Science topic

Attempted Suicide - Science topic

The unsuccessful attempt to kill oneself.
Questions related to Attempted Suicide
  • asked a question related to Attempted Suicide
Question
4 answers
Do you know of research that suggests the number of non-fatal suicide attempts to actual fatalities i.e., in a period of time and in the US, another country or worldwide?
Relevant answer
Answer
I think these studies may be helpful for your question:
Wan Q, Ding X, Hu D, Han Y, Wang S, Liu Y, Wu C, Huang L, Lu R, Xu K. A study of the epidemiology and risk factors for attempted suicide and suicide among non-psychiatric inpatients in 48 general hospitals in Hubei province, China, 2015-2017. Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 2020 Mar-Apr;63:21-29. doi: 10.1016/j.genhosppsych.2019.06.003. Epub 2019 Jun 8. PMID: 31230862.
Jørs E, Christoffersen M, Veirum NH, Aquilar GC, Morant RC, Konradsen F. Suicide attempts and suicides in Bolivia from 2007 to 2012: pesticides are the preferred method - females try but males commit suicide! Int J Adolesc Med Health. 2014;26(3):361-7. doi: 10.1515/ijamh-2013-0309. PMID: 24114895.
Mejías-Martín Y, Luna Del Castillo JD, Rodríguez-Mejías C, Martí-García C, Valencia-Quintero JP, García-Caro MP. Factors Associated with Suicide Attempts and Suicides in the General Population of Andalusia (Spain). Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2019 Nov 14;16(22):4496. doi: 10.3390/ijerph16224496. PMID: 31739626; PMCID: PMC6888127.
Fedyszyn IE, Erlangsen A, Hjorthøj C, Madsen T, Nordentoft M. Repeated Suicide Attempts and Suicide Among Individuals With a First Emergency Department Contact for Attempted Suicide: A Prospective, Nationwide, Danish Register-Based Study. J Clin Psychiatry. 2016 Jun;77(6):832-40. doi: 10.4088/JCP.15m09793. PMID: 27232826.
De Leo D, Milner A, Fleischmann A, Bertolote J, Collings S, Amadeo S, Chan S, Yip PS, Huang Y, Saniel B, Lilo F, Lilo C, David AM, Benavente B, Nadera D, Pompili M, Kolves KE, Kolves K, Wang X. The WHO START study: suicidal behaviors across different areas of the world. Crisis. 2013;34(3):156-63. doi: 10.1027/0227-5910/a000193. PMID: 23628665.
Sayil I, Devrimci-Ozguven H; WHO/EURO Multicentre Study of Suicidal Behaviour. Suicide and suicide attempts in Ankara in 1998: results of the WHO/EURO Multicentre Study of Suicidal Behaviour. Crisis. 2002;23(1):11-6. doi: 10.1027//0227-5910.23.1.11. PMID: 12650217.
Wagenaar BH, Raunig-Berhó M, Cumbe V, Rao D, Napúa M, Sherr K. Suicide Attempts and Deaths in Sofala, Mozambique, From 2011 to 2014. Crisis. 2016 Nov;37(6):445-453. doi: 10.1027/0227-5910/a000383. Epub 2016 Jun 1. PMID: 27245814; PMCID: PMC5133176.
  • asked a question related to Attempted Suicide
Question
3 answers
"In colleges and universities in the United States, suicide is one of the most common causes of death among students.[1] Each year, approximately 24,000 college students attempt suicide while 1,100 students succeed in their attempt, making suicide the second-leading cause of death among U.S. college students.[2][3] Roughly 12% of college students report the occurrence of suicide ideation during their first four years in college, with 2.6% percent reporting persistent suicide ideation.[3] 65% of college students reported that they knew someone who has either attempted or died by suicide, showing that the majority of students on college campuses are exposed to suicide or suicidal attempts.[4]"
"Why Is Suicide So Common Among College Students?"
"Burnout in College: What Causes It and How to Avoid It"
Relevant answer
Answer
There is nothing more tragic than student suicide. iAcademic stress plays a part but there is also being away from home, often too early, disillusionment with both social and academic life, substance abuse, behavioral addictions, broken hearts, competitiveness, loneliness, lack of confidants, mental health problems, medical problems, stigmatization, money problems, bullying, unsympathetic teachers. Large universities are cold, anonymous places and students come unprepared.
  • asked a question related to Attempted Suicide
Question
9 answers
I want to collect data from war-affected adolescence and the rate of a suicide attempt I was unable to find a scale for a suicide attempt if anybody could suggest a scale related to a suicide attempt
Relevant answer
Answer
See CAMS CARE
David Jobes, Ph.D, ABPP
  • asked a question related to Attempted Suicide
Question
5 answers
aug 2 2020 The Sunday Times Magazine
Although many of our nightmares about nuclear war have subsided, but does it still pose as big or a bigger genuine threat than climate change and pandemics? US, Russia, China , UK, France, India, Pakistan, Israel and North Korea possess nuclear weapons. How long before many other small countries possess them? Accidents, malfunctions, muscalculations, nuclear terroism and sabotage (The Sunday Times) are all possible events but so are local, traditional hostilities and suicidal attempts to preserve ruling elites in the face of internal or external threats.
Little Boy's, the bomb used at Hiroshima, explosion had used only 1.38 of its overall potential. If all its potential had been utilised the original doomsday symbolism would still be vividly with us.
Relevant answer
Answer
The obvious answer is yes though AI seems to take the podium these days nuclear Power remains a means to intimidate other nations and have an important say in the affairs of the world. It is easily seen through the main criteria to be part of the UN security council. A reasonable answer is that nuclear conflagration remains as likely as some years ago just that it is camouflaged inorder not to hurt some individuals feelings!
  • asked a question related to Attempted Suicide
Question
4 answers
I am currently working on suicide ideation among youth. I just need help with regard to Psychache scale. My question is how does the psychache scale differentiate between suicide attempters and non-attemptors?
Thanks
Relevant answer
You can do like this: compute two different linear regression analysis one with the hopelessness questions as IV and the other with the major depression questions as IV with suicidal attempts as DV. Then you can compare the squared part correlations, which indicates the % of the variance of suicidal attempts (DV) which is explained by hopelessness and major depression, respectively. If you want to read our paper on the topic you find it here.
  • asked a question related to Attempted Suicide
Question
9 answers
Iam trying to develop a community project for adults with mental health and offenders. in Italy, as I think everywhere, we develop a "pti" (individual therapeutic plan) for each of them, as well as to carry out recreational activities all together.
I am a future social worker, in October I should graduate and I am developing a thesis about this target of people. My intention is to develop a project for direct these people to a job once they leave these structures. the work that enhances man and gives him dignity and desire to live; but in a state in crisis like mine, in my opinion both for moral values ​​and for economic reasons, it is really difficult to realize this "work step".
I would like to realize the so-called "circular economy", regarding the recycling of plastics, a subject very close to me. I would like to introduce it to this project of which I spoke to you. but it is really difficult even for the purely security reasons of people with mental disorders and offenders. to realize this idea of ​​mine, they would use potentially dangerous machinery for people in their mental state. there are many cases of attempted suicide and assault in towards of other patients within the residences for the execution of the security measure.
I would like to know your impression and any ideas.
Relevant answer
Answer
I changed the aim of the project: I am focusing on the resocialization of the outgoing patient and / or once they leave the residence for the safety measures, always intertwining it with the concept of plastic reuse. The intention is to create a place where family members of patients, patients, operators, volunteers and civilians can buy, sell and build objects with recycled plastic, a place of socialization. Patients will contribute to the collection and processing of plastics. Some days are planned in which the patients will come out on a sailboat to collect the plastic in the sea, as well as on the beach. There are also days of awareness for schools, during which patients will give testimony of what has been learned up to that time. The goal of the patients will be to create awareness starting from the school and involving the children through alternative training cycles.
  • asked a question related to Attempted Suicide
Question
24 answers
If the person is mentally incompetent, under the influence of drugs, or unconscious then doctors should treat them.  But what about persons who have taken a drug overdose and are brought in to A & E and refuse treatment, stating they wanted to die?  Surely nowadays we have to recognize patient autonomy, and obey their wishes?
Relevant answer
Answer
There is a fine line between making a conscious, clear-thinking decision to suicide and having an illness interfere w/one's ability to think & make good choices.  How do we determine which group the suicidal patient falls into?  And in making the determination, are we playing God?
There is one school of thought that believes since we put down (euthanize) sick or injured animals to relieve their untreatable pain, we should allow the same choice to people.  At the same time, there is the opposing school of thought that believes there is a difference between euthanizing a companion animal and a human being.  Who is right?  And if someone is right, then it stands to reason the other is wrong.
I've evaluated people who have come into the emergency room after a suicide attempt.  There seems to be an equal number who tell me the attempt has changed their minds, they don't really want to die, those who continue their suicidal ideation, & those who say they don't want to die but see no other way of making the pain stop.  Additionally, there are those whose behavior can be said to be a slow form of suicide--alcoholics, addicts, self-mutilation, and many others.  Then there are those who are determined to suicide and no matter the intervention, will eventually succeed as they eliminate all of the ways that did not work.
The question of treating people with suicidal ideation must be answered on several different levels.  There is the physical treatment of reversing whatever they have done in the attempt.  The mental treatment, which may involve medication to treat a mood disorder.  And the spiritual dimension, which is where the provider must be clear within themselves about what they believe with the recognition that the client may not hold the same beliefs.  And there is the idea that people have the right to be wrong.  
Do we treat people with suicidal thoughts?  I think that we must even while we recognize their right to be wrong and  we perceive the person with unconditional positive regard. 
  • asked a question related to Attempted Suicide
Question
4 answers
Non-specific health problems (headache, muscle tension, fatigue, dizziness, unstability) 
(http://www.frontiersin.org/10.3389/conf.fnins.2010.10.00143/event_abstract) find almost all of us, but rarely and not so intensively. Do you know a scientific results regarding the different complaints, at which frequency/intensity should someone visit the GP? 
Only when the subject experience it very disturbing or scary? Or if it comes x times in y long period?
It is also important, because complementary medicine is thought to work effectively in these non-specific complaints, and I wonder, at which point should a CAM practitioner include a medical doctor in the healing process? 
It is also important, because for the mild complaints, various self-helper interventions (forms of self-soothing and self-compassion) were adviced as potential solution, and I wonder, when someone should go to the doctor, to exclude that it is not the case of a serious illness, better to heal with conventional medicine asap. 
Relevant answer
Answer
Hello,
I guess it might be interesting to look at the question from another point of view: can there be such a general guide? What would it tell us? That there is an objective threshold that distinguishes "benign intensity or frequency" from "pathological intensity or frequency". And this has to be considered individually. Concerning psychopathology, you will find these for example in the DSM, indicating which threshold applies to which psychopathology. The same is true for somatic disorders. So we fall on our feet again as it were: every clinician must know his field of intervention thoroughly enough in order to establish an argumented diagnostic hypothesis, to evaluate  symptoms severity, and then to make a therapeutic decision, for example adress to a GP.
  • asked a question related to Attempted Suicide
Question
4 answers
Good afternoon, I am interested in investigating how drugs are seen in society. A few months ago I went to a course that my university taught about different types of drugs and how they affect the body. I found it to be a very interesting experience at the same time as it is necessary for professionals who deal with people who are drug addicts or ex drug addicts and also for the rest. When I left the course I realized that I had very different ideas to those who explained to me there and it is striking that although the drug has a great weight in our society is not treated as a daily issue, but rather as something strange . I would like to know, what is your perspective on this subject.
Relevant answer
Answer
A drug is seen as taboo or not depends on the purpose for which it is being used. The same drug may be used to gain pleasure (by drug addicts) or for therapeutic effects (in medical setting). The former is seen as taboo while the latter is not. Also the degree to which a drug is seen as taboo depends on how common the drug is being used by people in society; for example - Nicotine is most commonly used drug in society whereas as heroine (smack) is less common, thus the latter is considered more taboo than former. It is like defining abnormal behaviour- the more common behaviour in society is seen as normal while the less common is seen as abnormal.
  • asked a question related to Attempted Suicide
Question
5 answers
We are planning to study the suicidal intent among suicide survivors in a tertiary care hospital. We are planning to use Beck's suicide intent scale. My question is, are there any other scales used to measure suicidal intent? 
Relevant answer
Answer
You can see this article: Published in IJPH in 4th issue of 2016. Risk Factors of Suicide among Patients Admitted with Suicide Attempt in Tata Main Hospital, Jamshedpur
Manoj Kumar Sahoo1, Harshita Biswas2, Sanjay Kumar Agarwal
  • asked a question related to Attempted Suicide
Question
3 answers
I have learned in my abnormal psych class that erderly people are more likely to end their lives in a suicidal way compared with their young counterpart. Meanwhile, according to previous research, non-suicidal self injury (NSSI) is especially popular among younger populations. It's paradoxical since they seem to share similar functions tho...I really couldn't tell.
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Xaiojin,
Some elderly persons may feel depressed, hopeless, and despaired due to a combination of terminable illness, or ill health, long-term physical pain and suffering, loneliness, and poverty, etc. They have the intention to end their lives in order to terminate their suffering, whereas some adolescents and young adults use self-injury to cope with their emotional distress without the intention to end their lives.
Beatrice's article sheds some light on the intrapersonal and interpersonal dynamics of NSSI:
"...NSSI is generally used to cope with distressing negative affective states, especially anger and depression, and mixed emotional states...NSSI is associated with a wide variety of externalizing and internalizing conditions..."
"...Some adolescent inpatients report hurting themselves specifically to stop suicidal ideation or to stop themselves from actually attempting suicide. Consequently, Favazza conceptualizes self-injurious behaviors without suicidal intent as 'a morbid form of self help.'...”
  • asked a question related to Attempted Suicide
Question
5 answers
By using three available scales:
1.   Beck's HOPELESSNESS Scale;
2.   SBQ-R (Suicide Behavioural Questionnaire); and
3.   ATTS (Attitudes Towards Suicide Scale)
Are these sufficient to form a sort of suicidality index? Beck's Hopelessness Scale should have similar tendency as the suicide scales (theoretically).
These are for the matching and comparison with the Level of Religiosity scale.
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Bob,
I totally agree with Tony's suggestion that you define suicidality.  There are many different definitions of this term floating around out there.  For some, it means the likelihood a patient will kill themself or the likelihood a patient will be seriously injured as a result of a suicide attempt.  While others, myself included, use this as an overarching term to include any suicidality phenomenon. 
If you are thinking about using a definition closer to the latter, the scales you mention above do not provide a good overall view of suicidality.  Not everyone experiencing suicidality feels hopeless.  Nor do they all engage in suicidal behaviors.  I have seen no data to support the idea that a patient's attitude towards suicide is in any way relevant in measuring their actual suicidality symptoms.  It is even possible that patients will have attitudes supporting suicide even though they are not suicidal themselves (e.g. a patient that has a loved one with ALS might think suicide is an acceptable alternative to slowly suffocating to death).
I always recommend a thorough suicidality scale which includes ideations and behaviors (and if possible, impulses) and does not primarily focus on other items that are not core suicidality phenomena like hopelessness or depression.  For example, a patient with schizophrenia that is experiencing a command hallucination to kill themself may not experience either hopelessness or depression, even though they are experiencing suicidality.  If you only look at hopelessness or depression this patient will likely not be identified.
The two most comprehensive suicidality scales are the InterSePT Scale for Suicidal Thinking - Plus (ISST-Plus) (and its extension for use in detecting an anti-suicidality efficacy signal the SIBAT) and the Sheehan - Suicidality Tracking Scale (S-STS) (and its extension for use in detecting an anti-suicidality efficacy signal, the S-STS Clinically Meaningful Change Measure [CMCM]).  (The ISST-Plus is copyrighted by Dr. Larry Alphs.  The S-STS is available from Dr. David Sheehan through HarmResearch.org.)  The first linked publication is to a validation study on the core versions of these scales.  A validation study on the expanded versions of these scales should start very soon.
Data has shown that a global severity of suicidality may not be a particularly helpful measure because some patients need to minimize the severity of their suicidality in order to cope with it.  See the second linked publication.
I hope this helps you decide upon your definition of suicidality and decide which scale(s) to use to measure it.
Best wishes,
Jennifer M. Giddens
  • asked a question related to Attempted Suicide
Question
4 answers
I am studying Religiosity and Suicide. Any good books on Buddhism. Also on those other categorised as Chinese Folk Religions? Regards.
Relevant answer
Answer
There are so many good books on Buddhism that I really don't know where to start! What aspect of Buddhism interests you in its relationship with suicide?
And what would you consider Chinese Folk Religions? What's a Folk Religion as a opposed to any other sort of religion (indeed, what other sorts of religion are there?)
  • asked a question related to Attempted Suicide
Question
2 answers
Any good book on the history of protestants and Lutheranism, and how protestants spread; and also any difference in concept and practice?
Relevant answer
Answer
At the link below you'll ind 10 books on the Protestant Reformation as recommended by Christianity Today
  • asked a question related to Attempted Suicide
Question
3 answers
I am working on Religiosity and Suicide. How can we get better insights into the mind of selected samples, besides using in-depth interview?
I am researching on Religiosity and Suicide. Thus any deeper insights shall be helpful.
Relevant answer
Answer
I'd say psychoanalysis is infeasible simply due to the amount of time required. I cannot say what hypnosis would add.
Depending on what you mean by "insights" you could use standardized psychological assessments. If none of them meet your needs, you could do a few interviews and then turn the most interesting or important issues into questions for your own survey.
  • asked a question related to Attempted Suicide
Question
30 answers
A suicide threat has been defined as "a verbal statement or behavioral act that may indicate serious intent to kill oneself" (see link to Wedig et al., 2013). In the case of borderline personality disorder suicide threats may also be made without any intent to take one's life (see J. Paris, Half in Love with Death, 2006). Suicide threats may be contingent ("If I'm not admitted I will...") or non-contingent ("I'm going to shoot myself!") (See Lambert, M., Seven-Year Outcome of Patients Evaluated for Suicidality, Psychiatric Services, 2002, 55,1, 92-94). Threats may or may not reference a plan. Suicide threats, of any type, would seem to be the second most common forms of suicidal behavior after suicidal ideation. The overwhelming majority of threats heard daily by emergency responders, crisis centers, hot lines, rehabs, and ERs, are conditional with more intent of personal gain or manipulation than personal demise. Nonetheless, many excellent discussions of "suicidal behavior" do not address suicide threats (e.g., Nock et al., Suicide and Suicidal Behavior, Epidemiology Rev., 30,1, 133-154). There appears to be relatively little research explicitly focusing on threats as suicidal behavior
Relevant answer
Answer
Hi Keith and others...
The definition of suicidal:
"deeply unhappy or depressed and likely to commit suicide.
relating to or likely to lead to suicide."
What does likely to commit suicide imply?
90%?    50%?      10%    .04% ?
The most at risk are bipolar men who have self harmed (Nordentoft et al 2011). They had a risk of about .04% per month.
Therefore no matter what a patient says or does they are unlikely to commit suicide. We need better terminology for patients who feel "suicidal" or self harm.
We need to assess the problems patients present with and regard all patients as at risk as most patients who commit suicide were assessed as not high risk. If we focus on hige risk we are ignoring most of those who will kill themselves.
What do you think?
For a fuller account of my delusions about suicide risk  see: http://bjpo.rcpsych.org/content/2/1/e1
Declan
  • asked a question related to Attempted Suicide
Question
8 answers
A significant number of Indians seek their untimely death due to hero worship or when the ideology, which they hold close to heart is challenged. Is there a specific name to this phenomenon? Are there any studies that explore in to the intricacies of this phenomenon? Please guide....
Relevant answer
Answer
I will read through all documents and revert. On a cursory look my question has answers
Thanks and regards
Rooban
  • asked a question related to Attempted Suicide
Question
3 answers
I read a statement by a police officer last night requesting an involuntary psychiatric evaluation on a young man who the officer stated was armed and telling the officer and others to "F***ing shoot me or I'll kill you!" Several such incidents occur yearly in SE Pennsylvania (USA) and seem to be increasing with issuance of Tasers to more police officers. There have been a few cases where an officer used a Taser to prevent bridge or RR attempts. There is some literature on Taser usage but little, if any, on this application that I have found. It appears that police are learning this use of technology "on the job" like so many other things. Given that so much suicide research is basically redundant this would seem to be an area worthy of at least some qualitative attention.
Relevant answer
Answer
Beatrice--Thank you for the excellent answer and resources.  Anne
  • asked a question related to Attempted Suicide
Question
6 answers
Recently, two incidents arising heat discussion in China. Two graduate students choose to commit suicide (jumped from a campus block) because their supervisors delaying their graduation from university. After their death, many  students stand out to say the drawbacks of their supervisors, such as ask money from them; insult them; say their students were clumsy as pigs; even get along with female students by some illegitimate sex relation.
Such tragedy is now drawing the attention of the government. With the increasing number of graduate students, a supervisor almost has one hundred graduate students. In this situation, how can supervisor guidance students in a proper way? What's your advice?
Relevant answer
Dear Hu, 
A supervisor is only a teacher and if there are enough teachers it is of course a good thing. However, the will to live is rooted in a deeper personality layer according to my personal opinion. Bullied children suffer, also those subject to many hardships in their personal lives. Those who have a personal faith may endure. 
  • asked a question related to Attempted Suicide
Question
4 answers
I included psychiatric ADRs following surgery on the web site www.april.org.uk and was astonished at the amount of feed back from the public.
 
Suicides including that of James the son of Clare Milford-Haven just around 10 days after his surgery. My daughter's sudden onset of psychosis 7 days after her wisdom teeth were removed were not the only stories of post operative psychiatric disturbance recorded. 
 
A lady doctor contacted me as her son also became paranoid just 7 days after surgery. A man who had surgery and was given co-amoxiclav became paranoid and under section was given anti-psychotics he felt he did not need as he was recovering. He feels the anti-psychotic medication damaged his brain and recovery is slow...None of these people had a previous history of psychiatric illness. a case of co-amoxiclav induced psychosis was reported in a letter and spoken of at our conference by anaesthetist Dr Anita Holdcroft in 2008.
 
My daughter had previously suffered a sudden onset of psychosis following taking sulphasalazine...when I asked her anaesthetist if there are guidelines given to anaesthetists, about which drugs or anaesthetic agents to avoid for patients known to be vulnerable to psychiatric ADRs - I was told this was not covered in the medical education he received.
I have followed up with the Royal College of Anaesthetists and find there is poor communication in the gathering of ADR information following surgery and linked to anaesthetics...The MHRA have refused to reinstate the Yellow Card reporting forms specifically for anaesthetists. The system for reporting and collating information does not seem to have improved since guidelines following the D of H Inquiry into Dental Anaesthesia in 2000 (A Conscious Decision).
 
The Report published July 2000  recommended the RCA should collect ADR information. A Professor at the Royal College of Anaesthetists, I knew personally, stated he could not inform the membership as he "Did not have the resources". I asked him to try and he stated " Well it is only a recommendation”.
The Report  by the Chief Medical Officer and Chief Dental Officer recommended' the following:
 
It is recommended that the extent of morbidity associated with general anaesthesia and conscious sedation is recorded and analysed by the Royal College of Anaesthetists and the Society for the Advancement of Anaesthesia in Dentistry respectively. In addition it is recommended that the General Dental Council’s guidance more specifically addresses the need for dentists to comply with the need to report to the appropriate bodies adverse events and reactions, as a matter of good professional practice.
Surely this 'good professional practice' applies to the need to report and collate ADR information on drugs prescribed or used during, before or following surgery? 
 
Full report is archived here: 
 
My concern is there is little attention paid to this directive and my research recently finds it is not clear how anaesthetists or GPs record ADRs following surgery or if there is any effort to rectify this lack of data collection. Furthermore medical education should include the understanding of drugs that affect mental capacity and trigger psychiatric disturbance and the need to understand pharmacogenetics and how some people are vulnerable to psychiatric ADRs.
Coroners do not have to record on death certificates if a person recently had surgery.
Relevant answer
Answer
There is a risk of secondary psychosis from many conditions that accompany surgery (anticipatory stress, anaesthetics, dehydration, fever, anemia, anoxia, postoperative pain, analgesics, insomnia, sensory and social isolation, disability, anorexia,,,,,,,,).Do you find that surgeons, dentists, anaesthetists are not sufficiently aware of this?
  • asked a question related to Attempted Suicide
Question
9 answers
Is there any evidence or personal clinical experience regarding the efficacy of antidepressants for depressive disorder and anxiety disorder in patients with carbon monoxide intoxication?
When a patient has previous history of depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder and later attempted suicide with subsequent carbon monoxide intoxication, is there any literature discussing the efficacy of antidepressants before or after the intoxication? Would the original antidepressant before the intoxication still be the best choice?
Would CO intoxication-induded Parkinsonism of the patient influence the choice of antidepressant?
Relevant answer
Answer
Once I had a patient who attempted suicide with carbon monoxide. She was with her baby, as how could the baby survive without her? She lived and was charged with homocide. I helped to get her hospitalized and eventually she was monitored as a psychiatric out-patient. This and other cases are discussed in my book, "Transforming Depression : Healing the Soul through Creativity." The 3rd edition (2002) is the most up to date. 
  • asked a question related to Attempted Suicide
Question
3 answers
I am a Neuroscience master student in Frankfurt am Main and searching for an international laboratory which  focuses on suicide and approaches from neuroscientific point of view. If there is any lab or any Professor who welcome a student with enthusiasm on this topic, I would be grateful to make my master thesis or an internship in that ideal laboratory. 
Relevant answer
Answer
  • asked a question related to Attempted Suicide
Question
5 answers
Looking on information on suicide bereavement support groups and the experiences adults (18- 50 yrs old) in this group have had.  Do these types of groups help or not.
Relevant answer
Answer
Lillian: Here;s a somewhat long in the tooth general bibliography that has some references that may help. There's a more recent evaluative literature on suicide loss support. Anecdotally, I've referred a lot of suicide survivors to groups like SOS over the past 20 years and their feedback is very positive. They find the groups to be safe sources of mutual self-help with peer facilitators who "get it" and other participants who share experience and resources. Open-ended groups that accept members soon after the loss seem the most popular. The only negative feedback I've received is that there are (1) too few such groups, (2) too few for adolescents, and (3) none oriented to "masculine grievers.
Bailley, S., Kral, M., and Dunham, H. (1999) "Survivors of Suicide do Grieve Differently: Empirical Support for a Common Sense Proposition" Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior 29(3) 256-271. Abstract
Barlow, C.A., and Morrison, H. (2002) "Survivors of Suicide: Emerging Counseling Strategies" Journal of Psychological Nursing/40(1) 28-39.
Barnes, D. (2006) " The Aftermath of Suicide among African Americans" Journal of Black Psychology 32(3) 335-348.
Barry, L.C., et al. (2002) "Psychiatric Disorders among Bereaved Persons" American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry 10(4) 447-457.
Beautrais, A. (2004) Suicide Postvention Christchurch, NZ: Christchurch School of Medicine & Health Services.
Cerel, J. et al. (2009) "A Call for Research: The Need to Better Understand the Impact of Support Groups for Suicide Survivors" Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior 39(3) 269-281.
Clark, S. (2001) "Bereavement after Suicide - How far have we come and where do we go from here?" Crisis 22(3) 102-108.
Clark, S. et al. (1993) "A Support Group for People Bereaved Through Suicide" Crisis 14(4) Abstract
Cooper, J. (1999) "Ethical Issues and their Practical Application in Psychological Autopsies of Suicide" Journal of Clinical Nursing 8(4) 467-475 Abstract
Crosby, A. and Sacks J. (2002) "Exposure to Suicide: Incidence and Association with suicidal Ideation and Behavior, US 1994" Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior 32 321-328.
Cvinar, J.G. (2005) "Do Suicide Survivors Suffer Social Stigma: A Review of the Literature" Perspectives in Psychiatric Care 41(1) 14-21. Abstract
Davis, C. and Hinger, B. (2005) Assessing the Needs of Survivors of Suicide Calgary, Alberta: Calgary Health Region.
Dyregrov, K. (2004) "Breaved Parents Experience of Research Participation" Social Science & Medicine 58(2) 391-400. Abstract
Ellenbogen, S. and Gratton, G. (2001) "Do They Suffer More? Reflections on Research Comparing Suicide Survivors and Other Survivors" Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior 31(1) 83-90.
Jordan, J.R., (2001) "Is Suicide Bereavement Different? A Reassessment of the Literature" Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior 31(1) 91-103.
Jordan, J.R., (2007)"After Suicide Loss: What Can We Learn from Grief Research?" Surviving Suicide (AAS)19(2) 7-9.
Jordan, J.R. and McMenamy, J. (2004)"Interventions for Suicide Survivors: A Review of the Literature" Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior 34(4) 337-349. Abstract
Latham, A. and Prigerson, H. (2004) "Suicidality and Bereavement: Complicated Grief as a Psychiatric Disorder Presenting Greatest Risk for Suicidality" Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior 34(4) 350-362. Article
Lindqvist, P. (2008) "In the Aftermath of Teenage Suicide: A Qualitative Study of the Psychosocial Consequences for the Surviving Family Members" BMC Psychiatry 8(26). Article
McIntosh, J.L. (1996) "Survivors of Suicide: A Comprehensive Bibliography Update, 1986-1995" Omega 33(2) 147-175.
McIntosh, J.L. (2005) "Survivors of Elderly Suicide: Opportunities Lost" Surviving Suicide Winter 2005 (American Association for Suicidology).
McMenamy, J., Jordan, J., and Mitchell, A, (2008) "What do Suicide Survivors Tell Us They Need? Results of a Pilot Study" Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior 38(4) 375-389.
Mitchell, A. et al. (2009) "Depression, Anxiety, and Quality of Life in Suicide Survivors: A Comparison of Close and Distant Relationships" Archives of Psychiatric Nursing 23 2-10.
Ness, DE and CR Pfeffer (1990) "Sequelae of Bereavement resulting from Suicide" American Journal of Psychiatry 147 279-285.
Piper, W.E. et al. (2001) "Prevalence of Loss and Complicated Grief among Psychiatric Outpatients" Psychiatric Services 52(8) 1069-1074.
Rubey, C. and McIntosh, J. (1996) "Suicide Survivor Groups: Results of a Survey" Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior 26(4) 351-358 Abstract
Rudestam, K.E. (1992)"Research Contributions to Understanding the Suicide Survivor" Crisis 13(1) 41-46.
Sakinofsky, I. (2007) "The Aftermath of Suicide: Managing Survivors' Bereavement" Canadian Journal of Psychiatry 52(Supplement 1)129s-136s.
Stillion, J.M. (1996) "Survivors of Suicide" in K.J. Doka (Ed.), Living with Grief After Sudden Loss: Suicide, Homicide, Accident, Heart Attack, Stroke Washington, DC: Hospice Foundation of America, 41-51
van der Wal, J., (1989-90) "The Aftermath of Suicide: A review of the Empirical Evidence" Omega 20 149-171.
Van Dongen, C.J. (1991) Experiences of family members after a suicide Journal of Family Practice
Wilson, A. & Clark, S. (2004) South Australian Suicide Postvention Project Report University of Adelaide.
For an overview of suicide loss support in Europe see "Suicide survivor activities, an international perspective" from the International Association for Suicide Prevention (IASP) (2004; PDF). 
  • asked a question related to Attempted Suicide
Question
12 answers
There are vast number of (bio/ electro/ chemical/ optical) sensors available in the market for measuring contaminants in drinking water to various diseases.
Is there any sensor available (or under development) to provide advance warning like your depression level is going to be very high after few hours and there is a chance that either you are going to shout at home or  you may commit suicide. So either control yourself or take rest. 
Is there any information available about sensor for measuring depression. 
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Béatrice,
Your point is well taken. But not everyone with a major life stressor will develop a depressive disorder or anxiety disorder, as people with resilience will just cope with the stressor. This study is preliminary, but anything that can help to predict who will indeed develop anxiety and depression after a major life stressor can conceivably help to prevent the conversion to disorder.
  • asked a question related to Attempted Suicide
Question
3 answers
This article was co-authored by a physicist and a psychologist.
Relevant answer
Answer
"Plos One" would probably be a good fit for that work.
P.S. It is nice to see the word "spirituality" mentioned in science people's work. In case you are interested there is this guy called John Polkinghorne (maybe you know him), both a famous physicist and an anglican priest, who has made some interesting contributions that show some light on the interaction between science and religion.
Good luck.
  • asked a question related to Attempted Suicide
Question
8 answers
Looked at through Joiner's IPPT (2005) both suicide completions and attempts involve a belief of being a burden or feeling worthless, a belief of non-belonging or disconnected from those one cares about, an intense desire to die, and an acquired capability for lethal self harm achieved through mental practice of a plan, abuse, experiencing violence, or other factors. The only difference is that in an attempt the outcome, for some reason, was not death. Similarly in O'Connor's Integrated Motivation-Volitional Theory (2011) both attempters and completers presumably experienced a pre-motivational phase, where fixed risk factors and life events may set the stage, and a motivational phase, where ideation is fueled by feelings of entrapment, defeat, or loss, and a volitional stage where a specific plan and means are present and may result in an attempt that may be fatal or not.
Perhaps the difference lies in the forms of suicidality rather than the outcomes? Is it the “chronic suiciders” (Paris 2007), individuals with borderline personality disorder who repeatedly use threats and attempts to manipulate, cope or solve problems without intent to die, who differ from the “acute suiciders” who definitely have intent to die when they make an attempt and who use distinctly lethal means?.
Relevant answer
Answer
Found an article by Beautrais reporting on research on this question which concludes: "Suicides and medically serious suicide attempts are two overlapping populations that
share common psychiatric diagnostic and history features, but are distinguished by gender and patterning of psychiatric disorder."  See A. Beautrais, "Suicides and serious suicide attempts: two populations or one ?" Psychological Medicine, 2001, 31, 837–845.
  • asked a question related to Attempted Suicide
Question
9 answers
In "A Theory of Suicide Addiction" (Sexual Addiction & Compulsivity, 5, 311-324, 1998) Ken Tullis, MD, argued that some individuals appear to become "hooked" on suicidal fantasies and behaviors. He did not suggest that this was a theory of suicide per se, though some individuals may proceed to increasingly dangerous acts without any intent to die to manage their mood and get a "high." As such it might account for a very small number of self-inflicted deaths recorded as suicides, but play a larger role in parasuicidality. As "Kevin Taylor, MD" he added to the topic with "Seduction of Suicide" (Bloomington, IN: First Books, 2002). S. Mynatt, referenced Tullis in "Repeated Suicide Attempts Analyzed as Addictive Behaviors (Journal of Psychosocial Nursing, 38, 24-33, 2000). An addiction psychiatrist, Tullis saw the 12-Step model as a feasible clinical intervention. His work led to "Suicide Anonymous (SA)" (www.suicideanonymous.net) a "fellowship" for those "with a desire to stop living out a pattern of suicidal ideation and behavior." SA characterizes "suicide addicts" as secretive, which would seem to set them apart from "chronic suiciders" described by Joel Paris, MD, in "Half in Love With Death: Managing the Chronically Suicidal Patient" (2006).
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Tony, 
It's a long time (2 years) since you began this discussion. Since 2011 I'm trying to test the hypothesis that some suicide attempters, particularly major repeaters (5 or more lifetime suicide attempts) might indeed develop an addiction on suicidal behavior. I've seen some suicide attempters, usually major repeaters, saying that they were "hooked on" their SB, and similar comments. We got the hypothesis published in 2012, and have recently published a paper on this. You can download it at my profile. Moreover, we've been accepted another paper in Psychother & Psychosomatics on automatic positive and negative reinforcement, and its role in major repetition of SB. Basically, we found that major repeaters are not "just" borderline PD patients, but also, that emptiness is critical to major repetition of SB. Indeed, emptiness was even more important to major repetition of SB than BPD itself. I guess the paper will be published during 2015. Hope u the best!
  • asked a question related to Attempted Suicide
Question
7 answers
I am interested in obtaining a full set of data as above. This relates only to England (but if trends in suicide on probation have been reported in other countries I'd be grateful for the papers). The Ministry of Justice seems happy to give the figures for the period 2006-10 (see attached) but nothing more recent. If you know how to locate such information, for the period 2010-14, please let me know.
Relevant answer
Answer
Many thanks, Rachel, the 2015 publication by Carderelli et al looks very interesting. I knew the Howard League paper but as you say the data isn't recent. .
  • asked a question related to Attempted Suicide
Question
11 answers
I am working with two patients suffering from suicidal tendencies. They are living but there is no change in the mindset.
Am I helping them to stay alive, or do I care about secondary gain of disease?
Relevant answer
Answer
There are studies about psychodynamic psychotherapy for suicidality. For overview look at the works from Therapie-Zentrum für Suizidgefährdete, UKE, Hamburg:
Lindner, R. (2006). Suizidale Männer in der psychoanalytisch orientierten Psychotherapie. Eine systematische qualitative Studie. Psychosozial-Verlag, Gießen.
Lindner, R. (2006). Suicidality in men in psychoanalytic psychotherapy. Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy 20: 197 – 217.
Gerisch, B.; Fiedler, G.; Gans, I.; Götze, P.; Lindner, R.; Richter, M. (2000): "Ich sehe dieses Elendes kein Ende als das Grab": Zur psychoanalytischen Konzeption und der Behandlung Suizidgefährdeter. In: Kimmerle, G. (Hrsg.): Zeichen des Todes in der psychoanalytischen Erfahrung. Reihe Anschlüsse, Bd. 4. edition diskord, Tübingen, S. 9-64
  • asked a question related to Attempted Suicide
Question
4 answers
We know that suicide has a low base rate and that most individuals with suicidal ideation will never make an attempt, much less, complete a suicide. Given this very low rate of individuals who are at great risk for suicide, how can we best identify and prevent the act of suicide?
Relevant answer
Answer
I believe the best way to prevent completed suicide is to treat all suicidality instead of only treating other psychiatric disorders.  If every person experiencing any level of suicidality (even those only experiencing passive suicidal ideation) had access to proper anti-suicidality treatments (not just anti-depressants) then the likelihood that a patient's suicidality would progress to the stage of a completed suicide would be reduced.  Unfortunately, this will take researchers shifting their perspective from suicidality being the result of depression or some other psychiatric disorder to suicidality being a disorder or even a set of disorders.  Once researchers make this shift they may find that treatments have specific anti-suicidality effects.  At which point, those treatments could be given to patients that experience suicidality in order to reduce their suicidality and lessen the likelihood they will actually take their own life.
  • asked a question related to Attempted Suicide
Question
10 answers
I will register for my M Cur next year I have a problem regarding respect for psychiatric patients during seclusion because they commit suicide I am struggling with literature  relating to prevention of suicide and respect for the patient
Relevant answer
Answer
Let's start by asking the question: Why are these persons being put in "seclusion" in the first place? Rather than "seclusion" and "surveillance" we should be offering CARE and ACCOMPANIMENT!! Our research consistently shows that listening to the patient and believing in them is what's most helpful (ie:offering space or presence when they say they need it vs 'getting them to comply' with our rules & regulations or making decisions for them such as deciding when they're 'ready'--or not--to go out, attend groups. etc). Instead, clinical interventions should focus on helping patients make decisions for themselves.
Gros, C.P., Jarvis, S., Mulvogue, T., Wright, D., (2012), Les interventions infirmières estimées bénéfiques par les adolescents à risque de suicide, Santé mentale au Québec, (37) 2, 193-207.
  • asked a question related to Attempted Suicide
Question
3 answers
I have found considerable literature on working with parental loss and grieving, but I'm trying to establish interventions and literature for working with children living with the pain of having had a parent attempt, but not complete, suicide.
Relevant answer
Answer
Thank you for continuing to help me with my research. This is an excellent resource; unfortunately, it's not quite what I'm looking for.
  • asked a question related to Attempted Suicide
Question
6 answers
Most of the literature base that I have explored focuses largely on completed suicide. I am specifically looking for resources regarding children's reactions, recovery, and interactions with loved ones (especially parents) who had attempted but did not complete suicide.
Relevant answer
If this kind of trauma can go along with other types of traumas in children then here are some ideas:
Child coping and parent coping assistance during the peritrauma period in injured children. Marsac, Meghan L.; Mirman, Jessica H.; Kohser, Kristen L.; Kassam-Adams, Nancy. Families, Systems, & Health 29.4 (Dec 2011): 279-290.
Understanding the impact of trauma exposure on posttraumatic stress symptomatology: A structural equation modeling approach. Chen, Wei; Wang, Long; Zhang, Xing-Li; Shi, Jian-Nong. Journal of Loss and Trauma 17.1 (Jan 2012): 98-110.
If you are specifically interested in parental suicidal attempts then these papers may give you some ideas:
Parental suicide attempt and offspring self-harm and suicidal thoughts: Results from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) birth cohort. Geulayov, Galit; Metcalfe, Chris; Heron, Jon; Kidger, Judi; Gunnell, David. Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry 53.5 (May 2014): 509-517.
Freeing the parent voice: A hermeneutic phenomenological understanding of parents whose children have survived suicide attempts. Henry-McAllister, Brianne E.. ProQuest Information & Learning, 2013. AAI3515256.
Childhood parental death and lifetime suicide attempt of the opposite‐gender offspring in a nationwide community sample of Korea. Jeon, Hong Jin; Hong, Jin Pyo; Fava, Maurizio; Mischoulon, David; Nyer, Maren; et al. Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior 43.6 (Dec 2013): 598-610.
An introduction to sensitivity analysis for unobserved confounding in nonexperimental prevention research. Liu, Weiwei; Kuramoto, S. Janet; Stuart, Elizabeth A..Prevention Science 14.6 (Dec 2013): 570-580
Attitudes toward suicide survivors as a function of survivors' relationship to the victim. Reynolds, Francoise M.; Cimbolic, Peter. Omega: Journal of Death and Dying 19.2 (1988-1989): 125-133.
Breathing out: Giving voice to women's transformation. Logan, Maria Christine. ProQuest Information & Learning, 2008. AAI3298179.
Maternal or paternal suicide and offspring’s psychiatric and suicide-attempt hospitalization risk. Kuramoto, S. Janet; Stuart, Elizabeth A.; Runeson, Bo; Lichtenstein, Paul; Långström, Niklas; et al. Pediatrics 126.5 (Nov 2010): e1026-e1032.
Les conduites suicidaires parentales et l'enfant. Lachal, Christian. Psychologie Medicale 20.3 (Mar 1988): 355-358.
As a start.
  • asked a question related to Attempted Suicide
Question
13 answers
The aim is to train teachers to prevent suicide and suicide attempts.
Relevant answer
Answer
Yes. Art, music and physical education promote healthy mental health for young kids.
  • asked a question related to Attempted Suicide
Question
18 answers
I need information about the psychological effects of unemployment.
Relevant answer
Hi Maria,
I agree this papers will be very important for my research. Thak you.
Marcelo
  • asked a question related to Attempted Suicide
Question
69 answers
Many psychiatric and medical conditions may lead to suicidal thoughts. Which condition has the highest per capita suicidal ideation rate, the highest suicide attempt rate, and the highest suicide completion rate?
Relevant answer
Answer
I think you might want to approach this differently. It's not the matter of psychiatric condition or objective state, but rather that of subjective state. The state in which most (if not all) suicides occur is that of dispare, and the diminishment of hope in regard to the possibility of their psychological pain ever vanishing. This is true regardless of psychiatric state as diagnosed. The choice of suicide is not primarily that of ending ones life, but first and foremost that of ending ones coping with suffering.
This probably doesn't serve your question, but it might direct some thinking on the matter.
  • asked a question related to Attempted Suicide
Question
7 answers
How does a suicide attempt affect the course of schizophrenia?
Relevant answer
Answer
Serious suicidal behavior, up to and including an attempt, may exacerbate symptoms and cause a relapse. In those with schizophrenia, or any serious mental illness, significant suicidality will negatively affect recovery. In those with a past attempt history it is possible that even suicidal ideation mat trigger retraumatization and raise risk. Developing/restoring strong social supports and connections should be part of any care plan. Clients should be helped to acquire coping skills to deal with the onset of any suicidal thoughts. Personal suicide prevention safety plans or a "WRAP" (Wellness Recovery Action Plan, see ME Copeland) are useful self-help resources. Peer supports such as a "warm line" should also be available.
  • asked a question related to Attempted Suicide
Question
70 answers
The DSM-IV cited suicide as a symptom of some psychiatric disorders. Until now suicidality has not been characterized as a disorder itself (though it could loosely "fit" the disease model, i.e., signs, symptoms,markers, course or process, etc.). Early in the DSM-V's development there were allusions to having suicidality become a new Axis-VI. Given the pervasiveness of suicidal behavior among individuals with serious mental illness that may have been useful. However, I am not sure what utility "suicide behavior disorder" has in terms of diagnosis, treatment, prevention, or research. Does the APA expect researchers or theorists to give this new disorder "further study" or will clinicians take on that task?
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Tony,
Let me go through your arguments one by one having published evidence and clinical experience as the sole arguments: (1) medicalization is to transform a normal human or social event in one that is in need for medical care; (2) medical care is of organizational nature and displayed to answer to an health problem, it does not specify the nature of the care provider (doctor, nurse, psychologist, etc); (3) suicide attempts occur because people present psychopathology, such as hopelessness and despair, they are not common, not within the normal range, not universal occurrences; (4) actually, most suicide attempts occur in people that present mental health issues such as depressive states and in only a minority of people just went through a transient 'bad' moment; (5) a suicide attempt means clinically that there was intention to die; (6) the disease model is not synonymous to medical model which is a broader concept more akin to the biopsychosocial model whereas the disease model is a restricted concept; (7) suicidality means suicide plus attempted suicide and suicidal behavior includes these two and suicidal ideation; (8) it is well established that suicidal behavior is an important risk factor for suicide; (9) there are people with recurring suicidal behavior even if not self-aggression with no intent to die which is recurring by nature; (10) suicide is hardly a symptom of mental disorders and I agree it is not a mental disorder, but yes, it is a complication of mental disorders, and it complies with the definition of medical complication.
I am much more afraid of stigma around mental illness through the associated stigma towards 'medical disorders' : that makes people not finding for the right help they need.
  • asked a question related to Attempted Suicide
Question
2 answers
And if they are translated into Spanish it would be better. Thank you.
Relevant answer
Answer
Millions of thanks Mary!