• Waldemar Koczkodaj added an answer:
    1
    Which questionnaire could be more appropriate for evaluating oral health related quality of life in autistic children?

    Many questionnaires used for evaluating oral health related quality of life. But suitability of this for autistic children is a mystery for me. please enlighten me.

    Waldemar Koczkodaj

    Have you tried to look at their tooth? :)

    One item questionnaire from their dentists should suffice but if you design more than one, the methods in the health section of https://www.researchgate.net/publication/289378862_My_selected_publications_2016-01-05 could be used for improving such scale and we can publish is as Önol oral health scale for autistic children

    I upvoted your question by the little green ^ arrow since Arrow (the Nobelist):

    http://www.cs.laurentian.ca/wkoczkodaj/p/ArrowReadsParadox.pdf

    is my inspiration :)

  • Shahar Gindi asked a question:
    New
    Does anyone have a good review of patient information seeking behaviors?

    I'm looking for general information about the way patients react to a diagnosis. I have a faint recollection of reading something many years ago about repressors versus information seeking. specifically, I'm looking at the way parents of children with autism react to a diagnosis in this regard

  • Massimiliano Petrillo added an answer:
    11
    What simple outcome measure would you recommend to regularly measure parent rated change in global ASD ?

    Children will be having a variety of non-specific therapies, and the measure needs to be able to be completed by parents, and be considered valid and reliable.

    Massimiliano Petrillo

    I hope can be a good response

    • Source
      [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
      ABSTRACT: -90 Italian children (72 boys, 18 girls) with a diagnosis of infantile autism (age range = 2.5-16.5 yr.) were assessed with a non-verbal intelligence test (Leiter-R). The test was repeated 3 times in four years. The measures used were IQ and Fluid Reasoning (FR), as evaluation of inductive and deductive reasoning, and the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS), indicative of the severity of autistic symptoms at the beginning and at the end of therapy. The increase in the average IQ and FR scores at retests demonstrates the effectiveness of a treatment that emphasizes the centrality of the relationship-based approach. Moreover, the FR score at intake was predictive of a significant decrease of ADOS scores after four years of treatment, and of the increase in IQ observed in later evaluations. The data support the hypothesis that a relationship-based intervention allows cognitive improvement regardless of the autism severity expressed in the ADOS score.
      Full-text · Article · Aug 2015 · Psychological Reports
  • Massimiliano Petrillo added an answer:
    4
    Can anyone recommend a review article about generalization skills in autism?

    Effective procedures to promote tacts and mands in social contexts.

    Massimiliano Petrillo
    • Source
      [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
      ABSTRACT: -90 Italian children (72 boys, 18 girls) with a diagnosis of infantile autism (age range = 2.5-16.5 yr.) were assessed with a non-verbal intelligence test (Leiter-R). The test was repeated 3 times in four years. The measures used were IQ and Fluid Reasoning (FR), as evaluation of inductive and deductive reasoning, and the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS), indicative of the severity of autistic symptoms at the beginning and at the end of therapy. The increase in the average IQ and FR scores at retests demonstrates the effectiveness of a treatment that emphasizes the centrality of the relationship-based approach. Moreover, the FR score at intake was predictive of a significant decrease of ADOS scores after four years of treatment, and of the increase in IQ observed in later evaluations. The data support the hypothesis that a relationship-based intervention allows cognitive improvement regardless of the autism severity expressed in the ADOS score.
      Full-text · Article · Aug 2015 · Psychological Reports
  • Anthony G Gordon added an answer:
    2
    Do you now anything about Enviromental Enrichment in Autism?

    I'm searching articles on how environmental enrichment ameliorates autism symptoms. If anyone have to suggest something, especially human clinical cases, home therapy, studies on Asperger i'm here. Thankyou

    Anthony G Gordon

    Isn't environmental de-enrichment likely to be more effective?

  • Robin P Clarke added an answer:
    1
    Is there a connection between the increasing existence of autism and the use of oxytocin receptor antagonists (OTRa)?
    Is there a connection between the increasing existence of autism and the use of oxytocin receptor antagonists (OTRa)?
    Robin P Clarke

    I would not rule out such a possible causal connection.  But.....

    Firstly I have already done extensive study concluding that the increase of autism has been entirely due to the introduction of non-gamma-2 dental amalgams 40 years ago.  (But this has been blocked from publication by the pseudic "peer review" system.) 

    Secondly, some "leading experts" are asserting that no increase has happened anyway.   As for instance my discussion of this recent paper: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/283543620_Identifying_the_lost_generation_of_adults_with_autism_spectrum_conditions

    • Source
      [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
      ABSTRACT: Autism spectrum conditions comprise a set of early-onset neurodevelopmental syndromes with a prevalence of 1% across all ages. First diagnosis in adulthood has finally become recognised as an important clinical issue due to the increasing awareness of autism, broadening of diagnostic criteria, and the introduction of the spectrum concept. Thus, the idea of a lost generation of people who were previously excluded from a diagnosis of classic autism has arisen. Making a first diagnosis of autism spectrum conditions in adults can be challenging for practical reasons (eg, no person to provide a developmental history), developmental reasons (eg, the acquisition of learnt or camouflaging strategies), and clinical reasons (eg, high frequency of co-occurring disorders). The diagnostic process includes referral, screening, interviews with informants and patients, and functional assessments. In delineating differential diagnoses, true comorbidities, and overlapping behaviour with other psychiatric diagnoses, particular attention should be paid to anxiety, depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, psychosis, personality disorders, and other neurodevelopmental disorders. Possible misdiagnosis, especially in women, should be explored. The creation of supportive, accepting, and autism-friendly social and physical environments is important and requires a coordinated effort across agencies and needs support from government policies.
      Full-text · Article · Nov 2015 · The Lancet Psychiatry
  • Ronan MacLoughlin added an answer:
    6
    Would it be better to administer vaccines(e.g, MMR) through a natural (inhalation) route?
    For a long time MMR or pertussis vaccines have been claimed to be associated with autism in children. When MMR or the pertussis vaccine are given intramuscularly, it bypasses a natural barrier which has a good protective role for us. For this reason, the rate of MMR vaccination has significantly droped in high society or in developed countries. If these vaccines were given by inhalation, the side effects may be minimized.
    Ronan MacLoughlin

    Aerosol-mediated delivery is certainly more and more in focus with the potential for high levels of dosing, non-invasive adminstration and the potential for long term protection from pulmonary mucosal exposure.

    The WHO-led study on inhaled measels vaccine was published last year, and whilst aerosol-mediated delivery was not as effective as injection in this study......it provides sufficient rationale for further human studies. 

    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/275033879_A_Randomized_Controlled_Trial_of_an_Aerosolized_Vaccine_against_Measles

    The limitation in aerosol-mediated delivery is the ability to deliver a sufficient dose, reliably and reproducibly within a given patient population, and so aerosol generator selection is critical.

     [https://www.researchgate.net/publication/258041169_The_Science_Guiding_Selection_of_an_Aerosol_Delivery_Device]

    Factors such as patient breathing parameters, patient interface (mouthpiece/facemask) droplet size, emitted dose, residual volume (i.e. drug never available to the patient), post-aerosolisation activity and lung dose all combine to dictate the eventual efficacy of an aerosolised vaccine.

    These are factors that are not typically well controlled/understood and should an inappropriate aerosol delivery system be used, sub-optimal results shall likely follow.

    Colleagues and I recently published on aerosol delivery systems for NHP to demonstrate that 1) breathing patterns and 2) device selection have a significant effect on the inhaled dose. Same rules apply to humans.

    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/286445626_Optimization_and_Dose_Estimation_of_Aerosol_Delivery_to_Non-Human_Primates

    Regarding potential side effects.............some points of note here:

    1) existing e.g oral formulations may well need to be reformulated for pulmonary delivery. Excipient choice will have a large influence on side effects.

    2) typically....but not always.....topical administration to the lung surface provides and direct and more immediate response. As such the minimum effective dose may be different/lower. Take the example of inhaled antibiotics used to treat lung infection. 

    3) regarding lung inflammation etc........again the root cause of inflammation will either be the vaccine itself (and so would illicit a response regardless of route of administration) or the excipients, which I propose would need to be selected for pulmonary targeting in any case.

    • Source
      [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
      ABSTRACT: Aerosol therapy continues to be considered as one of the cornerstones of the profession of respiratory care, even after 60 years. Aerosol therapy serves as a critical intervention for both exacerbations and chronic maintenance for a variety of respiratory care conditions. Aerosol therapy uniquely blends both the art and science of medicine together to produce the practical and necessary clinical outcomes for patients with respiratory diseases. This review was presented as part of the New Horizons Symposium on how to guide the scientific selection of an appropriate aerosol device.
      Full-text · Article · Nov 2013

    + 2 more attachments

  • Massimiliano Petrillo added an answer:
    22
    Architecture for autism. Who has sources for empirical and/or effect research ?
    For the last three years I've been trying to find out as much as I could about architectural adaptations to better accommodate people on the autistic spectrum. I've learned a great deal from professionals in The Netherlands who were involved in designing and building treatment facilities. On the other hand there's a growing body of literature around this topic. Some of the most important articles are to be found on http://www.ud-da.eu/information_nav.htm, Mostafa, Humphreys, Whitehurst and Scott have made key-contributions, so have the British architect Beaver and Khare & Mullick who have, like Mostafa proposed a matrix of design principles. Hendriksen & Kaup (2009) (http://www.kon.org/urc/v9/henriksen.html) constructed matrixes of classroom design, drawing from literature which was partly new to me. Until very recently my impression was very little research had been done. “Advancing Full Spectrum Housing: Design for Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders” by Sherry Ahrentzen and Kim Steele, however made me doubt this. (Their work is part of a larger project by the Urban Land Institute Arizona, Southwest Autism Research & Resource Center and Arizona State University.)
    Now I started a quest for effect research, testing one or more design principles which were published over the past 6 or 7 years. Many seem to work in practice, but I’ve not come across any rigorous tests [with the possible exception of Mostafa’s (2008) classroom-measures where the number of children was inversely related to their extremely impressive effects.]
    The context may be education with which most articles seem concerned, but can also be (semi) independent living (Ahrentzen & Steele) or any other, including treatment facilities of any degree of ‘intensity’.
    Ultimately I’ve come to believe there’s a limited number of motives behind design recommendations. My hypothesis is there are basically three: 1) the senses, 2) specific autistic phenomena such as (most notably) central coherence and 3) social difficulties which can partly be remedied through design.
    The main principle behind all this is basically the same as is behind many other measures around people with ASD: they can learn to a certain extent to adapt to the 'neurotypical world', beyond which the environment has to adapt to them. ‘The environment’ is usually taken to mean the social environment but should include the physical and the built environment as well. My working hypothesis is that physical measures can be just as effective as most therapeutic ones and combinations of the two even more.
    Massimiliano Petrillo

    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/280997107_ASSESSMENT_OF_A_LONG-TERM_DEVELOPMENTAL_RELATIONSHIP-BASED_APPROACH_IN_CHILDREN_WITH_AUTISM_SPECTRUM_DISORDER_%28.%29

    • Source
      [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
      ABSTRACT: -90 Italian children (72 boys, 18 girls) with a diagnosis of infantile autism (age range = 2.5-16.5 yr.) were assessed with a non-verbal intelligence test (Leiter-R). The test was repeated 3 times in four years. The measures used were IQ and Fluid Reasoning (FR), as evaluation of inductive and deductive reasoning, and the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS), indicative of the severity of autistic symptoms at the beginning and at the end of therapy. The increase in the average IQ and FR scores at retests demonstrates the effectiveness of a treatment that emphasizes the centrality of the relationship-based approach. Moreover, the FR score at intake was predictive of a significant decrease of ADOS scores after four years of treatment, and of the increase in IQ observed in later evaluations. The data support the hypothesis that a relationship-based intervention allows cognitive improvement regardless of the autism severity expressed in the ADOS score.
      Full-text · Article · Aug 2015 · Psychological Reports
  • Massimiliano Petrillo added an answer:
    16
    What is more important for autistic children, assessment or treatment?
    In researches of course.
    Massimiliano Petrillo

    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/280997107_ASSESSMENT_OF_A_LONG-TERM_DEVELOPMENTAL_RELATIONSHIP-BASED_APPROACH_IN_CHILDREN_WITH_AUTISM_SPECTRUM_DISORDER_%28.%29

    Autism and Mental Retardation in patients is hard to differentiate between one and the other. Does amyloid plaque formation occur in both cases? - ResearchGate. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/post/Autism_and_Mental_Retardation_in_patients_is_hard_to_differentiate_between_one_and_the_other_Does_amyloid_plaque_formation_occur_in_both_cases [accessed Jan 25, 2016].

    • Source
      [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
      ABSTRACT: -90 Italian children (72 boys, 18 girls) with a diagnosis of infantile autism (age range = 2.5-16.5 yr.) were assessed with a non-verbal intelligence test (Leiter-R). The test was repeated 3 times in four years. The measures used were IQ and Fluid Reasoning (FR), as evaluation of inductive and deductive reasoning, and the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS), indicative of the severity of autistic symptoms at the beginning and at the end of therapy. The increase in the average IQ and FR scores at retests demonstrates the effectiveness of a treatment that emphasizes the centrality of the relationship-based approach. Moreover, the FR score at intake was predictive of a significant decrease of ADOS scores after four years of treatment, and of the increase in IQ observed in later evaluations. The data support the hypothesis that a relationship-based intervention allows cognitive improvement regardless of the autism severity expressed in the ADOS score.
      Full-text · Article · Aug 2015 · Psychological Reports
  • Massimiliano Petrillo added an answer:
    4
    Screening tool for Autism
    What is the best Autism screening tool for children aged 7-10?
    Massimiliano Petrillo

    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/280997107_ASSESSMENT_OF_A_LONG-TERM_DEVELOPMENTAL_RELATIONSHIP-BASED_APPROACH_IN_CHILDREN_WITH_AUTISM_SPECTRUM_DISORDER_%28.%29

    Autism and Mental Retardation in patients is hard to differentiate between one and the other. Does amyloid plaque formation occur in both cases? - ResearchGate. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/post/Autism_and_Mental_Retardation_in_patients_is_hard_to_differentiate_between_one_and_the_other_Does_amyloid_plaque_formation_occur_in_both_cases [accessed Jan 25, 2016].

    • Source
      [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
      ABSTRACT: -90 Italian children (72 boys, 18 girls) with a diagnosis of infantile autism (age range = 2.5-16.5 yr.) were assessed with a non-verbal intelligence test (Leiter-R). The test was repeated 3 times in four years. The measures used were IQ and Fluid Reasoning (FR), as evaluation of inductive and deductive reasoning, and the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS), indicative of the severity of autistic symptoms at the beginning and at the end of therapy. The increase in the average IQ and FR scores at retests demonstrates the effectiveness of a treatment that emphasizes the centrality of the relationship-based approach. Moreover, the FR score at intake was predictive of a significant decrease of ADOS scores after four years of treatment, and of the increase in IQ observed in later evaluations. The data support the hypothesis that a relationship-based intervention allows cognitive improvement regardless of the autism severity expressed in the ADOS score.
      Full-text · Article · Aug 2015 · Psychological Reports
  • Massimiliano Petrillo added an answer:
    16
    Which Therapy Works Best for Autism?
    Please discuss your views and experiences about the most effective treatment methods for autism. There are numerous available in the market. Most of them are NOT evidence based but work successfully (or atleast claimed and are highly popular), though very few researches have been conducted to test their efficacy from empirical point of view. Which, according to your view, is most effective and how or why?
    Massimiliano Petrillo

    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/280997107_ASSESSMENT_OF_A_LONG-TERM_DEVELOPMENTAL_RELATIONSHIP-BASED_APPROACH_IN_CHILDREN_WITH_AUTISM_SPECTRUM_DISORDER_%28.%29

    • Source
      [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
      ABSTRACT: -90 Italian children (72 boys, 18 girls) with a diagnosis of infantile autism (age range = 2.5-16.5 yr.) were assessed with a non-verbal intelligence test (Leiter-R). The test was repeated 3 times in four years. The measures used were IQ and Fluid Reasoning (FR), as evaluation of inductive and deductive reasoning, and the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS), indicative of the severity of autistic symptoms at the beginning and at the end of therapy. The increase in the average IQ and FR scores at retests demonstrates the effectiveness of a treatment that emphasizes the centrality of the relationship-based approach. Moreover, the FR score at intake was predictive of a significant decrease of ADOS scores after four years of treatment, and of the increase in IQ observed in later evaluations. The data support the hypothesis that a relationship-based intervention allows cognitive improvement regardless of the autism severity expressed in the ADOS score.
      Full-text · Article · Aug 2015 · Psychological Reports
  • Massimiliano Petrillo added an answer:
    6
    Is Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) an effective treatment for autism?
    Is there research that supports the use of ABA? How precisely does it help autism spectrum kids?
    Massimiliano Petrillo

    I can suggest our research 

    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/280997107_ASSESSMENT_OF_A_LONG-TERM_DEVELOPMENTAL_RELATIONSHIP-BASED_APPROACH_IN_CHILDREN_WITH_AUTISM_SPECTRUM_DISORDER_%28.%29

    Autism and Mental Retardation in patients is hard to differentiate between one and the other. Does amyloid plaque formation occur in both cases? - ResearchGate. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/post/Autism_and_Mental_Retardation_in_patients_is_hard_to_differentiate_between_one_and_the_other_Does_amyloid_plaque_formation_occur_in_both_cases [accessed Jan 25, 2016].

    • Source
      [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
      ABSTRACT: -90 Italian children (72 boys, 18 girls) with a diagnosis of infantile autism (age range = 2.5-16.5 yr.) were assessed with a non-verbal intelligence test (Leiter-R). The test was repeated 3 times in four years. The measures used were IQ and Fluid Reasoning (FR), as evaluation of inductive and deductive reasoning, and the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS), indicative of the severity of autistic symptoms at the beginning and at the end of therapy. The increase in the average IQ and FR scores at retests demonstrates the effectiveness of a treatment that emphasizes the centrality of the relationship-based approach. Moreover, the FR score at intake was predictive of a significant decrease of ADOS scores after four years of treatment, and of the increase in IQ observed in later evaluations. The data support the hypothesis that a relationship-based intervention allows cognitive improvement regardless of the autism severity expressed in the ADOS score.
      Full-text · Article · Aug 2015 · Psychological Reports
  • Massimiliano Petrillo added an answer:
    6
    Is anyone interested in screening for autism?
    I am professor of pediatrics in Babylon university/medical college in Iraq and there are only limited data about screening of autism in my country. I have done a limited study about that in toddlers by using M-CHAT
    Massimiliano Petrillo

    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/280997107_ASSESSMENT_OF_A_LONG-TERM_DEVELOPMENTAL_RELATIONSHIP-BASED_APPROACH_IN_CHILDREN_WITH_AUTISM_SPECTRUM_DISORDER_%28.%29

    • Source
      [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
      ABSTRACT: -90 Italian children (72 boys, 18 girls) with a diagnosis of infantile autism (age range = 2.5-16.5 yr.) were assessed with a non-verbal intelligence test (Leiter-R). The test was repeated 3 times in four years. The measures used were IQ and Fluid Reasoning (FR), as evaluation of inductive and deductive reasoning, and the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS), indicative of the severity of autistic symptoms at the beginning and at the end of therapy. The increase in the average IQ and FR scores at retests demonstrates the effectiveness of a treatment that emphasizes the centrality of the relationship-based approach. Moreover, the FR score at intake was predictive of a significant decrease of ADOS scores after four years of treatment, and of the increase in IQ observed in later evaluations. The data support the hypothesis that a relationship-based intervention allows cognitive improvement regardless of the autism severity expressed in the ADOS score.
      Full-text · Article · Aug 2015 · Psychological Reports
  • Massimiliano Petrillo added an answer:
    11
    Is matching on age/mental age (using verbal or non-verbal IQ) for experimental and control groups a good approach in autism research?

    Matching subjects in a developmental study can be a challenge. Given that standardized IQ tests tend to underestimate individuals who have autism and/or other developmental disorders, what control mechanism can be implemented in the subject recruitment process to ensure proper representation of the linguistic and cognitive profiles for the individual subject groups? 

    Massimiliano Petrillo

    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/280997107_ASSESSMENT_OF_A_LONG-TERM_DEVELOPMENTAL_RELATIONSHIP-BASED_APPROACH_IN_CHILDREN_WITH_AUTISM_SPECTRUM_DISORDER_%28.%29

    • Source
      [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
      ABSTRACT: -90 Italian children (72 boys, 18 girls) with a diagnosis of infantile autism (age range = 2.5-16.5 yr.) were assessed with a non-verbal intelligence test (Leiter-R). The test was repeated 3 times in four years. The measures used were IQ and Fluid Reasoning (FR), as evaluation of inductive and deductive reasoning, and the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS), indicative of the severity of autistic symptoms at the beginning and at the end of therapy. The increase in the average IQ and FR scores at retests demonstrates the effectiveness of a treatment that emphasizes the centrality of the relationship-based approach. Moreover, the FR score at intake was predictive of a significant decrease of ADOS scores after four years of treatment, and of the increase in IQ observed in later evaluations. The data support the hypothesis that a relationship-based intervention allows cognitive improvement regardless of the autism severity expressed in the ADOS score.
      Full-text · Article · Aug 2015 · Psychological Reports
  • Massimiliano Petrillo added an answer:
    6
    What is the standard scoring method for ASD (Autistic Spectrum Disorder)?

    I would like to know the standard technique to give a performance value for a person affected with ASD as to compare to the normal.

    Massimiliano Petrillo

    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/280997107_ASSESSMENT_OF_A_LONG-TERM_DEVELOPMENTAL_RELATIONSHIP-BASED_APPROACH_IN_CHILDREN_WITH_AUTISM_SPECTRUM_DISORDER_%28.%29

    • Source
      [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
      ABSTRACT: -90 Italian children (72 boys, 18 girls) with a diagnosis of infantile autism (age range = 2.5-16.5 yr.) were assessed with a non-verbal intelligence test (Leiter-R). The test was repeated 3 times in four years. The measures used were IQ and Fluid Reasoning (FR), as evaluation of inductive and deductive reasoning, and the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS), indicative of the severity of autistic symptoms at the beginning and at the end of therapy. The increase in the average IQ and FR scores at retests demonstrates the effectiveness of a treatment that emphasizes the centrality of the relationship-based approach. Moreover, the FR score at intake was predictive of a significant decrease of ADOS scores after four years of treatment, and of the increase in IQ observed in later evaluations. The data support the hypothesis that a relationship-based intervention allows cognitive improvement regardless of the autism severity expressed in the ADOS score.
      Full-text · Article · Aug 2015 · Psychological Reports
  • Bonnie Fader Wilkenfeld added an answer:
    6
    Is there an assessment tool for capacity to consent to research, in Learning Disabilities?

    Do you know of an assessment tool to assess capacity for deciding to take part in research studies, for use with people with learning disabilities and/or autism?

    thank you!

    Bonnie Fader Wilkenfeld

    I work with a PsyD with training in functional age assessment tools which determine what categories an individual with ID can assent for participation, and we also obtain assent from participants (in addition to consent from guardians, and as the above poster suggests, checking in with participants continually throughout the interview process and making sure they understand they can withdraw at any time with no ill effects.  This includes paying attention to non-verbal body language cues.

  • Emad Alshoora added an answer:
    2
    Are Hypo or Hyper Sensitive AUTISTIC children able to develop by sensory adaptation strategies (e.g. gradual change in the environment stimulation)?

    Gradual change in stimulation means moving from low or high stimulus environment to more balanced environment and finally to a typical environment.  

    Emad Alshoora

    thank you so much Mr.Gudong Zhang 

  • Cathy Dalton added an answer:
    11
    Are body temperature responses intact in autism?

    It's a well established fact that many on the autism spectrum have an aberrant temperature perception, which can result from too high and too low sensory thresholds or both. In order to stabilize body temperature humans take conscious and unconscious corrective actions. Since many people on the spectrum aren't aware of their body temperature they don't take conscious corrective actions. My question is: how about the unconscious, automatic reactions of the body such as sweating, having goose bumps, increasing or decreasing ones metabolism and the like. Are these automatic responses intact in autism? All of them?   

    Cathy Dalton

    Thanks.

    By the way, any thoughts on multi-senosory rooms/ snoezelen I could visit in the Netherlands. Preferably in schools.

  • Eglal Ali asked a question:
    Open
    Effect of the visual perceptual disorder on motor control for the children with autism ?

    Any recent research for this topic?

  • Cari-lene Mul added an answer:
    7
    Have there been any studies on the role of video games and social rehabilitation of adolescents or young adults with Level-1 ASD (i.e., Asperger's)?

    I am attempting to pinpoint any perceived gaps in the literature in the field of Autism studies, and my focus is on the self-efficacy of vocational learners within an organizational change context. It would help to know if there is a correlation between the use of video games and higher levels of self-efficacy within this population.

    Cari-lene Mul

    Females with autism/aspergers are very under-researched, so please consider games that they play. I have heard from several individuals, independently from each other, that playing SIMS has helped them enormously with social interaction. Of course this is only anecdotal, but often research starts with a hunch. This is my hunch, for you.

  • Suriati Suhaili added an answer:
    2
    Does anyone know where can I get Checklist of Responses Acts Score Sheet (CRASS)?

    I need it to evaluate the behaviours of children with autism

    Suriati Suhaili

    Thanks :)

    I'll start from there

  • Ronald Swatzyna added an answer:
    3
    Does anyone know the compounding formula for Oxytocin inhaler or sublingual administration for children with autism?

    Dr. Gordan from Yale wrote the article: “Oxytocin enhances brain function in children with autism” (http://www.pnas.org/content/110/52/20953) and I have not been able to get a response from him. Any information is greatly appreciated.

    Ronald Swatzyna

    Dear Takeshi,

    I do appreciate your comments. What I am looking for is the compounding formula for the oxytocin administered via inhailer administration. Can you email me the formula?

    drron@tarnowcenter.com

  • John Kommu added an answer:
    10
    What is your experience with omega in ADHD and autistic children?

    omega in ADHD and autistic children

    John Kommu

    Not helpful

  • Gram Knapp added an answer:
    1
    I have worked with children with autism. I'm trying to see if picture-to-text software, such as PixWriter, can help them develop beginning writing skills.
    Children with autism have strengths with technology and visuals. They often have weaknesses with handwriting, spelling and both oral and written communication. No research could be found linking children with autism and picture to text software for writing. I was wondering if I missed something.
    Gram Knapp

    I identify as 'autistic' because I have Aspergers, yet many of us on that end of the spectrum are primarily verbal processors, and hyperlexic. I experience a Mathematics LD also, and clumsiness under stress that indicate a minor visual-spatial deficit, that my male-enculturation has perhaps somewhat mitigated.

    I can visually rotate objects in my mind, but I am unsure whether what I call visual rotation is what you call it? I feel I can judge distances well, but I cannot find something on a packed shelf in a hurry, or even quickly at all. I think it could be residual effects of a gaze-cue thing, a slight skew however rather than a visual spatial problem of the magnitude some other report.

    All of this contravenes the stereotype we ALL 'think in pictures'. I pace in circles and mutter to myself to get my best thinking done, ideas 'flow' in this way for my almost as a stream of consciousness yet they are often very useful ideas.. the quality in my thought generation improves.

    I don't mean to be too tangential to your topic, just to point out you may need controls to sort out whether your participants are truly

    -HFA's (report mutism and  learning problems with speech in early childhood.. yet somehow 'catch up' to Aspies in adulthood, or reveal their ability later in life as an ability they had all along, yet their avoidance or inability in early childhood indicate HFA's may develop propensity to learn in the visually-spatial way you address,

    or
    'Aspies'. Often Hyperlexic. I am, yet perhaps I would not have failed algebra from the time I recieved my first class, and be retaking basic statistics at university next semester for my fourth time... if pictures had been used? (I finally get it, so don't feel bad for me :P )

    In adulthood we can seem identical and many are misdiagnosed.
    For such a slight difference in presentation, it is important to establish correct diagnosis because best practice in treatment models would be substantially different, if not opposed between the two 'High-Functioning' categories.

    But please reconsider the comment 'children with autism have strengths with technology and visuals, the spectrum is far more diverse than that and such expectations cause some of us huge problems in being understood and treated, and even face social pressure around it that is unfair.

    Also: I am sensory-seeking, I crave touch. Haircuts are like manna from heaven to me. Think of the stereotype of having to strap an ASC ('Condition' not 'Disorder') child down for a haircut, or ASC adult jumping a mile when you touch them.

    Touching me actually 'grounds' or centres my thoughts somehow, and keeps me present in a social situation.

    If we go mute, its because of social exasperation- not difficulty with speech.
    Although I guess social difficulty with our pervasive literal interpretation of speech, delay in prosody recognition and verbosity may be considered speech delays?
    But we are not particularly frustrated with self expression anywhere near like HFA's report.

    I avoid gaze because I LIKE staring at things and find mysef captivated by people's faces- and that gets me into all kinds of trouble. As a male, the older I get the creepier it looks to others too. Not worth it. It is a very intense experience, but fascinating not painful like HFAs seem to indicate.

    So, my sensory-processing 'disorders' seem to be the opposite of the stereotype, and maybe that's because they haven't made any films about us experience traits at that level of extreme, and no-one has written a book about traitwise application from my end of the extremes as successful as Temple Grandon's.

    Yes I know you probably refer to 'Classic Autism'. I just wanted to highlight the need for specification with the pronoun, instead of just saying 'all children with autism'.

    The specificity/pedantry of my comment is both traitwise, but please accept is emphatically given because many of us suffer greatly from narrow stereotypes around what autism is. Aspergers is a kind of autism. I am actually traumatised by untold experiences of being mistrusted, or denied legitimacy, refusals to engage with me conducively and escalating aggressions toward me, even as I plead with people to consider my traits in the face of an impending meltdown, in social contexts, starting with the simple phrase 'Oh, you're not autistic'. It means they don't believe ANYTHING, and often bullying ensues.

    In terms of literature, I can only think of the Indian ( I think) mother who has successfully used pictures to teach her severely affected child to write, read and speak, and has monetised the system she formulated

    http://www.parents.com/blogs/special-needs/2015/03/31/news/rpm-the-life-changing-method-that-helped-my-non-verbal-son-to-talk/

    I know you'd be across that.

    Here's a few studies generated from a list mentioning that. Let me know if it was helpful. I assume you may have done all this and seek advanced research methodology to add to your dataset. But just in case :)

    Gidley Larson, J. C., & Mostofsky, S. H. (2008). Evidence that the pattern of visuomotor sequence learning is altered in children with autism. Autism Research, 1(6), 341-353.

    Blog article but solid referencing;
    http://www.thinkingautismguide.com/2010/06/questionable-autism-approaches.html


    Tostanoski, A., Lang, R., Raulston, T., Carnett, A., & Davis, T. (2013). Voices from the past: Comparing the rapid prompting method and facilitated communication. Developmental neurorehabilitation, 17(4), 219-223.

    From 'the horses' mouth' (so to speak);
    Mukhopadhyay, S. (2003). Rapid Prompting Method. lecture, Pasadena, CA, August (video-recording, produced by Helping Autism through Learning and Outreach).

    Plenty more with 'Rapid Prompting Method' in the search bar






  • Anthony G Gordon added an answer:
    6
    Can anyone suggest articles on the association between altered sensory processing in individuals with autism and educational outcomes?

    I've found a couple but i'm finding it hard to find any more.

    Anthony G Gordon

    "The issue of altered sensory processing for persons with autism is a comparatively new line of research"

    I recently raised the matter of the omission of sensory disorders with a distinguished clinician involved in old DSM diagnoses of autism. One point he conceded was that anyone who had come up with a proposal to study sensory disorders in autism would not have got the grant since these were not in DSM!  This situation should slowly be rectified now that sensory disorders are in DSM 5. 

    By far the best information about sensory disorders and their central relevance comes from the autobiographies of grown-up autistic persons. 

  • Onitra Wilkerson added an answer:
    20
    Can someone direct me to parent testimonials concerning positive effects of medical marijuana, Marinol, and/or Dronabinol, on their autistic children?

    It is now a known fact that marijuana (medical or otherwise) actually has positive effects on the human brain.  Even more amazing is the effects of the drug on children with autism.  Marinol and Dronabinol are both derivatives of marijuana, and seemingly just as effective in combating the symptoms of autism.  Can someone direct me to parent testimonials concerning the positive effects of medical marijuana and its derivatives on children with autism?

    Onitra Wilkerson

    How wonderful; thank you so much, Arthur!  This young man's story reminds me of my Thomas.  It will take me some time to go through the website; however, I have already read most of Sam's story and am definitely keeping it for my research.  Thank you again; God Bless!

  • Abdulhafeez Mohamed Khair added an answer:
    3
    How can I gain access to data on Echolalia in children on the Autism Spectrum?

     Looking for video data or other data for a Masters thesis on the Neuroscience of Echolalia in Children on the Autism Spectrum.

    Abdulhafeez Mohamed Khair

    A couple of reviews are linked below, one of them is rather recent.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19838574

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25321855

  • Johnathan Nuttall added an answer:
    6
    How significant is the maternal environment for risk of autism?
    A report from the California Autism Twins Study shows a significantly greater concordance of autism among dizygotic twins than previously reported. The authors conclude, "A large proportion of the variance in liability can be explained by shared environmental factors (55%; 95% CI, 9%-81% for autism and 58%; 95% CI, 30%-80% for ASD) in addition to moderate genetic heritability (37%; 95% CI, 8%-84% for autism and 38%; 95% CI, 14%-67% for ASD)."
    Johnathan Nuttall

    Here is a link to my recent review of the topic.

    • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
      ABSTRACT: Recent research suggests the maternal environment may be especially important for the risk of developing autism spectrum disorders (ASD). In particular maternal infections, micronutrient deficiencies, obesity, and toxicant exposures are likely to interact with genetic risk factors to disrupt fetal brain development. Objectives The goal of this paper is to investigate the plausibility of maternal toxicant exposure and nutritional status as causal factors in the development of ASD. Methods This paper reviews current research investigating the hypothesis that maternal toxicant exposure and prenatal micronutrient intake are important modifiable risk factors for ASD. Results Zinc, copper, iron, and vitamin B9 are identified as specific micronutrients with relevance to the etiology of ASD. Specific toxicants induce a maternal inflammatory response leading to fetal micronutrient deficiencies that disrupt early brain development. Importantly, maternal micronutrient supplementation is associated with reduced risk of ASD. Furthermore, animal studies show that micronutrient supplementation can prevent the teratogenicity and developmental neurotoxicity of specific toxicants. Discussion These findings lead to the hypothesis that maternal infection, obesity, and toxicant exposures (e.g. valproic acid, endocrine disrupting plasticizers, ethanol, and heavy metals) are all environmental risk factors for ASD that lead to fetal micronutrient deficiencies resulting from a maternal inflammatory response. It could be possible to use markers of inflammation and micronutrient status to identify women that would benefit from micronutrient supplementation or dietary interventions to reduce the risk of ASD. However, more research is needed to demonstrate a causal role of fetal micronutrient deficiencies and clarify the underlying mechanisms that contribute to ASD.
      No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Nutritional Neuroscience
  • Renzo Bianchi added an answer:
    53
    Can depressive symptoms differ between people?

    Signs and symptoms of depression in mothers of children with autism are frequently reported. However, based on extensive clinical observations and self reported data, I constantly observed that these mothers report specific depressive symptoms more than others. I did not observe this phenomenon in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorders. Is there any evidence supports this??? or it is a merely chance?  

About Autism

A topic to foster discussion of autism research among investigators. This topic is not intended for those seeking clinical advice. Autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) are marked by significant social, communication, and behavioral problems. It is estimated that 1 in 110 children (correction: now 1 in 88) in the US have an ASD. Although several genes have been implicated in ASDs, a systems biology approach will be required to adequately understand the molecular underpinnings of these conditions.

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