relevant answer
Answer
Why don't we conduct an experiment on neonatal rabbits for instance to prove/disprove that claim?
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
17 answers
Hindi Name : Kalmegh
Sanskrit Name : Bhunimbh
English Name : Kalmegh
Latin Name : Andrographis paniculata Pennel
Medicinal use of Andrographis paniculata (Kalmegh):
Andrographis paniculata (Kalmegh) has been used since centuries for the treatment of various diseases. It is a great benefit to the Unani, Ayurveda, Homeopathy and household treatment. The chemical components present in it are Andrographolite, neoandrographolite, and deoxyandrographlide. The derivatives of it are andrographiside, andropanoside, andrographin and panicolin.
Medicinal uses of Kalmegh are interesting to know!
Relevant answer
Answer
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
3 answers
While going through some publications on Polyherbal formulation for the management of diabetes, I encountered a publication where goat pancreas is used as one of the ingredients in addition to plants and calcified mussel cells. Can anyone tell me the relevance of goat pancreas and also how it can be called a polyherbal formulation?
Here is the link for the paper
Relevant answer
Answer
Formulations restrain 2 or more than 2 herbs are called polyherbal formulation. Drug formulation in Ayurveda is based on 2 principles: Use as a single drug and use of more than one drug. The last is known as polyherbal formulation. The idea of polyherbalism is peculiar to Ayurveda even though it is tricky to explain in term of modern parameters.
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
28 answers
During last 6 - 7 years publication of good Ayurveda research in high impact factor journals has become aim of researchers. How does this help in serving the society ? How can the knowledge of Ayurveda revived through new researches be used in patients especially in rural areas where the clinicians cannot access these journals / researches. Is Global acceptance of Ayurveda the last goal ?
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Dr Jasmine Ritesh Gujarathi , You have made a valid point.
My take on this.
1. The assumption behind publishing in high impact journal is that a) It follows a well established (blind) peer review system, (there by your research is vetted by your peers).
2. Researchers very often read/cite high impact journals (that is the reason these journal have high impact factor) - more reference/citation of your article affirms your article quality is high.
Drawbacks/ Shortcomings in this types of Preference
1. Local (issue) research is not get publishes. For example, A good research conducted in Southern India, but may not be generalized/applied in other places, - is not accepted for publication in such journals (their focus is global audience).
2. These journals take 1-3 years to publish an article.
3. Even if I get the article published, ( just like what you have correctly pointed out) this article information never reaches the local people (technology, language and other barriers).
Warm regards Yoganandan G
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
13 answers
What is the better option to improve immunity ? Medicine or diet ?
As per Ayurveda, Oja is the Bala (~immunity) which is originated by the Ahara which further nourishes Rasa, Rakta etc Dhatu and Finally it converted in Oja.
Relevant answer
Answer
One of the most important ways you can strengthen your longevity is by boosting your immune system. There is typically a direct correlation between declining immune vitality and declining lifespan. This is common sense since our immune system protects us from infections and helps us respond to various challenges to our healthy homeostasis.
The less efficient your immune system is, the more prone you are to inflammation as well. The good news is that the more you boost your immune system, the better you’re able to cope with the health challenges of daily life regardless of your age
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
15 answers
It's matter of big discussion that traditional medicine may play key role in management of Covid-19. Recently, in India, Ayurveda and Yoga has been included in National management protocol for asymptomatic n mild cases of Covid-19.
Relevant answer
Answer
Holistic management is a key concept in management of any ailment. Even WHO acknowledges the varied spectrum and dimensions of health. Aurvedic medicines have been accepted even by the Westerners and stood the test of times. In addition allopathy has borrowed much from traditional medicines. Yoga is also a great supplement to other therapies as it focusses on physical fitness as well as breathing exercises which further improve our respiratory system. Moreover allopathy has not provided yet any concrete evidence of management and are recommending only hit & trial therapies or symptomatic/supportive management. Therefore it's a great initiative to include such alternative system of therapies for the management so that we can enrich our arsenal for the fight against this pandemic.
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
4 answers
What is the exact human dose of ghrita and medicated ghrita? Is it 12 gm according to AFI or 48 gm according to classical text.
Relevant answer
Answer
Vinamra Sharma Sir, the paper just mentions 'The human dose of Ghrita as practiced traditionally is approximately 10 g per person', without reference. Is there a classical reference for this dose?
Apurva Priyadarshi Sir, can you help me find the classical reference for this? (In Abhyantar snehan karma it varies from 1 tola (12 gm) to even more than one Pala (70-80 gm).)
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
18 answers
How weather can be a factor in Corona virus spreading? As Africa is still safe from it.
Relevant answer
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
18 answers
Herbs are medicinal plants. they are used for the treatment of different diseases in traditional system of medicine. So if anyone knows the medicinal plants used to purify blood inside the body, then provide the list and methods of use.
Relevant answer
Answer
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
24 answers
It is said that kabasura kudineer a product of Indian traditional medicine siddha/ayurveda has some beneficial effects against covid 19 infection. I would like to know more about this.
Relevant answer
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
4 answers
Black HgS is used as a base material in Ayurveda Rasa medicines. I need to do a release study (dialysis method using PBS) for black HgS powder. Could you please explain me a method to quantify the HgS concentration in the aliquots?
Your explanations in this regard would be a great support to continue my research studies.
Thank you.
Relevant answer
Answer
@Ajay Kumar Meena,
Thank you very much. I'll go through it.
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
6 answers
As per ayurveda there is strong relationships between seasonal change and immunity but experts want evidence.....As per my knowledge previous viral diseases specially pandemic has rapid spread during seasonal change.
And detoxification of body may play important role to control and prevent .
Relevant answer
Answer
An important factor, often not recognized, is that at the end of the winter season (so February / March on the northern hemosphere) our immune status and ability to overcome viral diseases is at its nadir. This is associated to or caused by the annual nadir in vitamin D status ( 25OH vit D3 ) as shown in the next publications
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
3 answers
Simple search in Google Scholar shows that since 1960-70 many articles in peer-reviewed journals have supported various desirable effects of Transcendental Meditation (TM) but some people here and there claim that the research has always bee. Funded by certain organizations and people who benefit from advertising TM and the published evidences are not so reliable. Is that really true?
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
23 answers
I am looking to study the Ayurvedic formula Triphala, how can I purchase it from serious source in India or from Europe??
Relevant answer
Answer
You can buy from raw material supplier in India and can authanicate them through pharmacopoeial standards.
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
14 answers
The modern world is returning back to the nature! Organic/ Natural/ Unprocessed/ Wholemeal foods for good health, longevity - have become a craze now. But in case of treatment and prophylaxis - why do everyone opts for allopathic (the science based modern) medicine? Why not first the traditionals: Ayurveda/ Homeopathy/ Oriental/ Herbal/ Naturopathy/ Acupuncture/ Massage/ Yoga/ Dietary etc?
Aren't these scientific enough? Are they developing in appropriate pace with allopathy?
Why do modern clinicians still neglect/tease some of theses modes of therapies?
Why the new generation not getting solid confidence on these natural treatments?
Relevant answer
Answer
In rural and semi-urban India, traditional medicines are still the first option for treatment of diseases. People of all generations understand the importance of traditional medicines, that's why they are gradually shifting towards natural and plant based medicines as stated by Professor Amit Baran Sharangi Sir in his post.
Thanks!
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
4 answers
Ayurvedic drugs are largely criticized for their unproven safety. Number of case reports are available in the literature showing Ayurveda drug related adversities. These adversities are by and large found to be associated with heavy metals found in Ayurveda drugs. We however have also seen the contrary and found that Ayurveda drugs , despite their heavy metal content, proved to be beneficial in many clinical conditions without causing any adversity.
In this context , this seems highly relevant to establish safety of heavy metal containing Ayurveda drugs in human population which are routinely prescribed and consumed. What should have been the common parameters to evaluate and establish safety of such drugs prescribed in a set of clinical condition? Suggestions are welcome
Relevant answer
Answer
Unfortunatly we often see patients with severly high levels of mercury in the blood after taking self impoted ayurvedic medicine or given to them by travelling ayurvedics. Individuals also showed liver problems like non infectual hepatitis after taking ayurvedic herbs. More control is needed.
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
8 answers
Different clinical methods are being practiced for Diabetic foot care. Success ratio, recurrence and failure rates are different at their levels. This question is to discuss important points in light of both AYUSH and Modern Medical Science in benefit of science and community.
Relevant answer
Answer
Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) in China have spectacular results by treating diabetic foot. They were developed different herbal creams which are accepted by Chinese Food and Drug Administration and they are used in hospitals in China. The most terrible wounds can be treated by that medicines with great success. I saw it in Shanghai in Shuguang Hospital during my workshop at Shanghai TCM University.
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
6 answers
As per patent law
Relevant answer
Answer
Thanks Shantanu Shekhar Singh
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
3 answers
How many marker compounds must be analysed for Standardization of a single herbal Drug and for compound formulation ?
Relevant answer
Answer
If you want to analyze the drug for analytical purpuses, such as HPLC, UPLC, etc. (quality assurement) there are no rules for the number of analytes; however, it is recommended that they are chemically defined and, if posible, specific for the species, they can be either active or not.
If you want to standardize the extract for the activity, you should focus on the active compounds, usually from one to three compounds are preferred, since the methods are to be repeated several time, simplicity is desired. In that way, you could make mixtures of different samples to produce a standardized extract.
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
4 answers
Number of formulations of Unani and Ayurveda are prescribed in the books recommended by Drug & Cosmetic act. If we want to change the dosage forms by using same ingredients of formulation written in the above mentioned books then what may be the road map of development of this Drug.
Relevant answer
Answer
If the excipients and API composition is above the qualified/approved limit, yes.
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
3 answers
Can we judge two Different sciences with same principles? How scientific is that?
Relevant answer
Answer
Ayurveda approach of individualistic treatment is very scientific as disease condion is very much different in each individual and genetic profile of each individual is different. Further, contemprary science also have concept of pharmacogenetics, which is taken care by Ayurveda while treating any individual. RCTs also have limitation as they are performed in very controlled environment and conditions. Now,scientists are talk more about N of 1 trial. So Ayurveda can not be denied as a science, only Ayurvedic Research design has to be modified accordingly.
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
6 answers
Respected Ma'am
I recently read your paper entitled Quantum Logic in Ayurveda and was thrilled. I want to know about some topics that I can work on for my PhD.
Hoping your kind reply.
Yours sinecerly
Abhijeet Das
Relevant answer
Answer
Any topic, it is a matter of depth and originality, mostly. Be free to think.
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
73 answers
Ayurveda, the ancient Indian System of Medicine based on the philosophy of total health and wellness is a science of life with a holistic approach considering physical, psychological, philosophical, ethical, and spiritual aspects of healthcare. Ayurveda is a very logical science based on basic scientific principles. The ancient wisdom of Ayurveda is based on time-tested theories proven by observation, trial and error and experimentation. Like most traditional medicine systems, it was developed and refined over thousands of years, using observation and experience. Ayurvedic therapies have been practiced for thousands of years much before the development of placebo controlled experiments. The science of Ayurveda does not only depend upon the symptoms but believes in a thorough examination to discover the root cause of the ailment and instead of suppressing the symptoms, Ayurvedic therapy focuses on finding the reasons for the underlying symptoms. Despite lack of much clinical research on Ayurveda, many of the system’s principles and practices are now recognized and used in conventional medical settings. Herbs used in Ayurvedic medicine, such as tumeric, ginger, and neem, are now recognized as beneficial for heart health and as antioxidant-boosters. There are many evidences, which support Ayurveda performances better than Western medicine, mainly in case of chronic diseases. In retrospection of these facts, do Ayurvedic medicines need modern scientific scrutiny and validation?
Relevant answer
Answer
No, there is no need to test ayurvedic medicines scientifically as Ayurveda is a 5,000 year old science.
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
28 answers
What is the take of modern science on ancient sciences like Vedas, Puranas, Yoga, Ayurveda etc? Do they qualify as science? Why and Why not?
Has western colonisation of the world influenced the way which knowledge we qualify as science, even years after these countries gained independence?
Relevant answer
Answer
World Health Organisation has recognized ancient AYUSH system (and its parts- Ayurveda and Yoga) as science. World is celebrating International Yoga Day. It is funny to see scientific scholars of 21st sanctuary still questioning the scientific basis of Ayurveda and Yoga.
Ancient wisdom like Yoga, Ayurveda and the like are proven scientific sources of knowledge as they are based on time-tested theories proven by observation, trial and error and experimentation. Number of facts narrated in these ancient texts are scientifically proven/validated now-a-days. We have several published evidences in reputed Journals in this regard. Based on this traditional knowledge several scientific advancements are being made.
Though available tools/techniques/few school of thoughts are not compatible to understand and prove some of these ancient hypothesis/theories. Different school of thoughts should come and work together to fill this gap in knowledge and explore these ancient facts for future benefit of mankind.
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
4 answers
There is reference in Ayurveda classics that the administered medicated Enema can able reach whole body {it can able to reach Head to Toe}
So here i just want to know whether it passes BBB {Blood Brain Barrier} ?
Relevant answer
Answer
Mahesh M Parappagoudra : There are three areas where the BBB is "leaky", 1) the choroid plexus, 2) the area postrema and 3) the pituitary stalk and the pituitary gland, especially the anterior pituitary gland. However, for the medicinal contents of your ayurvedic enemas to reach these areas they first have to be absorbed by the colon itself, which by itself highly selective. hence the routine use of enemas, in medicine, to clean the colon without much concern for the absorption of the enema causing systemic effects. In medicine we do use many medications in the form of suppositories. But these have been tested through measuring the bioavailability of these drugs in the blood. there is an entire literature of pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics on each of these suppositories. thanks.
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
3 answers
Lots of Herbs are described in Ayurveda for Gastritis but it not provide quick results in Acid reflux or Hyperacidity like fennel, liquorice etc..
Relevant answer
Answer
ok, I got your question now...
I got good result with Mulethi churna but it was not that much quick as Rasa medicines were.
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
26 answers
All you know that by the efforts of Indian celebrities and the positive results of Yoga has made it a global phenomena. Similarly, do you think that Ayurveda has the potential to go global like Yoga.
Your views are solicited.
Thanks
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Dr. Mahesh Kumar,
The answer to your question in short is yes. Please have a look at this useful ResearchGate link.
Good luck!
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
12 answers
Is ancient dose suitable in current era
Relevant answer
Answer
Only validation required otherwise dosage form and dose both are well established with shelf life by various ancient scientists of Ayurveda
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
49 answers
Since anti-coagulants are used for the cardiac problems. So instead of relying on Aspirin or other blood thinners, can we shift to herbal medicine, which will be safer as compared to their chemical counterpart?
Relevant answer
Answer
Paravat skrit is the stool of dove..
In Ayurved it has been mentioned as a potent anticoagulant..
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
6 answers
Planning RCT for Ayurveda treatment with a control group of standard physiotherapy treatment in case of cervical spondylitis....
Relevant answer
Answer
Thanks dear Cherly Holler Miller for providing a very useful article..
Dear Rajib and Jafar, thanks a lot for your suggestions ...
Same thing is also with Ayurveda Treatment, both are individualized therapy, there are many variables in each case ... actually i was trying to do some stratification on which latter i can do a subgroup analysis....
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
3 answers
Maharishi Chyavann became an young man by consuming the Chyavanprass. But none of the brands sold in market have this efficacy.Two important factorsseem to be responsible for this;
1.Identity crisis of the ingredients
2. Incomplete knowledge about all the ingredients
Relevant answer
Answer
Logical questionncient about Chyavanprash, which is manufactured by the pharma industries claimed as a health tonic or immuno buster. But the contents of chyavanprash are varried from pharma. To pharma. However, none of them follow the classical norms, which is mentilned in Ayurvedic text Charaka samhita (Ch. S. Chi. 1-2/63-69). In this classical formulation total 47 ingredients are mentioned in which Amala as a principle ingredient along with 36 drugs used in the form of decoction + fine powdet 6 drugs as prakshep drugs + khanda + goghrira × tila taila + Mahdi. In due course of time pharma. Industries came in existence in between physician and patients and they are making chyvanaprash in their own way for the earn of money by altering the classical ingredients and added some new one. Although, which are not mentioned in the real texts of Ayurveda. The drug of Ashtavarga (Riddhi, jivaka, rishabhaka etc) are not available now a days and the drugs used in place of it are also not easily available. So, identity of ingredients of chyavanaprash and theirproper knowledge are required to justified the story behind it.
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
2 answers
I am looking for a team with similar set of values and goals as my. I wish to formulate effective natural/herbal solutions for personal care packaged in the form of products (day to day products) and services (like a herbal salon) for my upcoming venture. Looking for people who share the same passion to collaborate. Please reach out to me on simransoni.cbs@gmail.com
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Simran
Goood!!!
Check e mail from our company.
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
5 answers
Dear Sir or Madam I know that we can obtain these compounds with different solvents. However, i can not use this kind of extract in my product (food supplements or cosmetic). For food supplements maybe i can use sprey dryer but for cosmetics i should solve with same solvents. Please help me about this issue
Best regards
Relevant answer
Answer
I am unsure of what you are specifically asking- if they are not water soluble, they cannot be extracted by water... Unless you have very specific equipment (as I have learned, but have no experience with). However if you can use another solvent (Alcohol, Apple cider vinegar, Vegetable Glycerin) they'd become more available. Prepared as a Galenical (tincture) would be your best technique.
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
3 answers
I am seeking alternatives of above compounds for my research on herbal/ayurveda based formulation and its effectiveness against cosmetic alternative. Let me know.
Relevant answer
Glycyrrhiza glabra may be used for Hydrocortizone as per dosage forms extract, decoction or oil or deglycyrrhized extract may be used. For Ciclopirox and Ketoconazole may be used Acyranthus aspera,= apamarg kshar, Tankan bhasma = Borax compound, Panchavalkala=Five latex of five trees like Ficus etc.may search on google.
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
3 answers
My small observation reveals that some of the plants are similar to some plants available in India and their health care uses are in practices in formulation and products. By studying both we may find some more activities apart from described in ancient Ayurveda health care science.
Relevant answer
Answer
Very interesting. It will be surely worth considering. But please reveal the species of those plants...
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
4 answers
As per basic fundamentals of Ayurveda that in case of any deficiency like calcium we have an option to use calcium of sea origin i.e. Conch shell,cowrie etc.Can we able to find out the relation between both.(Calcium in human and calcium in Conch shell)   
Relevant answer
Calcium in human and animal originates calcium both are organic in nature
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
7 answers
The observations reveals that Vamana & Virechana Karma followed by Ayurvedic drugs is found beneficial in the patient of Psoriasis. Side by side, it also pacifies the other associated complaints of the patient. Thus, the therapeutic approach, which is used in this patient found to be very safe, cost effective and improve the overall health status of the patient. This observation is not finally conclusive but it is a lead for further study. In this regard provide us with a larger population based data on above study and give your views on the same.
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear all,
In our clinical practice, after proper bio-purification regimens, we found promising results of Bhasma based prescriptions, e.g. Mall Sindura, Hartala etc along with suitable herbal adjuvants in Psoriasis. Nevertheless, appropriate diet & life style must be followed by patient, else recurrence is often the common failure found in therapy.
The below mentioned report on Researches conducted at Gujarat Ayurved University, Jamnagar may add some knowledge in regard to its Ayurvedic management (achievements or failures of trials).
Regards
Dr Rohit
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
7 answers
Anyone who has validated Prakriti Questionnaire?
Relevant answer
Answer
Though the query raised by respected mam few years back. Many of researchers now might have gained access to various prakriti assessment tools and questionnaires.
My post is for those who still need some information:
A standardized validated questionnaire was used in a published report (Bhalerao et al.:Prakriti (Ayurvedic concept of constitution) and variations in platelet aggregation. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine 2012:12:248.).
To download the questionnaire:
Step 2: Click on 'Additional file 1: TNMC Prakriti 2004' and the word file of questionnaire can be obtained.
Dear Ayurveda stakeholders, knowledge on recent developments in this regard are welcome to discuss on this RG platform. Kindly share updated information, if any. Thank you.
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
33 answers
I am starting my M.Pharm project work for dissertation and am looking for native Indian herbal plants with potential anti-tumor activity.
Relevant answer
Answer
I agree with Ashok Wali as this coniferous botanical has been well studied to treat various breast, lung, and ovarian cancer, as well as Kaposi's sarcoma....Dabur recently perfected methods to extract taxol and has been selling its Taxus based products in chemotherapy...even billions turnover are having companies with Taxol. However wide area of research is left untouched yet and clinical trials to test it against other types of cancer and in combination with other therapies is needed..
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
6 answers
Sandhana kalpana has been mentioned in Ayurveda since centuries.Types of fermentation like acidic fermentation has also been mentioned.The period required for different formulations os different even though the initiator for fermentation(Woodfordia fructicosa) used is the same.
Relevant answer
Answer
We use Dhaatki flowers or yeast for fermentation in Asava/Arishta. For better bio-fermentation and quality desirable product, yeast should be avoided and natural methods of fermentation viz. Dhaatki or Kinv should be adopted.
Fermentation is incomplete oxidation of sugar into Ethanol and Co2 in the absence of oxygen, brought about by enzymes - 'Invertase and Zymase' secreted by yeast cells.
Process undergo 2 steps:
STEP 1
Sugar/Jaggery + Water ---------> Invertase acts upon it ---------> Glucose + Fructose
STEP 2
Fructose ---------> Zymase acts upon it ---------> Ethanol + Co2
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
3 answers
There are different types of agni mentioned in Ayurveda for preparation of different medicines, Dhoomagni is specifically mentioned for arka kalpana.What temperature can be considered for dhoomagni?
Relevant answer
Answer
Ya definitely you are right Jyoti. When it comes to Mandagni we consider up to 120-250°C, this is specifically in the context of kupipakwa rasayana. As there is no specific standardization available for Dhoomagni you can consider this by keeping your objective of Arka(Distillation ) in minnd
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
9 answers
When we recommend patients for HbA1C test, is it not necessary to convince them not to go for fasting and postprandial blood sugar level. It may reduce circumstances and routine hectic tension of patients. we can also council patients that HbA1C is enough to see improvement in their glucose profile.
Relevant answer
Answer
For type 1 diabetes, daily (multiple) measurement(s) of blood glucose levels is a necessity.
For type 2 diabetics, it is very useful for patients to have a good idea as to how their changes in life-style are helping them, hopefully it serves them well and keeps them motivated. In the absence of a routine test, complacency often works in the negative direction... just a matter of human nature. There are, of course, exceptions, but they tend to be less prevalent.
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
8 answers
Dear Experts, gau piyush is commonly available in the name of Cow Colostrum. it selling under Ayurvedic product. did any Ayurveda class texts described this? any other name?
Relevant answer
Answer
Please check this PDF attachment also.
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
14 answers
It has a high recurrence rate. Are there any medications to shrink or dissolve to prevent recurrence of mucus polyp?
Relevant answer
Answer
 Thank you Dr Vasant and Dr Jyoti
Even kasisadi tail nasya is described in treatment. It may shrink the size. 
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
5 answers
Nocturia and Thin urine flow trouble many adult males above 60 .TURS surgery is the gold standard now especially with Holmium lasers we know.Corn Hairs silks to ''Galo and Gokroo- Satholi'' in Indian ayurveda to Saww palmetto are known in varied cultures as "Cure'' relief for nocturia and poor urine flow in adult males.Do you know any thing else helps if we put patient on Tab Tamsulosin 0.4 ugms hs too?
Relevant answer
Answer
Hello Hemant
This is an interesting question. I don't know if there is anything new to you in these papers:
Shrivastava, A., & Gupta, V. B. (2012). Various treatment options for benign prostatic hyperplasia: a current update. Journal of mid-life health, 3(1), 10.
McVary, K. T., Roehrborn, C. G., Avins, A. L., Barry, M. J., Bruskewitz, R. C., Donnell, R. F., ... & Ulchaker, J. C. (2011). Update on AUA guideline on the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia. The Journal of urology, 185(5), 1793-1803.
This is the full text:
This is the RG link:
Zegarra, L., Vaisberg, A., Loza, C., Aguirre, R. L., Campos, M., Fernandez, I., ... & Villegas, L. (2007). Double-blind randomized placebo-controlled study of Bixa orellana in patients with lower urinary tract symptoms associated to benign prostatic hyperplasia. International braz j urol, 33(4), 493-501.
Very best wishes,
Mary
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
3 answers
I am planning to make a research on the history  of instruments, utensils and materials of ayurvedic therapies, e.g. swedana, shirodhara, udvartana, abhyanga, etc. This project has the following goals:
1.- Compare the instruments and utensils used in ayurvedic therapies from ancient times in India to those one used nowadays. For example, when ayurvedic therapies were described in old ayurvedic texts there were no plastic objects, electricity, ... Perhaps today the use of artificial materials is damaging the results of these therapies.
2. - Analyse the possible consequences of those changes mentioned in point 1.
3.- Study the exact recommendations about the use of certain materials and instruments given in the most relevant ayurvedic texts, i.e. Charaka Samhita, Sushruta Samhita and Ashtanga Hrdaya. Contrast this information with the ayurvedic practice from ancient times to the present.
4.- Determine the materials the different ayurvedic utensils and instruments are made of and analyse how their quality depends, for example, on the social position of the patient, etc.
Thank you
Relevant answer
Answer
There is a article in Sri Lanka, but it is in Sinhala language. Will try to translate and send a summery of it
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
4 answers
I want to carry out a research on the material history of Ayurveda. In this sense we would like to study the instruments, utensils and materials used for ayurvedic therapies, including surgery, as well as those involved in the preparation of ayurvedic medicines (Rasashastra). Due to the vast information covered by these aspects, we can distinguish three sections in this research:
1. Material history of ayurvedic therapies (e.g. swedana, abhyanga, udvartana, kizhis, pizhicil, etc.)
2. Material history of ayurvedic surgery.
3. Material history of the preparation of ayurvedic medicines (Rasashastra).
Thank you
Relevant answer
Answer
Arkaprakāśa composed by Rāvaṇa gives a description of the vessel to be used for preparing arka. The one I studied was translated by S.R. Vaisya and published by Sri Venkitesvar Steam Press, Bombay. It may be available with Chaukhamba Orientalia or Motilal Banarssidas.
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
5 answers
Selection of natural substances and to use these substances to maintain the equilibrium state among the bodily constituents is the prime object of treatment of the traditional system of medicine like Ayurveda.  
Relevant answer
Answer
Ayurveda medicine is holistic or comprehensive of body, mind ans spirit; the conventional one is symptomatic rather than treating root cause. Ayurveda believes that body is "Dosh=Functional humors, Dhatu=Body tissues and Mala=Excretory matter"  -"Doshdhatumalamulamhishariram".
Ayurveda medicine either herbal or mineral or herbo-metalic are the aggregation of many molecules acting on different targets in synergistic way. No doubts the action is slow takes much time, hence it is better and potent in chronic and life style related diseases. The Ayurveda medicine is safe and nature friendly.
More emphasis is given on prevention of diseases, during treatment also dietetic and activity=Karmabhyas is advised along with medical preparations.
The number of single, compound, marine, mineral, herbal, metalic drugs are more than one lac.  
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
34 answers
Polyherbal combinations in Ayurveda.
Relevant answer
Answer
Polyherbal formulation has its own advantage to have upper hand in treatment.  Actualy if we see polyhebal in broader sense, it do management of disease apart from treatment. If we see ayurvedic formulation closly and criticaly, we will find special combination of constituent in formulation and prepared by seeing patient and disease to treat disease along with management of complecations or to prevent forther growth of complication due to that disease. Also polyherbal formulation do not cause drug resistance and can be used for long time. Polyherbal formulation have one very important advantage of having its tannins, polyphenols  etc that act as antioxident and free radcal scavenger that remove harmfull metabolite and toxins from the body giving increase immunity too. 
Other reason may be that synergistic effect of constituents over other viz piper sp. used in formulation act as bioenhancer along with boost activity of other constituent. Likewise several constituent in polyherbal formulation act as to treat disease, to add synergistic effect, to subside drug resistance, to improve pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of major constituents, as excipients etc. 
That is why, seeing the value of polyherbal formulation GoI has drafted Gazette on Phytopharmaceutical to control and boost its market on data based evidence for herbal sector.
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
5 answers
For example, Why does the curd turn blue if the Tamra bhasma is toxic and how do we know that turning blue indicates toxicity?
Relevant answer
Answer
Curd test is one of the classical test mentioned to check the quality of bhasma specially copper containing. Most of the copper bhasma and other minerals having copper bhasma are in the form of CuO and CuS in final product. It is a test to check free copper metal, because when free copper reacts with lactic acid (one of the component of curd) copper salts are formed which gives blue colour and it is toxic in nature and produces nausea, vomitting beacuse of free copper ions, then again we have to go for further incineration process to pass curd test and get genuine quality of copper compound bhasma. 
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
5 answers
Ayurveda has concept of Rasa, Vipaka, & Virya which may be correlated with Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. And here I want to know how can we correlate the AVASTHHA -PAK, NISTHAA-PAK (A stages of Ayurvedic pharmacokinetics) with phases of metabolism.
Phase -I & II are the stages of metabolism in which body try to make the xenobiotic more polar so that it can get eliminated as soon as possible. Since the product of these phases of metabolism may also acts a active pharmaceutical moiety (e.g. in case of prodrug).
Relevant answer
Answer
I don't know much about the ayurvedic AVASTHHA -PAK and NISTHAA-PAK as much in detail but to my limited knowledge Avastha-pak is some thing like a passage of drugs or eatables after eating, churning from mouth to large intestine during which absorption takes place... this is not Phase I metabolism as Phases of metabolism starts in liver only and avastha-pak has nothing to do with liver... now coming to nishtha-pak which seems final metabolism of the absorbed juices after which the drug action or nutrition starts... This seems to me like the real metabolic phases in liver classified under single name nishtha-pak. Correct me if am wrong. !!!!
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
6 answers
Since ayurveda explains the concept of "Aasthapak and Nishtapak" about oral transformation of drug, so the question arises for Ayurvedic views about pharmacokinetics for non oral routes.
Relevant answer
Answer
As far as i have understood, i can say that ADME is a concept learn't to understand the drug and its metabolites movement through out the body compartments (blood, liver, kidney, protein-bound, etc) and this concept being a universal concept for all the categories of drugs let it be allopathy, ayurvedic or homeopathic remains same.  This means, ADME can be determined for any category of drug similar to any allopathic drug provided the measurement tools say LC-MS, NMR-MS, LC-NMR-MS, etc are precisely accurate even in NM or sub-NM concentration to measure the least amount of drug or metabolite in any compartment. The ADME is so universal that not only drugs, even food material can be evaluated for their metabolites. Hope my answer satisfy your doubts.
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
6 answers
Hello everyone, 
I'm planning to conduct a systematic review with meta analysis of Effect of Ayurvedic medicine in Hypertension. There is already a shortage of RCTs  in Ayurveda. I'd highly appreciate if anyone can suggest me some RCTs done in the field of Ayurvedic medicine.Thanks!
Relevant answer
Answer
Above answer are best supporting to your answer. You may search in ayurvedic journal AYU, JAIM, ASL, IJGP, IJAM etc. And best if you want then just contact scholar of BHU, GAU and Ayurvedic universities to look into MD and Ph. D thesises. 
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
3 answers
Ayurveda has many polyherbal formulations used for certain diseases.The single herbal drug action can be judged based on its composition and active principles.But in a combination of these drugs it becomes difficult to judge the biological activity of the drugs.
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Jyoti
Although I was follower of this question. I review the link  sent by Ashok Nahata and discussion on it. As  we know plant is cosmos of chemicals and even till date we are not sure how many chemicals remain undiscovered in particular medicinal plant, how can we put particular palnt for pharmaccokinetics? Turmeric and Neem are thoroughly investigated. There are evidence that curcumin negative fraction also have activity as well as Azadirachtin negative fraction also have antimicrobial activity. I think Ayurvedic Principles are more subtle and simply can not explain on the basis of present chemistry.
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
4 answers
During preparation of oils in Ayurveda,the lipid soluble and water soluble compounds present in the herbs get displaced into the oil.This medicated oil now contains active principles from many herbs which are used for preparation.It becomes difficult to identify a marker compound for it.
Relevant answer
Answer
Oleoginous medicaments (Sneha kalpana) have wider range of therapeutics because of different types of herbs and liquid medias are used during their pharmaceutical process. Regarding detection of marker in medicated oil, it was challenge because of the presence of different phytoconstituents. May be attached articles show you right path.
Thanks
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
7 answers
How could one evaluate the haematinic activity of Lauha Bhasma using in vitro techniques?
Relevant answer
Answer
I think instead if using any kind of animal models we see the effects in patients with anaemia and comparing it with the standard treatment of Ferrous/ferric salts.
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
3 answers
The active ingredients may or may not be synthetic in nature.
Relevant answer
Answer
COMPARATIVE TLC IN HERBAL MEDICINE AND AAS IN HERBO MINERAL PREPARATION
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
5 answers
  • Please give your opinions after considering the following points. [look at the PDF file bellow]
  • Controversy:
  1. In most of ayurvedic literatures which have been translated in modern times (after 1600 AD) “Tiniśa” has been recognized with Ougeinia oojeinensis (Roxb.) or O. dalbergioides (Benth.), belonging to family Leguminoseae by various reputed authors. In Ayurvedic fraternity Tiniśa even does not come under controversial drugs due to its strong authorized identity as mentioned before.
  2. But a thin yarn of controversy was emerged when an author, Balakrishna Gowda recognized Melastoma malabathricum L. as “Thimisah” in his book ‘Vanaspati Kosha’ [1] and again this controversy gained some blaze of wind when NMPB (National Medicinal Plant Board) of India in its website [2] mentioned “Tinisah” as the Sanskrit name of Melastoma malabathricum L. under the section of Folklore plants. The irony is that NMPB has also mentiond Ougeinia oojeinensis as the biological source of Tiniśa under the section of Ayurvedic plants.
  • Logical discussion:
  1. CSIR in ‘The Wealth of India’ [3] had recognized Ougeinia oojeinensis (Roxb.) as synonym of O. dalbergioides (Benth.) and considered it as a biological source of ‘Tinsa’ along with its trade name ‘Sandan’ which are the vernacular name of Tiniśa.
  2. Shri Bapālāl Vaidya in ‘Nighantu Ādarsa’ [4] recognized Ougeinia oojeinensis as synonym of O. dalbergioides (Benth.) and considered as the biological source of ‘Tinisa’. He even clarified & discussed about the various synonyms of the same plant as follows.
  • Tinisa: Because of its long life it can pass many nights (Nishi) or it is blackish.
  • Rathdru: Its wood is useful in making of chariot.
  • Chitrakut: Even though this tree is not very large in size but because of its steady  and long living nature it amazes all.
  1. All these Sanskrit synonyms fit perfectly to O. dalbergioides (Benth.). But M. malabathricum L. does not fit into the scaffold of these Sanskrit synonyms.
  2. First of all, habit of Melastoma malabathricum L. is shrub or under shrub (4-5 ft. in height) and its stem does not develop a rigid form of wood. So there is no question of its use in making of chariot.
  3. It’s true that being a shrub size of M. malabathricum L. plant is small. But it is neither very firm (strong) on its stem (or on soil) nor it enjoys the life for a prolong period of times.
  4. Fresh plants (stem/ leaf) of M. malabathricum L. do not seemed to be blackish in its natural habitat. But stem of O. dalbergioides (Benth.) evidently appears to be blackish in its natural habitat.
  • Ougeinia oojeinensis (Roxb.) or O. dalbergioides (Benth.) had also been considered as authentic source of Tiniśa in number of other ayurvedic literatures such as
  1. Bhāvprakāsh Nighantu of Sri Bhāvmisra [5] by Prof. KC Chunekar;
  2. Kaiyadeva Nighantu [6] by Prof. Priyavrata Sharma & Guruprasād Sharma;
  3. Rāja Nighantu of Pandit Narahari [7] by Dr. Indradev Tripathi;
  4. Dravyaguna Vijńāna [8] by Prof. PV Sharma;
  5. Indian Materia Medica [9] by Dr. KM Nadkarni;
  6. Dravyaguna Vijńāna [10] by Gyanendra Pandey;
  • References:
  1. Gowda Balakrishna. Vanaspathi Kosha. 1st ed. Kalpatharu Research Academy; Sringeri: 2004. p. 121.
  2. www.nmpb.nic.in ª Indian Medicinal Plants ª Search in Folk.
  3. Anonymous. The Wealth of India. Vol. 7. Council of Scientific & Industrial Research; New Delhi: 2001, p. 195-196.
  4. Bapālāl Vaidya. Nighantu Ādarsa. Vol. 1. Choukhambha Bharati Academy; Varanasi: 2007, p. 389.
  5. Chunekar KC. Bhāvprakāsh Nighantu of Sri Bhāvmisra. Chaukhambha Bharati Academy; Varanasi: 2013. p. 536.
  6. Sharma Priyavrata, Sharma Guruprasad. Kaiyadeva Nighantu. 1st ed. Chaukhambha Orientalia; Varanasi: 1979. p. 152.
  7. Tripathi Indradev. Rāja Nighantu of Pandit Narahari. Chowkhamba Krishnadas Academy; Varanasi: 2003.
  8. Sharma PV. Dravyaguna Vijńāna. Vol. 4. Chaukhambha Bharati Academy; Varanasi: 2003. p. 191.
  9. Nadkarni KM. Indian Materia Medica. Vol. 1. Popular Prakashan Private Limited; Mumbai: 2009. p. 561.
  10. Pandey Gyanendra. Dravyaguna Vijńāna. Vol. 3. Chowkhamba Krishnadas Academy; Varanasi: 2004. p. 646.
  • Tiniśa:
  • Botanical name : Ougeinia oojeinensis (Roxb.) Hochn.
  • Family : Leguminoseae-Fabaceae
  • Classical name : Tiniśa
  • Sanskrit names: Syandana, Nemi, Cakrasamvarana, Asmagarbhaka, Tiniśa, Rathadru, Vanjula, Rathavrksa.
  • Regional names: Sandan, Chhanan (Hindi); Tinish (Beng.); Tinas(Mar.); Syandan (Maha.); Tanachh (Guj.); Tella motuku(Tel.); Narivengai(Tam.); Malavinna (Mal.); Kurimutal(Kann.) ; Anjan (Uriya).
  • Description: Medium-sized deciduous trees; bark thin, grey or pale brown, blaze streaked with red. Leaves pinnately 3-foliolate, stipulate petioles 5-15 cm. long; leaflets broadly elliptic-obovate, acute 6-5 Î 3-9 cm; glaucous above, finely pubescent below, entire or obscurely crenate. Flowers in axillary racemes, fascicled at the nodes of old wood; bracts scale-like. Calyx 3-4 mm., tube campanulate; teeth small, 2 upper teeth connate, lower ones longer than laterals. Corolla white or pink, exerted 8-13 mm. long, standard orbicular wings spurred and slightly connate to the obtuse keal. Stamens 9-1, diadelphous. Pods linear-oblong, flat 5-10 cm. long, 2-5 jointed; seeds reniform.
  • Flowering and fruiting time: Plant flowers in February- April and fruits in April- June. Generally flowering is during spring season and fruiting season is summers.
  • Distribution: Plant occurs in mixed forests in various provinces; Uttar Pradesh, Central India (Madhya pradesh).
  • Chemical composition: The bark contains tannin 7%. A kino-like exudation from the incised bark is obtained. The heartwood contains a dimethoxy-7-methoxy-6-methyl isoflavanone. Heartwood contains homeferreirin and oujenin.
  • Pharmacodynamics:
  1. Rasa          : Kasaya
  2. Guna          : Laghu, rurksa
  3. Virya          : Sita
  4. Vipāka       : Katu
  • Dosakarma: Kaphapittasamaka.
  • Properties and action:
  • Karma       : Mutrasangrahaniya
                                  Sothahara, kusthaghna, medohara
                                  Vranaropana
                                  Rasayana
                                  Stambhana
                                  Sonitasthapana
                                  DahapraSamana
                                 Jvaraghna.
  • Roga        : Prameha
                                 Sotha-kustha-Svitra-vrana
                                 Atisara-pravihika-raktatisara
                                 Raktavikara-raktapitta
                                 Dourbalya.
  •  Therapeutic uses:
  1. The drug Tinisa is mutrasangrahaniya (antidiuretic) and useful (bark and heart-wood) in prameha (group of urinary anomalies).
  2. It is useful in diarrhoea, dysentery, blood diseases, intrinsic haemorrhage, kustha, debility, inflammation, ulcers, fever, burning sensation and ailments caused by aggravation of kapha and pitta dosa. It also belongs to rasayana drugs.
  3. Externally the drug is applied as paste over ulcers, inflammation, leucoderma and kustha.
  4. The drug is used in anaemia (pandu), worms (krimi) and obesity (meda). The bark is used as a febrifuge and also as fish poison. The kino-like exudation from the incised bark is used in diarrhoea and dysentery.
  5. Tinisa (sandan) wood leaves and bark are also economically useful (including timber, cordage and cattle fodder, implements etc.).
  •  Parts used: Heartwood, bark.
  • Dose: Decoction 50-100 ml.
  • Group(gana): Sālasārādigana (Suśruta Samhita).
  •  References:
  1. Susruta Samhita: uttar, 40/119 [ raktātisar]
  2. Carak Samhita: cikitsā, 7/95; 7/98 [ kustha]
  3. Carak Samhita: cikitsa, 1-2/12
  4. Nighantu Sesh: Vrikskanda.
  5. Bhāvaprakāsh Nighantu: Vatadi varga, 76.
  6. Kaiyādeva Nighantu: Ousadhi varga, 815-817.
  7. Rāja Nighantu: Prabhadrādi varga, 114- 115
Relevant answer
Answer
  • @ Neeraj Sethiya
  • Dear sir, I should start this post by stating that I have gone through your review article on ‘Shankhpushpi’ to enable myself to put my view in the context of your last post. I thank you for your consecutive attention & engagement in this particular topic. In your column you overwhelmingly emphasized the necessity of modern techniques [such as UV, TLC, HPTLC, HPLC etc. given by WHO] which are needed to be incorporated & that in turn according to you can resolve the controversy over Ayurvedic source plants.
  • With this introduction I express my regret for not being able to agree with your above comprehension. I should now explain why that is so.
  • Let me start with an example that will simplify the whole scenario for its better understanding. Mr. X was an eminent merchant who lived in a modern & civilized urban town. During a time of emergency Mr. X had to shift from his home town to an isolated island [where modern civilization had not touched it yet]. He was allowed to carry with very little amount of necessaries. He thought, even if he takes 10 kg of food, it will exhaust soon. So he took 20 gold coins in his pocket for his expenditure. But when he reached the island he did not find a single trader with whom he could exchange those gold coins for some foods. He started lamenting & cursed his own fate. While doing so he forgot to realize that island was full of green trees bearing plenty of delicious fruits. In due time he realized it & felt happy when he got some fruits. Then he pick up those gold coins on his palm & smiled [because, even though those were gold coins but in that circumstances those coins were worthless].
  • I should now enter into logical discussion. From here we should proceed with stepwise manner. First of all we need to set up an aim. Because it will lead us to logical conclusion. So let our aim to be – “To propose a suitable candidate to be designated as [any ayurvedic name, say Tinisa] among the 4 different botanical source plants.”
  • Now to proceed further we need to deal with comprehensive information about all four drugs along with a collective data set on 'Tinisa' [or any Ayurvedic drug which comes under controversy] in the context of our aim. Then obviously we will compare those data to come to a logical conclusion.  To do this, first we have to categorise our data sets into their relative groups. Let us assume that we have 3 categories of data sets. CAT-I, CAT-II & CAT-III. Among these three categories CAT-III represents Pharmacological data, CAT-II represents Q.C [quality control protocols, say analytical, physicochemical etc.] & CAT-I represents Botanical descriptions & study of etymological derivation of Sanskrit synonyms.
  • As I have mentioned before, to have a logical conclusion we need to have a comparative data set. Now let us see what we have with us & what we are lacking of. Here I am taking Sankhpushpi for an eg.
  • CDS [Comparative Data Sets]:
  • 1. CAT-III:
  • Sankhpushpi: Karma,  Roga & Cikitsa [Pharmacological action, disease & treatment] are well documented in every ancient Text [say Caraka Samhita] 
  • 4 botanical source plants: Pharmacological action, disease & treatment can be evaluated & documented for all four Botanical source plants
  • Productive/ Non- productive to resolve the controversy: Productive data
  • 2. CAT-II:
  • Sankhpushpi: All those modern technique such as TLC, HPTLC, NMR, MASS spectroscopy to name a few, cannot be found in Caraka Samhita or in other ancient texts. Because in that period those technique were not available
  • 4 botanical source plants: All these modern technique such as TLC, HPTLC, NMR, MASS spectroscopy etc. can be incorporated in the research study to generate a set of comprehensive analytical, phytochemical, Physicochemical  data [I only named a few of them].
  • Note: These data sets are similar to golden coins of our Merchant in the story.
  • Productive/ Non- productive to resolve the controversy: Non-productive data. Because one set of data is completely missing. But that does not mean that we do not need such kind of data. These data are elemental in standardisation aspects of any drug subject.
  • There are some exceptional cases for eg. in case of Bhasmas there are some Q.C. protocol like Varitara, Rekhapurnata etc. which were mentioned in ancient text. I will deal it later.
  • 3. CAT-I:
  • Sankhpushpi: Sanskrit synonyms, often depicting Botanical description can be found in almost every ancient text. Etymological derivation of Sanskrit synonym with proper explanation can be obtained from reliable sources to understand & describe those plants in more detail. This is evident in almost all ancient text where many plant drugs were classified under the headings of nature of habit, habitat, flower, fruits of a particular plant. Sometimes plants were classified under a particular disease and sometimes plants were classified under the heading of a prototype drug for an eg. Guruchadi varga.  
  • 4 botanical source plants: Morphological, macroscopical, microscopical & all other Pharmacognostical characters of all 4 botanical source plant can be generated to compare with data obtained from  similar category of Shankhpushpi.
  •  Note: One can raise a fragile argument here by indicating that Pharmacognostical study has been mentioned in WHO guidelines. I agree to some extent but it never opined or conceptualized in the perception of resolving controversial aspect of source plant. I must say they never emphasized on value of Sanskrit synonym in a true sense, at least in a similar way that I have done here.
  • Productive/ Non- productive to resolve the controversy:Very much productive and helpful in order to come to a logical conclusion.
  • As I have said earlier that I have gone through your Shankhpushpi article. But in your discussion or conclusion I have not found you to propose a particular source plant that is most suitable to be designated as ShANKHPUSHPI. The reason behind it I suppose, I have explained properly. Please don’t take my comment in a wrong way. My only intention was to have a logical point of view when we are solving controversial aspects of Ayurvedic drugs. I hope you understand me & will excuse me because I am not a good writer; to top that I was poor in my Literature during my schooling days. In contrast to this, I request you to take a look at the discussion & conclusion parts of my article ‘A COMPARATIVE PHARMACOGNOSTICAL & PHYTOCHEMICAL STUDY ON DIFFERENT PLANT SOURCES OF PARPATAK’; where I was able to come to a concise conclusion by following the same principles. [Please look at the attachment file]
  • Though I had conceptualized these principles long back but I did not share it with a knowledgeable person like you until now. So if you find any inconsistency in my above said concept, you are very much welcome to correct me.
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
1 answer
These are the prakritis- brahma, ṛṣi, indra, yama, varuṇa, kubera, gandharva
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Suri, based on my experience of Ayurvedic psychology, I have made the following observations that relate to your question. 
Sattva prakruti is prediminant in those who can sustain choiceless awareness or pragya and discern subjective and objective aspects of reality through pragyana. Pragyaparadha, the mistaken sense of reality that is accompanied by psychophysical actions - fear-control, sadness-anger and rejection-disassociation - produce vikruti through predominance of rajas and tamas.
The difference between the different sattvik states relates to one's natural or inborn inclinations. For instance a leader would have an indra prakruti, while a teacher would have a varuna prakruti, and one who has a calm presence, will have a brahma prakruti. 
Reference: 
Monsanto, C. Lakshmanan, S. (2015). Awareness and Discernment lead to Homeostatic Integration., published in Ayurvedic - Vedic Journals
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
11 answers
In Ayurveda s , many plant are used as folk medicine and different cosmetic use. But how can we judge the particular compound is behind the cure of particular disease or special application. Can we isolate and characterize directly that  compound? Suggest me the standard procedure to identify and get the useful compound only.
Relevant answer
Answer
This is a very important question, and research is still ongoing in identifying the compounds that are crucial to the beneficial effects of a plant. As mentioned in the discussion, the accurate methods to identify these compounds are long processes, relying on targeted isolation of the metabolites in the tissue of the plant and testing them individually. This has been demonstrated to work and indeed many medicinal molecules have been identified this way. However, I would argue that Ayurvedic medicine emphasizes balance of the doshas, and that focusing on the single compound that is most important to the beneficial effect of a plant or tincture may not provide the same benefit when taken alone, as when prepared with the other compounds present in the plant with that specific molecule. By isolating these compounds, you may lose the additive (or even greater) effects of all compounds working together. I am not suggesting it is not a good idea to try to decipher from the wide array of compounds which are beneficial, but I think there is an argument to be made that many of our modern methods for purification will reduce the system to individual components that on their own contribute little to the symptom they are treating, and the community will gain little from having purified compounds as opposed to how they are currently produced. To gain greater insight, perhaps look at commonly used plants in Ayurvedic medicine and see if you can find common groups of metabolites. This can also be expanded outside of Ayurveda, and look at the plants identified for medicinal use by ethnobotanists around the world. You may find that the presence of enzyme families in these species are common to those in Ayurvedic practice that have the same effect when used (e.g. plants from the Lamiaceae (basil, mint) family are used in Europe and southern Asia) and could help suggest targets for identification. However, you may need to combine many of these compounds to find a mixture that has similar effects to the traditionally processed plant material. This is also why in the US, regulatory agencies have a hard time allowing herbal supplement companies to make claims about health benefits directly on their product, since in laboratory testing does not often conclusively show many of the benefits associated with the plants that these compounds are derived from, due to the nature of the processing. Instead, companies choose to make whole tissue extracts, or ground tissues in capsules, without specifying what in the mix is directly providing the benefit.
An example of work done to identify the important compounds in Neem is presented here: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1658365513000423
and a good discussion of how to extract compounds is here: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3218439/
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
6 answers
Tangible Energy is basically in the form of the blood and flows in the arteries and the veins. Acupuncture tries to explain it and supports the theory of energy flow. What is the form of energy focused in the practice of Acupuncture?
Relevant answer
Answer
The efficacy of acupuncture has been confirmed by the gold standard of clinical science - Cochrane Reviews. Both the basic and clinical research of acupuncture have met the gold standard of science as explained in http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2644274/
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
8 answers
There is a description of 14 natural urges in Ayurveda Literature. Ayurveda strongly believes that suppression of Natural urges like Urine, Stool, Sleep leads to diseases. 
Relevant answer
Answer
Sir,
You may go through the link on the effects of Purisha Vegadhara.
Dr. Venkat
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
3 answers
Is infrared rays can be used after oil massage? If used what precautions should be taken?
what will be the duration and course?
Relevant answer
Answer
IRR for 45 mins will be too long as it can cause burns. Usually it is given for 10 mins, to the max 15 mins and it is very good combination after massage espicially in palliative care
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
10 answers
How to evaluate the outcome of panch karma therapy?
What are its prior indications in comparison to allopathy?
Relevant answer
Answer
Dr Klueber, would be grateful if you could let me know if, what you find in Hattingen is what you were looking for. 
I was trained in Ayurveda from Kerala ( the home of Panchakarma) but am now in UK. If you would like, I can ask  my peers in Govt Ayurveda Collegiate hospitals in Kerala  if formal studies like the one you are looking for have been undertaken. Please let me know.
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
1 answer
Asparagus racemosus is a medicinal plant which is used in traditional medicine.
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Ramanayake
It is always useful to state your purpose to appropriately respond to your question. For good results, in general, medicinal plants are recommended to be properly stored (improper storage conditions quickly spoil the quality of plant material ) for not more than 6 months. In the case of Asparagus, I suggest you not to peel the tubers or cut them into pieces, if you wish to store them for more than 6 months. 
Commercial tubers available in the markets probably are stored for longer periods and it is difficult to assess their storage period. 
Good luck.
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
3 answers
Is there any possibility of re-mineralization of Nano particles due to oxidation?
In ayurveda the nano-particles (bhasma) is used as medicine. If this bhasma is exposed to air and moisture, then the nanoparticles are converted into the original metal or oxidized form.
Relevant answer
No, in Ayurvedic system of medicine, the bhasma are already oxides of metal. further oxidation is not possible and no way they will turn back to original minerals.
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
4 answers
I am an Ayurvedic physician and i am wish to share some information which may interest this group.
In Ayurveda, we use detoxifying enemas extensively to cure diseases and improve health. Two varieties of enemas are advised-1) Seaseme oil boiled with herbal decoctions used in small volume, and 2) A large volume (500ml+) preparation of oil, decoction and herbs.
The basic intention of these are twofold-to improve the absorbtion and elimination of materials from and to the internal ienvironment of the body.
I was just curious to ask, why is such a perspective not yet considered and researched in the treatment and prevention of Colorectal cancer?
Relevant answer
Answer
Vijay,
The reason why it has not been considered so far is that the ayurvedic approach is different from the allopathic approach. The enemas are based on an ayurvedic understanding of the disease cycle, mainly aimed at pacifying the Vata dosha. Allopathy understands cancer as an alien force needing to be attacked with chemotherapy and radiation. Ayurveda is a more peaceful approach aiming to remove the disease at the root while Allopathy attacks the symptoms.
The list goes on....But the main difference is the understanding of the human body and its purpose.
Regards
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
9 answers
In ayurveda following calcium sources are used in Bhasm form (Calx)
conch shell
Coral
Cowries
Pearl 
Pearl shell. 
It is regarded as Conch Shell> Coral> Pearl  calcium source us best according to the expert Physicians of Ayurveda. is there any scientific rationale?? plz explain with research evidences 
Relevant answer
Answer
IAccording to the data that I know and my experience, the calcium citrate complex is the only one that does not cause constipation at all.
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
14 answers
I would like to know is there any Siddha or Ayurvedic formulations available for the treatment of external parasites like ticks, lice, fleas, etc. The formulations available for human use is fine for me to give a try in animals for its efficacy. If anyone is aware of such formulations please let me know.
Relevant answer
Answer
Sir Neemba oil (neem oil) will be useful in lice and other parasites. 
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
4 answers
Vamana, virechana and basti are indicated in a prameha (diabetic (mellitus)) patients. When should we administer Vamana karma?
Relevant answer
Answer
Hello Barry Turner. It is not superstition. Ayurvedic Classics advised after doing repeated research and observations.
Vamana Indicated in
Type 2 DM (Kapha-Pitta Medavrita Madhumeha)
Vamana Yogya Patient
Obese
Precautions:
1st Rookshana and the Snehana-Svedana followed by Vamana
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
65 answers
In case of poly herbal formulated tablet how to convert the human dose to animal dose for preclinical research?
Relevant answer
Answer
For which species do you want to convert the human dose? The way I convert the human dose to animal dose is based on the body surface area.
Human dose (mg/kg) to mouse dose (mg/kg) - multiply by 12.3
Human dose (mg/kg) to rat dose (mg/kg) - multiply by 7.4
Human dose (mg/kg) to guinea pig dose (mg/kg) - multiply by 4.6
Human dose (mg/kg) to rabbit dose (mg/kg) - multiply by 3.1
Human dose (mg/kg) to dog dose (mg/kg) - multiply by 1.8
  • asked a question related to Ayurveda
Question
6 answers
We are working on the comparative study between sixteen personality types of Cattell and those explained in Ayurvedic (part of CAM) texts, as part of a thesis work. On close observation, we feel that there is a striking difference between the aforesaid two, in terms of labeling certain 'Types'. In other words, the 'types' described by Cattell are more or less seemed 'Attributes' as per Ayurvedic literature. However, we are interested to know any further research/critical studies/journal papers in this direction.
Relevant answer
Answer
A Google search on the Five Factor Model of Personality usually yields close to 20 million hits, so I may not be able to thoroughly answer your question here! I am attaching an article that may at least give you a good start on this issue. Though not entirely without critics, it would be reasonable to say that over the past 20-25 years the FFM has achieved at least 90% dominance as the model used in empirical research in the field of psychology. People nit-pick at the details, but there are really no significant competing models. If you email me directly at McCord@wcu.edu, I will be happy to send a half-dozen or so additional articles that could help you orient to this area of literature.